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The Star, No. 6, January 20, 1984
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The Star, No. 6, January 20, 1984 - File 001. 1984-01-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2148/show/2135.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1984-01-20). The Star, No. 6, January 20, 1984 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2148/show/2135

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 6, January 20, 1984 - File 001, 1984-01-20, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2148/show/2135.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 6, January 20, 1984
Contributor
  • Hyde, Robert
Date January 20, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Austin Pride Week Task Force Organizing There will be an organizing meeting for Austin's Pride Week Task Force on Jan. 80, 8 p.m., upstairs at 302 West 15th. The Task Force needs new coordinators, lots of volunteers and lots of energy. All organizations and busines,;es inter• fflted in helping and supporting Pride Week this year ere encouraged to attend. The Task Force may be contacted by writing APWTF, Box 13303, Austin, Tex. 78711. New Texas Human Rights Foundation Director says 'We Have to Keep It Going' Hollis Hood, p.4 SAGA Announces 1984 DSA Banquet The San Antonio Gay Alliance (SAGA) announces its 19114 Distinguished Service Awards Banquet to be held Feb. 12 in the Americana Inn at 96 N.E. Loop 410inSan Antonio. This banquet is the third annual DSA dinner and it is held to honor outstanding contributions by indivduals to San Anto­nio's gay community. Cocktails will begin at 6:30 p.m., cash bar, and dinner will follow promptly at 7:30 p.m. 'Entertainment will be provided by "sensational" young smger/ compo,;er Dan Busse. Semi-formal attire is sug• gested. Tickets are $12.95 advance and $15 at the door, They are available at Kevin Wagner's Cards and Gifts, On Main Cards and Gifts, The Unicom Shop on the River or by mail from DSA Banquet, c/o San Antonio Gay Alliance, P.O. Box 12063San Antonio, Texas 78212. THE STAR AUSTIN * SAN ANTONIO Meet Ginny Apuzzo Executive Director of the Nation's Biggest Gay Rights Group Kathy Tepes, p.6 How Do You Rate as a Houseguest? Roz Ashley's Quiz, p.S Jan. 20, 1984 • Issue .5 • Published Every Other Friday Angry SF Gays Protested Release of Convicted Killer White Copyright 1984 by Michael Helquist SAN FRANCISCO-It happened at 8:00 a.m. on January 6th: Dan White, con victed assas91n of San Francisco Mayor George Moecf)ne and gay supervisor Har­vey Milk, be<-ame a free men. White was released from prison after serving just over five years of his voluntary mans• laughter sentence. All political andjudical efforta to pr<'vent his release had failed. Angry San Franciscans rallied to protest th1• widely perceived travesty of justice, and several thousand in the city refused to l<'t the day pass with business-as-usual. A nurnh1•r of inddents of civil disobedience occurred, but there were no reports of vio• Jenee. The full day of protests began on Janu­ary lith just before midnight, the hour at which White became eligible for parole. Two protesters joined the small crowd of reporters t·11mped outside the entrance of Soledad prison where White had served most of his sentence. Health activist and person with AIDS. Bobbi Campbell, and his lover, Bobby Hilliard, carried candles and sijClls which declared "Dan White is More Dangerous than AIDS" and "But He Can't Kill Gay Pride." Campbell told reporu-rs that AIDS currently has a mor­tality raw of 40 percent. whereas Dan White has a fatality rate of 100 per<'ent. The California State Parole Board announced the next day that White had already b<'l'n moved from Soledad to another prison facility for hie release. Authorities cited concern over White's anfety ea the reas~n for_theunprecedented security surrounding his releaRe. Two major protest ralhea drew thou• sands of San Franciscans during the day. The Ad Hoc Committee to Protest the Injustice had issued a call to all city workers to support a work stoppage and not to go to work that day, if possible. About 500 demonstrators rallied at noon at Union Square m downtown Ssn Pran• cisco. Speakers included lesbian activi,;t and attorney Mary Dunlap and recent candidate for city supervisor Sister Boom Boom. Attorney Dunlap called upon the dem­onstrators "to turn against the govern­ment that permits us to be illegitimatized and that allows us to be turned out of our houses and jobs." Dunlap underscored the feelings of many of the protesters when she addressed the issue of violence "We demean our movement, our live,, and our values if we Join in the chain of violence begun by Dan White. It is death to his ideas and actions that we must dedicate oursleves." Sister Boom Boom, a member of the pol• itically active gay male group, Si.,,terb of Perpetual Indulgence, also refrained from any <'alls to violence, but he did indulge in some plausible conjectures about V,hite's future. He stated, "Yesterday wa;; the last day Dan White could be assured he'd Jive through the whole day Today he bei,:ins his life sentence. and I'm sorry to say it's going to be a short one" Sister Boom Boom brought a light moment to the protest when he explained, "I don't call for violence, but who know·, maybe one of us BOme day will be a little depressed, maybe off our diets. and who knows what may happen." At thi,; point, he began eating a Twinkie, a symbol of White's i;uccessful defense of"diminished capacity" due to too much stress and to a diet of junk food. After a half,hour of speeches. the crowd took to the atreets for an impromptu march through the financial district, stop· pmg traffic for six blocks. Demonstrators blew shrill police whistles and banged pot,; and pans. The marching crowd quickly swelled to over 5000 men in busi­ness suits, and women in fashionable attire jomed tho casually dressed prate.s­tore. 2 THE STAR / JAN. 20, 1984 Soviet Vodka Seeps Back In The cold war between American eateries and Russian vodka is thawing a bit, reports the New York Post. Some of New York's poshest restaa• rants, including Luchow's and the "21" Club, have ended a boycott that began after the Korean jet disaster. But not every innkeeper is so forgiving. Says restaurateur Mel Dansky: "I won't sell Russian vodka until they recognize that each human life is precious." San Antonio Soap By He len D1sb Such a Week! I swear, sometimes I think my little ol' head is gonna 1ust blow ott In this harsh winter clime When I moved to this city, I thought it would be all sunny and warm and now I may have to think about N1caragual Well, enough fanticiz­lng for today, kids -o- Madam Arthur'• has moved to a new nver s1dt1 location. The Grand Opening w,11 be this Sun­day (Jan. 22) Hope to see you all there It may be a little too chilly to stroll the R,verwalk, but at least we can all enioy the view and think of Spnng -o-we ve been asked to convey the following mes• sage PF & L J -1 loveyou and noone·sonleash -o- Fac:.- hosted the Min Gay Metroplex last Monday and Tuesday The lovely Jerrie Harper has the oonor of the title this year, fol• lowed by Forst Runner-up, Candy Stratton; Second Runner-up 1s Mallsaa Damoore. -o- Helen would hke to know who the gorgeous hunk was, lying in that car after leaving the Bonham Exdlange Saturday night. If anyone knows, please inform me immediately -o-il's tnv,a tome. Did you know that the Galleon 1s the only club In San Antonio that features Moller Lite Jongn9Cks? It may not be shocking to some Yankee, but to me. ,t comes as a bog sorpnse! I thought Texas was home of the longneck bottle My httle fingers JUSI don't feel nght unlees they're wrapped around the long hard shaft of a longneck bottlt1.I THE STAR Orcullteo 6n Au:stln enc, San Anion.o Published every other Friday Phone Austin (512) 448·1380 San Antonio (512) 137-0087 VT,~~~NCo The SI• .f 000 cop,ea bt-weekiy Montl'Ole Voice IHoustonJ 11.000 cop1N W'Mk'y oa11a Gov - e.ooo - _.,, totat Texat aru. 19 000 COl)IN ...-,y. avg (rectuc.d Circ:ulanon in January) ~- 3317 ~ 8hld tJDe. Hou110n TX 17008. t7131529--0!!22 Contents COl)ynght C1964 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg P"/:J/1_, Robert Hyde,.,.,,_ -or Mark Dragos,., ...,_,ng woctor __ Ace! Clark Mt uocto< JellBrayg,opl>ia Sonny Davis euounr,ng M~ Gay Pr .. ANOCJ.aUon New,s.mcn tnternattoNIOayNewsA~, P.ctflc,-,,... - LanyllulllfW•"'- oc, Syl'tdleated Fub.Jre .s.,._,1c:a & w,w., • .Jeffrey w,tton.. Randy Art'f'ld Stc>nrrwan FNtures Synchca1e Bnan McNaugl'lll. Joe 11 ... , POSTMASTE" s.nd acklr- corrections to 3317 MontroN •308. HoUlton. TX 71006 ~,on tale Jfl US ,n N.i«J .,.,.,.,~ 149 pc,,year (52 lssuosl $2tpe,st, montlls (29-l o<Sl 25pe,_(_ lhan29- Baell-$200Ndl NatJOMI ~Utg ,.,,,.,.,,,.tiv• Joe O SaoatO. ~ i ...,..,.ng l!M ..,, Avenue ,._ Yon 10011 (2121 142-eae:l ,--.,n_gF_-o_ve ..n., y,n..g-r ..-., s30pm ""ruuo ~to.tdWrt..-n L.ocele<tvertl9ingratetcnectu:fe0t1ewu ef'tediWNow 1 11913. ---ty .,. .. -ng 5..,..