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The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984
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The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984 - File 001. 1984-01-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2158/show/2149.

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(1984-01-06). The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2158/show/2149

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984 - File 001, 1984-01-06, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2158/show/2149.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 5, January 6, 1984
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date January 6, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Meet Frank Mosca second Degree Black Belt Karate Expert, Racing Pigeon Enthusiast, and Author of the Gay Novel '~II-American Boys" Interviewed THE STAR AUSTIN * SAN ANTONIO Jan. 6, 1984 • Issue .5 o Published Every Other Friday Feminist, Gay Rights Activist Date Set for San Antonio Gay Sonia Johnson Coming to Austin Alliance Awards Banquet Noted feminist and gay rights advocate Sonia Johnson, a fifth generation Mor­mon wife and mother of four, will be com­ing to Austin, Mon. and Tues., Jan. 30 and 31, to make TV and radio appearances, and an addreBS is tentatively set for the ballroom at the Texas Union, UT campus, Monday evening at 7:00 p.m. J,'rom a traditionally chauvinist house-hold, she suddenly saw the anti-women aspect of her life jlnd the Mormon church and started campaigning for the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment, which resulted in her excommunication from her church and divorce by her husband. Hurt, but not daunted by these traumatic events, Johnson has become one of Ameri• a' mo~t Pll Ri..onatr. dvpc te pf women's r ights and the rights of gays. SAGA, the San Antonio Gay Alliance, is soliciting nominees for its Third Annual Awards Banquet to be held February 12. The event will honor lesbian and gay achievements in the San Antonio area. The SAGA Awards Committee is requesting that awards nomination, be i.b "t r , that all nominations can receive sufficient consideration. Nominations should include the nominee's full name and mail­ing addres,;, and a brief de,,cription of the person's achievements in 1983, or an out­line of his continuing long service to the community. Award should be mailed to: Award Nomination, c o San Antonio · Alli xl an Antonio, TX 78212. John Glenn No Longer the 'Right Stuff' for Gay Community Acknowledging that discrimination exists against gay men and women and by stating that he wishes to do nothing about it, Presidential hopeful, former astronaut and current Senator John Glenn (D.-Ohio) no longer has the right stuff as far as the gay community is concerned. And feeling as he does, Glenn even lost his campaign manager for the State of New York, State Sena­tor Manfred Ohrenstein, whose district includes one of the largest gay consti­tuencies in the nation. Glenn met with members of the National Gay Task Force (NGTF), the National Association of Gay and Let!­bian Democratic Clubs and six leaders of the New York City gay community on Dec. 13, reports the NGTF newslet­ter. The meeting, arranged through the offices of campaign chairman Ohren• stein, came six weeks after the candi­date had expreased his opposition to the federal gay/ lesbian civil rights bill in response to a question from an NGTF representative at a New York forum. After the meeting, NGTF Execu­tive Director Virginia M. Apuzzo and Peter Vogel, Co-Chair of the National Association of Gay and Lesbian Demo­cratic Clubs, a88erted that Glenn "remained intransigent" on issues of special concern to the lesbian/gay com• munity. The meeting, which lasted for over an hour, did not center around the civil rights bill ai; a "litmus test," but rather addressed a broad spectrum of issues mntinul'd pagl' 5 2 THE STAR/ JAN 6, 1984 Texas Live The Mustang Band Plans to Fill the Dance Floor at Snuffy's By Billie Duncan They re known as the pickers who pluck to please the kickers. They can fill a dance floor faster than a cowboy can empty a longneck. They are the Mustang Band, and they play this weekend at Snuffy's in San Anto­nio. Home for the band is in Houston where they are the house band for the Brazos River Bottom. As such, they have played backup for many guests. On New Year's Eve they formed the musical spine for the singing of Grand Ole Opry star, David Houston (remember "Alm08t Persuaded" and hlS duet with Tammy Wynette, "My Elusive Dreams?") When David and his manager, Tillman Franks (another name from the Opry) were leaving the club, they told the band that they were the best backup band they had ever had That opinion is shared by many. How­ever, they are more than a backup for itin­rant country singers. The Mustang Band 1s a name in and of itself. About three years ago, the band was simply known as a "local" band, a title that somehow has the connotation that if they really were good, they wold not be local Leader Tom Groves decided to put the band to the test and took them on a national tour It was a national tour with a difference. "The bars we played," explamed Tom, "were 99 and 44 1()() per• cent gay" Besides Tom Groves, who plays guitar, the band consists of Terry LaMont on lead guitar, Russell Lewandowski on key• boards Robert Badolato on bass and the mcredible Rohm LeNorman on drums Rohm may be m the background as far as seating on the stage, but his gutsy drumrrung Is a deeded plus for the entire sound of the band. He 1s at home in rock as he 1s in country and he has a great versitil- 1ty when 1t comes to playing songs in dif• ferent styles than the original recording. Besides all that, he is fun to look at. Actually, the whole band is quite attrac­tive Maybe being good-looking is not a prerequ1&1te for bemg a good musician, but THE STAR ed AUii San A IOl'UO and Cotpua C • Published every other Fnday 3008-A Burleson Road Austin, TX 78741 Phone Austin (512) 448-1380 San Antonio (512) 737-0087 Montroae Voace Publ•t.ng Co C RCU.ATION ni. Slat • 000 copl• ... _'Y ._.ontrOM Vote• (HOullon) 11000 copi• Wffkly Dalla Gay New>. MOO a,--ly total TPHe .,c. ... -19, 0y00_ c,o,p.