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The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984
File 004
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The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984 - File 004. 1984-01-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2158/show/2152.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1984-01-06). The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984 - File 004. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2158/show/2152

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984 - File 004, 1984-01-06, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2158/show/2152.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date January 6, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript Jan. 6,1984 /The Star 3 Gay Author Addresses Career, Early Years Books By Sasha Alyson In his new book All-American Boys, Frank Mosca tells the story of a teenage love affair between two boys that should have been simple—but wasn't. The book raises some timely issues: about self- defense for gay people, about role models, and about how hard it can be for a young author with something to say to get published. In a recent interview, Mosca dis- cussed these subjects. How do you get started writing? I've always enjoyed writing ever since grade school. In college, I took the usual writing seminars and courses, in addition to my major in biology, and during the same period, I had a column in the American Racing Pigeon News. However, it wasn't until after college, when I attended a writing-for-market class sponsored by one of the local cities' recreation departments, that I began to consider myself a writer. The woman who taught that class Texas Minister Combats Sneezes When Texas minister Dale Hunt says "God bless you," it has a special meaning. The Detroit News reports that he's replaced sneezes with Jesus in a special room of his Fort Worth church built to accomodate victims of severe allergies. Worshippers sit on plain metal chairs in an uncarpeted, undraped room which is preheated to avoid reactions to natural gas. Scented cosmetics are banned, and Hunt makes sure he wears a freshly cleaned suit. He says he gets up to 20 people a week at his ecumenical service. "They cling together because they have a common medical problem" Hunt says. But not too closely—it might set off an allergic reaction. showed me more about marketing my materials in four weeks than I had learned in all my schooling before. I won't say I started to sell immediately—I didn't—but at least I knew how to do so now, and I began getting encouraging comments from the editors. That kept me going and so did my friends. They wouldn't let me quit. I love them all dearly for that and umpteen other things. I also went to the library and grabbed the books I remembered as being the best I'd read. I have about six favorite authors. I took those books home and read them critically, trying to figure out why they were good. In two cases, I wrote the authors and received marvelous replies and advice. In addition, I went to a school for script writing and trained in that. I figure a person should know as much as possible in his field, and if I wanted to write, I should do everything I could. Is All-American Boys your first published work? It's my first book. Right now the only other thing I've gotten published is a short story, The Last Lifeguard, in the October '82 Mandate. I wrote that as an exercise for myself: I wanted to see if I could write a piece with some humor and humanity in addition to the sexual content. I'm now working on a sequal to All-American Boys. In it, I'm planning to deal with AIDS and the reaction of family and friends to the disease. I am also working on a screenplay. An agent with one ofthe high-powered agencies in Hollywood has seen some of my stuff, and she liked it well enough to ask to see more. How hard was it to get this book published? Let's just say my records show I sent it out nine times before I found a publisher w tiling tn handle it. I got some nice com mentsfrom most of the others, but they all felt it wasn't right for them. One of the Austin Soap By Tututu Divine Houston the word is he was injured in a skiing accident. Is there another story in Dallas we should know about?? Closings and Flashings Daisy Dauber, where is my Weller and water? Signed. Jim Smith. — o— I know this is old news, since Quenton has been telling everyone that The Private Cellar closed its doors New Year's morning What's this we hear about a new location? — O — I heard Christine flashed two Mac truckers in Dallas a while back. C'mon, Christine, can we talk? — D — Lambda is having a Movie Marathon Jan. 13— 14 at the Congregational Church, 23rd and San Antonio. Some of the features are La Cage Aux Folles, Personal Best, On Golden Pond and Victor, Victoria. Donations at the door —o— From the bar in the suburbs known to some as "Boathouse North" aka Dirty Sally's, special thanks to the Boathouse and the Crossing for furnishing their employee's for the evening of Sally's employee's Christmas party, — D — Is it true the manager of Austin's number