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The Star, No. 8, February 17, 1984
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The Star, No. 8, February 17, 1984 - File 001. 1984-02-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2231/show/2218.

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(1984-02-17). The Star, No. 8, February 17, 1984 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2231/show/2218

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 8, February 17, 1984 - File 001, 1984-02-17, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2231/show/2218.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 8, February 17, 1984
Contributor
  • Hyde, Robert
Date February 17, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Billboad States Some Ashamed of SMU's Position on Gay Organization By Don Ritz DALLAS-Right in the heart of SMU country, amidst all the bars, apartments and restaurants frequented by SMU stu­dents and/ or swinging singles, stood this sign: SMU-"Some May Understand, but Others are Ashamed of Your Position on Gay Rights." The sign, located at Greenville and Uni­versity, was erected by David Beebe. Beebe owns the billboard and rents the spare for short periods of time for personal messages Beebe, who is not gay, said that when he uses the billboard himself. hetries to selec-t topical issues, and his publici8t employee, an SMU student, told him the Gay and Lesbian Student Support Organization was the topic of the Phil Donahue Show on Jan. 10. Beebe said, "I was very angered that SMU took that stance, then went nation­ally and acted proud of it. It made me mad THE STAR AUSTIN * SAN ANTONIO Feb. 17, 1984 • Issue .a a Published Every Other Friday Bv Larry Bush WASHINGTOI\- Thtn city , which ofti-n cakhes on to things after the rest of the country, ""s pri-p11ring to start the 1984 Y<'~lr ut the end of January The Presidt·nt govt• his Stau• of the U n°ion messagt• on ,Jan. 26, and <',<>nl{Tess had only begun tht> year by rN·onv1•ning two days earlier on Jan. 24 .. The President's new budget, which will take up most of the year's debate, wasn't out until Feb. 2, and then the details probably weren't clear for two Wt-'eks aft£>r that. F.ven in a presidential election year that feels as though it started months earlier, the first votes by rank­and- file citizens won't be cast until Feb. 20 in Iowa. Most of J~nuary was taken up, polih­rnlly speaking, by drei;s rehearsals­politicians floated trial baloons on new progr11ms or upproaches to win votes, reporters scunned the horizon for n£>w wuys of looking at the same faces , and ordinary citizens searched for new rt•u sons to feel optimistic. Among the January trv-outs was the idea, n•newed with a iittle more evidence h£>hind 1t, that gays might make a consid­erable difference in the elec-tions and in Amt•rican society in 1984. The Wall Street Journal ran a feature Buggesting gays could be "the major fac·tor" in the '84 elec­tions, the Los Ansele• Times ran a mam­moth front-page artide Jan. l, the New York Times began researching a second article on gay politico, the "McNeil-Lehrer Program" began interviewing gay politi­cos, NBC c-ollected more footage at gay enronement meetings, and the Christian Right churned out new warnings about tht> "gay threat" for 1984. Amidst the hoopla, however, gays were given an importnt new glimpse into the way the world views their efforts. It came in the Los Angele• Times article, which included 11 major nt>w public opinion sur• vey Public attitudes toward homosexual ity c-ontinued ~shows large disapproval factor, and attitudes toward civil rights laws showed a large approval factor, but for the first time, the public was surveyd on a new question: "How sympathltic would you say you are to the homosexual community?" Nationwide, the American public said it was pretty unsympathetic: 63 percent to 30 perc-ent. That compares with 52 percent opposed to homosexuality and 43 percent accepting it for themselves or others, and 52 percent favoring job protections for gays with a minority 36 percent oppooing them-almost a reveroe of the figures of those_sympathetic to a gay community. While not enough information is avails• ble about how the public feels about other and embarrassed that it (demal ofGLSSO recognition) was brought to national attenuon: It made Dallas look behind the time,;." Are You Growing Old Gracefully? Roz Ashley's Quiz, p.9 minority communitie,;, there still appearo to be some thought-provoking relation­ship in these responses. The public appears increasingly acceptant of ending di•crimination, uncertain on the issue of homosexuality itself, and unhappy about the emergence of a gay community. In 1984, that may well turn out to be the cutting edge of change for gay people. There are other and even strong indica­tions that gays as individuals are winning public acceptance out in the open-the changes can almost be characterized a,; a ..post-Harvey Fierstein" climate. Cer tainly one of the ironies in January wa, the launching of an Olympic,; 19!!4 fun-y draiser m ?\'ew York ",th George Hearn sin1,<ing " I Am \\'hat I Am," no" refl'rred to as a new gay anthem, "hilc the Olym­pics Committee itself continues to argue m court that the term "Gay Olympic," de.mean, the sporting world. But there are only the . tirring, of an indication that it,, becoming accepted for gays to form a community, to act like a political voting bloc, and to seek to streng then bond,; that cut ac.ro,,~ regional, eco­nomic, educational and even racial and sexual lines in recognition that a sense of being gay supercedes those other identi­ties. It very likely is due to the unease of the public toward the gay community, rather than gay right,;, that some political figures still kCf'p away from public gay eventn; withm the gay rommunity, such distinctions s('('m almost disingenuous. In l!l/4, with a focus on politic and a con• tinued nero to respond to the AIDS crisis, the major dialogue may be on why gay,; have had to form a rommumty, and what that community ha,, as 11, goals. In the ~-ear ahead, th c appear to be the most likely place, and 1. ues around which that debate may take place. The Federal Government: the Presid­ency and Congre~s. The maJor concern gay,; will have ,.,th the Reagan Adm1ms­tration will be over the propo. als for AIDS funding m the new, fiscal 1985 budget. That budget won't even begin until Oct. l , but the President proposed it in February, Congre ·s will begin pickmg it apart in March and April. major committee action will come in June (virtually no work will take place this summer. due to the national political conventions), and the full vote will likely come in September.Just in time to have the greatest political mileage. In fiscal 19!14, Reagan started the year by prop(>&ing a $17 million AIDS budget; by the time Congress looked it over, and tht' RPagan staff saw the senti­ment for major inCT('lll!CS, the final figure wa about $42 million. The addition of continued page 3 2 THE STAR/ FEB. 17, 1984 Austin Soap By Wanda Rumors So Glad to be Back with the Horses Pans was simply fabulous last week, even though I was forced to wear my Blackglama on the banks of the Seine. But I have to admit, dahlings, that the Eiffel Tower has nothing on the lady who stands atop our Capitol (read me). And the stars shine ever so much brighter up here in the Hill Country. -o- States,de aga,n, I must fill you in on what's happening in this town. My maid, Agatha­bless her heart-was so overcome with the latest that she spilt my morning (read after­noon) coffee all over my Persian rugs and scalded the cat. But having been abroad recently, we must-just this once-depend on her for the lowdown. -•- Agatha seems to be part,culary excited about a new bar opening on Lavaca Street. I can't understand why. She can·t make the ones that are open now But she does love new bars. It's supposed to be called Buddie's. How wonder­ful' Sounds cozy, doesn't it? She told me it will have wonderful space for balls (read dancing), hors d'oeuvres (read food) and people watch­ing (read cruising) until all hours of the morn­ing. Goodness. rm glad I don't need her before noon. Agatha also told me that the Crossing had a kissing booth on Valentine's Day. How quaint' Kisses were only $1. How ridiculous1 Why I wouldn't hold a man·s hand for less than $50 But I understand ,t was all in fun and for the new organ (1) at the Oasis Church. -•- And I Just didn't believe that Beaux and Ken tied the knot last Tuesday during the Swee­theart Ball at the Back Street Basics. Rumor has ,t that this should be the hottest match since Liz and Dick. rm just dying to know what the wedding presents were, but Agatha had no idea -•- And while I was away, it seems that the Rockln R's have becor:ie quite an item. They just received a service commendation for their work for the S.A. community. They rode in the GAY COMMUNITY STAR ,v,nr.,:;r,Jwor,o A Vo,ce Pub/iahing Company Newspaper Published every other Friday Phone Austin (512) 448-1380 San Antonio (512) 737-0087 Vo,ce Pub1tsh1ng Co CIRCULATION Gay Community Star, 3.000 copies bi-weekly Montrose Voice /Houston), 10.000 copies weekly Dallas Gay News. 6.000 copies weekly total Texas area. 17,500 copies weekty, avg Company H .. dquartert 3317 MontrON Blvd '306. Houston. TX 77006. (713) 529-0822 Contents copyright '1984 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publisher Robert Hyde manag,ng editor Mark Drago St•r advert1smg director Acef Clark art director Jet• Bray graph,u Sonny Davis accounrmg MBmber Gay Press Assocaation News Serv,ces International Gay News Agency. Pac,f1c News SeNIC9 Larry Bush (Washington O C) Synd1catfld F•atura Services & Writers Jeffrey Wilson. Randy Atfrad. Stonewall Fealures Syndicate, Bnan McNaught. Joe Baker POSTMASTER ~nd address correchons 10 3317 Montrose •306 Houston TX 77006 Subscr1pt,on rat• 1n US n sealed envelope $49 per year (S2 ISSUftl S29 pers,:x months (26 issues). or$1 25perweek (less than 26 .uuesJ Back Issues $2 00 each National edvWf~ ng r•prenntat,ve Joe D1Saba.to. A1vendeJ1 Marketing. 666 6th Avenue. New York 10011, 1212) 242-6863 Advert,~ ng deadline every other Tuesday. 