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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 9, Summer 1979
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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 9, Summer 1979 - File 001. 1979-22. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2036/show/2019.

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(1979-22). Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 9, Summer 1979 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2036/show/2019

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 9, Summer 1979 - File 001, 1979-22, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2036/show/2019.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 9, Summer 1979
Contributor
  • Reese, Gary
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date Summer 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript free! summer 1979 vol. 3 , no. 9 Verdict against Driskill Gay victory r• n court J,,'IJJTOR'.'i SOTF.'. As this issu, oj (;ay Austin u·as qmnq 1,, pri .,s. thf' Ca/mr.-t disco 11,,s found guilty of twlat• 111.Q lht nt11 s ord/nm,cc and fi,u d $200. Th, m uuirtpal court Jury rmnposed of thr,,,, tronu·u (111d thret men took fr.1ts Ihm, half"" h1111r to ri·arh its 1·,-rdict that //1, d1srn ·s h1111.si rul1 aqain.,t same­~, J da11n11q 11ofoff.s th, .. pubhr ucrom • mmlotious .. urdi11nt1n. Thi· romplaint against the Cabaret bar nt th,• Driskill Hotel for discriminating against patrons on the basis of sexual oriental ion 1s 1•xp1·rl!•d to tw heard in mumripnl ,·uurt Jul} 10. Thi• spc·r1f1t· s,•tt1ng oft h1• trial is st ill pt'ndmg," explained Woody Egger, who has clos1•ly monitored the complaint's progress. "In any case, 11 is expected to go hc•fore a iurv trial.'" The manngement of the Cabaret is charged with expelling two couples for mg m ame x d nrini: a the club floor ,n Fehruarv 1978. An ord1 nanc1· passed by the city council before that time prohibits discrimination against gays in public places. If found in violation of the ordinance, the club faces a maximum fint> of $200. Tht• elub had rhallenged the validity of the ordinanee and the case was srht•duled to be heard in district court last month. However, at the beginning of Jun,•, the Cabaret dropped its injunction against the rity and opened the way for a trial on the farts of the ease in muniripal rourt. Matthew Coles, a San Francisro at torney who has worhd with Gay Rights Advocates in helping draft similar ordi Math, u Cole.,, the qa!I rigl.ts acti n st from Sari Fm, cisco ,m hand 111 .4ustm for th, lrinl, ca/1,•d th, ens, the first ,,,- 1l.1 kind in th, rmrnlr1/ u ·h,r1 th, ts s11e of" thscn m uullion ro11~rr1u d a person\ ·" ;ru,,I pr,/1 rt nc,• lJrt•k1/I atlor111 y Mark L, 1·barg said hi 11·011/d u , k 11 11 app1 al ,m th, grounds that the ordwrrnce ts ""lmJ mgue tu t'U/orn . " nances in other cities, was scheduled to come lo Austin in June for the trial. Coles is primarily concerned with defending the ordinance from any con •titutional challenges, such as the Cabaret's injunction "This is one of the first test casf's of surh an ordinance anywhere." Egger said. "It's certainly the first ofits kind in T1•xns." Neither Houston nor Dallas havr similar laws to protect the rights of gays. Austin b th<' only citv with ordi-n V> u rant th, r , ii rights in the areas of employment and publir accommodations. "At the time (the alleged offense was committed), the Cabaret officials were told that there was an ordinance and there would be a complaint filed," Egger added. Three of the four complainants 11lan to he present when the case is heard in court. The Cabhret's defense, Egger ex• plained, is that sexual orientation, as defined in the ordinance, is ''am biguous." "'They claim that they are not disrriminatmg against gays, since het1·r osexuals rannot engag1• in same·st•x dan ring 1•ith1•r." Celebrants on Town Lake tor all-day festivities May 26. Marchers convene NEW YORK - Organizers for the National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gav Rights are convening in Heu lo. Ju · for ati I con fereuce to finalize plans for the October 14 event. Delegates from all regions of the country, representing the ethnic com position of their areas, will attend