•. .w eekly avg 3311 uontt'oM Blvd. ooe. Houston. rx 77005. (713) $&-0921 Contei,ts copyright c1993 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Hei,ry McC urg pub/,.,_, Ed Marl nez ,,,.,,-r; geo or Lyt Harns e.rKU • .oterto g 1,,ecror Mark Drago S •r •"'wt• g d rector Acel C ark Mt director Jell Bray IJ'IIPIWQ Sonny Dav11 occour, g Jhmt»r Gay Presa Anodahon N..,, s~ ees ternaucnaJ G.ly Newt Agency Pac fie News - Larry a .... Wa,.,,glcn. 0 CI Synd gt«! FHtuteS.,V,c., & Wrlf1ts Jeffrey Wilson, Randy A rrec:1 Stonawa Featurn Syndicate. Brian McNaught Jo• BPor POSTMASTER Send addrNS COITIC1f0,. lo 33, 7 ~Ord:rOH 1306. Houston TX 7700e Subacr'Pbon r.ie In US III Na/ed ff'Weloo,, S49 per year (52 tuua S29pe,1t.monthl:2fl1111.JHJ orSt2Spe,week less than 2& ll1un Back .,,.... S2.00 eadt National ~•,ng c,rNenlalwe Joe D&bate. RiVendt Matketa,g. &ee $th Avenue New Yo,k 10011 (21Z) 242-,U,63 Athetf ftM!I. ._ ever; othef Tuese!ay 5:30pm, to, -.sue •-lo- g Fliday-"'ll Not • oMIN ,..,., LOQllaOv-en,smgra•eacheduleOnewas -elf...,._ Nov I Illa:! -- n-g., Tom Grotes of the Mustang Band plans to pluck for dancing feet at Snufly's m San Antonio this u·e1 "end it certainly is nice to have something plea­sant to look at while you are listening to the music they put out. If there is one fault of the band, it is that they do not include the audience much in their show. Not that they really need to. Face it, most people who go out to a coun• try western bar are out for just one thing, Dancing. Okay, maybe two things, three if you include drinking. But dancing is way up on the list. And the Mustang Band c-an play to please most dancing feet. Included m their repertoire are polkas, waltzes, two-steps and the all-powerful Cotton-Eyed Joe. They can even get down on some real down-home blues. San Antonio, get out those boots and hats and mosey on down to Snuffy's. The Mustang Band is ready to get you on the country western dance floor. The Mustang Band discovered there was a large world of gay country western fans out there, and the rest of the country discovered the Mustang Band. Some ot the cities they played were Oklahoma City . Tulsa, Fort Smith, Little Rock, Atlanta, Mobile, New Orleans and Nashville. In Nashville, where Tom had managed to get a one-night stand for the band, they \\ent over so well that they were held o,·er for three more nights. • One or the funniest bars," said Tom "was m Mobile. They only had room for RO people, eo the people had to form a line to tip!' They aleo toured the west coast. hitting Phoenix, Los Angeles, the Gay Rodeo in Reno and the Sands Casino. How about that! At the Reno Gay Rodeo, they were such a smash that they have been invited back ever since. Their drummer on that first tour was none other than Ron Weaver, who went on to be the owner of guess which bar in San Antonio? That's right. Snuffy's! Ron still sits in with the band when they make their visits to San Antonio and sings at least a song or two. He was the original drummer with the band, Now, once again, the Mustang Band is in the process of evaluating their future. ''We'll probably do another tour, but not until next summmer," said Tom. Austin Women Artists Hold Exhibition in Dallas Women and Their Work, Inc., a multi­disciplinary arts organization based in Austin, will hold an exhibition of paint• ings and photography in two separate shows during January in Dallas. An D: Austin Women Artists in Dallas, an exhibition selected by Laura Carpenter of the Delahunty Gallery, will be on dis­play at 2917 Swiss Ave. from Jan. 5-17 in the D-Art Visual Arts Center It will open "1th n rl'<'eption on Thursday. Jan. 5, from 5:30-8 p.m. Included are works by Snnta Barraza, Ann Chamberlin, Janet Engle Kastner, Carol Ivey, Carol Rabel, Claudia Reese, Vicki Teague-Cooper, Susan Wal• lace, Ellen Wallenstein. Laurie Weller and Susan Whyne. The Ties That Bind: Photographers Por• tray the Family, is the second exhibit in the Bath House Cultural Center on White RO<'k Lake from Jan. 5-31. Photographic works by Gay Block, Keith Carter, Ron F.vans Suzanne Pnul, Alan Pogue, Bar­bra Riley, JamC'e Rubin and Wendy Watnss nre featured. There will he an opening reception on Saturday, Jan 7, from 6-1! p.m, JAN. 6, 1984 / THE STAR 3 Gay Author Addresses Career, Early Years Books By Sasha Alyson In his new book All-American Boys, Frank Mosca tells the story of a teenage love affair between two boys that should have been simple-but wasn't. The book raises some timely issues: about self• defense for gay people, about role models, and about how hard it can be for a young author with something to say to get pub• lished. In a recent interview, Mosca dis­cussl'd these su bjecta. Hou do yuu get started writml(t l'vl' always enjoyed writing ever Hince grade school. In college, I took the usual writing seminars and courses, in addition to my major in biology, and dunng the sam1• 1>1·riod, I had a column in theAmrri• can Racing Pigeon Neu•s, However, it wasn ·t until after college, when I attended a writing-for-market class sponsored by one of the local cities' recreation depart• ments, that I began to consider myself a wnter. The woman who taught that class Texas Minister Combats Sneezes When Texas minister Dale Hunt says "God bless you," it has a special meaning. The Detroit News reports that he's replaced sneezes with Jesus in a special room of his Fort Worth church built to accomodate victims of severe allergies. Worshippers sit on plain metal chairs in an uncarpeted, undraped room which is preheatro to avoid reactions to natural gas. Scented cosmetics are banned, and Hunt makes sure he wears a freshly cleaned suit. He says he getH up to 20 peo• pie a Wl'f'k at his ecumenical service. "They cling together because they have a common medical problem" Hunt says. Rut not tou cloaely-11 might aet off an allergic reaction. Austin Soap By Tututu Divine Closings and Flashings Daisy Dauber. where ,s my Weller and water? Signed, Jim Smith. - o- 1 know this ,s old news. sonce Quanton has been telling everyone that The Private Cellar closed ots doors New Year's morning What's th,s we hear about a new location? -c-l heard Christine flashed two Mac truckers on Dallas a whole back c·mon, Chrost,ne. can we talk? -o- Lambda ,shaving a Movie Marathon Jan. 13- 14 at the Congregational Church. 23rd and San Antonio. Some of the features are La Cage Aux Foiles, Personal Best, On Golden Pond and Victor, Victona. Donations at the door -o- From the bar on the suburbs known to some as "Boathouse North" aka Dirty Sally's, special thanks to the Boathouse and the Crossing for fumoshong their employee's for the evening of Sally's employee's Chrostmas party -e-ls 11 true the manager of Austin's number one cruise bar dropped $100 at Bac:k• trfft BHICI on New Year's Dey? Does that tell you what kond of New Year's Eve he had? -o- What Auston bartender had fun and frolic on a U-haul on his way back from San Francisco durong the holodays. and that's w,th no shower? Dod you have a towel? -o- What's more important to a Houston bar owner, hos bar or a new fur coat? - o- Speakong of bar owners. we heard Pre•ton Por­ter was laid up on hos back after hos truck got plowed Into Of course we heard that about Preston before he was lnJured Of course. 1n showed me more about marketing my materials in four weeks than I had learned in all my schooling before. I won't say I started to sell immediately-I didn't-but at least I knew how to do so now, and I began getting encouraging comment.