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Gay Austin, Vol. 1, No. 10, June 1977
File 006
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Gay Austin, Vol. 1, No. 10, June 1977 - File 006. 1977-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/225/show/223.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-06). Gay Austin, Vol. 1, No. 10, June 1977 - File 006. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/225/show/223

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 1, No. 10, June 1977 - File 006, 1977-06, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/225/show/223.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 1, No. 10, June 1977
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date June 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript GAYS WALK OUT AND THE BISHOP RESPONDS NAME CHANGE FOR POLITICAL ORGANIZATION Gay activism in the form of lobbying the United Methodist Church for changes in its official attitued toward gay people, has been going on in the Austin- San Antonio area since 1971. About 20 people wore armbands with pink triangles and sat together at the ordination services ofthe Southwest Texas Annual Conference on June 1, 1977. This group of 20 was made up of members of the Southwest Texas United Methodist Gay Caucus and their friends, members of the Metropolitan Community Church in San Antonio, and members of Integrity, the Episcopal gay organization. Following the sermon, most of the gay group walked out of the serri.ce in protest just before the ordination ceremony began. After the ordination of deacons and elders, 3ishop J. Chess Lovern responded tothe walkout by making a few impromptu remarks and leading the conference in prayer. Bishop Lovem state that he felt that the group had walked out because it felt it was not wanted by the church. The bishop affirmed that all of us in the church have weaknesses and failings, that all of us need to grow and change, and that all of us are welcome at the table of the Lord. He requested that the group meet with him personally again in the near future. The annual conference level gay activist effort has been concentrated on the ordination service because open, out- of-the-closet lesbians and gay men are denied ordination into the ministry of the United Methodist Church. 3ishop Lovern's genuine offer of fellowship with the Gay Caucus is an act of Christian leadership on his part. However,the voting members of the annual conference, lay and clergy, are another matter. They are not bound to follow their bishop's example of •-.-arm comradeship and acceptance of gay church people. Even if the conference members do choose to "accept" gay activists as fellow Christians, they probably will not feel like pushing for the acceptance of lesbians and gay ment into the ordained Methodist ministry. Acceptance into the menistry is the sign gay activists look for to signal them that the church does indeed want and respect them. Sitting on the other end of the pew from the Gay Caucus was Don Hand, a lay delegate from the Southwest Texas Annual Conference to the General Conference in Portland, Oregon, in 1976. It was Mr. Hand who proposed the legislation that was incorporated into the 1976Discl'Dlir-e which states that United Methodists regard homosexuality as "incompatible with Christian teaching"—Anita Bryant's viewpoint exactly. It is the General Conference of the United Methodist Church which makes the laws and policies for this particular denomination, just as the Congress does for the United States. Until General Conference declares that sexual or affec- tional preference shall not disqualify a candidate for ordination, the individual annual conferences cannot legally ordain out-front lesbians and gay ment into the Methodists ministry. Wayde Frey For approximately the past three months the Gay Political Coalition has been active in the campaign on protecting human rights locally as well as nationally. The Coalition first surfaced in response to the Clay Smothers House 3ill 1902 which attempted to regulate gay students on state-supported campuses. The most visible actions ofthe political group have been gathering signatures on a petition protesting this bill. Lobbying both representatives and senators at the capitol on various pieces of legislation and most recently .in helping with the collection of donations for the struggle of the Dade County Coaltion were also part of their activities during the first few months of its existence. In order to take a more progressive stand the Coalition has changed its name to the Society for the Advancement of Freedom and Equality: 5.A.F.E. The the future the organization will be lobbyingthe new mayor and city council regarding this city's housing ordinance. 5.A.F.E. meets twice a month on Sunday evenings at the M.C.C. For fur- thur information regarding the time, contact Gay Community Services at 477-6699- OPINION (From San Diego activist groups newsletter) "Yes, I like to meet gay people, but GCS is not for me. The place is really cliquish and most people just go there to drink." "GCS is not even a cruisy place, why should I go to see the same people over and over again." "The good old days were neat. We used to get fifty or sixty people every Wednesday, and had dances and programs. I went there two weeks ago and there was nothing going on." I've heard these comments time after time; most of them are probably true. We come here with expectations, we want to meet new people, start love affairs or form acceptable social groups. . . .3ut nothing happens and we end up getting the well known ''GC3 Depressions". Maybe GCS should disappear and we should all start going to the bars instead. After all, who wants to put energy into an organization which doesn't give anything back. Well, it is very easy to put GCS down, toget fed up and stop coming. But that's the easy way out.I firmly believe that WE ARE GCS and when I say we I don't mean the six people who always come. GCS is for °n of 'us and we make out of it what we want. There are no rules which say that GCS shouldn't be cruisy or an intellectual-political group. We can actually become any of these things, but we need YOU to do it. We need to get people who want to have a gay environment in which to interact, people who want to make this place a comfortable one to all gay people. WE NEED YOU Give us a chance to prove that we can make something good out of this. RE-EMBER THE FREE VD CLINIC ON FRIDAY, JUNE 17, AT THE AUSTIN CLUB BATHS, 30S W. 16th STREET, 8-10 pm. BE SAFE.': (5)
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