---~"" c:lalma ANdeB lhOukl •.., '"TIie Star 10 any --ng "Best in Country Sounds" SPECIALS MONDAY­THURSDAY 8-10 Monday 75¢ Longnecks Tuesday 30¢ Ponies Wednesday $1 l!argaritas &. Screwdrivers Thursday $1 Call Drinks HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 2-7pm Draft 50¢ k~~~J~J .?c?u~ed) Bar Drinks s1°0 Er~t Wednesday L BAND No Cover 9pm til SISTER BAR TO SNUFFY'S • Regular Subscription $30 • Trial Subscription $15 115 Gen. Krueger, S.A., 340-1758 - • Send me more information, please. Name _____ _ Addre-.,.,_ _________ _ ~ ------- City. __________ State_z,p ____ _ Type of Computer _______ __________ _ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 Gays Don't Fit Stereotypes "Husband" and "wife" are not roles rou• tinely assumed by gay couples who have been together for a long time, says The Male Couple: How Relationships Deuelcp, by David McWhirter and Andrew Matti• son, psychiatrist and psychologist, res pee• lively, at the UC San Diego School of Medicine. Their new book also says that sexual fidelity is not as important as in heterosex• ual marriages, from information gained by interviewing some 156 couples. Some older couples fit the stereotyped husband and wife roles, said McWhirter, simply because for years they have been told they should. The five-year study, begun in 1974, in terviewed 312 men asking them 240 questions dealing with everything from the couple's sex lives to their long-range plans together. Based on the interviewed, the authors found that fidelity was defined in terms of emotional commitment rather than sex• ual behavior, and that the longest lasting relationship8 involved an age difference of at least five years. Austin Soap By Tututu Divine It's Me Again! I'm here to tell you of all the scoop here In Capital Coty I've been lurking in the most wonderful places, and with all this weather the way ii is, lurking has been no mean JOb1 - o- The Boathouaa hes really been hopping• All the UT eluclent9 •"• back in town. taking full advantage of the frff beer on Sunday nights. and 10 cant drlnkl on Wednesdays! Have I been the only one to notice how , .. y the young college men look in their down vests dunng this awful weather? Sixth Strfft never looked so butch! -o- Quentln has divulged to me that things have never been better for him since he moved to Austin He has really appreciated the help T im and all hos other froends have given him Ya gotta have froends, you know -o- Austm's Gay Pride Wffk T•k Force ,shaving a meeting Monday, Jan 30 at LAMBDA, 8pm. All those interested should attend. especially since coordinators will be selected Remember how much fun the last Gay Pride Week was? There's no reason to flee to Dallas or Houston anymore when we have a much more intimate and personalizt1d celebration here. -o- Aualln'• Alternative is having a great show on Jan. 26. Where are the lllualona? They seem to be very elusive; or are they really 1ust illusions? No, of courst1 tht1y'rt1 notl Go see the show and discover It for yourselves! Also at Austin's Alternative, Womyn Speak ,s having a benefit, Sunday, Jan 29. There 1s a dollar cover charge, topped off by llve enter­talnmenl - o- Backltreet a .. 1cs 1s still having their famous Tund•y SIHk Night. complete with 25 cent dralt beer all day end night. I hear that lots of hunky numbt1rs can be found lounging around the charcoal, eepec1ally now to keep warm• - o- M1chae1 Jackson, eat your heart out You thought Thr,l/t1r was an experience unlll it was announced that a hot new bar, Dr. Frankanlur­tar'a, 1s opening soon at 317 E. 6th. We await with ant1c1. pat1on! - c - l Just couldn't believe all those horny Caprt­cornal Lots of them were all found having a great tome this past Wednesday al The Cran­ing. If you weren't tht1re you mossed a crazy time! - o- Pul on them klt1ats and start stompin· and hop­p1n ·, because Austin is abou' to have a wom­an ·, rugby tHml If you should be interested In Joining, call 2e3-S586 tor Information FBI Documents Stolen from Gay Activist Siminoski LOS ANGELES-Gay activist Dan Sim• inoski was in Phoenix in early December for a speaking engagement, but when he returned from an evening appointment he found the automobile of his host broken into. The only item stolen, reports an American Civil Liberties Union news release, was Siminoski's briefcase con• taining several thousand dollars worth of plane tickets, travelers checks and the doc• uments concerning a controversial suit by Siminoski against the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The hriefcase was returned by the police several days later, still containing the val­uable plane tickets and travelers' checks. Curiously, the only thing missing were the FBI documents. crucial to Siminoski's ongoing attempt to force the release of doc­uments of alleged illegal spying stories against gay and lesbian activists and organizations. The hreak-in caused an abrupt cancella llon to Siminoski's nationwide tour. How­ever, he later announced that he would resume the tour, which includes stops in Houston, Lubbock, Dallas, Austin and San Antonio. Siminoski is scheduled to be the keynote speaker at the Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference Jan. 27•29 at the Savoy Hotel, Houston. The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California filed suit in a federal district court in Loe Angeles on $iminos• ki'e behalf late last year. The suit, filed under the federal Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), seeks to compel the FBI to release d<><·uments concerning unlawful FBI surveillance of gay and lesbian acb vista and organizations since 1950. The, suit also seeks an injunction to force the FBI to grant Siminoi;ki's request for a fee wa.1vrr S1minoski, who holds a doctorate degree m political science, is in the midst of researching a hook on the impac-t of gay and lesbian politic11 on the 1984 national elections. Fire Bombing at LA Gay Bar LOS ANGEi.ES (IGNA)-A bar catering to gay people was firebombed recently, injuring the 74-year-old bartender, but patrons grabbed and held the two suspects until sheriffs deputies arrived. Deputies said a Molotov cocktail started a small fire at the Raincheck Room on Santa Monica Boulevard in the West Hol­lywood area. Customers cornered the two men who had thrown the fi rebomb and were beat• ing them when the deputies arrived. "It was a real hostile crowd. We proba• bly rescued them just in time," said she­riffs Sergeant Mike Allen. The arrested, J ohn Negrini, 22, and his brother, Anthony, 26, from Or ange County, were held on sus picion of arson . Anthony Neirnni suffered cuts on his face. Patrone said the men had been in the bar earlier but had been kicked out. They then returned with the firebomb. Bottled Snob Appeal Even if you're not the head of a big corpo• ration, maybe now y_ou can still em~ll like one, reports the Pacific News Serv,ce. Two Cleveland entrepreneurs have come up with a new cologne called "C-E- 0 " which sells for $11 an ounce. What do y~u get for your mone_y? Sno? appeal, according to store executive Edwma Moas. She aaya a few years ago, everyone wanted to be natural, "but now ther, want money, prestige, a Mercedes-Benz. Also bulliah on the sm~ll ofeuccees: an Italian company marketing a fra~ance called "Wall Street." ~mpo~r _Neil V_an Eerden aaye its big aelhng pomt 1a prestige and the fact that " people can pronounce 1t.'' WHERE COUNTRY IS #1 820 SAN PEDRO, SAN ANTONIO, 224-7739 Open 2pm-2am RappJ \\our 1.pm·lpm Monda1·Saturda1 TWO FOR ONE Monday-Saturday Zpm·4pm and Wednesday Zpm·8pm Zf~ DIIAFT BEER TUESDAY Zpm·Zam Beer Bust Saturday U Sunday SI.SO Spm·Spm with Free Hot Dogs Sunday Secured Parking on Weekends HOME OF S.A. MUSTANG Ya'll Come to Snuffy's on the San Pedro Strip A Jewish lesbian in search of her heritage The Law of Return h\ AlilL' Biol h "This 1s .i beautiful am! heal:ng work hllt-d with the vo1<e, of w,,m,n trammg to knov. each ,,th,•r h·h«• Nt•wman m off 0111 l1acks "Bloch s prn,e is ,trnng 11 highly pt.>rsonal . speaking lo some powrrful <•mot10n., and creating evo<alive image.,_' l'11blisll!'rs WedJv "Alice Bloch has much to say to any woman who has ever wondered who she really is and where she belongs. Letty Cottm Pogrel:>in editor Ms. magazine 'Ilte LAW RETUR:--1 In J9bQ American-born Ellen Rogm departs for a summer vacation in brad Drawn by the land, the language, and the religion, she adopts her Hebrew name Ehshcva and ,;ettles in Jerusalem, where she explores Or­thodoxy and her own haunting question,: about love, relationships. and sexuality. When she learns that Daniel - the one man she felt she could marry - 1s gay, Elisheva·s quest for resolution threatens to explode, ex­posing her own love for women . $7.95 in b<wkstores, or use this coupon to order by mail . ....... ..... ..... ......... ....... TOOROER ........ .............. ........... . !'lea"' """'J me Endo,...