~ from the editors. That kept me going and so did my friends. They wouldn't let me quit. I love them all dearly for that and umpteen other things. I also went to the library and grabbed the books I remembered &fi being the be,t I'd read. I have about six favorite authors. I took those books home and read them critically, trying to figure out why they were good. In two cases, I wrote the authors and received marvelous replies and advice. In addition, l went to a school for script writing and trained m that. I figure a J)('r­son should know as much as possible in his field. and if I wanted to write, I should do everything I could. Is All-American Boys your first pub lishcd work? It's my first book. Right now the only other thing I've gotten published is a short story, The Last Lifeguard, in the October '82 Mandate I wrote that as an exerci8e for myself; I wanted to see if I could write a piece with some humor and humanity in addition to the sexual content. I'm now working on a sequal to All-American Boys. In it, I'm planning to deal with AIDS and the reaction of family and friends to the disease. I am also working on a screenplay. An agent with one of the high-powered agencies in Hollywood has seen some of my stuff, and she liked it well enough to ask to see more. Hou• hard u·as it to get th,s book pub lished? Let's just say m) records ,;how I sent it out nine times before I found a publisher willing to ha ndle it I got some nice com•~·•----'-~L­m,• nts from most ofth,• others, but they all felt it wasn't right for them. One of the Houston the word ,s he was Injured on a skiing accident Is there another story on Dallas we should know about?? San Antonio Soap By Helen Dish Who is the Lover-On-A-Leash? Darrell ,s the hot new bartender we·ve been seeing at The Crew lately Drop by and say hello. -o- San Pedro will soon be the home of a new club with a dance bar downstairs and a cruise bar upstairs. Their location ,s a closely held secret. but I wlll say that ot is located next to Snuffy'• Saloon. -o- Don't forget the retreat for SAGA Jan 21 & 27 at the Guadalupe River Ranch. -o- Hog WIid has an 1nterest1ng bronze plaque on their front. starting with an arrow pointing north, 'To North Pole-4189 moles· Why? -o- TORA wolf be meeting th,s Sunday at 2:30 at Snuffy's. -o- Who ,s the new lover-on-leash running around SA Town with Ms LJ OUT with '83 and in with 84? - o- Rumors abound about the Gay Community Center. and ,t ,s still on the works People are working together towards ,ts formation -o- Cahoot• was closed this past Mon & Tues because the employees were on need of recup­erat, on1? Frank '11osca, gay author, is also a racing pigeon enthu,;iast most disappointing times was when I showed the manuscript to a woman work• ing with a film production company in Los Angeles. She liked it and sent it to CBS, New York, for possible production as an Afterschool Special for kids. CBS like it, but this was the period when the Moral MaJority and others were screaming about Tony Randall's gay character on Laue, Sidney. They returned the cript Quite honebtly, at that point I got depressed and, like a fool, I stuck the manuscript in my draw~r for six months before I sent it out again. Thankfully. I got over that piece of stupidity and hopefully will never repeat it. Why d,d you choo_.e to write a work about high-school-aged characters? At the time I started the book, I went to Books ,n Print and checked all the books on homosexuality that had been written for young adults. The common thread was that they were told from the viewpoint of the sympathetic nongay friend. I thought it was about time a gay person told his own story. I went the young adult route because it's an important age and one where important questions are asked. I hoped to answer a few of them. Also. a friend told me that young adult publishers were into "real life conttrns.'' and I wo, I stand a chance of being publi8hed th, r, that I might not otherwise ls th,., book heavily autob10graph1cal' No. Writers are always told to write about what they know When they do, pro­pie ~ays it'~ autobiographical. In thest'nse that everything I write is filterro through my own Jl('rceptions of ri'nlity, then, of course, it is. Rut hell, I didn't even attend a public high Nchool. I was at a pn, ate Catholic minor semmnry 1n Holh.ston, Mass.h.antedtobeam1 1onnrypr1 t. l d1dn 't evm come out until I \\BS 21 and a junior in college. My own coming out was hell, and I mean that literally. I had to deal with all the guilt trip the seimnary had left on me. Once one of the guys was thrown out for being gay and we were all talked to and we were told that he had ruined his life and would never be happy. Immediately after that, we were each hauled before the rector and grilled as to "'hether "'e had made II with him As I remember, I admitted that I had because he'd already given my name, but I denied everyone else they asked me about. It wasn "t until I got involved with the Gay Student Union at the Claremont Col­lege in 1972 that I met openl> gay people. They wert! the greatest. I still remember my first party about a month after I met them. I sat in the corner of the room and watched. They thought I was bored, and I didn't know how to explain I was almost in tean; because I saw men dancing with men and women with women. and it was beautiful. It was as if I'd been kept outside a pastry shop my whole life half-starved, and suddenly one night they opened the door and said ifs all for you Tho~e people helped me to see the beauty in myself and m the other around me. They also were politically active. and I liked that and joined in when I saw the garbage we were being forced to swallow even on a supposroly liberal college cam• pus. I wound up by being the co-ordinator for the GSU for I\\ o years and was actn·ely involved in many of the earl> Californian student proJecta around the state. There's a scene m my book where Neil finds out Paul is gay, and he's shocked. Today it's no revelation to know that gay people are e,erywhere-thnnkfully we're making ourselves known-but I was like :-:eil at the beginning. I'd meet people and ,ay, "You're ga>'" I won't say I thought they \Ii ere all supposed to be in dre-,es-J 4 THE STAR/ JAN. 6, 1984 didn't know about drag until I came out­but the books I did read as a kid told me that gay people were unhealthy psychot­ics, child molesters and-worse­miserable all the time. I knew I wasn't like that, but it took me time to get rid of the idea that maybe the others were. My own coming out was hell, and I mean that literally. You said you were in seminary; I pre­sume that means no one knew you u-ere gay? In a sense, I didn't even know. I just knew I liked guys, and most of my friends did too. The seminary screwed me up so bad that while l was there, I never tried to make it with anyone I was really attracted to. I figure they were somehow more noble or something, so I only made passes at people I wasn't crazy about. Ifthatsounds sick, 1t was. I don't ever want any other high-school-aged person to go through that kind of crap. In one way, the kids now have it easier than I did. They know there's a a gay com­munity out there. They know that they're not alone in the world. Still, I've given lots of talks in high schools, I've worked crisis hotlines, and I think it will always be hard for kids to come to grips with their own sexuality, at least as long as we live in a country where people bitch about giving kids basic sexual and biological informa­tion. In addition to