5 30pm. for 1.ssue ,e eased touow-1no fnday evening Not,ce to edvert,aerJ J>Cal ad'Yert1s1ng rate schedule One was effective Nov 11 1:983 Ffnpons b ty "The Sta,- does not assume ,espons1bd ty for a_d'.Y,e,rt. _n.g. .C,la.lqfflSg R. eaders shoukl alert The Star lo any rodeo parade with six horses and 14 members (surely not on those six horses). No, no, nol That's six horses rode in the parade, and 14 horses on the hayride. No, no, no! Oh, well. Agatha says a good time was had by all. Maybe we·11 have a chance to get this straight at their next meeting at Our Place at 2pm this Sunday (Feb 17). -•- And if the above ,s confusing, the Riders, a four-month old organization, is just dying to teach all of you about riding and entering rodeos-and you Jjon't even have to have a horse' And I so wanted an excuse to buy Trigger. For more details about this group, call Our Place. With the Riders teaching horseman­ship, sponsoring trail rides and giving their proceeds away to charities, I can't think of a more wonderful way to pass the spring -•- Must fly. Dinner in Rome this evening. Do keep Agatha informed for me. San Antonio Soap By Helen Dish Overcome by Spring Fever My, my, my! The past two weeks have just been incredible-so incredible with all this spring­time weather that's I've developed a severe case of spring fever. Why, it took all the energy I could muster just to get out some info to you this week. -•- I'm not sure exactly what he's come down with-probably playing too close to the Gaudalupe-but I wish Bullfrog a very quick recovery from whatever it is I'm waiting to dance-and I don't mean leap frog-with you at Snuffy's. And speaking of Snuffy's, TGRA (don't you just love initials) is having a meeting there this Sunday at 2pm. -•- And after that, box up your box and head over to the Mustang Club of ol' San Antone's benefit to be held later in the day at 6:30 p.m. George will auctioning off the goodies. Now no sur­prises, boys' -•- Cunis, Curtis, Curtis, I can't begin to tell you how wonderful it was meeting you. Why, if I just close my eyes. . -•- Don't you just love to hateAlexls? Even though she's secretly in love with Blake, she really needs her eyes scratched out, and I think we should all do it together Wednesday nights at the Galleon, which has a new cable TV just for Dynasty. -•- Wish I had more for you, but this spring fever 1s making me terribly sleepy. Do write. LEAP YEAR PARTY Wednesday, Feb. 29th Join us for Dynasty, 8pm, with new cable TV Partying til 2am Also, don't forget our Sunday Brunch, noon .. FEB. 17, 1984 / THE STAR 3 The Year Ahead Will Test Gay Clout and Community from paRe 1 some carry-over money from 1983 means that about $47 million will be spent on AIDS in 1984. For 1985, expecttheReagan Administration to propose something between $SO and $60 million, with inaugu­ration of some new funding for local gay groups to provide services. (In the Feb. J budRet submitted to Congress. the ReaRan Administration requested $53.9 million for AIDS fundmg) Congress will likely make some increase,; in that figure, depending on how well gays argue for additional funding. Th.e scientific community already has made it,; arguments at every level, and so the major tinkering will come through new money for counseling programs, hot lines and the like, where gays are now trymg to document needs. In addition, expect Congresi; to push harder for fund­ing of the $.10 million Public Health Emer­gency Fund, which it authorized but did not fund last year. Do not expect the Rea­gan Administration to put any money in its budget proposal for the fund, however. the Government Accounting Office issue a report on how much the military spends to determine who is homosexual and then to process them for military service; a Con­gressional Research Service study of what antigay laws and regulations currently exist around the country that would be overturned by a federal gay civil rights law, and oversight hearings will continue on such topics as police responsiveness to minorities, federal security clearance reqmrements, even some consideration about minority participation in federal funding for the arts and humanities. The reason for this activity is clear: all 4:J.', members of the House are up for re­election this year, and 34 members of the Senate as well. While no one expects major new legislative initiatives, oversight hear• ings give members of Congress a wonder­ful platform to raise issues they believe will help back home. This time, the issue increasingly will be insensitivity to minor­ities and the poor, and gays will more than ever be included in the groups whose vm­ces will be invited to be heard. State and Local Developments of National Significance. Even though 1984 is a presidential election year, much that is going to be important for gay peo• pie will take place at the local level. In a number of instances, the efforts will be of importance to gays elsewhere, because they symbolize the changes taking place in the country or because they provide a AIDS Awareness Week Shaping Up new initiative that might be replicated. In San Francisco. for example, expect Mayor Dianne Feinstein 's study panel on a spouse benefits law to end up before the Board of Supervisors, where it likely will pass and become law. The national focus on San Francisco as the site of this year'g Democratic National Convention will put even more of a spotlight on a spouse la" this time around. A similar effort to pro• vide a legal basis for gay spouses is also expected in Minneapolis this year, accord­ing to activists in that city. Gay civil rights laws also will go before city and county councils for votes in a number of cities in 1984, but the most important ones are likely to be New Orleans, Houston and Chicago. The Deep South has been undergoing remarkable changes in the past decade. partly as the states there have brought in new employ­ers who have been in tum bringing in more highly educated and urbanized' employees. The freeze-out of progress for gays should end thio year, a historic devel• opment. Expect New Orleans to be first. probably in- time for Mardi Gras in March, with Houston coming in close thereafter There may be a housing ordinance or may­or's order passed in Birmingham, Ala., which also would be a landmark. Chicago, which has a fractious City Council, appears to have the votes for an ordinance but can't lay down fights on other issues long enough to get action. It is one of the few major citiei; without such a law. Gays also "';11 move forward on an agenda that goes beyond legislative changes in some citie . Expect that New York City, for example, where there has been nothing but turmoil over getting a city gay civil righL~ ordinance passed, will move to the front ranks in getting city and state funding for special social services for gay people, including possibly a shelter for home le. s youths. Other candidates for such action include Boston and Philadel­phia. In ,ome locals, simply the public emer­gence of a gay community and its ability to get major elected officials to meeting openly with them will make news. Expect that New Mexico gays will make more and more news during the year. Look for Ohio gay~ to make ,ome strong gains in 19M, ,eemingly coming from no place to an effective tatewide force. North Carolina gays also c-an be expected to emerge into vi,ibility, po,sibly of national propor­t10ns, as a re,ult of their involvement in the effort to defeat Sen. ,Jesse Helms. 191i4 b;> Larr;> B=h The Reagan Administration may also get smoked out of hiding on the immigra­tion reform issue on exclusion of gays. Congress will take up the exclusion ques­tion in a Judiciary subcommittee hearing, perhaps in March, but even before that White House counselor Edwin Meese will go before the Senate Judiciary Committee for confirmation hearings for his new post as Attorney General. That could lead to questioning on the Administration's feel• ings about reform of the antigay exclu­sion . Observors also exp~-ct Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Service,; Edward Brandt to deliver on a commit­ment to oppose the antigay exclu~ion's health rationale, thus adding another Administration voice in favor of reform. Expt-ct few Administration meetings with gays outside the Health and Human Service· Department. The Justice Depart­ment, at JeaRt pre-Meese, was unwilling to meet with the Nnt,onnl Gay Task Force on civil rights legislation or on its review of Hl'<'urity clearance requirements; some mN·tings did take place with the Justice team working on immigration reform. Members of the community are invited to attend the next committee meeting for 'United and More in AIDS Awareness Week to be held Feb. 21 at the Austin Lesbian Gay Political Cau• '84' Pride cus (ALGPC) office at 1022 W. 6th at 7:00 "Where the World Meets Houston" p.m._~~~~,a~~....--,...-. -~~-Wee F mi Additional planning for the week. April Defense Dt•partment officials flatly refust•d to meet with the National Gay Tusk Forcf' even on the humane issue of servic~ml'n with AIDS. Tht• White House itself has remained aloof from guys, although representatives of the Liatson Offit·e have been quott'd sev era! times making derogatory remarks about gay civil rights and expressing hopes that Americans will tag the Demo­crats as the "pro-gay" political party. As the year begins. there are quiet moves among gay Republicans to begin bringing their issue to the White House, but the out­look for succesR remains uncertain. In Congress, however, there now appears to be more open doors than gay groups can handle. In addition to the AIDS concerns and the immigration reform issue, there now are efforts to have 1-8, will be done to solidy plans for the week-long benefit. Already scheduled for the week is an educational forum on April :J co-sponsored by the U.T. Gay Lesbian Student Associ­ation and the Awareness Week committee, which are also planning a run and a women's blood drive, Also scheduled for the week ii; an AI.GP(' cocktail party and silent auction fundra1ser on April 7 at the Hilton Hotel. State Treasurer Ann Richards will be the featurt'd speaker Part of the proceeds from this fundraiser will go to the ALGPC AIDS Project and for other group,;' AIDS educational and service projects. A blood drive is scheduled for April 8 for persons with AIDS to provide blood "insu, ranee" should they need it. The blood will be solicited from persons not at risk for AIDS, per the request of the director of the Central Texas Regional Blood Center. For more information about AIDS AwareneHs Week, call Janna at 441-1130. MONDAY s100 Call Lici.uor 8-10 TUESDAY-s12s Bar Drinks 8-10 WEDNESDAY _s100 Long Necks 9-11 THURSDAY -s100 Margarita 8-10 SATURDAY-5O¢ Draft 2-5 SUNDAY-35¢ Draft 3-6 "Best in Country Sounds" Sister Bar to Snuffy's The national them for Gay Pride Week this year is "United and More in '84," and member,; of the Austin gay and lesbian community are currently planning the big event. Everyone from the community is invited to participate in formalizing the final plans and are encouraged to contact Joel Jacobsen at 343-0435 for more inform&• t1on. Dressing Downscale If you"vi• i::ot it, don't flaunt it. That's the word from adwrtising executive Philip VoHs, who surveyed fashion plates from Nob Hill to Newport Voss suys. in the San Francisco Chront· cle, that the shabby look is in-for a couple of reasons: it shows you 're so chic you don't have to prove it-and it discourages muggers. 