one cruise bar dropped $100 at Backstreet Basics on New Year's Day? Does that tell you what kind of New Year's Eve he had7 —o — What Austin bartender had fun and frolic in a U-haul on his way back from San Francisco during the holidays, and that's with no shower? Did you have a towel? — □— What's more important to a Houston bar owner, his bar or a new fur coat? — D — Speaking of bar owners, we heard Preston Porter was laid up on his back after his truck got plowed into. Of course, we heard that about Preston before he was injured. Of course, in San Antonio Soap By Helen Dish Who is the Lover-On-A-Leash? Darrell is the hot new bartender we've been seeing at The Crew lately. Drop by and say hello. San Pedro will soon be the home of a new club with a dance bar downstairs and a cruise bar upstairs. Their location is a closely held secret, but I will say that it is located next to Snuffy's Saloon. — D — Don't forget the retreat for SAGA Jan. 21 & 27 at the Guadalupe River Ranch. —□— Hog Wild has an interesting bronze plaque on their front, starting with an arrow pointing north, "To North Pole—4189 miles," Why7 — D — TORA will be meeting this Sunday at 2:30 at Snuffy's. — D — Who is the new lover-on-leash running around S.A. Town with Ms. L.J. OUT with '83 and in with '84? — D — Rumors abound about the Gay Community Center, and it is still in the works. People are working together towards its formation —a— Cahoots was closed this past Mon & Tues because the employees were in need of recuperation'? . . Frank Mosca, gay author, is also a racing pigeon enthusiast most disappointing times was when I showed the manuscript to a woman working with a film production company in Los Angeles. She liked it and sent it to CBS, New York, for possible production as an Afterschool Special for kids, CBS like it, but this was the period when the Moral Majority and others were screaming about Tony Randall's gay character on Love, Sidney. They returned the script. Quite honestly, at that point I got depressed and, like a fool, I stuck the manuscript in my drawer for six months before I Bent it out again. Thankfully, I got over that piece of stupidity and hopefully will never repeat it. Why did you choose to write a work about high-school-aged characters? At the time I started the book, I went to Books in Print and checked all the books on homosexuality that had been written for young adults. The common thread was that they were told from the viewpoint of the sympathetic nongay friend. I thought it was about time a gay person told his own story. I went the young adult route because it's an important age and one where important questions are asked. I hoped to answer a few of them. Alao, a friend told me that youngadultpublishers were into "real life concerns," and I won.I stand a chance of being published tht re that I might not otherwise. Is this book heavily autobiographical' No. Writers are always told to write about what they know. When they do, people says it's autobiographical. In the sense that everything I write is filtered through my own perceptions of reality, then, of course, it is. Rut hell, I didn't even attend a public high school. I was at a private Catholic minor seminary in Holliston, Mass. I wanted to be a missionary priest. I didn't even come out until I was 21 and a junior in college. My own coming out was hell, and I mean that literally. I had to deal with all the guilt trips the seimnary had left on me. Once one of the guys was thrown out for being gay and we were all talked to and we were told that he had ruined his life and would never be happy. Immediately after that, we were each hauled before the rector and grilled as to whether we had made it with him. As I remember, I admitted that I had because he'd already given my name, but I denied everyone else they asked me about. It wasn't until I got involved with the Gay Student Union at the Claremont College in 1972 that I met openly gay people. They were the greatest. I still remember my first party about a month after I met them. I sat in the corner of the room and watched. They thought I was bored, and I didn't know how to explain I was almost in tears because I saw men dancing with men and women with women, and it was beautiful. It was as if I'd been kept outside a pastry shop my whole life half-starved, and suddenly one night they opened the door and said it's all for you. Those people helped me to see the beauty in myself and in the others around me. They also were politically active, and I liked that and joined in when I saw the garbage we were being forced to swallow even on a supposedly liberal college campus. I wound up by being the co-ordinator for the GSU for two years and was actively involved in many ofthe early Californian student projects around the state. There's a scene in my book where Neil finds out Paul is gay. and he's shocked. Today it's no revelation to know that gay people are everywhere—thankfully we're making ourselves known—but I was like Neil at the beginning. I'd meet people and say, "You're gay'" I won't say I thought they were all supposed to be in dresses—I
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