that. it's still hard for young gay men and women to meet other people. I once put up a 17-year-old young man for a few days until we could find him a permanent shelter He'd been beaten by his father because he was gay. I've seen kids tormented almost to suicide-and sometimes literally to it-by their peer groups and often with the implied consent of the adults in charge. There's a lot of pam still out there. Maybe I'm a dreamer, but I'd like to help some of "Best in Country Sounds" SPECIALS MONDAY­THURSDAY 8-10 Monday 75¢ Longnecks Tuesday 30¢ Ponies Wednesday $1 :Margaritas & Screwdrivers Thursday $1 Call Drinks HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 2-7pm Draft 50¢ Longnecks 75¢ (Lowenbrau not Included) Bar Drinks s 1 °0 . SISTER BAR TO SNUFFY'S t~e kids there realize they they can be gay without having to give up their dreams and goals and loves. Are you telling gay kids to stay in their closets then? Hell no! I've also seen the other side. I've seen people 16, 17 or so who are out and the happy, whole people they should be. I would never say don't come out. I also don't know ifl personally would have the guts to tell the whole school, but I would tell my friends. I wish to God I could have come out m high school. Years after I left there and had dealt with my own han• gups, I wrote people I had known there­my best friends-and found out that many of them were also gay. I even found out that the best friend I had in grammar I sometimes think it's self-hatred by gay people that keeps many of them from learning to defend themselves. school back in Somerville, Mas6., a guy I fantasized about for years, was gay too. What a waste ,and I don't mean only sexu­ally. There was so much caring and living that was lost, or if not lost. at least not lived to its fullest. You 've got a second-degree black belt in Kuni( Fu San Soo. Has that given you more confidence in being out in the public, knowing that fal(-bashers may hat·e a hard time u1th you? You better believe it. I didn't originally get into the art thinking about that, but while I was the GSU co-ordinator, I was subject to verbal and mild physical abuse on occas10n. I vowed that no one, I repeat no one, was ever going to hurt me or some­one I cared for without me doing my best to stop them. It may sound cruel or nasty, but I really think the only time fag-baahlnii ia going to stop is when we send the basher home on a stretcher. I'm not a cruel per­son, but I think I'm simply being realistic. In most situations, the police aren't there to protect you; in some, even when they are, it doesn't make any difference. I think everyone ofus, and I don't only mean gay people, is respoMible to himself. Many times just the way you carry your­self is enough to stop any hassle. One night my friend, also a black belt. and I were Being harMsed outside a bar. The punks were in a truck and couldn't under• stand why we weren't running. One kept coming, opening the door, stepping down as if to spook us, then jumped back inside when he found we simply waited for him. They left without incident. Just a few weeks ago though, this same friend and his lover, a green belt, were ju umped in Los Angeles by five guys out to kill them. My friend got a black eye; of the five, one went to the hospital minus an eye, the others were severely damaged enough that the police had no problem arresting them. Fighting is not pretty, but it's unfortunately necessary. I sometimes think it's self-hatred by gay people that keeps many of them from (earing to defend themselves. It's almost as if they say I really deserve to be hurt. Overall, kung fu has meant a lot to me, and I really do love the art. At one point I was volunteering my time to teach a self­defense class for gay people in Los Angels, and I am seriously considering doing so again. How do the people at the kung fu school deal u·,th your being gayt It's funny. I was out openly everywhere except there until two years ago. I didn't want to have to prove my "ma, culinity" every night. When I started to mention it to people, all I got was boredom on their part. They all knew. Actually, that's not quite true-one guy was a pain in the ass but that's since been straightened out. One reason I made /1:eil a fighter 1s because I wanted to have the reader real­ize gay people can have any interest, and that lhey can..be. iiood .at anyt.hiD~ th.,y SCHNAPPS want to. I'd like for Neil and Paul to be role mod­els. I don't say that with any inflated sense of self.importance. I merely mean that I think they're a lot more healthily integrated characters than many in young adult fiction who are gay. At least neither races off and does himself in-or is conveniently killed so the nongay charac­ter can tell you how great his pal was. Before any other of those authors write me nasty notes, I am aware that in some cases the original manuscript wasn't like that. and that the changes were made at the publisher's insistence, but thatdoesn 't negate the eixsting fact. Now that "All-Americans Boys" is out, would you like to see CBS or someone pick up and do a screen version? Hell yes! And if anyone is listening, I know just the guy to play Neil (and I don't mean me). There are so many gay actors in the theater, I'd love to see an openly gay one do the role, but again, at the moment it's only a dream. When you camr out, u·ere your parents as rabidly homophobic as Paul's or as understandmR as Neil's t Neither. They were somewhere in the middle. There was a tense period of a few years that has long since mellowed out. Overall, my family's been great. In fact, at one point a few years back, my sister yanked me aside and in mock anger her, ated me in front of my date for always having better looking partners than she did. ls there anything you'd like to say in closing? Only that despite the work, I had a lot of fun writing the hook I didn't worry about political correctness or anything else. I simply wanted to write an entertaining story, one that hopefully people will enjoy more than once. I'm just vain enough to think I've succeeded. This mten·,eu• u·as prepared by Alyson Publications, which has a commercial ,ntereat in the ub1ect ma.tt r---~----~-.. 