<,J "$ namr coty rnp,e, of Th,• Lau· ,,f Rrt11m al $8.50 each, postpaid. addr(")> ___ stJte __ Ztp _ ____ _ ALYSON Publications, PO Box 2783, Boston, MA 02208 l'•S JAN 20, 1984 / THE STAR 3 Gay Youth May Remain in Scouts, Says Court In a move hearalded as a victory for gay rights activist,;. the California Supreme Court denied a petition by the Boy Scouts of America contesting a gay youth's right to belong to that organization. The ruling in Curran L'S. Mt. Diablo Council of the Boy Scouts of America sends the case back to Los Angeles Super­ior Court where the Boy Scouts will have to show cause why a gay young man can• not remain a member of that group. "This is a giant step forward in the on• going effort to end discrimination by organization. "hkh appeal to the public for membership," said George Slaff in commenting on the high court's decision. Slaff an AC-LU Foundauon volunte<>r attorney, 1s lead counoel in the case. Timothy Curran a ga,· scout who cl. ims that his expulSton from the Scouts violated California's Unruh Civil Right,; Act and hi, common law right to fair procedure, had held numerous leadership positions m his Scout troop and helped form a troop for deaf boys in the Oakland area. When Curran turned 11'1 he was no longer eligible to be a Boy Scout, so he applied for Scouter status; young adult members who assist the Scoutmaster of a troop. He was expelled because he revealed that he \Ii&. homo, cxual during a newspaper profile. He then filed suit m Los Angeles Superior Court only to have the case dism1"ed, ruling that Curran had no constitutional right to belong to the Scouts. Last fall, ho,.,ever, the California Court of Appeal, m a unanimou. decision ruled his expulsion "capricious and offen;.ive to public policy" The Boy Scouts filed a peti• tion with the California Supreme Court which ruled in favor of Curran "This affirmanc-e b) the Supreme Court, that the Boy Scoc.t,; are subject to the nruh Act; ndenicoree al1forn1a s lead ersh1p position in rooting out bias and preiudice wherever possible in our society," Slaff noted. Gay Prostitutes Say They Lied About Mississippi Governor Three homo,aual prostituU·s who said they had ex WJth succe,, ful gubernator• ial candidate Bill Allain of Missifisippi stated earlier thi~ week that the allega• tions were not true and that they had been paid to make them. The accufiers gave the story to the Jack• son, Miss., Clarion-Ledger on the gover• nor's inauguration day to "set the record straight." The men, Grady Arrington, David Holli• day and Donald Johnson, all recanted the story they had told and gave sworn state­ments to that effect to Allain's attorney. Bill Spell, the J ackson attorney who supervised an investigation of Allain'e private life for his Republican opponent, said the move was expected and that the three had been offered "large sums of money" in a "combination of threat and reward" to change their stories. Spell said Arrington had mentioned an offer of $5000, which Allain's attorney, Crymes Pittman, demed. Holliday, one of the prostitutes, said a representative of a private detective agency that worked for Allain'e oppo­nents gave him money to maie the atate­ments. All three were allegedly placed on the payroll at 162 per day, with promises of more money on election day by Allain'• opponents. Allain, 55, denied thu tatementa thathe had homosexual relationships and took a lie detector test to prove his innocence. He was elected \\rith 56 percent of the vote on Nov. 8. 4 THE STAR / JAN 20, 1984 'We Have to Keep It Going,' Tom Coleman Says of THRF By HolliaHood The Texas Human Rights Foundation will continue all its courtroom battles for gay rights, said its new director, Houston attorney Tom Coleman, following the loss of its founder, the late Robert Schwab. ''The loss of Robert set us back because he served so many roles," said Coleman. "He had experience and guts and made our cause public. We have to keep it going." One of their biggest battles involves the furor which continues to sizzle around the Texas Penal Code 21 06. "Some people mistakenly assume that the 21 06 battle is over," said Coleman, "although the Attorney General has dropped the appeal. (Amarillo) District Attorney Danny Hill and the Dallas Doc­tors Against AIDS (DDAA) are appealing that Fifth Circuit decision. "None of the efforts of the Dallas Doc­tors Against AIDS has anything to do with the disease," he said. "They are try• ing to recriminalize gay people by reenact• ing 21.06 or by passing new legislation that would accomplish the same thing." DDAA is very well funded, he said, and represented by three old-line established Dallas law firms. Hill, who actually filed the appeal. has little to do with the case, he said. ''These people (doctors whom he noted include a veterinarian, a dentiat and no Write Us Letters to the Editor. THE STAR We Want to know Your Opinion on Issues of Interest to the Gay Community "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale Houston Texas 77006 (713) 520-9767 one involved in research) exhibit the 'clas­sic homophobic personality' aa expre11Sed in court pleadings," Coleman said. Homophobic personality traits, as defined by the court, include ignorance of the truth regarding the phobia, religious fanaticism, and doubts about one's own sexual identity. ''They project their problems on other people," said Coleman. "It's just an irra­tional fear of homosexuals." Coleman said whichever side wins at the next appeal level, the case will qurely go to the Supreme Court. "We had no idea that bigotry was so well-funded," he commented. Copying costs alone for the recent appeal in Baker vs. Wade were in excess of $2,000, he said, and when the case goes to the Supreme Court, special stipulations take effect that could run such clerical con• siderations upwards of $20,000. "We have no indications that the law firms are doing their work for free," said Coleman. And in pursuit of that "work," the firms initiate a great deal of costly work for THRF. The foundation pays attorneys to litigate cases-in Baker vs. Wade, the attorney ts Jim Barber-and furnishes a great deal of voluntary work. "21.06 is important, and the outcome of this case is important because it deter­mines if gays are criminals," said Cole­man. "It would affect child custody rights, employment, accommodations and dis­crimination, and it would affect public attitudes toward gays. These all depend on the outcome of 21.06. "If we win, discrimination won't disap­pear; and if we lose, it doesn't mean the end of the world. We will appeal it to the Supreme Court." Coleman said the foundation is also involved in a court battle forrecognition of a gay student group at Texas A&M Uni­versity. He quoted Schwab regarding the Texas A&M case. saying THRF is "cautiously optimistic" about the outcome, although the case lost in a lower court. "We are optimistic We are approaching 1t m First Amendment terms. "One of the briefs (from the opposing side) stated that gay students would have orgies at the student meetings, which 1s ridiculous Spreading AIDS has nothing to do with free speech, and it hos nothing to do with that activity " He said the cnse may be heard nt any time. Another case that THRF initiated and m which it 1s still involved is Richard Longstaff LS. the lmmigrat1on Author, ties. Longstaff. after several years m the l 1mted • totes and a reputable business man seeks to hecome a naturalized e1t1zen and and has been dented e1tizensh1p pnn c1palll on the grounds that he 1s homosex .:al The cnsc lost at the Fifth Cm·utt level nttonnl Gay Rights Advocates recently won a s1m1lar case in Cahforn1a nnd 1s as !Sting in the Longstaff cnse THRF was also represented at o recent ml-etmg m New York of several orgamza t1ons interested m gay rights when the ACLU expressed interest in attacking the sodomy laws m the remaining 23-25states that h ave them. Baker vs. Wade wns the landmark cnse m this area , so THRF will be working closely with groups and attor­neys from other states to eradicate this "invasion of privacy " ''The law only applied to people of the same sex, not between persons of opposite sexes" Coleman said. 'That's 1rrabonnl "'tlnless you are basing the law on preJud1ce or ignorance Coleman became director ofTHRF last Novernben, hen "1t became apparent that Robert v. as not going to recover from the AIDS-rela ted infections," he said. He had worked with the foundation pre­viously a nd had written briefs in the Baker vs. Wade case regarding Texas Pen.al Code 21.()6. TRAVEL CONSULTANTS ffiA~U, ~~%llDl1 'tt~~'ir~ ~~lL 1fA!ftl1T% 'Ilm&~lL ~~ru!'if&~1~ ~~~!Jl'lfA~~1fSS MARDI GRAS Various Statewide Group Departures For prices and info call Houston (713) 529-8464 or Texas Toll-Free 1-800-392-5193 Plan Now to Attend the Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference twt GAY PRESS ASSOCIATION January 27-29 Hotel Savoy Houston Workshops, Speeches, Entertainment ~~~~~ If you are working in the gay media or are a 9ay person working in the non-gay media ( either journalism, adver­tising or administrative), plan to join your colleagues in Houston. Also, for officials of gay organizations who are NOT in the gay media but who would like to learn haw to better Influence the gay media, local and natlonal, we'll have a special workshop. To Henry McClurg. vice president Gay Press Assoc1at1on 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 Enclosed 1s my S25 registration fee ( for GPA members) or S30 registration fee ( non-GPA members) for the Southern Reg onal Conference (lnc'ude S10 additional if pos+. marked after Jan 13) I am in the gay media. I work for the non-gay rT'edia. do not work ,n the media but wou d Ike to attend the workshop on 1nfluenc1ngthegay media and other events of the conference. Name Address Phone(s) I am a member of the Gay Press Association I am NOT a member of the Gay Press Association (farrMng Houst nb','plonc tranorbu5 ot.isknowvOl.rtm oforr11101ondwow. plc:k vou up at tho a rport or depot When we receive your form, we'll send YOu a conference schedule and a brochure on the Sa-lay Hotel so you con make reservations (You do not hove to stay at The Sao/oy to attend the conference ) fhe Sa-lay ts wrthrn wo ktng distance of several gay clubS Add1t10n­olly. busses w•II be ovorloble for tours of Montrose nig htspots. Your reglstrot10n fee will include tickets for free and discounted admis­sions to several clubs. JAN 20, 1984 / THE STAR 5 How Do You Do as a Houseguest? Quiz Goin' South By Roz Ashley What kind of houseguest gets invited back? And how do you rate on that score? Get in the mood and reminisce about the last time you visited a friend. What really happened? Did you strip your bed before you left? Did you strip yourself so your friend's mate could see you? Did you strip your host/hostess? Or did you simply strip the bathroom of that great cologne you found there? Be honest on the following quiz, you'll have fun and also get a brutally frank rating on your chances of being invited back to all the "right" houses. Circle the answer that moHt truthfully completes each numbered paragraph. Skip any items that don't apply or seem stupid to you. An11wers (and aconng) follow the last question. 