106 Avondale Houston Texas 77006 (713) 520-9767 115 Gen. Kru r, S.A., 340-1758 HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 2-7pm Draft 50¢ ~~~~~~~UL~¢ Bar Drinks s1 °0 WITH ID., NO COVER FOR ROCKIN' R & TGRA MEMBERS (SHOWS EXCLUDED) 4 THE STAR/ FEB. 17, 1984 Phil Donahue Show Examined SMU's Gay Rights Issue By Doug Weatherford The nationally syndicated Phil Donahue program focused on the struggle for recog­nition of the Gay and Lesbian Student Support Organization (GLSSO) at South­ern Methodist University in Dallas in a program taped Dec. 13. It is being aired in Texas at different times on different sta­tions in January. Representing GLSSO was Leslie Cooper, former co-chairperson for the group, who, along with Robert Rios, helped found the support organization and fight for formal school recognition during the spring and fall semesters of 1983. Speaking for the other side was former SMU student senator Ted Brabham, who has continued to lead the opposition to GLSSO's efforts for senate recognition, despite his failure to win a position as a student body officer. Also included on the hour-long discus­sion program were the Rev. Troy Perry, whose Metropolitan Community Church organization has been attempting to win recognition and admittance into the National Council of Churches, and the Rev. Dr. Oscar McCloud, the head of the Council's Constitutent Membership Com­mittee. The Council spent 18 months deliberat­ing the issue of MCC admittance, only to put the application on indefinite hold, pending the ability to form a better con­sensus among Council member churches. Donahue began the program by point• mg out that many major colleges have already accepted the efforts of gay stu• dents to have support organizations. But he stated that it was not possible to over­state the controversy which had been raised among students. faculty, adminis­tration and alumm ofSMU over the appli­cation for recognit10n of GLSSO. He stated that it had split the campus and split the governing board which is put in the middle of trying to balance the rights of students against the needs of a minority student body. Donahue said that he sensed the fear among many at SMU was perhaps that the school's image had been tarnished by the media by the suggesbon that if you're Texan, you are a redneck and a reaction• ary, are afraid of people of different opin­ions or lifestyles, and adamantly against having any "queers or steers" on campus. It was pointed out by Cooper that a cam• pus poll showed most SMU students, if allowed to vote yea or nay on the issue of recognition, would vote it down by a mar­gin of 59 to 41 percent (with a six percen­tage point margin of error). She also stated that many members of the SMU gay com­munity were afraid to come out of the closet or attend GI.SSO meetings fo:r fear of being ostracized by the rest of the stu­dent body Donahue opined that SMU seemed, through its administration and alumni, to be proud of the labcl "conservative," but that it was sensitive to Brabham's appear• ance on the program, not wanting him to be perceived as speaking for SMU in any official or school-sanctioned capacity. Student Body President Homer Rey­nolds was quoted on the program as say­ing many at SMU were frustrated at Brabham appearing on the program, and that there was "sheer disgust" that he would appear to be representing SMU on national televiRion. Brabham countered that Reynolds had an "unfortunate personality," and that he had previously tried to label Brabham a "media hound." Brabham averred that most Texans were not rednecks and did not hate gays. He said that persons who held a like opinion to his simply did not want to have a school-funded support group for gays on campus. Donahue then asked why this was not a denial of civil rights of gays, to which Brabham replied that it was not a ques• tion of civil rights, but of school privileges (an argument which was used this past fall during the debate before the senate for recognition). He said he perceived a differ• ence between allowing a black student organization and a similarly constituted gay group. Cooper pointed out that both times GU,SO had sought recognition, it had rec,,ived a unanimous recommendation from the senate Organizations Commit­tee, and that the group has the support of the leaders of the Perkins School of Theol­ogy. Yet the fact that the Roman Catholic Georgetown University had also recently denied recognition to a gay support group was brought forth, as well as the fact that this decision of the university, when chal­lenged in federal court, was upheld as the right of a private institution to formulate its own policies in dealing with such issues. In discussing the failure to take action by the National Council of Churches on the application for membership of MCC, Donahue asked 1f it might not be true that many churches would leave the National Council if the MCC were allowed in, the implication being that at SMU, also, some students would either leave the school or would not apply in the first place if a gay group were officially recognized on cam­pus. In agreeing, Rev. McCloud stated that this was also why the Council had never been able to take a unified stand on the subject of abortion for reasons of wanting to speak with unity on policy issues. Donahue said he saw this attitude as merely wanting to ensure against boat• rocking, rather than wrestling with decid­ing what a truly Christian stand would entail. He asked 1f it were not reasonable to ask the Council to speak honestly and effectively to the needs ofa membership of Christians who are of a certain sexual orientation, which is not really a Chris• tian moral question, and which is really not anybody else's business. Rev McCloud stated that MCC met all the criteria for the white majority. e 1984 Edition of CJOe Whole gay Ga.ta.log featuring thousands of books for gay men and lesbians, their famtl!es and friends. Our new 100-page Whole gay Gatalog brings the world of gay and lesbian literature as close as your mailbox. Order Your Copy T oday! From Lambda Rf.sing, The World's Leading Gay & Lesbian Bookstore. (Discreetly packag~d I c=-- -=--=--==------------------------ P~ase send me 11fe tna.lc 9-1 Bet~. I enclose $2 Name Address City State __ Zfp _ _ 5<,nd to· Lambda Rl.9lng Dept. GAN 2012 S Street, NW Wa.shlngton. D.C. 20009 Rev. Perry then pointed out the inconsis­tency of allowing non-Christian groups official recognition at SMU, when often the argument against recognizing GLSSO has been that it represents a lifestyle anti­thetical to Christian precepts. Unfortu­nately, admitted Brabham, there was such a contradiction, but he offered neither an explantion nor a justification for it. An audience member felt that perhaps the major problem with the topic was a fear of dealing with gays by the heterosex­ual majority because of a lack of under­standing on their part. But Brabham said he felt no fear, only that he didn't want something which he felt went against Christian teaching to be officially recog-nized at his school. , Rev. McCloud said he was of the opinion that the mere existence of the Metropoli­tan Community Church was the fault of the mainline churches, since gay people are seldom accepted into the congrega­tions of most churches once their sexual orientation is out in the open. These gay churchgoers then become isolated and must find somewhere else to tum for their spiritual fulfillment. In another comment from the audience, someone wanted to know just how many students at SMU were involved, saying that the size of the minority being served was an important factor in determining whether the support group was really needed. Cooper stated that there were 28 stu• dents at the first meeting last spring, and that the meetings have grown each time since then. She then lamented the exam­ples of harassment which followed some of GI...<;SO membe111 coming out publicly in support of the group, and said these were examples of invasions of people's integ­rity. Brabham then asserted that neither he nor the majority of students wanted such harassment to take place. But Donahue then asked how it was that such bigotry and intolerance were to be fought unless this anti-social behavior can be counte­racted by such an educational atmosphere as should exist allowing for diversity, a diversity which would include groups like GLSSO. However, Brabham said he believed that the high visibility of the group on campus would lead to increased, not decreased, harassment and resent• ment. Another audience member said the school was within its rights not to give a "stamp of approval" to su_c~ a gro_up, while another said a prerequmte to bemg a Christian was acei'pting that God did not like sin, and that homosexuality was a sin in His eyes. Rev. Perry then stated that human sexu• ality is morally neutral, !hat people who exist m loving relationships were not sm­ful in God's eyes, and thnt "Jesus died for my self, not my sexuality." A letter was read by Quincy Adams, president-elect of the SMU Mustang Club, wherein he was quoted as inviting those gay students who are unhappy with condi­tions at SMU to leave and find another school to attend. He said he wanted to send a "message to the world. If you are a professor or a student and have this lifes­tyle, then don't come here (to SMU)." Brabham disagreed, saying he did not want gay students thrown off the campus. A caller pleaded with Cooper and her supporters not to give up, though, since the caller said he had graduated from a small church-oriented school, was gay, and that "none of us (gays) knew who one another were," Rev. Perry reiterated that once people got to know homosexuals, they changed their attitudes and forgot the stereotypes they assumed were the norm among gay people. An audience member asked why gays were so intent on fighting hard to prove they were different from anybody else. But Donahue said that "sounds real nice on the Hallmark card, but the problem is that Jews and gays and Irish have had moments of societal pressure and negative pressure directed at them," and that at times measures needed to be taken to coun­teract the negative pressure. By the end of the program, when Donahue took an informal pool of the mostly blue-haired