2NDANNUAL I ~. aust1n JANUARY WHITE SALE all white bar liquor drinks 100 DURING JANUARY 2828 Rio Grande @ 29th Austin, TX 478-8782 Open 8a.m. dally with Happy hour JAN 6, 1984 / THE STAR 5 Naming a Gay Commentary . . Glenn No Longer the 'Right Business 1s Not an Easy Feat Stuff' for the Gay Community By Peter Harrison If you want to open a business, better think up a name right now. One of my oldeat, dearest and best-hung friends recently went through the trauma of going to the county clerk's office to register a name for his new plant store: he thought "The Green Queen" was a good one. But, no! Someone else somewhere else in the state had beat him to it. I tried to soothe him with a combination of warm careSBes and cold gin. I even sug­gested a better name, I thought: "Sod 'Em and Grow More Rye." But he went into terminal wilt until he came up with "How Does Your Basket Hang?" and ran off to the courthouse to try that one. I'm beginning to think that I should open a busine.ss of my own, a kind of advi­sory service for people like him who need nameH for new enterprises. After eating at a couple of new gay restaurants, I've come against catchy names, too. You won't find service stations called "Don't Pass Our Gas" or "The Lube Your Joint Joint." Movie moguls are very happy with "Superman III" and "Rocky Infinity." Hilton and Sheraton just keep on throw­ing up "Hilton Hamtramcks" and "Sh~ raton Sheboygans." But our people suffer from what I call the Rumplestilskin Syndrome. You gotta have a name or the magic's not there. Let me tell you the true story of two men who went to Russian River, fell in love with the place and decided to open a gay guest house. After tramping around (and I emphas­ize tramping) for three days. they con­sulted a real-estate office and found a charming old building with ponds, trees, ducks and flowers. It was going cheap, because it was near a railroad siding where two abandoned cabooses were bak­ing in the sun. No one wanted them, and prospective buyers considered them an eyesore. Our heroes, truly creative sorts, realized ✓ t ~ - that the cabooses could be easily lifted off - the tracks onto the property and made into "L •• -:'\. charming (a key word in gay business) I ) little (another key word here) weekend , F hideaways (that's called a literary hat l r ~ i trick-three key words in one phrase). \:JI ~ ~ }.__ They checked with the railroad-sure ' t ~ ~~~~h~;t~~:~. z~~tn~:~~~aJ;\t~:,~ I I t J was adequate water, sewage and a ready- ' • made clientele. ir So they sat back and started planning. There ~ould be little Roger & Gaillet soaps, big bath towels and complimentary sh_ampoo. They started making lists of , ,(t. - things to check· is KY available in tin • > little tubes? Can you grow watercress in a 1 'i duck pond? And, they considered the name. "Take -' . The A Train," "Looi;e Caboose" and I \ carded. "The Right Track" and "Club ..,.._ Car" just seemed to prove that the railroad · 1 , :,;,o;: motif wasn't the way to go. "Wanderlust" ~ , ~ j - and "Loose Ends" killed a travel theme. ~ ) ~ • Mean. while, interest rates crept to 12 per• 0 0 ce~}o· Mama's," as in "Where are you staying?" "Yo' Mama's!" nearly caused J an argument. "Mother Ducks" was offered • rapturously by one of the partners and received coolly by the other. Intere,;t went to 13 percent. To cut. a long story short, by the time \ they arrived at a name-"Boys R Us"- , ~ \ ~ mortgage rates had gone through the ceil• 1 , '.• '' ing. In~tead of realizing their dreams of ~ ,,1 _.. r"l,, .'\ welcoming hunks to their soignee orgy r ~ I 1 11"' '•~ parlor, they found themselves over- 1 : f 1 "'.ht·lme<I with mountains of brochures for 1 ' k1tchl'n implements, souvenir mntches 7l_ \ sharing their work as well as leisure lime, ~ /4 and lawn furniture. Instead of happily ._, \\ they found themselves with a severely '. .._,1 , \!., . , I 1 ~ strained rPlationship ("If we'd called it • ' 111 '•'' h 'Gundy Dancers' like I wanted, we'd be to the conclusion thntmorellmewasspcnt planning what to call those places than on any questions of food preparation or deL-or "A (lmchc Before Dining" did offor quiche us an appetizer, a bouncy little item that prophes1zcd the latex-derivative stl'ak lo rnme •~romorrow's Manicotti" had papered the walls with old physique magazim•s, it's truP, hut th,• pnsta tasted more liki• ye,i,tnduy's. Raw fish has n1•ver appenled to mt•, so I can't honestly comment on •:Na~i: That Tuna" and ''If You Knew .Sushi. Obviously, thP gay community puts great storp m originality. Othi•rs don't se<'m to can• qu1tP so much. In both New York and San Francisco. there are "Old Original ,Joe's" and I l>l'heve that there's even cm "Old Original Joe's NumberTwo" in onl' or tht• other llaVIng lot8 of money seems to work operating now." 'If we'd named it that, we'd be out of business now") AU of this could have been n,01ded if I were in business, offering help to those who need it. A quirk consultatmn with Peter Hamson, and you'd be off in a flame with a nnml' Vital with a title All svstems a l{<•go with a logo. A gay v1dro arcade? "Shirley Booths." Gay farm chemicals? "Weed 'Em and Reap." Gny storage system? "Closet Cases." Dry cl1•aners? "Pressing Con• cerna." Footwear? "The Shoe Must Go On." See how easy I could make 1I for you? If you're interestNI, keep watching this column. and I'll lt•t vou know how to get in touch. I'll be open f~r business-as soon as I can think of II name lfarnson /11·,·• in .Vrw Jrrsey. Hi., column appf'ars her1• and in other ,:ay publ,ca• tio11s. 19113 Sto11ru·oll Feature., Synd,- c-at,•, continued from page 1 especially important to lesbians and gay men, including immigration, AIDS, vio­lence, social service delivery and discrimi• nation against gays and lesbians in the military. The group also challenged Glenn's contention, made earlier in the day, that lesbians and gay men were unfit to work as "teachers or YMCA directors." While the dialogue was cordial, the Ohio senator continually focused on the idea of sexual orientation as a choice rather than a pr~existing condition like race or gender. "The Senator acknowledged the exist• ence of discrimination," Apuzzo noted, "but was unwilling to support any remedy for that discrimination. This intransi­gence is unacceptable." Vogel added, "He offered no new depar• lures from his previous positions." Glenn, himself, stresRed that he wanted a "continuing dialogue with the gay and lesbian community," and conceded that "this issue (gay and lesbian civil rights) has become an item on the national agenda." Two days later on Dec. 15, Senator Ohrenstein announced his resignation from the Glenn campaign because of Glenn's "refusal to support homosexual rights legislation . .. (which) called into question his otherwise superb record on civil and human rights by engaging in a prolonged debate on lesbian and gay rights, an i88ue which has broad-based support within the Democratic Party." Former Houston Gay Political Caucus President Lee Harrington, Association Vic~Chair for the South Central Region of the National Association for Lesbian and Gay Democratic Clubs, issued the follow• ing statement: "While the meeting Glenn requested ... was a frustrating one for our association ·s co-chair, Peter Vogel, and for Senator Ohrenstein, we are very encouraged by John Glenn's desire to continue meeting, as well as by his very sincere desire to more fully understand the issue of civil rights for gay citizens. Ohrenstein's resig­nation may reflect a feeling that he can better educate the open-minded presiden­tial contender from outside the campaign structure, rather than from within it. "It seems to all of us. and I find it to be the case so often with so many other well­intentioned persons, that John Glenn's level of understanding here is directly related to the lack of exposure he has had to the people and the i~sue. "'As you get to know us, the myths about us, I think, begin to fall away. If Glenn can learn fast, and he appears to be