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The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984
File 005
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The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984 - File 005. 1984-01-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2158/show/2153.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1984-01-06). The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984 - File 005. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2158/show/2153

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984 - File 005, 1984-01-06, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2158/show/2153.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date January 6, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript 4 The Star / Jan. 6,1984 didn't know about drag until I came out— but the books I did read as a kid told me that gay people were unhealthy psychot- ics, child molesters and—worse— miserable all the time. I knew I wasn't like that, but it took me time to get rid of the idea that maybe the others were. My own coming out was hell, and I mean that literally. You said you were in seminary; I presume that means no one knew you were gay? In a sense, I didn't even know. I just knew I liked guys, and most of my friends did too. The seminary screwed me up so bad that while I was there, I never tried to make it with anyone I was really attracted to. I figure they were somehow more noble or something, so I only made passes at people I wasn't crazy about. If that sounds sick, it was. I don't ever want any other high-school-aged person to go through that kind of crap. In one way, the kids now have it easier than I did. They know there's a a gay community out there. They know that they're not alone in the world. Still, I've given lots of talks in high schools, I've worked crisis hotlines, and I think it will always be hard for kids to come to grips with their own sexuality, at least as long as we live in a country where people bitch about giving kids basic sexual and biological information. In addition to that, it's still hard for young gay men and women to meet other people. I once put up a 17-year-old young man for a few days until we could find him a permanent shelter. He'd been beaten by his father because he was gay. I've seen kids tormented almost to suicide—and sometimes literally to it—by their peer groups and often with the implied consent of the adults in charge. There's a lot of pain still out there. Maybe I'm a dreamer, but I'd like to help some of the kids there realize they they can be gay without having to give up their dreams and goals and loves. Are you telling gay kids to stay in their closets then? Hell no! I've also seen the other side. I've seen people 16,17 or so who are out and the happy, whole people they should be. I would never say don't come out. I also don't know if I personally would have the guts to tell the whole school, but I would tell my friends. I wish to God I could have come out in high school. Years after I left there and had dealt with my own hangups, I wrote people I had known there— my best friends—and found out that many of them were also gay. I even found out that the best friend I had in grammar / sometimes think it's self-hatred by gay people that keeps many of them from learning to defend themselves. school back in Somerville, Mass., a guy I fantasized about for years, was gay too. What a waste , and I don't mean only sexually. There was so much caring and living that was lost, or if not lost, at least not lived to its fullest. You 've got a second-degree black belt in Kung Fu San Soo. Has that given you more confidence in beingout in the public, knowing that fag-bashers may have a hard time with you? You better believe it. I didn't originally get into the art thinking about that, but while I was the GSU co-ordinator, I was subject to verbal and mild physical abuse on occasion. I vowed that no one, I repeat no one, was ever going to hurt me or someone I cared for without me doing my best to stop them. It may sound cruel or nasty, but I really think the only time fag-bashing is 115 Gen, grneger, S.A., 340-1758 = "Best in m Country Sounds" ■ SPECIALS MONDAY- H THURSDAY 8-10^1 Monday 751 Longnecks Tuesday 30$ Ponies Wednesday $1 Margaritas & Screwdrivers Thursday $1 Call Drinks ®t T^l^ScaSEC. * ..nV^aaa^aOKSJtRBS^ |P ^3JR IW 'iMIWl lUl % %~ ifrHi mil HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 2-7pm fPfiffi^illiiiif Draft 50$ Longnecks 75$ (Lowenbrau not included) Bar Drinks $100. SISTER BAR TO SNUFFY'S ^ going to stop is when we send the basher home on a stretcher. I'm not a cruel person, but I think I'm simply being realistic. In most situations, the police aren't there to protect you; in some, even when they are, it doesn't make any difference. I think everyone of us , and I don't only mean gay people, is responsible to himself. Many times just the way you carry yourself is enough to stop any hassle. One night my friend, also a black belt, and I were being harassed outside a bar. The punks were in a truck and couldn't understand why we weren't running. One kept coming, opening the door, stepping down as if to spook us, then jumped back inside when he found we simply waited for him. They left without incident. Just a few weeks ago though, this same friend and his lover, a green belt, were juumpedin Los Angeles by five guys out to kill them. My friend got a black eye; ofthe five, one went to the hospital minus an eye, the others were severely damaged enough that the police had no problem arresting them. Fighting is not pretty, but it's unfortunately necessary. I sometimes think it's self-hatred by gay people that keeps many of them from learing to defend themselves. It's almost as if they say I really deserve to be hurt. Overall, kung fu has meant a lot to me, and I really do love the art. At one point I was volunteering my time to teach a self- defense class for gay people in Los Angels, and I am seriously considering doing so again. How do the people at the kungfu school deal with your being gay? It's funny. I was out openly everywhere except there until two years ago. I didn't want to have to prove my "masculinity" every night. When I started to mention it to people, all I got was boredom on their part. They all knew. Actually, that's not quite true—one guy was a pain in the ass but that's since been straightened out. One reason I made Neil a fighter is because I wanted to have the reader realize gay people can have any interest, and that they can be good at anything they want to. I'd like for Neil and Paul to be role models. I don't say that with any inflated sense of self-importance. I merely mean that I think they're a lot more healthily integrated characters than many in young adult fiction who are gay. At least neither races off and does himself in—or is conveniently killed so the nongay character can tell you how great his pal was. Before any other of those authors write me nasty notes, I am aware that in some cases the original manuscript wasn't like that, and that the changes were made at the publisher's insistence, but that doesn't negate the eixsting fact. Now that "A 11-Americans Boys" is out, would you like to see CBS or someone pick up and do a screen version ? Hell yes! And if anyone is listening, I know just the guy to play Neil (and I don't mean me). There are so many gay actors in the theater, I'd love to see an openly gay one do the role, but again, at the moment it's only a dream. When you came out, were your parents as rabidly homophobic as Paul's or as understanding as Neil's? Neither. They were somewhere in the middle. There was a tense period of a few years that has long since mellowed out. Overall, my family's been great. In fact, at one point a few years back, my sister yanked me aside and in mock anger berated me in front of my date for always having better looking partners than she did. Is there anything you'd like to say in closing? Only that despite the work, I had a lot of fun writing the book. I didn't worry about political correctness or anything else. I simply wanted to write an entertaining story, one that hopefully people will enjoy more than once. I'm just vain enough to think I've succeeded. This interview was prepared by Alyson Publications, which has a commercial intercut in tht- subject mutter k 2ND ANNUAL JANUARY WHITE SALE all white bar liquor drinks *ioo m$& DURING JANUARY 2828 Rio Grande @ 29th Open 8a.m. daily Austin, TX 478-8782 with Happy hour
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