the conference, said Ray Hill. co-chair of the national logistics committee. "Such a nationally representative body can guarantee the March on Washington s11eaks from the heart of the American lesbian and gay population," Hill said. A national transportation network has alri·ady b1•1•n announr('d by march or ganizt•rs. A press release from the :,.;e" York offire outlines 11lans for a 24 hour toll free information line, as well as po ters and other informative materials to be distributed nationan,. A logast1i,s office will soon be ·et up in Washington torna e the publit1t) effort. A support staff wdl monitor ma.tth transportation arrangements for some 50 locales. A computer system will keep the office up to date In arranging rides and c rpools. The office will also assist in arranging transportation by air, bus and rail, but warns that from many locales comtnl'rcial services are already booked solid. Persons interested tn helping organ• 1ze the transportation effort should con tact the :>,;ew York office, which is co­ordinallng the effort until the office m Washington is •et up. The ?\·ew York of fice phone number is !2121924-29i0. Delegates to gather here in August Organizers for the sixth annual state wide gay ronferi·nre are expecting a largn turnout than ev!'r before and are scheduling an ambitious program for the 400 delegates 1•xp('rted here next month. Texas Gay Conff'ri•nce \'I. sponsored by the Texas Ga) Task Force. is slated for th1• wrt·kend of August 17 19 at the Sheraton Crest Hotel in downtown Austin. A wide varil'ly of workshops havl' been srheduled and two nationallv rt>cogniz!'d gay, spokesp!'rsons plan to att,•nd. The featured speakers for this year's ronference include Leonard Matlovi<-h, "ho has worked lo reverse discrimination against gays in the armed forrl's and is presently a eandidate for dty su1wrvisor from San Frannsro', P11t 811nd 111 one ofh, r s tagc roles 11rcdominantly gay district; and Pat Bond, a Bay Art>a actress and comedian who is hest known nationally among the gay community for her appearance in the film, "Word Is Out." Recently, Bond has gained rerognition for her one• woman inter11retations of Gert rude Stein and Colette. ''We're organizing our workshops into three pniods with five to six workshops per 111·riod," Woody Egger, coordinator for the conference, said. The workshops will rover diverse topics, ranging from leg-al questions ,ind child custody to physical h1•alth rare and a report on the lobbying effort at thi, state legislature. Olht•r ,ubjerts in,·lude sessions on "'life­styles," fund raising, prohlPms of adoles­rt• nt gays, historv and roots of gays in Tex.is, and "'transpeopl,•." Two additional "orkshops will deal with how gays have been depicted in puhh\'. life and on stag<', srreen and tele vision, and how gay organizations and individuals can devl"lop elfecti\•e work ing relationships with the mass media and ensure the most favorable treat• ment possible. Io addition lo the "orkshop sessions, Egger hopes to schedule a caucus period -.. h1cb will not connict "ith the ,. ork shops. "It will be a sort of coalition build­ing session," Egger explained. Bond and :11atlovich will address conference dele­gates at Saturday night's banquet. A short busines, mel'tmg for the confer• ence is also planned for Sunday morning. The pre registration fee for delegates is $20, which include the co l of the ban quet and a get acquainted party at the Sheraton Friday evening. Registrations at the door will be $25. Inquiril's may be addre sed to the Texas Gay Task Force, P 0 . Box 91, Austin, TX 78767, or intere,ted persons can rail Gay Community Sen ices at 477- 6699. 2 gay austin ______________ _ Gallup polls teens on gays Attitudes toward ga) s have not changed a great deal among the younger generation. according lo a recent Gallup poll survey. The Institute for Public Opin10~ polled 1,115 teenagers on a variety ol topics and found that their opinions ol gays did not differ s11:nificantly from those of lhe,r parents. Only 39% ap pro, ed of gays as preachers and min isters and 38% ,.ere sympathetic toga, doctors. But. 73% of the teenager· said they ,. ould rather see a gay behind a sales counter or in the armed forces. the survey d scovcred A maJor1t, of the teenagers polled 55% thought t all right for gays servmg n the armed forces. l1S% for tearhmg college student . 