ladies who were in attendance, the applause was about evenly divided among those who thought the group should be formally recognized and those who did not. Cooper ended by stating that, if recog­nized, funding is then voted on separately, that the gorup was funded by members and supporters and was running short of money, and that any money received from the SMU student activity fund wold be used for educational purposes such as ads, literature and speakers for programs. In discussing how her appearance on the program came about, Cooper aaid GLSSO's executive board voted to send her as the spokesperson. She said the audience did not know what subject was to be discussed in advance of their coming to see the taping, and that their response was surprisingly positive, considering the makeup of those in attendance who were primarily older women unused to thinking about the issues brought up. Cooper said the Donahue staff had researched the subject very well and were on top of the points which were brought up in the discussion. She said she took the pressure of the appearance on national tel­evision in stride, and had gotten a lot of help from her teachers, who allowed her to rearrange her exam schedule in order to be on the program. She said she was sorry that the hour was not really enough time to cover all the important aspects of the issue, but dnimed to he pleased at the results and at thi, moral support she had gotten from her friends, fellow students and even the people involved in producing the Donahue program, including Donahue himself. .,.., ,, EA.GLEC:R.EST I:N':N' for Ultim.11te Accomodation.,. Heated Pool * Jacuzzi * ont. Ure.,kf.,.,t Weekend-. 104 Avondale, HC>US I"ON (713) 523-9004 LAMBDA Planning Women's Day Events Austin's LAMBDA is planning several events for the week of March 5-10 to com­memorate International Women's Day. A Women's Coffee House is already scheduled for Mar. 9 at 7 p.m. at the Con­gregational Church. A slide show "From Spiral to Spear," will be shown ~t 7:30. Admission is $1. . For those interested in becoming more mvolved m the five-day celebration, con­tact Sue Beckwith at 474•5388 or Janis Heine or Roxanne Elder at 474•2399. Austin LGPC to Make Endorsements The Austin Lesbian I Gay Political Caucus will make its spring primary endorse­ment.,; Feb. 28 at 7:00 p.m. in County Court at Law No. 2 of the County Courthouse. Anyone in the community wishing to become more involved with the caucus is invited to attend, Votinl( may be done by any member who has joined the caucus at least two w1•eks prior to the meeting; former members may renew their memberships on th1• day of the meeting in time for endor­sements. Friar Tuck Look . Now Available Are you ready for the Friar Tuck look? Bob Shelley of Memphis hopes so. ording to the Boston Phoenix, he's mar• keting what he calls the ultimate in designer loungewear: a classic hassock, complete with rope belt and hood. The monk's costume is available in any color you want, as long aa it's brown. Gay Atheist Leader Dies, Asks for Forgiveness Thomas Rolfsen. founder and leader of Gay Atheist League of America (GALA), died last month from a liver disorder shortly after having last rites said by a priest, reports Chai Cochran in a GALA newsletter. According to Cochran, Rolfsen asked the pri1•8t to ask God to forgive him of what he c111l1-d hio "blasphemous years" us leud,•r of GALA He also a ski'd that Cochran, his lover of '27 ye11rs, dissolve the GALA organization and ask all thos(' who had ever supported the organization, both rast and present, to ask for forgiveness as well. Rolfsen left half of his e,;tate to Dignity, the national gay Catholic group. GALA was formed in 1976 at the height of Anita Bryant's antigay crusade. Cochran said that he had no plans to continue the group of gay atheists, and that only two small chapters in San Fran­cisco and New York remain in what was once an influential nationwide organiza­tion. Apologies to Dirty Sally's Jim Smith The editors of THE STAR would like to sincerely apologize to Jim Smith for what he perceived as a less than respectful use of his name in our last Austin Soap column "Tututu Divine" was unaware at the time she wrote her last column of the importance of Mr Smith's contribution to tht' Austin gay community. . . . Although she was merely Jesting m her remarks regarding "'a roast," we're sin­n ·n•ly sorry that Mr Smith took it person• ally ShP would never mt>an to offend. AIDS Update Community Health forum II Dr. Peter W .A. Mansell M.D. Director of Cancer Research PI.D. Anderson Hospital Tumor Institute Houston, Texas An authority on AIDS 3:00 P.M. Sunday, Feb. 26, 1984 Riverwalk Marriott Cash Bar Suggested Donation $5 To Help With Expenses Sponsored by 1rsa9aJJ llhCJj ,nS.nAnloo•o AIDS SIA Project " Gay romance and adventure on the high seas THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDITION h ·Jn T.ilbot h,1' J ,ecn·t. Jlth,,ugh he\ d,,n" hi, bl'sl to , n•,11, .i pulilit irn.igt' t>f h1m,l'lt .1, ,1 pl,wbov, h, know, in,idt• 1h,11 l11, stn,~gt',I st·,ual lt·d1ng, Jrl' for rnl'n . t'Vt·n his old dJ"rnJll' Hamish wh,, is him,dl 4u1le op,·nlv i:a,· J,,,.,n I ,u,pt•cl Ev,rn, -ecrel Whl'n .1 lril'ml of lhl' I\\ o men i, impn~ont•d by lanJIICs m the ~liJdll' l:Jsl , l::vJn Jnd Hamish IJ\ plan, for a r,·,cul' mission bo,,J..ing passage <>n a cruise• ,hip bound t.,r the• Ml'diterram·Jn. As the mission progrl'sses. romance and mterna­t, onal ,1Jvc-nlurl' wc•Jve l<>gl'lher into an unforgettable story. S5.05 in bookstore,, or usl' this coupon lo order by mail ......................... ......... TO ORDER ................................. . I 'I1.-,t!-(· ~·nd rr1t• 1 m lu"-•d 1, 5 n,mH Judrt,.., SIJll z,p ALYSO Publica tions, l'O !fox 2783, Boston, MA 02208 FEB. 17, 1984 / THE STAR 5 Atlas Savings Seeks Nationwide Gay Clientel "Three years ago all the big banks in San Francisco were highly skeptical about the idea of a financial institution owned and operat~ by gay men and lesbians," said John A. Schmidt, chairman of the board of Atlas Savings and Loan Association. "Now they are frankly envious of our phenomenal success and ask us how we did it" Atlas Savings. the world's first gay and lesbian owned financial institution, has barely been open for business two years and has already seen iLs assets grow from 2.5 million to more thn ,.90 million. In recent "eek. , two major developments have further indicated Atlas' growth: I) Atla. stock. which went on the market over two years ago. will soon split three shar\'5 for two; and 2\ construction has begun on a • 1 million branch office locat.ed on Castro Street where many gay men ar.d women live and work. As a public corporation. stock in Atlas Savingb is owned by thousands of gays with investors and depositors in 48 of the 50 states and in several foreign countries. When Atlas stock went on the market it was selling for $12.50 per share; current book value has risen to, I 9 per share. Tra­ditionally wht'n. tock splits. the per share price goes down-Atlas will probabl\' then sell for. 11 or ~12 per share · !--chm1dt said, "Atlas was founded b) the 11ay community becau,e many finan­cial insutution, O\'erlooked gay people in the past. We felt the time was right for a gay savinirs and loan that could make fel­low gays more comfortable •· Schmidt gave the example of two gay men or two lesbian. coming in to apply for a loan to buy a home. "With us, there doesn ·1 have to be any lies about the rela­tionship and no embarrassment. We understand their life ·tyle, and if they qualify for th" loan, we wa n t to give it to them. "This savings and loan not only shows the financial clout of gay people," Schmidt continued, "but also destroys the myth that gays are not good managers of their money. Atlas provides many of the servi­ces of other financial institutions, but I feel we add the personal touch." In its first two years of business. Atlas has not only enioyed enthusiastic support from gay men and women in the San Fran­cisco Bay area. but also has attracted dep• ositors aero the nation . ''We are. o plea. ed that gay people ever­ywhere are financially supporting us," Schmidt said. "Smee many people bank by mail any­way, we encourage out-of•state customers to do at least some of their bankin11 in San Francisco. Gays want to show their pride in our institution and be part of us, even if they hve m Ch1rago or Houston or San Diego. This gay pride 1s much of the key to our ~uct·ess " More information can be <>btained from Atlas Sa,;ngs and Loan Ass, oation. 1967 Market Street, Department K. San Fran• cisco. CA 94103. Loneliness More Lethal Than Smoking Pacifi<- Nt-\,,\, • •. .' r'\-·JC'lf' We used to hearofpeopledyingofa broken heart only in son!( but a new study con• firms that loneliness is in fact a great.er cause of death than smoking, drinking or eating the wrong foods. Researcht'rs at the Um,ersity of Cali• forma at Berkele) sa) lonely peoplt' are particular!\' susC'l'ptiblt' to cardio-vascular disease. thl' nation·, number one killer. A related study at John. Hopkins Umver• sit\ found that many people who deve­loped cancN were also ,·ict1ms of londine,.s Sa) s one doctor "Loneliness 1s finally commg out of the clo et. ' 6 THE STAR / FEB 17, 1984 That Little Brown Bottle Is in the News Commentary By Joe Baker That httle brown botUe. Remember the first time someone placed it under your nose and said, "take a whiff?" I can't believe it, but it must have been at least 10 years ago. I vaguely remember who I was with. He was an "older" man­you know, in his 30s . I know the place was Arsonists Damage Florida MCC By Joseph McQuay/Tbe Weekly New, Via Gay Pr•• Auociation Wire Service JACKSONVILLE, FLA.