1. You arrived at the apartment of some friends a few hours ago. Now everyone has gone to sleep, and you don't know which towel to use. You: a) don't wash; b) use the little lace one on the rack; c) use a paper towel from the kitchen. 2. You've been visiting a good friend who didn't mention how long your stay should last. The atmosphere is getting tense, so you: a) pack up and throw a good­bye kiss; b) wistfully ask if you should leave; c) offer drugs. 3. Your friend is on a diet, but you love to snack. What do you do? a) Nibble secretly; b) bake brownies and share; c) liake brow• nies, but scarf them all up yourself. 4 On a visit to a friend, you stain one of the towels badly, so you: a) apologize; b) rinse 1t out; c) take it with you when you leave. 5. Your friend has gone out, but hi,/ her lover drops by So you: a) chat, but avoid flirting; h) offer half of your newspaper and Sf!ttle down to road; c) serve a strong drink, maintain eye contact and hope your frif'nd will be gone for at least an hour. 6. A hostile dog guards you·r friend's place, and you must enter alone after a date. You have a key, but you're afraid. You solve the problem by: a) placating the animal with raw hamburger in advance; b) wearing dog repellant; c) making a night of it. 7. You 're visitng friends, but you forgot to pack toothpaste. So you: a) wait a day and then buy some; b) aak for some and use it; c) use the toothpaste in the bathroom and complain about the flavor. 8. You get up early, but your hostlh~s­tess likes to sleep late. So you: a) read m the mornings; b) run the water in the tub, take a bath and flush the toilet a lot; c) turn up the stereo and do some aerobics. 9. You're leaving your friend after a visit, and you're selecting a thank-you gift. You buy; a) replacements for every• thing you've broken; b) a book you intend to borrow back right away; c) some wine to share during your last dinner together. 10. You're on an extended visit with a busy person. You plan to: a) go your own way each day; b) ask every morning, "What are we doing today?"; c) ask every morning, "What are you doing today?" 11 You spilled red wine on your friend's rug. You tried to wash it, but the spot only got bigger What do you do? a) Have 1t cleaned, pay for it and co_nf~s all; b) move the furniture so the spot 1s hidden; c) cry a lot. 12. You're visiting a friend whose par• ents arrive unexpectedly from out of town. You: a) offer them your room and sleep on the couch; b) leave gracefully; c) claim squatter's rights. 13. Your friend has just come ?Own with a case of the flu. Y ~u: a) serve ~htcken soup and hang around m case you re needed; b) take Vitamin C and leav~ for the day; b) take Vitamin C and stay m your room. 14 It'• very late and in order to get to the bath.room you \\ould have to pass through your host's bedroom when an overnight guest is being "entertained." What do you cio? a) Ti1,toe past them without looking; h) stay out, because you've planned ahead, c) walk through, apologizing at great length. 15. At the end of a relaxing soak at your friend's place, you: a) scrub the tub shiny clean; b) use the back brush to wash your back; c) use your friend's lover to scrub your back. And now, to get your Houseguest Score and Rating, add up the points for the answers that you chose· ! · a•l, b-0, c-5. 2: a-5, b-0, c-0. 3: a-5, b-0, c-0. 4. a-2, h-5, c-0. 5: a-5, h-5, c-0. 6: a-0, h-1 , c-3. 7: a-5, b-5, c-0. 8: a-5, b-0, c-0. 9 : a-5, b- 1 , c-½ . 10: a-5 , b-0, c-0 11 : a-6, h-0, c•0 12· a• 1, b-5, c-0 13: a-6, b-0, c-0. 14 a-1, b 5, c-0. 15: a-5, b-3, c-0. Houseguest Score: ½-24. On "welcome-back" scale of 1-10, you rate a, You 're a real disaster. Go to a motel next time and check in under an assumed name. 25-49. Not too good; not too bad. On that "welcome-back" scale, you get about a 5. If you invest in an impressive house gift and give your friend a long time to forget, you may be invited hack. 50-73. So you got a high score. If you didn't fib, you rate a 9 on the scale. You're sure to be invited back. In case you're cur• 1ous about why you didn't get a 10, it's just that I'd hate to ruin ~our personality by making you arrogant. By the way, what • are you doing next weekend? Ashley 1s a personal counselor. 1983 Stoneu•all Features S)nd1cate. Illegal drugs and workers are streaming mto the United States from Mexico, but customs officials sa, the real action i.s gomg the other way: Amencan pilots are making fortunes supplying ,outh-of-the--border consumers with everything from tax-free stereos to .stolen cars. reports the Boston Globe. The exploits of the border runner,, called "Contrabandistas," have evoked mixed reactions from American authori• ties The FAA 1s keeping hands off, ,a, mg it's purely a Mexican problem But some smugglers aCC'U,e the U$. custom, servtce of Upping off the Mexicans t.o incoming Amencan flights Say one pilot, " It's a flat-out betrayal of American cttizcns " No Where Else but the Galleon Serving Miller Lite Longnecks $1.25 Also, don ,t forget our Sunday Brunch, N oon 6 THE STAR/ JAN 20, 1984 Virginia Apuzzo: NGTF's Outspoken Executive Director By Kathy Tepes Via Gay Presa Auociation \\'ire Service "Before there was gay pride, brothers and sisters, there was gay and lesbian rage. We now have an opportunity, and damn good reason, to be m touch with that rage again for the SECOND STO!',;EWALL," said Virginia Apuzzo, executive director of the National Gay TaRk Force, at a recent gay pride rally in New York City which addressed the AIDS issue. "And just like our brothers and sisters who took to the street because they were fighting for their lives," she continued, "we came to the street today for no less purpose. We are fighting for our lives, and the government better get the message that we intend to win. "The fact of the matter is, brothers and sisters, that we stand at a critical moment in our history. We can look at this moment and decide in our guts, and decide at this Second Stonewall, what our principle will be: Intolerance is intolerable. "Our wealth 18 not affluence, nor acqui­sition; it is the opportunity to put our 'What we ought to do for the time being in this Presidential race is fall in love with an issue and forget about falling in love with the candidate. ' ideals to work-to put them to work for the purpose of making the history that we can be proud of-a history that does not have as it's objective 'to survive,' but 'to thrive.'" At this time when so many people in our community are fearful of AIDS. Apuzzo delivered a very up message to fight back. Notable activists Robin Tyler and Stonewaller, himself, Ed Murphy called Apuzzo "Our Leader." Apuzzo recently met with White House representatives in the offices of the Health and Human Services. Concerning the out­come of the meeting, Apuzzo said, "There i.a no evidence that there is a commitment about AIDS. I don't believe that the Rea­gan administration knows what the number one health care priority is. "At the meeting, we were told that we are making a political issue, whereas AIDS is a medical problem. My answer to them was. 'If your boss in the form of the Reagan administration says that you must live within your budget, and in the constrain ts of your budget you find that all you can commit is only $12 million. and if you are telling me that your answer is a scientific answer, then I'm telling you that your answer is political-that all you are allowed to say ts that there is only so much money. You are not utilizing science as the variable; you are using political con• straint as a variable, and I'm reacting to what l think is a political conclus1on."' Apuzzo added, "When the New York Times said that the Reagan administra­tion is yawning concerning AIDS, we in the lesbian and gay community know that they are sound asleep. "We have to let the Reagan administra­tion know that we see that politics is based on homophobia, and that AIDS is an example of what government does when any group gets disenfranchised-be it ,. omen, the poor, people of color, the unem­ployed, the underemployed, the aging and the lesbians and gays."