willing to try, he'll still have a shot at in excess of 5 million gay votes in 1984." Harrington also stated that realistically he does not expect Glenn to progress that fast, as "he's still in the 'what causes homosexuality' stage." Harrington felt that his willingneSB to talk, however, may be a good example to other 'middle Americans' in reference to the gay is ue. Ohrenstein's resignation is significant. however. As the New York Senate minor­ity leader, he has influence with many key Democratic leaders. Also. New York brings to the Demo­cratic National Convention, to be held in San Francisco in June, the second highest number of delega~ after California. Walter Mondale, frontrunner for the Democratic Party's nomination for Presi­dent, has already stated his support for gay righta legislation '"acro88 the board." Now Hiring The STAR, your new community newspaper, is ready to begin expanding its service to the Austin and San Antonio gay communities. San Antonio Editor This is a part-time position for an experienced journalist or writer. Submit samples. Will re­quire about 6 hours a week. Pays $200 a month. Austin/San Antonio Advertising Director This is a commissioned position but expect about $1000 a month-more when newspaper switches to weekly format. Mail resume. THE STAR 3008-A Burleson Rd., Austin, TX 78741 6 THE STAR / JAN. 6, 1984 Fourteen-Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JAN. JAN. 6 7 JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. 15 16 17 18 19 For add t;orial kiformatJOn or pnone 11umbe" tor event, lt1ted below orgaruz1tion under '0rgan1zat1ons In the The Star's 01rectory look to, the IPQnlOnng Selected Events • IN 2 WEEKS: NO\'re Lesbian Rights Conference, Jan. 20-22, Milwaukee •LV 2 WEEKS: SA Gay Alliance Leadership Retreat, Jan. 21-22, near Boerne •IN 3 WEEKS: Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference, Jan. 27-29, Houston • IN 3 WEEKS: Austin Lesbian Gay Political Caucus meets 7:30pm Jan.31, Commissioner's Court, Courthouse Annex • IN 5 WEEKS: Lincoln's birthday, Feb. 12 • IN 5 WEEKS: Blueboy's 6th Annual Man of the Year Contest, Feb. 12, Union Club, 110 E. 14th, New York • IN 5 WEEKS: Valentine's Day, Feb. 14 •IN 6 WEEKS: 5th Annual Women's Valentine Dance, Feb. 17, Unitarian Church, Austin • IN 6 WEEKS: Washington's birthday, Feb. 20 • IN MARCH: ALGPC sponsors "AIDS Awareness Week," exact dates to be announced • IN 8 WEEKS: Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday, March 6 •IS JO WEEKS: St. Patrick s Day, March 17 • IN 12 WEEKS: April Fool's Day, Apnl 1 • IN 13 WEEKS: 9th Annual Southeastern Conference of Lesbian and Gay Men, "Pulling Together and Reaching Out," Holiday Inn-Medical Center, Birmingham, Ala., opens Apr. 12, lasting to Apr. 15 •IN 15 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Foundation 1st Southeastern Lesbian/Gay Health Conference, Apr 21, Atlanta • IN 17 WEEKS: First primary party elections in Texas and party precinct conventions, May 5 •IN 18 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12, lasting to Nov. 11 • IN 19 WEEKS: Texas Senatorial District Party Conventioni., May 19 •IN 20 WEE.XS: Gay Press Association 4th National Convention, May 25-28, Los Angeles • IN 20 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 28 • IN 21 WEEKS: Run-off party elections in Texas, June 2 • IN 23 WEEKS: Texas Democratic Party Convention, June 15-17, tentatively Houston • IN 23 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 16th anniversary of Stonewall uprising, national slogan "United & More in '84," June 15-24 IIEARL Y J ULY: Lesbian and Gay Bands of America concert, Loe Angelee •IN 23 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Foundation's let International Lesbian/Gay Health Conference, ''Toward Diversity," New York, June 16-19 • IN 28 WEEKS: Democratic National Convention, San Francisco, J uly 16-19 • IN 32 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug 19, San Francisco ANNOUNCEMENTS BUSINESS OWNERS We ftSt lrN NCh wNk In tNI Chtectory community org1naattone plus bu11neua Nf'Ylng u d •tribution points for THE STAR e 1ndicates -.,.·,- ..-.u ng--,..--ST AR do tntiut,on point DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES ROOMMATE WANTEO San Antont0 male, professional, non• smoker, to share 2 bedroom, 2 bath hre-- f\~e~ u~1~::S g~r.,~(~~~)'~~-~ ~;e~, 681 -2128 Store Owners Are you a STAR distribution point? If not, become one. There's no charge and you'll find it will bring people into your business. To be a d1str1but1on point. we require you to place the newspaper In a ltghted. eas1ly•access1ble locatoon, and be able to distribute at least 25 copies each issue (Some locations go through 400 to 500 copies each issue) Your location will be pr,nted in the paper each tsSue AUSTIN ROOMMATE NEEDED To share nice-11z8d 2-bedroom house in Hyde Part< S2SO • 1/2 btlls Call Scott. 452-2813 Star Classified EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED SAN ANTONIO DISTRIBUTOR Eam $25 every two weeks lor about two hours .work distributing The Star in San Antonio we·re lookln~ for a responsible. ~f,jf;{5s".;_-;:~ar all Henry MCCiurg AUSTIN DISTRIBUTOR Earn $25 every two weeks lor about two hours work distributing The Star 1n Aus .. tin we·,e look no for a respcns ble, neat person with car Call Henry McCturg In Austin at 448-1380 STRINGERS WANTED • The Star" seeks free-lance news wnters 1n Austm and San Antomo ror ass1gl"I• ments Send sample, of your work to Henry McClurg "The Star 3008-A Burleson Ad Austin TX 78741 AUSTINiSAN ANTONIO Presently working In a laboratory and w,shIng to get fnto sales? Represent nationally known scient1hc inst rument tine College degree, 25-30 years, unal ­fected masculine demeanor and outgoing personality Submit resume 1n strict con• f1dentiallty to Sales Manager. Suite 219. 2615 Waugh Dr Houston, TX 77006 GAY BARS i Hidden Door ~003 Morgan Av ----l82-01S3 i Jofty Jack 2-413 Peoplel ! SpaniSl> Ga _, 5t7NCll.aparrat-682-o510 e Sandbar---«>I Tay10r 8&4-0277 • zoo ao- 617 s Stapleo &3-775.3 San Antoruo M1n1ng C0----800 E San Anton,o­" 46-9903 wt,rspera-«)1.!!_~I ~,o-~ McAllEN-Bumpera- 1100 Peca,i Ouffys-1702 N 10tr1 Ma f Bo•-200 N 291h e e1 Jara n- 106 Navarro- 223-7177 e i=aces-119 El M o-34•"'302 ;-Galleon-330 San Pedro-225--23$3 • :..Js ')503 West Av -341 9359 e Maoam Arthurs-607 N SI M.uya 225-9678 :s.o,.;e N ght Satoon-815f,_,.,,c:klburg-73&- i Our Place-115 Gen K,ueoer -344>1751 e Ra* Po• er& LJght Co- 2315SanPedro- 734· 1399 • San Pedro M 1mng Co-826 San Pedro-223- 02"3 e 201s Ptac ......... 2015 Sa,, Pedro -:-1-:i- 111';5 ORGANIZATIONS iiLECTEO NATIONAi.. ORG.-N1ZAT10 NS Clay Preu A.$socil.ll0n---POB 3300$.. w .. rungton.. OC 20033-(202) 387-2-<30 GayReghts Nationallobb'y P081192 Washington.. DC 20013-(202) ~1801 Human Rights Ca~rgn Fund-POB 1396 Wes~ lngton DC 20013-(202} 5'16-2025 UtnOt1a Legal DefenN-..-132 W <&;ltd. N.., YOtlt NY 1o:x»-(2t2) 144·'kaa Med~ Fund for Human ~!Qht1 iOay Prn1 AslOCla:IIOn)-POB 33605 Wnhington OC 20033---(202)387•'2430 ~ IONS ~ Of Bus MIi Coundla Bo• 1514S San Ft•ncllCO. CA 94111-/4 15) ~ National AslociabOn Of Gay & LNblan ~ratie Oubt 17'2 Maa Av SE Wnl'Mngton, DC ~ ~ 74104 Nationat Gay Health Educatt0n Foundati()n,.