-As if the 100 members of Jacksonville's Metropolitan Community Church didn't have enough problems, the Rev. Donald Johnson was leaving the church next week for health reasons. Then it happened. Sometime dur• ing the night of Monday, Jan. 16, an arsonist tossed in an ignited bottle filled with kerosene•soaked socks. causing major fire and smoke damage to the church. "I came to the church about 10:15 Tues­day morning," Rev. Johnson said. "When I opened the door, billows of smoke rushed out of the sanctuary and I immediately called the fire department." Luckily, the fire had burned itself out dunng the night. Fire officials found part of a pew and the pulpit burned and black• ened smoke damage throughout the sanc­tuary. They also found remnants of glass and socks smelling of kerosene on the floor. The investigation is s till open, and no suspects have turned up. The Fire Mar­shal's office 1s definitely labeling this blaze an act of arson. "Everything was just black from the smoke," Johnson said. "We're going to have to replace some drapes, some desks, the clerical robe,, and all the choir robes." Johnson said the church had not expe­rienced significant problems in the neigh• borhood. They had been "egged" twice in the last year, and some windows were broken on the north side of the bulding Jan 13. After the window incident, John­son called police to ask for more surveil• lance at night. He said he had seen no evidence of that m the three days before the fire. Criminal Investigator Thanks Gays for Aid in Capturing Elusive Man "I'd like lQ add a special thanks to the gay conunun1ty for getting involved," read the communique from C E. Dennis C. Carl, criminal 1nvestigator for the Reading, Pennsylvania's Bureau of Police. "For six months I tracked Hun~berger around the United States, and th1~ (his apprehension) was only made possible by the gay com• munity gettin11 involved." Scott Alan Hunsberger, a white male, 23, was wanted on various charges, including theft in Pennsylvania; New York; Las Vegas, Nevada: Dallas. Texas; Sacramento, Calif.; Mann County, Calif.; and Merietta, Ga He was apprehended at a shopping mall in Columbus, Ohio, on Dec. 16 when he was observed and reported by a person who had seen his picture in a local gay publication. He traveled under several aliases, and police completely lost him for one month until he was identified in Columbus, end• ing a six-month search. "Without their (gay press and individu• al.s} involvement, Scott Alan Hunsberger would still be free," wrote Carl. "Whether society be gay or straight, we know that our function to the community was served to the best of our ability. Thanks to all who aSSlsted in making my job a little easier." a bedroom in Flint, Mich. I took a whiff, and I thought my head was going to spin off my neck and my heart was going to jump out of my chest. I then sorta drifted-and I felt wonderful. I iiot even homier than I was. It was a good thing we were in the middle of a romp in the aack. The sex that night was terrific. At the time, I though it was the best ever. That little brown bottle. I fell in love with it. Oh, what an aphrodisiac! Of course, I'm talking about what is inside those bottles. The proper name of the substance is alkyl or butyl nitrite, but we just call them poppers. Forget that their manufacturers insist they are only producing incense and room deodorizers. We know why they exist and how they are really used. I remember the first time I bought a bot­tle. I couldn't find poppers in any of the stores where I lived so I ordered some through an adverisementin a gay publica­tion. I could hardly wait to get them. Then the day came. When I opened my mailbox, I almost got knocked to the ground. My pre­cious package was all smashed, and the aroma was disgusting. It was definitely no turn-on. The liquid had soaked into the package and dried, and all I had was a smelly envelope filled with glass. Just like in the Chivas Scotch ads, I wanted to cry. I wrote a letter to the company, however, informing them what happened. I think I said something about all the postal workers between California and Michigan having iiotten a rush at my expense. The company was real nice. They imme­diately replaced my order-in a crush proof box. Soon after that, poppers officially arrived in Michigan and you could buy them in bars and adult bookstores. Like so many gay men at the time, I started using poppers often. Moving to Fort Lauderdale, I discovered they were even more popular there. It seemed like everybody on the dance floors had those little brown bottles under their noses. Most bedrooms had them on the nightstand or laying on the floor along­side the bed. Poppers were "in." Poppers were "it." Poppers were the gay man's passport to good times. In my rational moments, I supppose I always realized that sniffing poppers wasn't exactly the most healthy thing in the world. I mean 1t doesn't take a genius to know that breathing chemicals and fumes isn' t good for one's body or brain. But I told myslef that everybody was doing it, so it couldn't be so bad. And besides, if it was really dangerous, our good government would have stepped in and banned poppers. It had already taken steps against the "real" stuff- amyl nitrite. The Food and Druii Administration had ruled that amyl-which is used to stimulate heart patients-couldn't be sold without a pres• cription. So I kept on using various alkyl or butyl nitrite products. Locker Room, Rush, Head, Bullet, Hitt, Quick Silver, Pig, etc. Gosh, there's been so many names and brands. I convinced myself that they were all just imitations of amyl and couldn't hurt you as long as you didn't go ovt:rboard. I really didn't know how much was "going overboard," but I figured I would know if! ever got to that point. Around 1981, I realized I had. It seemed everytime I used poppers myu chest would get all congested. Discussing my problem with a pharmacist friend of mine, he told me 1f I didn't quit using poppers so much I would soon be facing a lot of health prob­lems. I took his advice, and over the past cou• ple of years I have had few coniiestion problems. The times I did were brought on by real colds. I haven't quit usmg poppers all together, just cut back. Maybe that is the reason why I no longer have chest prob­lems. Or maybe, I'm using a better-or purer-brand of poppers. Oh, one other thing. My thumb is no longer constantly yellow from holding it over the top of that little brown bottle. It was always tiO embarrassing to have my boss ask me every Monday morning why my thumb was yellow. Seriously, I still don't know for sure if poppers are really bad for you, but I'm sure they don't promote good health. It is sorta like cigarettes. We have to be responsible for our own actions, and be willing to face the consequences should we take the risk. I like to believe that if we keep such actions to a minimum and don't go overboard to excessiveness-then we should be all right. Maybe I'm just trying to rationalize my actions because I still enjoy poppers. Just like those people who smoke (I don't). The questions over the safety of poppers, however, is about to enter a new phase. San Francisco has just adopted the strictest law in the country to inform the public about the poi;sible health hazards of poppers. They can no longer be sold to anyone under the age of 18 and stores sel• ling poppers must post bold "May Be Hazardous to Your Health" warnings. The city resolution states that while the " long-term effects of inhaling alkyl nitrites are not known, several different recent studies have suggested that long• term use may possibly impair the body's immune eystem.11 Ever since the AIDS crisis began, there has been a movement to link poppers to the disease. So far, scientists and health officials have not been able to directly con• nect the two or prove that poppers cause AIDS. So-the jury is still out. I predict, though, that there will be a lot of cities and states following San Francisco's move during the next year. Poppers are an eay target. I have no problems with that. I just hope they don't try to go further and ban poppers. Just like with cigarettes, the health waminii puts the responsibility on ourselves. Where it belongs. Governments have not tried to ban cigarettes, even though they have been proven to be unhealthy. And they shouldn't try to ban poppers on that basis alone either. Medical science has a long way to go before it is known what effect nitrites have on the human immune system. There are possible impairments to our bodies everywhere we look these days. Let's face it. Just about anything we eat, drink or do is said to be somewhat unhealthy and may cause cancer. Good luck, medical science. Texas Has a 'Poppers Law' A Texas state law was put into effect on Sept. 1 last year regarding the possession and sale of volatile chemicals. The law lists 22 volatile chemicals, including amyl and butyl nitrite. The law stipulates that use of any of these chemi• cals for purposes "in a manner contrary to directions for use, cautions, or warnings appearing on a label of a container of the substance" constitutes a violation of this law. Furthermore, the law states, "A person commits an offense if the person inten• tionally or knowingly sells or delivers a substance containmii 11 volatile c~~mical to a person under 17 years of age. Improper use of a volatiel substance or sale of a volatile substance to a minor are both Class C misdemeanors, which may include a fine, not to exceed $200, and the possibility of arrest, at the discretion of the police officer. A Jewish lesbian in search of her heritage The LaH' oj Ret1Crn I)\ t\lilc rnlll h This 1s J beJut1tul Jnd hl•Jlmg \\ ork hlkJ with lht• vo1cl.'S ot \\Oml'n sl r,11mn)! h• ._now l'.ith ,,thl'r fl'11tl' :,.,l'\\ m.m m ,•// 0111 /1,11 /.. Ul,>th, prow 1' -iw n)! 11 h1)!hlv p1•rson,1 l s pt'ai-.m)! lo snmt• po wt•rt ul l'm,,111,n, .inJ trl',lling l'Vl>t,llJVC lnl,l)!CS /'11/1/,-/r1·1s 1\n•f..lv Alicl' Uloch h.is much 11, s.w lo any woman "t,,. has t'Vl'r w,>nJl'n•J v.h,, ,h .. n,.1lh 1s anJ "h,•rt she bl'l,>n)!s I, II\ ( ,>llm l'ogHbm l'Jllor \I, mJ):JZIOI' 'II\• LAW I RETURN In JOt,ll Am1·r1<.in I,,.rn 1-11, n l{ogm dl•p,1r1, t.,r J ,urrmn v,itah,,n 1n J,r.,d Dra" n In th,· I.ind tlw l,mgu,igt•, ,md lht• rd1gu•n. ,ht• ,1d,,p1, lwr fld,n'\'. n,1m1• I h,h,•, a Jnd st·llles in h-nJS,lll'm wht.'H' ,ht· l'xplorl's Or­th,, do, , Jnd ht·r ,1\ , n h,wnling 4u,-,11ons. about lovt•, rtlal111n,hip,, and , ,•,uJlity \\'h,·n ,111· h•,1rn, that l),1n1d lhl' om· man shl' It'll ,ht> wuld mJrn 1s g,1v I li,lwv,1, qut·,1 lllr rt''l>lu l1on 1hrl',lll·n, 11, t•,plo,k ,., po,ing ht·r own Ion• t.,r w,,men S7 05 in bool..slorl's. ,,r USl' th,, «>upon lo ordt•r 1,y mJd ..... ... ................... ....... TO ORDER ................... .. ... ........ .. l'l1•J...- ...