12% for teach, h h hool students and 37% chool •e ching positions. n o, erall more tn eranl w th n bo , and st er.ts v.1th a higher a adem stand.ng expressed more fa> orab e .i t1tude owards ga vs. 0 n e uoled , he pol fr, m a s1xtee e r d g1r from El zabeth o" n KY· I t d see whal differ ence a persons sex I .fe has to do w th the r b p enc . Of c ur e, 1 he paraded their homosexuahtJ you know. made a big dea of 1t publicly I'd Just as soo no have them teaching httle ktds · In other words, the teens hke the r parents - don't mmd what we do m our bedrooms bi,t . Look who's :S:ot that tt surprises anyone, but na tionally syndicated columnist Ann Landers still refuses to budge from her position that homosexuality is a patho­logical disorder. Quotmg her column of June 4: "My position is unchanged and I shall repeat 1t, I believe homosexuality is a dysfunc­tion - a deviation from the normal. In mv opm1on, given a choice, the 'normal' quotes are hersl person will select as the obJect of his ts1cl sexual expression a member of the opposite sex." Mmng herself even further, Landers contmued, "Those who prefer as sexual partners members of their OWN sex ha, ea psychological problem . . Many homo xuals. hoY.ever, are Y.eli ad Ju••td prod c•1, e membl'rs of society Th• v art• r.irel mo esters of ch1ldr , dnd shoulr. r. be denied cmp,oyment c b s1 of their scxi:.il prefcn•nce" Th nks. but O thanKs,Ann. On the other side of the coin, Masters and Johnson have been making the talk show circuit recently, plugging their new book, Homoaexualtty in Perapec It e. l ..,'TIN • pub •shed monthly by r.a Comm•Jn,ty Serv crs o · Y\IC A YV. C-\ 2330 r.aad Jpt,, Austin. Texas 78705. " '(, y C mmun v ~erv.ce! Inc ude: General Coordinator P hhrat on C'•JOrdinator Offce •~d Peer ( o "SP 1ng C'oord,nat, r Med a cnord n tor F ,a er ( nordinator p,,aker fl re ('oordinalor nsexpres edinGAYAlSTINarethose r1hewr1erored1tor t ~• es r I those or Gav Comm unity Serv re<. the l "" erS1t v Y'wl( A Y\\ ( A or the advert• ers Thr pubhrat on herein or any per n • ame, portrait or photograph ,. not an 1nd1ca1 on or that per on sex,31 or entat,on. All rontent• copvright 1979 bv r. A Y Al ST!'- Materia mav he reprinted without prior perm1Ssion ,r red,t g ven to GAY A l'STl!II GAY Al Tl'- staff, Gar Ree e Gary Reese (arr r g Mana~•ng Ed11or Nrv., Editor Ad er11 g Manager C'O TR!Rl'TOR \'IDCOl.l \I'll TS rrrash, Be•t e Na lor, Tm O nger Rona d ~a,.ev Reese b <"a· on "ere, ~,d ':1 <"Omp 1n'° '1a 1onal and 1nttr r h•is eofGA\Al Tl', rHE Al ~TIN AMERIC'All< STATF. MAN Au•l ~ Hnuston \I n rose ~ ar l Pl New ~nv1re talking . Dick Cavett devoted two 30·minute programs to the sex researchers and asked them what they considered to be the most startling aspect of their study. "The most important finding is that there's absolutely no difference in the facility to respond sexually," William Masters remarked. "This is not unique to heterosexuals, nor to men instead of women." Virginia Masters added that they had found nothing to indicate that sexual preference ts biologically determined. "We don't think tthat there are born homosexuals). We are all born sexual beings, and we have to stop there. We learn sexuality - homosexuality as well as heterosexuality." Cavett asked ironically how anyone cou d have a doubt about someone like I Truman Capote Masters retorted that "usmg body style, pitch of voice, or areas of interest as n means of deter mmmg llOmosexuaht) 1s a cultural rn·s lake" Donahue also hosted Masters and Johnson for two consecutive programs. staging the second before a predomi nantly gay audience ID Chicago. This proved to be a more heated exchange than the Cavett programs, since the audience was able to query the sex re searchers with Donahue moderating and interJect1Dg his own views. While one gay wondered if the study's overall positive view on homosexuality would prompt an anti·gay backlash, another straight woman was concerned that the book's findings would encour• age youngsters to "go the easy way." There seemed to be little consensus about the book's reception or its after• effects. Johnson reiterated their conten­tion that homosexuality is nol