---,81) 8th At .,,305 N.,_ Yotll NY 10011 212 206-1009 NatJOnaf Gay Rights Achoeales 5-40 Castro. San Franesco CA94114 415)M3-362<1 Nauonat Gay Task Foree-ao 6th A'I N .. York NY EL PASO _ _,---~~-•~ 11-_.i,2.., 1 2l-"~'..,"""°- 1-.JOM ~""' The Apartment ~ Myr!le York &ate) Club Ptga ,..,. 411 E Frank n AY 532 9018 Tp.a Gay 'lffbla,i Task Fo,ce-P08 Al< Dtnton ~~-~~~~~e8~=~ 78201 817) 387.t2UI Noe Noa--t726 Alameda Av 779-9273 Old Planlat,on-219 S 0cnoa 53J.6055 Pet Shoo II -919 Patsano Or 5.co.9629 AUSTIN-AuIt. n Lambda-POB 5455 78783 478-8653 _Didn't you resolve to give up Mark last year? ~sl1n Lflbtan/Gay Pohl1C1l caucvs-POB 122 78787 474-7717 meets last Tues 7.30pm, Comm111k>nersCoon CourthOuleAl'H"l8ll AIDS Awareness Week In Marer, (Janet Zumbrun 11 441 1130) CORPUS CHRISTI Gay Bartenders Anoc1a1ton c o zooiac Lounge 817 Staples-883-1753 ~ropoUtan Community Church-c/o Um,a, .. Ian Church 3125 Home Rd-851·9898 SANANTONIO Alamo Human Rights Committee-854·007• 45,i..5485 Dignity ~49-3632 meets Sun 5pm SI P1tnc:k1 Church 1·35 nea, New Braunfels & Pine O1y Sw1tchbo41rd 7JJ.7300 lntegrty SA PO8 15006 78212-73'--0759 meeta 1st & 3rd lttul'II Umbda AA 13•2 Wyommg - 674-2819 =-•bean & Gay People In Med;cine- Bo• 29000 78280 Rock n R Riders e10 Our Ptece t 15 Oen Krue,ge,-3,t~t7$8 SA Gay A• anc......OOx 12063 78212-733-6315 Leader1h1p RetrNt Jan 21 22 near Boerno PERSONALS AUSTIN LODGING for white. mamed, b1. straight. g00d­lookIng young Iocks by w 1M 28. body• builder 472-6875 • SEEKING BISEXUAL COUPLES Sensual fun frolic and parties Meet oth• ers with like interests Call (Austin) 445- 6421 TIRED OF BARS GWM, 20. 6', 180. looking lor same Wrote 'Todd." Box 2355. Midland TX 79702 FINANCIAL BACKER OR partner wanted to build homes In boom• ~g Austin Masculine, sane 445-5888 BLACK AND WHITE Men Together creates a better lifestyle 3317 Montrose. Su,te 1142. Houston 77006 PRISONER SEEKS HELP Gay TDC Prison inmate requtres moral and financial suppart to process appeal to US Supreme Court Landmart< declslOll would prevent being gay as admlssable evidence to support convIctIon on totally unrelated matter Will respond to all inqu,nes Any financial help graciously accepted. and somehow repaid Carl t . Jordan 3528~A. Route #4 Box 1100 R09haron TX 77583 POLISH GAY MAN 31, passove, black hair, hairy body wants friendship with active gay Would hke to immigrate to USA Will answer all AndrewHos.,owskl UIWars.,awska 15i6. 44•100 Ghw1ce Poland AUSTIN PRIVATE GAY CLUBS e ctub Austin Bath1 308 w 19th- 47&-798e RESTAURANTS, SANANTONIO CAFES e Club San Antonio--1802 N Main.Av-735,-,246 e E.xecutn1• Hea U'I Club 77.3 Av 8 225-8807 STAR CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS ADVERTISING RATES Placing a Classified other than a Personals? Read this: • ANNOUNCEMENTS • CARS & BIKES • DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES • EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED • FOR SALE, MISC. • MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS • SERVICES • TRAVEL RATE: Up to 3 words in bold, $2 each week. Additional regular words 30¢ each per week. Minimum charge $3 per week. DEADLINE: 5:30pm Monday for Friday's newspaper. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 issues or longer, pay the full run in advance, and make no copy changes during the full run, and you can deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 issues or longer under the same conditions and you can deduct 25%. CHARGE YOUR AD: All classifieds must be paid in advance OR you can charge your classified to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill-except through your credit card-for classifieds PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in classifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. Placing a • PERSONALS? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words in bold and up to 15 total words, FREE. (Additional words beyond 15 per week are 30¢ each.) FREE PERSONALS apply only to individuals. No commercial services or products for sale. HOW LONG? A Free Personal can be placed for one, two or three weeks at a time-but no longer without re-submitting the form. BLIND BOX NUMBER: If you want secrecy, we'll assign you a Blind Box Number. The answers to your ad will be sent to us and we will then confidentially forward the replies to you. Rate is $3 for each issue the ad runs but replies will be forwarded as long as they come in. ANSWERING A BLIND BOX NUMBER: Address your reply to the Blind Box Number, c/o The Star, 3008-A Burleson Rd., Austin, TX 78741. Enclose no money. Your letter will be forwarded unopened and confidentially to the advertiser. CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD: ~ charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box charges must be paid in advance OR you can charge to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill­except through your credit card-for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in Classifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. The Free offer does not apply to Personals phoned in. You will be charged the same rate as other types of Classifieds. (up to 3 normal-size words in bold capitals) (free or 30¢/word) (free or 30¢tword) (30¢/word) (30¢ word) (30¢/word) bold headline at $2 words at 30¢ each Blind Box at $3 per issue Total _~~~- times ...... . . weeks ---- (use add•ttonal paper If necessary) Name Address Amount enclosed __ _ (• check o money order, o cash In person o VISA charge o MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card: # ----~- _ e,p. date Mail to The Star, 3008-A Burleson Rd., Austin, TX 78741 BERNIE AusrN e Th1ngum Bob Esq Eatery -607 Red River 472--8783 SANANTONO-e Bogarts-11541 WMI Av-34~7167 • ~rcles 107 V,i Locust-733-6237 SERVICES, ETC. ALJST•N-The Star tn Austin-~ 1310 SAN ANTONiO-Arner1can Male fha1r re~acementt)-3438 N St Marys-736-9678 The Star in San Antonio~ 737.()()87 By Tycho JAN. 6, 1984 / THE STAR 7 Vllll Monte Carso- N..St MarysatMu berry 73&-- SHOPS & STORES AUST N-e Ekk;k woman 324 E i&th-472-2785 !_Wn Attack Records,_ E 7tf'I 47~13 e worka-413 E 8th- 47....,..511 SAN A.NTONIO- • ~ecord HOle--6431 San f>edro-349--1367 :;~~ 1 :;:r11 V1n~ge"C101hng-1803 N • Video World 1 eo2 NM.in,,:.