· Switching to the upcoming Presidential race, Apuzzo said, "Alan Cranston haR historically always been supportive. Wal­ter Mondale did the Human Rights Cam­paign Fund benefit dinner, and he also sent out a gay rights statement for Gay Pride Week. Ernest Hollings-few people Virginia Apuzzo, executiue director of the National Gay Task Force know it-has made a commitment to sign a gay rights bill. "Those of us who are working nation­ally are in the process of putting together a statement that we will ask all of the candi­dates. and then we will report to the com• munity what their responses were. Of course, some of the candidates may have a disastrous record in other areas, and we have to look at that. What we ought to do for the time being in this Presidential race is fall in love with an issue and forget about falling in love with the candidate." 'Be yourself! Reach inside yourself and dare to be the best you can be.' However, Apuzzo would like to see the Board of Directors at NGTF get more involved and begin to take their roles more seriously: to perform. to be accountable to the community and to know when it's time to go. "Membe1'8 of the Board of Directors need to recognize that they are policy mak­ers. If the organization isn't going in the right direction, don't just blame the execu­tive director or the staff. Ask youl'>lelfwhy are you on the board. what do you have to contribute, who i. your constituency, and what resources do you bring to the organi• zation?" In apparent reference and contrast to her predecessor, Lucia Valeska, and her turbulent resignation, Apuzzo said, "If members had thesensethatitwastimefor me to move over, they wouldn't have to write tyrant articles in the newspaper. They should simply send me a dozen roses to say, 'You served us for whatever period, now your time IS up, and thank you very much.' It's a smart person who knows when to go." In conclusion, Apuzzo said, "I love this community. I think the movement saved my life. There wns a time when I never thought it was possible for me to ever say that I was a homosexual out loud, even in a room by myself. The movement helped me and I owe a lot. "I'm 42-years-old and I see myself work­ing on behalf of the movement for several more years. "Congress is something that is a dream to me, but if the dream doesn't come true, well, I have to live my life." Tackling another political issue, Apuzzo talked about a recent case where a closeted politician approached the lesbian and gay community and requested our help and support in a political campaign. Apuzzo commented, "More and more people within the community are going to have leas and lesa patience with people who take all of the benefits of all of the people who take the risks and who are not willing to take a risk themselves. Basically, you've got to care enough about yourself to be who you are." And many women wish to be like Apuzzo. When I suggested to her that she was a role model, she responded with, "Be your elr. Reach inside yourself and dare to be the best you can be. Dare to be yourself. Young women today have to remember what so many women had to struggle and fight for. You must make it better; you must go on. Never give up! "I just love Holly !Ii ear's line: 'If you got all your freedom this afternoon, tonight you'd have to have your first meeting to 'The finest thing you can hope to have is the support from your peers.' make sure that they didn't take it away."' Apuzzo has had a varied career from nun to teacher to politician to leading one of the major gay rights organizations in the country 'Tm a teacher first. a lesbian feminist, a politician and I'm Italian. I'm very cultu• rally identified, and that is good. I like that-to put aside where I came from and what I'm about. " I learned my politics in the two most political environments-as an ex-nun, there is nothing more political than the Church; and a~ a teacher, there is nothing more political than academia. "In the convent, the Church is the politi­cal beast, and academia is perhaps the most cut-throat environment." Apuzzo went on to explain how she learned politics on the street in the Bronx. Then she briefly entered a convent when she was 26-years-old, already having a 'I love this community. I think the movement saved my life.' 8.A. degree. She went on to study theology and philosophy, although, "The Church paid very little to have me work for them for years," she said. One of her proudest accomplishments was introducing Black Studies in the Archdiocese in New York. Apuzzo held two positions in New York City administration. She was the former Assistant Commissioner of Health and supervised the largest ambulatory system in the world at that time and provided the first patient literature on ammebiasis. Her second position was a term as executive director of Administration Trials and Hearing,, the internal court system of the city. Apuzzo no longer supports her one-time - boss, Mayor Koch, nor is she in agreement with Herb Rickman, who was appointed liaison to the lesbian and gay community. "I think that Koch has to seriously con• sider not only whether Herb Rickman serves our need, but also whether Herb Rickman, in fact, serves Koch's need in terms of dealing with our community." Also, Apuzzo had vigorously, along with the majority from the community, supported Governor Cuomo, who recently approved $5.25 million towards AIDS. Apuzzo takes great pride in her excellent reputation within the community: "The finest thing you can hope to have is the support from your peers. It matters a great deal to me. People have been very suppor­tive to me. My staff has been extraordi­nary. We are a team, and l feel real good about that." Speech Betrays Social Status What time you eat, the shape of your drive­way and whether you go for poinsettias or rhododendrons reflect your social status, says cultural critic Paul Fussell, who has written a book dividing America into nine social classes, reports the Philadelphia Inquirer You can try to boost your class, says Fussell. by stocking your place with antiques, hut spcec·h always tells the tale. For example, he notes, if you pronounce "exquisite" aH "exquisite.'' you are operat­ing with a major cultural disadvantage. White Stuff Ain't the Right Stuff The New York Post reports that a new study of cocaine use has documented how the white powder can wreck your wealth ns well aR your health. According to n survey of 200 cocaine abusers in the New York City area. 78 p<'r• cent suffer from depress10n, 4:l )'.l('rcent from a loss of sex drive and 59 percent reported a general deterioration of their health. The atudy also found that 55 )'.l('rcmt used at least half their life savings to buy coke, and 2S percent stole. JAN 20. 1984 / THE STAR 7 Life, Death and the Uncertainties of Justice Gay Community By Dan Siminoski, Ph.D. 10:00 a.m., November 30. I am writing in the shadow of death this morning. Robert Sullivan, a gay man who wa~ (wrongly, I believe) convicted of a 1973 robbery and murder, was executed by Florida officials a few moments ago. At the time of his arrest, police had no physical evidence to link him with the crime; fingerprints were inconclusive, and footprints found near the body were grossly different from his own. While the murdered man's credit card and watch were in Sullivan's possession when he was arrested, the police systemat­ically refused to investigate any of the plausible ways they might have come to him, other than through the murder. In particular, they refused to investigate Sul• livan 's claim that he had received them from his roommate, a small-time hood who disappeared after the murder. Sullivan stayed on Death Row longer than any other prisoner in America at the time; over 10 years. He continued to pro• claim his innocence to the end. The Sullivan case is a textbook example of the inequities of the American system of criminal justice. Evidence and the word of witnesses placed Bob at a gay bar 40 miles away from the scene of the crime.Ayoung man specifically recalled being with him at midnight, because it had been his birth­day, and Bob had bought him his first legal-age drink: None of thie evidence was presented at the trinl, in part because his court• appointed defender seemed disinterested in the case, and in part because the homo­phobia that was to inflame Dade County in Anita Bryant's campaign made the lawyer fear that prejudice would effect the case (and perhaps his own future?). When, after nearly a decade, gay and civil rights attorneys got involved in Sulli• van's case, it proved impossible to locate the witneesee who could testify to Sulli­van's presence in the bar that night. Des· pite overwhelming doubt surrounding the case, it was impossible to save him from execution. Sullivan, a round-faced, blue-eyed college-educated man, walked into the exe­cution chamber this morning, acknowl• edged the presence of observers, and was slowly and methodically strapped in the death chair. He wae handed a microphone and was allowed to read (calmly, but in a quavering voice that betrayed his fear) from Pealm 62. "And in God alone is my soul at rest because my hopes comes from within." Hours before, he had been told that Pope John Paul II had contacted Florida offi­c; aJs to beg for his life. Now, he thanked the Pope for his personal intervention and smiled at the three confessors who stood in the room with him. He urged his supi,orters and other inmates to continue their struggles, say- You're Reading THE STAR Amenca·s Newest Gay Community Newspaper ing: "To all my J)el'r& on Death Row, des• pit_e ~hat is about to happen to me, do not quit. He lowered the legal