-nd rr, l:~do,ul is S n.1n1t I I \ tt1p1t, ,,t 11,, l,h1 1 / R,l1"11 ,11 58 50 t·.u.h po,tp.wl lip Al YSON Publication\, 1'0 Ho'< 2783, Boston. MA 02208 ALGPC Establishes AIDS Project The Steering Committee of the Austin Les­bian I Gay Political Caucus adopted at its meeting Feb. 7 a proposal to establish an ALGPC AIDS Projecl According to ALGPC's newsletter, the thrust of the project will be to address the issue of AIDS through the political sys­tem, with efforts such as: 1) Working for the allocation of public funding for health, social services and training; 2) Educating elected officials about AIDS; 3) Working for the election of candidates committed to impacting the AIDS prob­lem through their offices; and 4) Working to defeat any anti-gay legis­lation which is promoted through the use of scare tactics about AIDS. "Elected officials hold the purse strings of public health and social service," stated ALGPC Co-chair Juan Ochoa. "If we expect to have services available to vic­tims of AIDS, we must convince these offi­cials to allocate funds." Co-chair Janet Cobb added, "Many of our elected officials aren't very familiar with our community or with AIDS. We intend to use the political contacts we have developed over the years to educate office holders about AIDS and its impact on the Austin area." While the AIDS Project will be ongoing, one portion of the project will gear up each election season. The Caucus will survey candidates concerning their commitment to address AIDS issues should they be elected. ALGPC will target certain elective offices as critical to addressing the issues of AIDS, and will concentrate resources on viable, supportive candidates for those offices. The project will also include lobbying elected officials to provide professional training about AIDS for health care pro­viders in publicly-funded health facilities. Not Too Late for Valentine's Celebration Female members of the community who slept through Valentine's Day last Tues• day will still have a chance to celebrate cupid's annual event this Friday evening <Feb. 17) at the AuAtin Le6bian1Gay Polit• ical Caucus' Women's Valentine's Dance The dance will be held from 9 p.m. to one in the morning at 4700 Grover. Houston's Cherry Wolf will spin the records. There will be a cash bar, and nonalco• holic beverages will be available. The $5 admission for non-ALGPC members will apply to Caucus member­ship; admission is $4 for members. Hill Country Leathermen to Hold Anniversary Party Austin's Hill Country Leathermen are whipping up their first anniversary party, "Black and Bluebonnets," to be held April 6 and 7. The party will start Friday night, April 6, at Austin's Back Street Basics bar, and will continue Saturday afternoon at Camp Ben McCullouch Park just outside the city, which has Ix-en reserved for the day. Saturday's events will begin at 3 p.m. in the park with an "Everything's-Better• With-Blu~bonnets-On-It" contest. Dinner will be served at 6 p.m. Entertainment for the evening will follow with Houston's Danny Villa serv!ng as M.C: . The registration donation 1s $25 through April 1, $30 after that. Checks should be made payable to Hill Country Leathermm, c/ o Tony Rihn, Box 595, Manchoca. Tex. 786.'i2. . Registration for the party will be held from 8 to 11 p.m. Friday, April 6, and from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 7, at the Back Stred Basics, Application forms, posters and further information can be obtained by contact­ing Larry Horne, 5121244-0261 , or Gary Williams, 5121288-3088. Noted Physician to Address AIDS Issue in San Antonio Dr. Peter W.A. Mansell of M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute in Houston will present Community Health Forum II, "AIDS Update," at 3 p.m. Feb. 26 at the Riverwalk Marriott Hotel, San Antonio. Mansell's discussion will be co­sponsored by the AIDS Project of San Antonio and the health committee of the San Antonio Gay Alliance. A native of London, Mansell is deputy head of the department of cancer preven­tion of the University of Texas system cancer center at M.D. Anderson Hospital in Houston. He also head~ two sections, preventive medicine and health education, in the '-' department of cancer prevention at M.D. Anderson. Before joining the UT system, the 47- year-old physician practiced, taught or researched in Louisiana and Florida. Other assignment.q have taken him to Kenya in Africa and Montreal, Canada, as well as to his native country, England. His work with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Sy ndrome includes serving on the AIDS Core Curriculum Committee at M.D. Anderson , as well as being a board member for the Kaposi Sarcoma I AIDS Foundation in Houston. In addition, he serves on about 10 committees at M.D. Anderson, including the infection control and infectious control committees. His membership in professional organi­zations includes work in about 15 groups. Most of the organizations are concerned with cancer research. Medical journals have published more than 80 of Mansell's articles. He has made about 100 presentations throughout the world to professional and community organizations. FEB 17, 1984 / THE STAR 7 Many Finns Not Delighted with Gay Life International Gay !'iewa Agency Legislation about gay rights in Finland has lagged behind that of other Nordic countries, according to Seta magazine. At present it is still possible to be arrested and punished for "encourage­ment" of homosexuality in this Scandina• vian nation, despite efforts by gay activists to alter the laws. At the same time, the age-of-L-onsent law discriminates against homosexual behav• ior, since hetero6exual acts are permissi­ble at an earlier age. Finland is in the process of passing a sexuality equality law to create greater parity between the sexes, but unless the statute,; are changed, it will still be possi­ble to discnminate on the basis of sexual orientation. (~ (~ MIRAGE presents THE ROCK ERA from the 30's to the 80's Tyra Bishop presents from Las Vegas ~ 9 r9 r9 ~ ~ (9 (9 (9 starring *Judy * Carol * Jan Matney * GinaFobia * Barrie * MikeyJ. (back as Michael Jackson) *The Famous Duet and more * Sabrina Ross plus San Antonio's 1983 Entertainer of the Year * Pauletta Leigh and * Corky * Laureen &Kathy • (9 • ~ (9 ~ ~ 8 THE STAR/ FEB 17, 1984 Go Skiing at Colorado's Only Gay Ski Lodge '>k tf. ;,r ng at the only gay sk, lodge n Colorado l<>Cated h.gh m the central nlJtr Only I hours from Denver off I 70 The Bunkhouse offers the fmesl sk, f •1e the WPst w th three ska areas available on a free shuttle bus service· B kenndge, Copper 'l,fountam and Keystone And Va I sonly 35 miles away' P,.iurea roaring fireplact' w11h steaming mugs of ,offeeon a bearskin rug after a h,ud da, s skung, surrounded bv some of the hottest skiers m the countrv1 All at some of the lowest rates m the country' · THE BUNKHOUSE (303) 4S3-b47S POB 6, Breckenridge, CO 80424 • G.4 Y N~ • INF.DIIIIA.TION • • COIIIIUNICA nONS • ·--•- -R-eg-u-la-r S-u-b~scr-ip-ti-on- $-3-0 --------~-~---------· • Trial Subscription $15 • Send me more information, please. Name ______________ ______ _ Addre.,.._ ___________________ _ C1ty. __________ State ___ Z,p ___ _ Typeo!Ccmputer _____ , __________ _ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 New books from A L y s 0 N PUBLICATIONS 0 THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Fnedel, $7 00. The entertawwg coming-out story of Burton Raider, who is so elegant that a~ a child he reads Vogue in his playpen. "The wnung 1s tresh and cnsp, the humor often h1lanous," wmes the L.A. TJmes. "The funmest gay novel of the year,• says Chnstopher Street. C ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. One teenager m ten 1s gay; here, twenty-su young people tell the1r stories. of comwg to terms with being different, of the decision how - and whether - to tell friends and parents, and what the consequences were. 0 THE BUTTERSCOTCH PRINCE, by Richard Hall, $5.00. When Cor­dell's best friend and ex-Jover is murdered, the only clue 1s one that the police seem to consider too kin.Icy to follow up on. So Cordell decides to track down the killer himself - with results far different from what he had expected. • ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. 'I've known that I was gay swce I was thirteen. Does that surprise you! It didn't me .. "So begins All-Amencan Boys, the story of a teenage love affair that should have been simple - but wasn't. 0 CHINA HOUSE, by Vincent Lardo, $5.00. A gay goth1c that has everything: two handsome lovers, a mystenous house on the hill, sounds in the mght, and a father-son relat1onsh1p that's closer than most. 0 THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDmON, by Pamc1a S1tkm, $6 00. When Evan Talbot leave~ on a m1ss1on 10 rescue an old schoolmate who has been 1mpnsoned by fanaucs in the Middle East, be doe5n't realize that the tnp will also wvolve h!S own coming out and the discovery of who It 1s that he really loves. 0 DEATH TRICK, by Richard Stevenson, $6 00 Meet Don 5trachey, a pnvate eye m the classic rradmon but wah one difference· he's gay TO ORDER Enclosed 1s $, __ -; please send the books I've checked above. /Add $1.00 postage when orderwg 1ust one book; if you order more than one, wdl pay postage.) D Charge my lc1rcle onej: Visa Mastercard acct. no.: ________ _ expiration date:, ____ _ signature: ________________ _ name address city ___________ state_z1p _____ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS, Dept, P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 Quiz How Do You Do at Aging? By Roz Ashley We're all growing older, but there are many different and fascinating reactions to the process. How do you feel about it? Grateful? Unaware? Insecure? Are you a Peter Pan? Is the biological clock a time bomb for you? Do you tint out the gray hair, or comb it forward into prominence? Do you cruise in a warm-up suit, or just use it to keep warm? Whatever your reaction to these ques­tions, you must surely feel the need to know your Old Age Acceptance Rating, so take the following quiz by circling the answer that most truthfully completes each numbered paragraph. Answers fol ­low the last question. I. When you go to a party, you cause everyone near you to: a) flirt. b) talk. c) doze. Now add up the scores for the answers you checked: 1. a-5 b-5 c-0; 2. a-0 b-5 c-3; 3. a-0 b-3 c-3; 4. a-3 b-3 c-0; 5. a-3 b-5 c-0; 6. a-0 b-5 c-0; 7. a-5 b-0 c-0; 8. a-0 b-0 c-5; 9. a-5 b-0 c-0; 10. a-5 b-5 c-3; 11. a-5 b-0 c-0; 12. a-0 b-5 c-0; 13. a-3 b-3 c-3; 14. a-0 b-5 c-3; 15. a-0 b-5 c-0. 6-26. You're in such a panic about grow­ing older that you're making an ass of yourself. 27-48. You have normal fears and twinges about giving up your youth. Keep exercising and hang in there! 49-69. Please invite me to your next birthday party! No matter how old you are, it's bound to be a blast! Ashll'y is a personal counselor. ~ 1984 Stonewall Featurl'S Syndicate. FEB 17, 1984 / THE STAR 9 e 1984 Edition of 'JOe Whole gay Gatalag f eaturlng thousands of books for gay men and lesbians, their f amilies and f rlends. Our new I 00-page Whole gay Gatalog brings the world of gay and lesbian !tterature as close as your mailbox. Order Your Copy Today! From Lambda Rf.sing, The World's Leading Gay & Lesbian Book.store. (Discreetly packaged.) -L:---=--=-==------------------------ Pleasesendme ~ tna.le Qc11 Gotclo•.lencloseS2. Name Address _____________ _ City State _ _ Zip ~ndlO Lambda Rising !Hpt. GAN 2012 S Street. NW Washington. D.C. 20009 2. How do you feel about getting wrin­kles? a) "I'll never get wrinkles!" b) "Eve­rybody gets wrinkles." c) "Wrihkles? Those are laugh lines!" 