-736-9927 e Kev1t1 Wagner Cards & G its 180tN M&in- 1= Fortunes For Fr,day evening, January 6, 19114 /hrougn Friday e.enmg. January 13 19114 ARIES-Changes tn your love hie and In any work proiects tn progress keep you from a fresh start on the New Year, and with your "Do It Now" attitude. that could present problems. Try some new approaches to old matters, and don't make any bI3 resolutions until February. TAURUS-Too much of th,s and that adds up to too little of anything But. while physical exhaustion may hang around for a while. once you've settled down, you should have the mental energy to solve that problem and any others that are tn your way Thtnkl GEMINI-When you feet romantic and a bit lazy at the same time. there's one thtng to do. Get lazy with the ob1ect of your romantic mtentions. Be like that lucky old sun and roll around heaven all day '83 was quite a year for you. Now, just lay back. CANCER-Most people ftnd comfort ,n their homes. None more so than Cancer, and for Cancer, rarely more than now. You may feel you have little direction over the course of your hie now, so the safety and comfort of your own abode offers the place you can be tns,de yourself, outside all the rest. LEO-Keep on dancing! Many of the other s,gns are quieting down, now. but not Leo• Your energy seems inexhaustible. If there·s fun to be had. you'll have 11, with no post-holiday blues All this danctng and singing. ,t might as well be Spnngt VIRGO-You're the one to make New Years resolutions and make them stick Any bouts of indecisiveness are over Plans laid, dec,s ons made, you're right on target With en intelligence that can verge on true wisdom, you can make the moves that make 1984 a year of triumph. LIBRA-Don't even try to figure out how ti will happen, because you wont directly have anything to do with 11, but a nice money surprise could be coming your wayI In fact, stop tcying to jigure everything out Let things happen to you now and they will SCORPIO-A January bride? Well. something old ,s going to end and something new ,s about to begin. Something borrowed has to do w,th brothers and sisters (bridesmaids and ushers) and something blue Is up to you. Start working on your trousseau, Scorpio• SAGITTARIUS-How many faces and sides you have to you. Sagittarius• Starting now. and throughout the year, you're going to be expressing and exploring many of those facets Everyone shares this constant process. but for you the poss1b11tt,es are more exciting and almost endless. CAPRICORN-Respons1b1hty ft starts now, gains momentum as the year gets go,ng, and for manywlll bethetheme of 1984 ft doesn't have to be the kind that we,ghs you down. tn tact, tt can be the ktnd that raises you up to quite an exalted place Take hold of the rems and go AQUARIUS- Tv.o very important things are happentng now that will continue for most of the year. New avenues of creat1vIty open up, g,vtng you kinds of expression you had never explored At the same ttme, serious relations w,11 be seriously tested. What lasts may be forever PISCES- The idealism that has earned you through much of your life ,s taking a very practical turn. That will result In your making important contributions to a group effort. The group will ,n turn sustain you and give you much tn return. Isolation ,s over Join in •1964 STONE\\IALl FEATURES SYNOICAl[ JASON, I FEEL Lll<E A~ SOMETHING DIFFERENT. A STYLE TMAT SA:m FOR YbO, LETS YOU \lt)ICE Ya.I~ INDIVIO­IJALIT"( wrrn A 'IIS~L TRleurE. JUST LEAVE IT 1t> ~E. !'VE GOT JUST THE STYLE. You~ LOOKING FOP., SWEE15. Wal., WHAT DO 'rtJlJ "THINK? I KNOW IT'S A BIT PUNK, 8llT 'tt)UlL &ET USED 10 IT IN AWW(~,wof \ ' 8 THE STAR/ JAN. 6, 1984 A L y s 0 N PUBLICATIONS 0 Till MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Fnedel, $7 00. The eotenammg commg-out story of Bunoo Raider, who 1s so elegant that as a child he reads Vogue m ills playpen. "The wmmg 1s fresh and cnsp, the humor often hilanous," wntes the L.A. Times. "The funniest gay novel oi the year," says Christopher Street. 0 ONE TUNAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. One teenager ID ten 1s gay, here, twenty-sue young people tell their stones of commg to tenns w1th bemg different, of the dec1S100 how - and whether - to tell friends and pa.rents, and what the consequences were 0 THE BUTTERSCOTCH PRINCE, by Richard Hall, $5 00. When Cor­dell's best friend and ex-lover 1s murdered, the only clue 1s ooe that the police seem to consider too lunky to follow up oo. So Cordell decides to track down the killer himself - w1th results far different from what he had expected. 0 ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, SS 00. 'I've known that I was gay smce I was th.ineen. Docs that surpme you? It didn't me . " So beg1IlS All-Amencan Boys. the story of a teenage love affair that should have been simple - but wasn't. 0 CIDNA HOUSE, by Vincent La.rdo, $5.00. A gay gothic that has everything; two handsome lovers, a mystenous house oo the hill, sounds m the mght, and a father-son rela11oosh1p that's closer than most. 0 THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDmON, by Pamcia Sitkm, $6.00. When Evan Talbot leaves oo a mission to rescue an old schoolmate who has been 1mpnsoned by fanatics ID the Middle East, he doesn't realize that the tnp will also mvolve h1s own com1Dg out and the discovery of who 11 IS that he really loves. 8 DEATH TRICK, by Richard Steveosoo, $6.00. Meet Doo Strachey, a pnvate eye m the classic tradmoo but w1th ooe difterence: he's gay. TO ORDER Enclosed IS S · please send the books I've checked above (Add $ 1.00 posta~e when ordermg 1ust one book; if you order more than ooe, well pay postage.) D Cha:rge my (cucle one): Visa Mastercard acct. oo : ________ expua1100 date: ____ _ signature: ______________ _ _ o.une address c ty __________ state _ __ z1p _____ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St , Boston, MA 02118 Special Texas Departure January 31, 1984 Call Bruce for Details Key West/Ft. Lauderdale extensions available Houston phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 Plan Now to Attend the Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference cttl GAY PRESS ASSOCIATION January 27-29 Hotel Savoy Houston Workshops, Speeches, Entertainment If you are working in the gay media or are a gay person working in the non-Qay media ( either journalism, adver­tising or administratJVe ), plan to join your colleagues in Houston. Also. for officials of gay organizations who are NOT in the gay media but who would like to learn how to better influence the gay media. local and national. we'll have a special workshop. To Henry McClurg, vice president Gay Press Association 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 Enclosed is my $25 registration fee (for GPA members) or $30 registration fee ( non-GPA members) for the Southern Regional Conference. (Include $10 additional if post­marked after Jan. 13) I am in the gay media. [ I I work for the non-gay media. I do not work in the media but would like to attend the workshop on influencing the gay media and other events of the conference. Name Address Phone(s) I am a member of the Gay Press Association I am NOT a member of the Gay Press Association (If orrMng In Houston by plane tro,n 01 bus. let us know yoor time o f omvot ondwew ,n pick YoU up at the a irport or depot ) When we receNe your form. we'll send you o conference schedule and o brochure on the Savoy Hotel so you con make reservations. (You do not hove to stay at The Savoy to attend the conference ) lhe Savoy IS within wolklng distance of several gay c lubs Addition­a lly busses will be ovolloble for tours of Montrose nightspots. Your registration fee will include tickets tor free and d iscounted odmis­s, ons to several clubs
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