pad from which he had been reading and spoke theNe final words: "I hold malice to none. May God bless us all." His face was covered by 8 blac-k hood. He was electrocuted, another offering to the gods of retribution and cer­tainty who claim that justice in America is unbiased and infallible. Meanwhile, a few days earlier at the otht•r end of the c-ontinent, there was another ct•lt•bration of "justice." Gay pt'O• pie in San Frandsc-o had just nights before marked the fifth anniversary oft he murders of County Supervisor and Gay activist Harvey Milk and liberal Mayor George Mosc-c,ne by Dan White. White was a homophobic-, c-onservative County Supt•rvisor who had resigned and was angered by Mosc-one'srefusal to reappoint him rnto a political office. He admittedly viewed Mllk a,; a per~onal enemy. One morning, he loaded his handgun and walked through the Supervi•ors' pri• vate mtrance to City Hall for a requested appointment with the Mayor. Once inside, he exchangtd a few angry words, and, standing at point-blank range, fired repeatedly into Moscone's body. Then he calmly reloaded the weapon, walked across the hall, and did the same to Har• vey Milk He left behind witnesses, finger­prints, a gun, and a personal admission of guilt. After a trial in which the prosecution seemed reluctant to construct a full case against the former supervisor, he was found guilty only of two counts of mans• laughter. H;s sentence was only seven years m prison. With time off for good behavior, he qual­ified for parole; he was released on Janu­ary 6. He walked into a community that at least in part prai,e,, hi" deeds. and he probably felt rather smug about the work• ings of justice in America. As I look through my files on the~e cases, I see two round, boyish faces star­ing at me from faded newsprint. One is alive and one is gone. One was guilty. the other probably framed. I can imagine the anger Dan White must have felt before his crimes, and I wonder if, so short a time later, he regrets them. And, I can imagine the emotions Bob Sullivan went through as his last minutes ticked by, as he was shaved and wired. as he scribbled the words he would read. Imagine anyone's fear during the count• down to that finality so few of us come to terms with. ;'I; ow filter in the po,~ib1hty that he knows he 18 innocent and that a dreadful mistake is about to be made; add the immutable fact that his is a nightmare from which he c-annot wake A scream of anger might shake the re,;t of ua into an appreciation of his agony, but that is not enough. We have to continue our work. As Bob wrot~in his last letter, "I ask that you keep strong and that you be NOT afraid, no matter what. We have fought well, and more importantly, we have been in the right." Dr. Siminoski IS a political scientist and has been ac-tlt'e in the ga:,. rights moL·e­ment for about a dec-ade. He may be writ• ten at 1221 R<'dondo Blvd., Los Angeles. CA 90019. 1984 Stoneu·all Features Syn­dicate. AUSTIN'S ALTERNATIVE A f'IEW CHOICE FOR THE TEXAS WOMAN! (AND EVERYONE ELSE TOOi) DOUBLE FEATURE THURSDAY, JAN. 26, 9pm til • • • Your MC- Judy Martin 5500 S. Congress, Austin- 442-9285 8 THE STAR/ JAN. 20, 1984 New Orleans' Vieux Carre Serves Up Treasured People on a Grand Scale By Billie Duncan Staying in the French Quarter for a few days is like taking one lie)<: off an ice cream cone. You can guess the flavor, but you want so much more. Before I left to go to New Orleans, an acquaintance of mine told me, "Why bother going to the French Quarter? It's just a bunch of bars. You can go to the bars here in Texas and save the travel • expense." I have to disagree. New Orleans (or any other town, for that matter) is not just a bunch of bars. New Orleans is a city of history. Of architectural romance. Of strange contrasts. And of characters. The characters of New Orleans­especially the French Quarter-are trea• sured, almost as if they were natural resources. And they run the gamut from people you expect to be characters anywhere-like musicians-to people you don't find anywhere else-like the Duck Lady. The police in the Quarter are quick to expel dingy derelicts from the mainstream Bourbon Street action, but they are protec­tive and even gracious to the established creative oddballs that inhabit the Quarter nights. In other words, it's okay to be dif­ferent, as long as you have proved yourself to be harmless. In a city where historical texture is the PHornsevs,LLieou c N springboard for attitude, it seems only natural that characters would abound. The Crescent City has always been a home for the adventurous and the roman­tic. Jean Baptiste Lemoyne Bienville claimed the area upon whichNewOrleans sits for Louis XIV in 1718 and named the city for the Duke of Orleans. With the easy access from the Gulf of Mexico, New Orleans was built with a European flavor. French charm abounded. You would think that France might have had some pride in this little strug­gling cosmopolitan city. But, no! In 1762, France gave the land to Spain. Now, here is a most interesting fact. Two huge fires destroyed the city during the Spanish occupation, and what is now the French Quarter was rebuilt-by the Spaniards. So, the French Quarter is really not French at all. Of course, there was still a great deal of French influence, and the combination of French and Spanish came to be called Creole. Residents of New Orleans say that Creole means "child of the colonies." But the word has an interesting origin. It is a French word based on a Spanish word based on a Portuguese word that meant "Negro born in the master's house" that was derived from the Latin creare which means to create or beget. Now, that may not be earthshaking information, but how many stories on New Orleans have you read lately that never euen mentioned the original of any word? A little esoteric information never hurt anyone. But back to the French Quarter. After rebuilding the city, the Spaniards gave the land back to the French in 1803. Twenty days later, Napoleon I sold the territory, along with a huge chunk of adjacent land, to the United States. (Remember the Loui­siana Purchase?) So, now added to the Creole and the Cajun was the American. Ah, yes, the Cajun. The Cajuns were French settlers in Novia Scotia who were expelled by the British in 1755. They were not Cajuns then. They were Acadians. Through linguistic corruption, Acadian became Cajun. It's easy to see how that happened. After years in the bars, my name has in some cases evolved from Dun­can to Mud. With all the diverse influences of the varied settlers, add the fact that New Orleans is a port. A lot of people from all over the world have managed to just come and stay. Travel Street artist and tourist Carriages at Jackson Square Hot Dog Stand Man The Duck Lady and Officer Michel W14 Street worker m French Quarter With that kind of humanistic milieu, tol• erancc for differing lifestyles and opinions seems almost necessary. And the widest variety of humanity 1n N cw Orleans 1s in the Vieux Carre (the Old Square), which is the original Creole city of New Orleans. Packed tnto the tight rows of housf's along the narrow, CTUmbling streets are the demzens of the Quarter Spacious is not an adjective at home m the Quartt>r Some people 1n th1• Quarter are still the poor" ho hove been there for years, but the poor are slo\\ ly being replaced hy people who have come to New Orleans and just ha1,. to hve tn th<' V1t>ux Carre. These pen pie pay an arm and a leg for the privilege. Moot of the people I met who were work ing m the bars and m the restaurants had come from the Midwest. The old good-bye­oh to Ohio syndrome But tht> characters, the creative odd halls, the beautifully strange creatures that stand out from the crowd, all seem to have sprung from the magic of New Orleans. My favorite character was Ruthie, the Duck Lady. Huthie roller skates down the streets of the Quarter with several ducks truiling hehmd her most of the time. She ulso c11rnes II toy stuffed duck under her arm When I talked to her, P11trolman I) F Michel of the New Orleans Police Depart m1•nt was her translator and protector, "Shi, raises ducks," he 1•xplained "She's ht-en doing it ever since I can remember. Lots of people have writ!Rn stories about her. She's even been on TV. Isn't that nght. Ruthie?" Ruthie nodded vaguely. "Yeah." She looked me over to - if she really wanted to talk to me. Shedce1ded to volun• teer some information. "I was born nght in the French Quarter." I asked how long ago that was. She looked at me from the height of her little­old- womanly vanity and told me with more than a little huff m her attitude, "I don't tell my age," I told her that I didn't tell mine, either. She liked that She decided to confide in me "I eat red beans and rice and spagh­etti." I told her I liked red beans and nee, so she gave me the secret of life "I stay young I keeps young by roller skate" We seemed to be on a roll so I asked her how sh<' supported herself. Ruthie does not seem to like direct questions. She stared off down the street and mumbled some­thing Hut Patrolman Michel explained for me. "She goes in places where she can drink." Ruthie ts not the only person in the Quarter with a bird follo\\ing. Be,,ides the Duck I.ady, there is the Pigeon Man. His name is James Greer and he feeds the pigeons m Jackson Square. Now, he doesn't Just feed the pigeons, he dresses to feed the p1ge<Jns, and he feeds them with flair 11nd style Tht•rc are th<Jusands of pigeons who clusu.