3. What's your main feeling about grow­ing older? a) Fear. b) Worrying that Social Security will run out before I get any. c) Grief over not cruising any more. Your eyes say a lot about you-don't let them tell your age! 4. At the last party you went to: a) You didn't get a date. b) Someone asked you if you were a parent of the host. c) No one seemed to see you. 5. When you're cruising, what makes you feel old? a) When no one looks back. b) "I never feel old." c) Everything. 6. When you feel like you 're getting older, what do you do? a) Hang out with younger people. b) Simply relax. c) Wear shorts and sneaks. 7. If you thought you could get into a movie at a senior citizen rate, what would you do? a) Grab it in a minute. b) Ignore it. c) Sneak in a lone 8. How will you know when you're old? a) "When I reach 30." b) "When I reach 60." c) "When I can't reach." 9. You're 48-years-old, and you dream of: a) Someone about your age. b) Someone 10 years younger. c) Someone 30 years younger. 10. What do you plan for your old age? a) Eating anything I want. b) Lots of travel. c) A face lift. 11. What do you do to stay young• looking? a) Nothing, b) Carry a tennis racket. c) Stand near someone really old. 12. What do you do when someone asks your age? a) Lie. b) Brag. c) Plead the Fifth Amendment. 13. You know you're getting old when: a) No one will hire you. b) No one will date you. c) No one will. 14. How do you feel about birthdays? What do you do? a) Hide and try to ignore them. b)Celebrate. c) It depends on the presents. Hi. How do you regard the passing years'! a) No problem. I'm not getting old. b) I don't think about it. c) I'm hysterical. Security Clearance Brochure for Gays Published National Gay Rights Advocates, the San Francisco-basNI public interest law firm, has just published a brochure directed toward lesbians and gay men who need security clearance as a reeultofthe federal government's apprehension in granting such clearances to gays. "The government often refuses to grant a clearance because of a supposed vulnera­bility to blackmail," said Leonard Graff, NGRA legal director. "Yet they cannot point to a single case where a lesbian or gay man has been blackmailNI into giving up e~cret government documents." The brochure is part of the employment discrimination program. and in its questi­on/ answer format, it is intended for use by a gay person. It is free to NGRA members and costs $1 to the general public. Send a stamped, self.addreseNI envelope with reque.st to: NGRA. MO Castro St~ San Ptah ist:<>, Calif. 94114. 2 oz. White Swallow Eye Cream $15.00 Ask for White Swallow in your favorite men's store - ---~ White SwckN-1 eye cream iS for the man who dcreS to are about tlS appea.:nce. Because the area a-uunct the eyes haS few 011 ~ this area rs the frst: to '!TON signs of aging wme Sw;i/Ow eye cream IS pemaps the frest eye cream ever made. ft restores moisnre ald gives the eye area mat youmful cjl:NJ. ccred,t card or money order 10 day delivery> Name Address c,ry ( MONEY ORDER Card" signature Mall to State VISA [.) MASTER CARO Zip Exp Date White Sw allow c o sm e tic comp any Order Total S 1n Texas. add 6% sat~ tax s Postage & Handling s Total Enclosed s PO Bo x 73448 , D e p t. F-260 Houston , TX 77273 1 50 Order before March 15 and receive a FREE travel size eye cream Retail inquiries contact Stephen Lacobee, vice-president, Marketing ..,, ., ,~. 0 ii: ..... 0 0 .:,f ... •,. ,-. ..a,.: .•, ,0-. 0 J: Q. 10 THE STAR / FEB 17, 1984 Fourteen-Day Calendar •IN 31 WEEKS: Texas Freedom Festi\'al event: Texas Gay Pride Parade and Rally, Dallas, Sept. 23 Star Classified Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat FEB. FEB. 17 18 FEB FEB FEB. FEB. FEB FEB. FEB. 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 FEB FEB. FEB. FEB MAR. 26 27 28 29 1 F , add tQMI formation or phOne numbers tor events led below ook tor the i,ponsor ng ga aat under Organ zabons n the The Star's 0 rectory Selected Events First Week • FRIDA l-': 5th Annual Women ·s Valentine Dance, Feb. 17, 9pm lam, 4700 Grover, Austin • }WONDA Y: Washington's birthday, Feb 20 • TUESDAY: ALGPC's AIDS Awareness Week Committee meets 7pm Feb. 21 , 1022 W 6th, Au tin Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Austin Lesbian Gay Political Caucus meets 7pm Feb. 28, Commissioner's Court, Courthouse Annex, "Endorsement Meeting~ • IS 2 WEEKS: Mardi Gras Fnt Tuesday, Mar 6 • IN 3 WEEKS: Austin Lambda Women's Coffeehouse, Mor 9, 7-llpm 408 W. 23rd, with slide show "From Sprral to Spear" • IV 4 WEEKS: St. Patrick's Day, Mar. 17 • IN 6 WF.F..KS: Apr. Fool's Day, Apr. 1 • IN 6 WEEKS: ALGPC' sponsored "AIDS Awareness Week" opens, April I-?! Austin • TS 6 WEf;KS: UT-Austin Gay Lesbian Student Assoe. & AI.GPC AIDS Awareness Week Committee cducntional forum April 3 • IN 7 WEEKS: Hill Country I..eathermen 1st anniversary party Apr 6-7, " Black and Bluebonnets," Back Street Busies 611 E 7th. Austin • IN 7 WEEKS: Austm AIDS Awarenes Week party & aucuon Apnl 7, Hilton Hotel •IN 7 WEE.KS: Austin AIDS Awareness Week blood drive Apnl • I.V 7 WEE.XS: 9th Annual Southeastern Conference of Lesbian and Ga Men, "Pulling Together and Reaching Out," Holiday Inn-Medical Center, Birmingham, Ala., opens. Apr. 12-15 • IN 9 WEEKS: Fiesta opens. San Antonio, April 20 • IN 9 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Foundation 1st Southeastern Lesbian Gay Health Conference, Apr. 21, Atlanta • I,\" 11 WEEKS: Fiesta climaxes, Son Antonio, Apr. 28-29 Angeles •/.'\' 14 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 28 • 1.,; 15 WEEKS: Run-<>ff party elections in Texas, June 2 • IS 17 WEEKS: Texas Democratic Party Convention, June 15-17, tentatively Houston •EARLY JULl': Lesbian and Gay Bands of America concert, Los Angeles • IN 17 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Foundation's 1st International Lesbian Gay Health Conference, "Toward Diversity," New York, June 16-19 • IN 18 WEEKS: Dallas "Pride JU '84" opens, "Unity and More in '84," Gay Pride Week June 23-30 •IN 18 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins June 24 in many areas, national slogan "United & More in '84" •IN 18 WEE.XS: 15th anniversnry of Stonewall Riots, New York, June 27, 1969, marking the beginning of the modern gay nghts movement • IN 19 WEEKS: Dallas Gay Pride Week event· Oak Lawn Softball AssOCJation tournament June 30 •IN 19 WEE.'KS: Dallas Ga Pride Wl-ek event; Razzle Dazz.le Dallas, June 30 • IN 21 WEEKS: Democratic National Convention, San Francisco, July 16-19 •/.'\' 23 WEEKS: "Hot Men, Hotlanta," annual rnfl race down Chattahoochee Ri\'er Atlanta. Aug 3-5 •/,'\' 26 WEE.KS: 21 06 Freedom Celebration, Dallas, Aug. 17-19 • /.V 25 WBEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug 19, San Francisco • IN 25 WEEKS: Republican National Convention opens, Dallas, August 20 •IN 26 WEEKS: "Series 8," Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens Memorial Park, Houston, Aug. 26-31 •IN 30 WE'EKS: opening of Texas Freedom Festival, Dallas, Sept. 16-23 •IN 31 WE.'EKS: Texas Freedom Festival event: Human Rights Campaign Fund Dinner, Dallas, Sept. 22 (tentative) BERNIE ANNOUNCEMENTS Bus1NESS OWNERS we, st frN each •Hk in thlS Cl rectory community organ1zahont plua buslnesses aetv1ng as Cl str but on points lo, the STAR e 1nd1cata lhtS st'"9 I I STAR d 1tribut10n polnl COMMERCIAL SPACE FRENCH QUARTER BAR New Orleans establ sned. 35-years on busy street, exce ent location, lucrative low down with some owner t,nancing Contact Fanguy and Associates. (713) 439-1334 DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED STRINGERS WANTED '"The Star'' seeks tree-lance news writers In Austin and Sar,, Antonio for ass,gn• ments Send samples ot your work to Henry McClurg Vorce Pubtrsn,ng 33 t 7 Montrose #306 Houston TX 77006 FOR SALE CONTACT,FANTASY, FUN :,~11:~ro: .. i:~· s~~~-~ ; •1,~; St. New York, NY 1001 t BAR LIGHTING FIXTURES ~rr.::i~y,~tsj f:~:~p,enera Sellctleap GAY BARS AJSTlN e Aust n Al1emaUve S$OO S Congress 442-- 9285 • Baek Street Bases -611 E. 711"1 477 3391 • Boat HOUie< 407 Cotnrado- 474-9667 e Budd1e:I 1301 Lavaca e Ttle Cr0111ng 611 Red R ver ,476-3611 e Otrty Sa ty1 2828 Rio Ciranae- 4781782 GORPLJS CHRISTI Hidden Door 1003 Morgan Av ,882.()183 :.~:r,c~: ~~~~haparral -882-0S10 Sandbar-408 Taylor -884..()277 Zodiac 617 s Staplel 883-n53 EL PASO The Apartment -801 t.Ayrtkt Club Ptga le--4 I 1 E Fr•Nll1n Aw--632.0018 Diamond Ul-308 S Florence -~8332 Le M11Qrd 207~ E San Antonio-646-,9327 Noa Noa 6726 Alameda Av 779-9273 Old Pla ntlttOn 219 $ Ochoa----633-eOM Pet ShOp II -919 Palaano Or --M6-9629 San AntonlO Mining Co-800 E San Anlomo- 546-9903 W'111pera-601 N El Paso-b-4•-6988 i:ic.ALLEN-Butnpers- 1 100 Pecan Dully 1-t 702 N tOtn M• Box -200 N 29th SAN ANGELO Phase 111 2226 Shenl,OOd Way--0.42•9188 SAN ANTONIO-eA. b s Wntemaire--622 Roosewtt 532-0015 e flogarts 115,41 Welt AY .349-7167 Larry's new roommate mui;t be well read. It siws here that they met in a bookstore. •/,',' 11 WE.'EKS: First primary party elections in Texa• and party precinct conventiono. May 5 BERNrE, ~ SO GW.TEFUU. 10 '(OU FOR WORKING aJ lllE St.it:. (,#J I (:,(Jr 'l'OIA S(J,f ETT//NG-? '{EJijl - U{,ff ,M 1-WJ' COOL{) '1W IWlD M6 J. SCREwOOVER. ? ~.MlfitN!6~GolM'r? l "Ero T)U.T ~~ ! •IN 12 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12-Nov. 11 •IN 12 WEEKS: 7th Annual Fund for Human Dignity Dinner, May 14. Plaza Hotel, New York, honoring U.S. Rep. Gerry Studd& (D-Mass.) •IN 13 WEEKS: Texas Senatorial District Party Conventions, May 19 •IN 14 WEEKS: Gay Press Association 4th National Convention, May 25-28, Los e Bonhar Ex " l ' ~ '-1 i Bunhat!' • Cahool> 435 McCarty 344-9257 e Club AltantJS-321 Navarro- 22S--9488 • Club Heads o, Ta s-2526 Cu le bra 436,-4450 e c.rew -309 W M af'il;et 223--0::.33 e EJ Jardin- 106 Navarro- 223-7177 e Faees 119 E Mo- 3'1·'-302 • Galleon )30 Sin Pedro- 225-2353 • W 1 3503 West Av -341 9359 eMadam Arthur 1 '607 N St Mary• 225,-9678 e Noo zoo-10121 Coacnhgnt e ane Night t:ialoon-- 815 Fredericksburg 736- 9942 • Our Ptace 115 Gen Krueger 340-U58 • Per1ect Blend 4326 Gardendale- 699-9631 • Raw Power & ~,ght Co 23 • S San Pedro, 73" 3399 • San Pedro COnr,ec:tton 8.::6 San Pedro- 22:c 0150 • Snutty a Saloon 820 Sin Pedro- Z'i4• n39 e Sunse1 Boulevard 14.JON Main Av ~ e T&Jk ot the Town 3530 Broadway 82EJ.9729 e 20•s Place-2015 San Pedro- 733-3365 ORGANIZATIONS SELECTED NATIONAL ORGAN ZATIONS Gay Press Auoctation POB 33605 Wash ngton DC 200J3.. (202) 387-2430 Gay Righlt Nahonat Lobby-POB 1892 Washington. DC 200,3-- ('202) ~ 1eo1 ~~ R.