•r around him and perch on his hat and arms. And when he feeds them, they fly and dive He turns feeding the birds into ll poetry SC88ion for the eyes. There are other characters almoot too numerous to mention There was the hot dog stand man who gave me a leeson on territorial rights. "Sometimes you Just gutta fight for your corner. You may lose friends, but mat', Ginl(cr Grant the way tt 1s. There was "Ginger" Grant who works m a Bourbon Street strip Joint where the boys take it all off. "I'm 43 years old, and I've been doing it (stnpping) for 17 years My mothe.r was a stripper on Bourbon Street. She's retired. I'll rettre when I'm too old and can't boogie anymore." There was the driver, Bobb), of a car­nage drawn by a horse named Clarn Bobby gave a creative "history" of the French Quarter that was mterspersed with comments such as, "Here's one of those bars" 1th only guys m it. I don' go m to there. They don' alllow no womens. No womens m that bar " There was Tommy Van de Velde at the Parade whownnted to know, "Could I sny hello to Marsha nt the Copa?" Sure There was David Antony at Play It Again .Sam who proudly showed off his tiny little stage in the bar, and he said that the bar did "strictly professional shows. The last show was a big Vegas-style show." David was a dear, but it was hard to imagine where the elephant could exit. There was Pat DeCuir, the leader of Copas Brothers who play C&W on Bour­bon. ''We get a lot of Texas people listen to us. I guess it makes 'em feel at home." He look1-d off mto the sky. "You'd like to feel at home on Bourbon Street." There were street artists, street mus1- cmns, street workers. Maybe there are a lot of bare m :-e" Orleans. Maybe one of the best things about the town is the food Maybe it's the music. But in between going to all the places, don't forget to stop and talk to the people They're the best attraction in the French Quart.et. JAN 20, 1984 / THE STAR 9 C& W Binger Pat DeC'wr of CoP<U Bros. 10 THE STAR / JAN 20, 1984 Fourteen ... Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JAN. JAN. 20 21 JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 JAN. JAN. JAN. FEB. FEB. 29 30 31 1 2 For ad01t lona lnformat10n or phone numbers for events lested below Jock tor the spansoring organizat,on under "'Organ zauon, n the The Staf1 Directory Selected Events First Week ~RIDA Y: NOW's Lesbian Rights Conference, Jan. 20-22, Milwaukee -SA TURDA Y-SU.VDA Y: SA Gay Alliance Leadership Retreat, Jan 21-22, near Boerne • TUESDAY: Austin Lesbian Gay Political Caucus meets 7·30pm Jan.24. Commissioner"s Court, Courthouse Annex Selected Events in Future Weeks •/ .'\' I WEEK: Gay Press Assooation Southern Regional Conference, Jan. 27-29, Houston •IN 1 WEEK: Feminist Sonia Johnson speaks 7pm Jan. 30, Texas Union ballroom, UT campus, Austin • IN 1 WEEK: Austin Pride Week Task Force meets 8pm Jan 30, upstairs 302 W 15th • JI'\' 3 WEEKS: Lincoln's birthday Feb 12 • IN 3 WEEKS: San Antonio Gay Alliance 1984 D1Stinguished Service Awards Banquet 6·30pm Feb 12, Americana Inn, 96 NE Loop 410 •IN 3 WEEKS: Blueboy's 6th Annual Man of the Year Contest, Feb. 12, College Club, 110 E. 14th, New York • /1\' 3 WEEKS: San Antonio Gay Alliance 3rd Annual Awards Banquet, Feb. 12 • IN 8 WE'EKS: Valentine's Day Feb 14 • IN 4 WEEKS: 5th Annual Women's Valentine Dance, Feb. 17, Unitarian Church, Austin •IN 4 WEEKS: Washington's birthday, Feb. 20 •IS MARCH: ALGPC s ponsors "AIDS Awareness Week," exact dates to be announced • IN 6 WEEKS: Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday March 6 • IN 8 WEEKS: St. Patrick's Day, March 17 •IN 10 WEEKS: April Fool's Day, April 1 • IN 11 WEEKS: 9th Annual Southeastern Conference of Lesbian and Gay Men, "Pulling Together and Reaching Out," Holiday Inn-Medical Center, Birmingham, Ala., opena Apr. 12, lasting to Apr. 15 tiN 13 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Foundation 1st Southeastern Lesbian/Gay Health Conference, Apr 21 , Atlanta •IN 16 WEEKS: First primary party elections in Texas and party precinct conventions, May 5 •IN 16 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12, lasting to Nov. 11 •IN 17 WEE.'KS: Texas Senatorial District Party Conventions, May 19 •IN 18 WEEKS: Gay Press Association 4th National Convention, May 25-28, Los Angeles •IN 18 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 28 • IN 19 WEEKS: Run-off party elections iri Texas, June 2 •IN 21 WEEKS: Texas Democratic Party Convention, June 15-17, tentatively Houston •IN 21 K-'EEKS: 191l4 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anniversary of Stonewall uprising, national s logan "United & More m '84," June 15-24 • EARLY JUl,Y: Lesbian and Gay Bands of Amenca concert, Los Angeles • IN 21 WBEKS: ' ational Gay Health Education Foundation's 1st International Lesbian Gay Health Conference, ''Toward Diversity." New York, June 16-19 •IN 26 WEEKS: Democratic National Convention, San Franasco, July 16-19 • IN 30 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug. 19, San Franasco •IS 31 WEEKS: "Senes 8," Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens Memonal Park, Houston, Ang. 26, lasting to Aug. 31 ANNOUNCEMENTS BUSINESS OWNERS w. hSI ''" NCh week tn this d rectory communf!Y organlzatk)ns ptus tiuaines.Ma Hrvmo •1 diltrlbutlon Points for THE STAR • •ndicatn tntS hstlng II I ST AR OtStribut10n pG 01 DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES SOUTH AUSTIN APARTMENT ~~iu1,~~ =c::e 1~fr~·se~~~~· Call Austin « 1-M79 ROOMMATE WANTED San Antonio male . protes11ona l, no"'11mo1<er. to sPlare 2 bedroom. 2 bath, f,replace. cable Bau&-McCullough area $185 • ut1l1t,es Char1HI. 15121822-1335 or 681-2128 Free Personals Continue Free Personals (up to 15 words) continu_e in THE STAR. Send yours in today. See the form in the back for details. EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED STRINGERS WANTED The Star seeks free-lance news writers in Aust in and San Anto n io for ass,gnments Send samples of your work to Henry McClurg. Voice Publlsh,ng 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO Presently working In a laboratory and wrsh1ng to get into aafes? Represent nationally known sclent1f1c instrument ~~:ffec~~~leg;as~~P.~:e d:~~~~oi8=~~ outgoing personality Submit resume In strict conf1dent1ar1ty to Sales Manager. Suite 219. 2615 Waugh Dr . Houston TX 77006. FOR SALE CONTACT, FANTASY, FUN ~;t::~~cfe 1~10;:'.;';!k s~0 ~~~m~o:,,S 10th St New York NY 10011 BAA LIGHTING FIXTURES Z:°.f1" :~~fl~t•~ f'.Bmp1~ners Sell cheap GAY BARS AIJSTIN- •Au•t n A"ernat v• 5500 S Cong,ess iaack suee1 ea,cs-e~, E 7th 477~39~ iBoal HouS&-..t07 C01orad~4 74 9667 ~ 7 ':~at'''>' 1 Apartment 2828 Ro Grande- • Red River Cron no 6 · 1 Red CORPUS CHR STI • Htdoen Door 003 Morgan Av '882-0183 i"Jolly Jaett 2-413 Peopfes i 5pani:st1 Ga eon -517 N Cha parrai-882-o510 e Sandbar -408 T•yso,-184-02n 8 Zod ao- ~17 S - ~n5l EL PASO The Apartme t-104 M,rtJe Club P~al et-411 E Frank Aw 532w9018 Diamond l 308 S Florene.- 54&-9332 le M tord 207 E San Antonto--646--9327 Noa -~726 Alamedo Av 779-9273 Old Plantal .,,,_119 S Ochoo-633-e055 P&t Shop II 919 Pa uno Or -646-9629 San AntonMl 1,t ng Co -eoo E San Antonio- 5'&9903 Wl'Uapers-801 N El Pa~ Star Classified McALLEN Bumpers-1100 ~n Duffy a-1702 N 10th Ma I 8o11 200 ~h SAN ANGELO-SAN° 7NTONIO­• Abl Westernaire-122 AOOHvelt !532~15 e Bogarts-11s.c1 West Ave--349-7187 ieonham e.change-411 Bonham-2'71-381 1 e Cal'W>Ots-435 McCarty---3• 4-9257 e caub Atlantis 321 Navarro-22S-9468 e Club Heada or T111a-2526Culebra 436--4.CSO • Crew 309 W Markel -223--0333 i e1 Jardin- 106 Navarro 223-,7177 i i::aces-1 19 e r M o-3-4--4302 • Ga eon-330 San Pedro 22S..2J$3 • ~•• 3~ West Av :W1 9359 eMadam Arthur'I 607 N SI Mary 1 22s.9678 e One N gtil Satoon-e•~ Frederkht,urg, 73&-119'2 • OurPlac~1•1GenKr~, ~0-1758 • Ru, Powe, & Lt;hf Co- 2315 San Peci,o 11-0-3399 • Sen Pec1to M ntng Co-t.;.;6 San Pedro- 223-0243 • Snufty a Saloon-e;..~ San Pedro-124-7J )9 e SunaetBoulevard 1430NMa nAv Z25--6M4 • Tak of the Town 3530 Broadway 82&--9729 • 20,-5 Plac~ 2015 s• n Pedro- 733-336$ ORGANIZATIONS 6[ ECTEO NATIONAL ORGAN ZAT1QN.,. Gay Presa AQOCiabC)n POB 33eOS WIV'! ngton DC 20033- ('202) 391.2,30 Oay R,gl'tts National Lobby POB 1892 Wash nglon 0C 20013- (202} !>46-18"1 Human Rights Campa gn Fund--POB 1396 Wash "'gt°" DC 20013---12"21 !M&-2020 ..arnbdl Legal o.ffflM--132 ~ "3rd Nil'IW YOO. NY 10039-(212) - Med I Fond for Human R gl'tts IO•y Prell Auoc-'..atlOfl) POB S3S05 Wash ngton DC 20033-(202) 3117-2430 • National A.sloeiatlOft Of Bu91NU Councill Bo• 1S14 $anfranc:IICO CA94t1~ •1S>18$-1363 Nalional Association of O•y & Lnblarf Oernocrati:c Out. 11,2 MUI Av SE WQNngton. DC 20003--(202) S,47--3104 Nation.I Cay Heafth Educa:On f'ounda on--POB 7M ,_ Yorit NY 10036- 212 56J.-6313 or 0, OrNnbefg 11 (7\3 523--5,20,t Natcn.t Oay Rights Advocates 6'0 Castro. San F-.notc:0 CA 9411• ,1s ~362• Nltionai Gay Task f •rce- eo Stn ,,,_., ~ew YOflt NY •0011 (212) 741'"5a00 NOTF'I Ctllisl ,..._ 800) , 704' outlide New Von SUI•• Taaa Gay L•tuan Task Forc.-POB A.K. Oento 7620' ,,n ,a1-u·& AuSTIN Austin Lambda POB 5455 78783-47~ Aust .. et.r ~· , iayPc, • ,;.aiIC<i., r, L:Z 78787 .c1, J.717 mqt) •rti Tu- , JUPft1 Comm1a,1oner1COUrt COurthOuseAnnex AIDS Awareness Week 1n March IJanet Zumbf'un ai 441 1130> Ausbn Pride Week Task Fon:e-P08 13303 78711 meet1no 8pm Jan 30. upstatrt302W 15th CORPUS CHRIST/- Gay Bartenders A11oc1at1on c o Zodiac Lounge 617 Staples-183-7753 Metropolitan Commun,tY Church- c o Un1tar1an Church, 3125 Home Rd~9698 SAN ANTONIO-Alamo Human Rights Comm,ttH-M-4-0074 65S-5485 01gn1ty 349-3632 ffl8tlll Sun 5pm, SI P1I11ck1 Church, i-35 nea, New Braunfela & Pine Gay Sw,tchboard-733-7300 lnte,;;irity/SA POB 15006, 78212-734-0759 meet, 111 & 3rd Thura Ulmbda AA 1312 Wyoming 674•2819 L•bi•n & Gay People1n Med.cine-- 9o_. 2'9CXM3 78290 Roc.k n R Rder,-c,o Our Place 115 Oen Krueger ~Q-1759 SA Gay Alhanc. Bo• 12063 78212 733-8315 Le• der,h p Retreat Jlf1 21~22 near Boerne 19&1 ~:~1.u::,.~ :'r::f:/•ooa~E r::~~h 6 30prn PERSONALS TERRELL F. Looking for you• Please call 1f you re around (512)495-3661 Chns A MONOGAMY SOUGHT with sensitive. attractive man First time adver111er Attracllve GWM, 26. 6'4" t75 lbs, Bki BI Interests include poltt1cs. his• tory, camping. hiking. rellgion, travel, stu­dies Broad taste in arts. EnthusJastle drinker, but prefer home to bars love affeet,on but no hurry for sex lets be friends hrst Then, who knows? Write Box 6A c/o Star, 3317 Montrose Sune 306 HOUS1on TX 77006 HOT TEXAS AGGIE GWM 21, 62 175 brown ha1r seeks special person for fnend/lover Honesty and alncerIty a must Larry Garrett 3200 Bethany Ct Brya~. TX 77601 SEEKING BISEXUAL COUPLES Sensual fun frolic anCI parties Meet oth ers w th Ike interests Call (Austin) 445- 6421 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS That is my ex-lover isn't it SANANTONtO- •Club S.n Antomo- 1802 N Main Av- 735-2487 ~ .... HNUh Clut>- 723 Av 8~s=ao, RESTAURANTS, CAFES WANTON/0- •Bogarta-115-41 WHI Av-34~7167 eC,rclel- 107 W Locust 733-5.237 SE~VICES, ETC. STAR CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS ADVERTISING RATES Placing a Classified other than a I Placing a • PERSONALS ? Read this: Personals? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words in bold and up to 15 total • ANNOUNCEMENTS words, FREE. (Additional words beyond 15 per • CARS & BIKES week are 30¢ each.) • DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES FREE PERSONALS apply only to individuals. No commercial services or products for sale. • EMPLOYMENT & HOW LONG? A Free Personal can be placed for JOBS WANTED one, two or three weeks at a time-but no longer • FOR SALE, MISC. without re-submitting the form. • MODELS, ESCORTS, BLIND BOX NUMBER: If you want secrecy, we'll MASSEURS • SERVICES assign you a Blind Box Number. The answers to your ad will be sent to us and we will then confiden­• TRAVEL tially forward the replies to you. Rate is $3 for each RATE: Up to 3 words in bold, $2 each issue the ad runs but replies will be forwarded as week. Additional regular words 30¢ each long as they come in. per week. Minimum charge $3 per week. ANSWERING A BLIND BOX NUMBER: Address DEADLINE: 5:30pm Monday for Friday's your reply to the Blind Box Number, c/o The Star, newspaper. Voice Publishing, 3317 Montrose no.306, Houston, LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the TX 77006. Enclose no money. Your letter will be same ad 4 issues or longer, pay the full forwarded unopened and confidentially to the run in advance, and make no copy advertiser. JAN. 20, 1984 / THE STAR 11 ,=.:=u==:s=r'=,=N:==-========= eWOn&t-413 E eth-474--4511 Tl'Mt SW ln Austin--44&-1380 SAN ANTONIO-SAN ANTON-0- Amencan Male thl1r ~ts)-3431 N St M&rys-73&-9671 The Star .,, Sall Antonio-737-0017 r~• Cark:>-N St Marys It Mulberry- SHOPS & STORES AUSTIN-e Book worn~4E,~765-­• waa AttlCk Recoros-608 E 7th-'73...a313 By Tycho eAecord Hote---6431 S.n Pedro-349-1367 : ~~ 1::-,,s: Vintage Clot~ng- 1803 N e Vadeo Wortd-1902 N Ma,n-~9927 .-K-;;;;-Wegne, Cardi & Gdtt -1801 N ~I n- 73).~ TRAVEL --TRAVEL GROUP LEADERS Consult us first about your group needs ~~~ 8~a!;~c~~ur:::~t~~~~i1~ 5193 Fortunes For Fr,day everung. Januery 20. 1984 through Fr day evan,ng. January 27. 19/k ARIES-Tt11ngs do work out After a rough-and-tumble start to the new year, the light finally shines on the Ram. Through some crazy kind of cockeyed 1mpuls1ve &ct. you somehow get the right gears in motion. Something elusive and maybe illusory about a major relationship still nags. TAURUS-A friend with' a different set of values, ideas and ideals could really influence you deeply. You've been having a problem with acting on what you know Another viewpoint could be just what you need to get the wheels rolling again GEMINI-What you want 1n love and what you get In love could be almost the same thing now This could be one of those ··some enchanted evening you will meet a stranger" ktnd of things You may be surprised at the object of your intent, but you'll recognize the feelings you experience. CANCER-You could find yourself drawn Into a part of your past that you'd rather not delve into right now. In response to this unpleasantness. you will continue to find your comfort in your home. Physical activity there will be therapeutic, so get out the manner, the ladder, the paintbrush. and work. LEO-Feeling testy, maybe even bitchy? No one wants to play with you anymore? Except. of course, for that one special friend who takes you as you are no matter what Be careful not to take advantage of that magnanimous receptivity, or you'll even scare that one awayl Cool off. VIRGO- The purposefulness and decisiveness that have been guiding you lately serve well now. Your mind 1s stimulated to the point that you have to make a decision that you've been avoiding. Here 11 comes again. out of the back of your mind: this time you'll know what to do. changes during the full run, and you can CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD: deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 issues or All charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box longer under the same corditions and ·charges must be paid in advance OR you can you can deduct 25%. charge to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill­CHARGE YOUR AD: All classifieds must except through your credit card-for classifieds. be paid in_ ~dvance OR you can ~harge PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be your class1f1ed to MasterCard or Visa. We charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in Clas­do not bill-except through your credit I sifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am card-for classifieds. to 5:30pm. The Free offer does not apply to Person­P~ ONE IN Y~UR AD: Only those who als phoned in. You will bechargedthesamerateas will be charging to MasterCard or Visa other types of Classifieds. can phone in classifieds to (512) 448- LIBRA-Fate rolls in with some more surprises. You are not out of control. but you have less of it than you'd like Beware of a man with a ~--·---mission. Don't even begin to argue the point he wants to make. "How" may be a more important question than "why" right now. 1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. (up to 3 normal-size words in bold capitals) (free or 30¢/word) _ __ _ (free or 30¢/word) __ _ (30¢/word) (30¢lword) ___ _ (30¢/word) bold headline at $2 _ __ words at 30¢ each __ Blind Box at $3 per issue Total ___ _ times ........ weeks ___ _ (use add1t1onal paper ,f necessa,y) Name Address ------- - ------ Amount enclosed ---------~ (• check a money order, a cash in person a VISA charge a MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card: # _ _ ____ exp date ___ _ Mail to The Star, c/o Voice Publishing, 3317 Montrose no.306, Houston, TX 77006 BERNIE WEU., rr'S AS0UT TIME,A~. 010 YOU LEAVE "1f AH( ~WAJIR. SCORPIO-II you've been holding back on some anger, now's the best time to let 11 go, no matter how hot and heavy you get. The words will get through to their intended place (victim?) and hit home You know the power of your sting. It won't kill you or the obJect of its venom, so use ill SAGITTARIUS-What do you get when you combine kind of kinky and very kind in a somewhat upfront and dramatic way? Well, imagine blending Dolly Parton and Boy George Get the picture? Be who you want to be. but be gentle with your crazy love. CAPRICORN-Th,s 1s an excellent time for you to make decisions concerning partnerships. whether business, romantic. or what Details that concern your Joining your force with another are easily handled II you've done your homework, you'll go the head of the class AQUARIUS-There's a man who wants to tell you something you don't want to hear He may come on so heavy that you will be immediately tempted to turn away Don't Listen-object1vely-to what's being said, but don't take it too personally You'll come out on top. PISCES-Sexual catharsis time for Pisces ! You can take 11 to the limit in whatever fashion you please. In fact, testing limits and delving deeper into specific areas is what this is all about With the right person, you'll learn a lot about yourself. Very, very hot time. • 1884 STONf'WALL rEA TURES $YN0ICATE ALAN, I O!O'NT t<HCN-1 'ftXJ WERE ltm> L.41HERf 12 THE STAR/ JAN. 20, 1984 BACKSTREET BASICS 611 EAST 7th • AUSTIN. TEXAS 78701 Tuesday is Steak Night $4oo for everything 25<:DRAFT ALL DAY & NIGHT Tuesday is C&WNight Dance Lessons with Kenny at 9:30 Music by Jim Poston -$100:00 m-­cAsH-" ·at· 1am with - 50(: Well Drinks 8pm-2am
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