&~~~Pl~t~':~e 1396 wem- Larnbda Legal 0.f•nM 132 W 4Jtd Nt-w Yo,k NY 10039 (212) $44-948$ Media Fund lor Human Rights fGay Preu AaaociationJ-P09 33605. Wash1ng1on 0C 20033 (202) 387 i 430 Nal ional Associa!IC)tl OI 8US1ness CouncilS Box 15145 San Francisco CA $4115-{4l5) l85-e363 NatlOl'lat Auoctation ol Gay & teebian Oernoerahc Cluba 1742 Man Av SE. Washtng1on. DC 20003 (202) !,47-,3104 Na!IONI Gay Health [ClucabOn FounctaHon--POB 784 N..-YM NY 10036-(212) 563-6.113 01 0, GrNf\befg at (713) 523-5204 National Gey Rights Advocates -s.tl) Castro Sa FranctKO CA 94114 1415) 863-3624 Nationa6 Cay lffl fOfce- -1() Sth Av New Yo,• NY 1'X)11 t:•2) 741 &800 NGH a Cris,altne-(800) 221•7044 (outside New York State) Texas Gay/Lesbian Task Force--POB AK. Denton 76201-(817) 387·6216 AUSTIN-Auslm Lambda- POB 5455. 78763-478-8653 women's coffeehouse 7 • 11 pm Mar 9. 408 W 23rd with shde show .. From Spiral to Spear'' Auslinlesbian/Gay Po~;,=pOB 822. 78767--474-2717: meets 4th Tues., 7pm. Com­missioners Court. Courthouse Annex: Women's Valentine's Dance Feb 17, 9pm-1am. 4700 Grover. AIDS Awareness Week Committee meets 7pm Feb 21. 1022 W 6th: AIDS Aware­ness Week April 1-8 (Janet Zumbrun at «1- 1130) with UT-Austin Gay/Lesbian Student Assoc & AIDS Awarenes, Week Committee educattonal forum Apnl 3, Hilton Hotel party & auction April 7, blood drive April 8 Austin Pride Week Task Force-POB 13303. 78711 meets upstairs 302 W 15th Hill Country Leathermen-c/o Tony R,h-;---PQe 595. Manchaca 78652-244·0261. 288-3088 1st anniversary party Apr 6-7, "Black Ind Btu­ebonnPts •· Back Street Basics. 611 E 7th The Star STAR CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS ADVERTISING RATES Placing a Classified other than a Personals? Read this: • ANNOUNCEMENTS • ACCOMODATIONS • CARS & BIKES • COMMERCIAL SPACE • DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES • EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED • FOR SALE, MISC. • MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS • PETS • SERVICES • TRAVEL RATE: Up to 3 words in bold, $2 each week. Additional regular words 30~ each per week. Minimum charge $3 per week. DEADLINE: 5:30pm Monday for Friday's newspaper. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 issues or longer, pay the full run in advance, and make no copy changes during the full run, and you can deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 issues or longer under the same conditions and you can deduct 25%. CHARGE YOUR AD: All classifieds must be paid In advance OR you can charge your classified to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill-except through your credit card- for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in classifieds to (512) 448- 1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. Placing a • PERSONALS? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words in bold and up to 15 total words, FREE. (Additional words beyond 15 per week are 30¢ each.) FREE PERSONALS apply only to individuals. No commercial services or products for sale. HOW LONG? A Free Personal can be placed for one, two or three weeks at a time-but no longer without re-submitting the form. BLIND BOX NUMBER: If you want secrecy, we'll assign you a Blind Box Number. The answers to your ad will be sent to us and we will then confiden­tially forward the replies to you. Rate is $3 for each issue the ad runs but replies will be forwarded as long as they come in. ANSWERING A BLIND BOX NUMBER: Address your reply to the Blind Box Number, c/o The Star, Voice Publishing, 3317 Montrose no.306, Houston, TX 77006. Enclose no money. Your letter will be forwarded unopened and confidentially to the advertiser. CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD: All charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box charges must be paid in advance OR you can charge to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill­except through your credit card- for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone In Clas­sifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. The Free offer does not apply to Person­als phoned in. You will be charged the same rate as other types of Classifieds. (up to 3 normal-size words in bold capitals) (free or 30¢/word) ___ _ (free or 30¢/word) ___ _ (30¢/word) ___ _ (30¢/word) ___ _ (30¢/word) ___ _ bold headline at $2 __ _ __ words at 30¢ each ___ _ Blind Box at $3 per issue ___ _ Total ---- times ........ weeks ___ _ (use additional paper If necessary) Name Address ______________ _ Amount enclosed ____________ _ (D check o money order, o cash in person o VISA charge o MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card: # ______________ exp date ___ _ Mail to The Star, c/o Voice Publishing, 3317 Montrose no.306, Houston, TX 77006 ~=:c==.:::====.c===,::===== FEB.17, 1984/ THESTAA 11 CORPUS CHRJSTI-Gay Bartenders Associat1on-cI0 Zodiac SAN ANTONIO-Lounge. 617 Staptes-883-7753 e Sogarts-11541 West Av-349--7167 Metropoh!an Community Church-c/o Umtar- • Ctrcles-107 w Locusl-733--5237 ,an Church. 3125 Home Rd-851-9698 meets 5pm Sundays SAN ANTON/0- ~:,~o#~a'i;~;~~~~rl~~ Ter,ell SERVICES, ETC. Dignity-349--3632: meets Sun 5pm. St Patncks Church, 1-35 near New Braunfels & P,ne Gay Switchboard-733--7300 Integrity/SA-PCB 15006. 78212-734-0759 meets 1st & 3rd Thurs Lambda AA-1312 Wyoming-674-2819 Lesbian & Gay Peoplem Med1c1ne-Box 290043, 78280 Rockin' A R1ders--c/o Our Place. 115 Gen Krueger-340-1758 SA Gay Alliance-Box 12063, 78212-733·8315 PERSONALS GWM, 29, 6'1", brn/brn, seeks sincere person to build lifetime relationship. POB 2574. Austin 78768 SEEKING FRIEND/LOVER Me-W1M, 5'9" 150, 42. hairy, V9rsatile You-under 40. smooth. slim body Skip 512/828-8481. • PRIVATE GAY CLUBS Ausr,N-ic1- ub Aust~rl~Baths-308 w 16th -476-7986 SAN ANTONIO--- e Club San Anlomo-1802 N Main Av· •735-2467 9 Ex9Cu11v4,-Health Club· 723 Av s-=225-8807 RESTAURANTS, CAFES AUSTIN----- --- e Th,ngum Bob. Esq Eatery-607 Red R,ver- 472-8783 By Tycho AUSTIN-Gay Community Star, Austin-448-1380 SAN ANTONfO-Amer1can Male (ha,r replacements)-3438 N St Marys-736-9678 Gay eommun1ty Staf. San Anton,o-737-0087 Th,nk Ahead Ha.rcutters-5247 McCullough- 824·9862 v.iia" Monte Carlo-N St Marys al Mulberry- 736-9698 SHOPS & STORES AUSTIN-e Book Woman-324 E 16th-472•2785 e wax Altack Records~ E ith-473-8313 e w0f~E-6ih=474-cs11 SAN A.NTONIO-e On Main-2514 N Main-737-2323 e Hog Wild Aecords-1824 N Main-733-5354 • AeC0rd Hole~, Sin Ped~o-349~ 1367 i stnng of Pearls Vlfl18ge Clothing-1803 N Ma,n-733-1433 ev,deo World-1802 N Main-736-9927 e Ke-vin Wagner Carel~ & G,tts 1801 N Main- 733-3555 TRAVEL EL RANCHO VISTA Experience that special charm found only at a guest house. Spend the weekend an the country POB 245. Glen Rose. TX 76043 (817) 897-4982 TRAVEL GROUP LEADERS Consult us lirst about your group needs Vanous fares and rules may permit you to tavel free Travel Consultants. 1-800-392- 5193 Fortunes For Friday. February 10. 1984. through Thursday. February 16. 1984 ARIES-If a wish is a dream your heart makes, why not share your dream with your heart's desire? You're a bit overwhelmed with dreaminess this month. Be specific with your specific someone, and watch the whole world change fo r the better. TAURUS-While all that working-out has been good for you, there have been points along the way when you've been all "worked out." Try to keep a balance between effort and relaxation to achieve the perfection you're after Your helpmate is there for those relaxing times GEMINI-You're thinking about doing some travelling. and if you're really smart. you'll include some business along the way. You could make some very good contacts and make your fun tax-deductible while you satisfy your wanderlust! Start packing' CANCER-A man who ,s close to you (possibly a relative) needs your help very much. In answering a plea for assistance. be giving, but know where to draw the line. Give gladly, but not at the expense of everything else in your life. Promise only what you can be sure of. LEO- The tension you've been bu1ld1ng needs to find release. Use any method that is safe to take the clamps off. Everyone has a limit, so don't push past what you know is yours. Relief from outside comes in a very short time, but this week is the one that you have to be good to yourself VIRGO- While you've always had a penchant for being organized, this is one of those times when your ability to bring all the details together can result in accomplishing exactly what you set out to do. You won't miss a thing, and you'll even gain more than you imagined you could. LIBRA-What was lustful and passionate and lots of fun has turned onto something that you weren't expecting at all-love. What you could do with this surprising turn of events might change all sorts of things in your life. Don't deny it. Let it out and let ,ton! SCORPIO-Scorpios have a more direct knowledge of what power 1s than any other sign. What they do with that knowledge vanes extremely Now is one of those times when you can use your knowledge ,n a practical and magical way An Anes or a Sag,ttarius could be a very helpful ally SAGITTARIUS-A much-needed long-distance conversation or a beautifully written letter may come now Though possibly not from an expected source. that can make ,ts effect even more profound. It will assist you in your process of getting rid of excess baggage. CAPRICORN-First. it was your turn to make a commitment. then fate took a turn. Now the ball is on the other person·s court. and that's where the final decision comes from. You've done all you can about this. Que sera. sera-and you'll know next week. AQUARIUS-Your confusion slows and comes to a near halt. The excellence of your intelligence pierces through all the S.S. thafs around and allows you a vista of what's ahead. Though details remain to put together it looks like you're clear of weirdness for a whole PISCES-Yes you are very sexy Yes. you have a direct lone to what's really going on, and yes. your dreams are coming true, right before your eyes And yes. you might grow complacent and yes. you can become too arrogant. Even with your 1ncred1ble good fortune. you can blow 1I. Careful' 1984 STONEWAL1. FEATU~ES SV""OIC.ATE 12 THE STAR / FEB, 17, 1984 AUSTIN'S NEW BEER BUST AND T-DANCE OCO T Time: Every Monday, 6pm Place: Back Street Basics, on the patio Bartender: Bobby D.J.: Richard BE THERE BACKSTREET BASICS
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