patho­logical. "Gays come from loving families. There is no reason to presume that repression at home inevitably results in homosexuality," she added. "What we have been attempting to do over the years is to understand sexual function· Ing m order to learn how to treat sexual dysfunctioning. On the topic of sexual functioning, Masters commented, "There I~ no question that, in compari son to heterosexual couples, committed homosexual couples spend more lime and care ID effective sexual approach.'' Johnson added, however, that "we express our sexuality infinitely and to a greater degree outside the bedroom than in 1t." When asked whether th y feared their research would be m•sun<lerstood and, that bcmg the case "hether such research should even be publicized, Masters defended h1msC'lf and his col league and wife, saying, "The media" ill always go after the lo" est common de nominator I couldn't care less. We have to report research whethrr it is mis­understood or not." \\{)I-L ~ l+,' ()() Austin's ONLY Women's Bar it) WE ARE NOW OPEN TUES · FRI FROM 4 PM UNTIL 2 AM SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS FROM 2PM UNTIL 2AM for your afternoon enjoyment Disco Dancing HAPPY HOUR TUES.-FRI. 4 to7 • Backgammon •Checkers ·Dominoes ALL WELL DR! NKS HALF PRICE · Pool · Pinball ·Cards KEG PARTY at 2:00 EVERY SUNDAY AFTERNOON AVAILABLE MONDAYS FOR PRIVATE PARTIES Reports Statewide __ surnmer 1979 ___ 3~ TV evangelist back DALLAS - An area evangelist whost• tell'vision program was cancelled February 25 wht•n hi' airl'd a program critical of gay "lifestyles" may bt• hark on t ht• air within a week. Jamt•s Robinson's program was ranrl'lled by WFAA TV in Dallas after tht• station had rer,•iv.-d num,•rous protests about lhl' Februarv 25 teh•,·asl. The station cited the Fairnl'ss Doclrin,• as grounds for th,• ranrellation. "Wl' nl'vn objected lo his being on lht• a,r," said Louis<' Young. president of the Dallas Gay Political Caurus. "We objerted to his derogatory us<' of homo­sexuality in a political context." For his part. Rohm son said he would ht• sensitive to anv hroadt"aster's position in the "hotseat of publir skepticism," WFAA TV Gl'neral Manager Dave Lant• said that an agrt•t•m!'nt had been rearhed. but that the dall• of Robinson's return to the airwaves was not yet finaliz!'d, The agreement allows the station lo pre view Robinson's shows prior lo airing. Robinson said that he doubted the February 25 program would be broadcast 'again. "I would never ht• so unkind as to try lo make a reque~l like that," ht• said. Perry visits Austin AlXrI~ The Rev. Elder Trov Il. Perrv ad drt•sst·d a rrowd of 80 people' at th 0 t' Metropolitan Communilv Churrh of Austin Junt• 1. l'errv is thl' fnundl'r a~d moderator of 1h1• l'niversal Fl'llowship nf !\IPtropolitan Communit v Churcht•s and rt•r•·ntlv rt·n•i\'t·d t ht• Humanitarian ·Award of th!' Gay H1ghi°s C'hapt1•r nf the American Civil Lih1•rt1t•s Union. "H1·,. P,•rry's message• was r1•nll'rl'll on 'For Surh a T1m1• As This' and romhiOl•d th,• histor.v of gavs "'it h t h1•1r nt•{'(l to unit!' in Christ and Christian pfforls," said Candant'l' ;'la"hilt. pastor nf tht• loe·al 1CC. "HPv. Perry ralh•d p<'opll' not only out of thl' do~wts of s(•xualit,. hut also out of tht·ir c·losc•ts of Christian lwlil'fs a~d hat'kgrounds tn fight the• hat t 1,· to vidory as whole human ht.'ings and as matun\ ('hrostians." 2828 RIO GRANDE/AUSTIN 478 0??4 I NTRANU IN 11f AR Stet·e Shiflett and Larry Bagn, ris t.sti• f!(ing before the US. Civil Rights Com• mission. Photo courtesy Houston PosL Assault bill killed In House committee Al'STIN A rontroversial bill lo change the definition of rape in the Texas Penal Code died in House committee in May when the state legislature adjourned. The bill would have allowed rharges lo be filed in ease of homosexual assault. -..hich is not covered bv lht• present la" . The bill had already won approv~I of the Senate in April. passing with a vote of 19 7 on its serond reading and finally adopted with a voice vote. "The real thrust of the hill is that it would make ,t t•as11•r for jurors to convirt." said Kath, Bonner of the• Texas Woml'n's Politiral ('aurus. Tht· hill would have eliminated the word "rape" from the slate r.-nal code and suhstilutrd th!' word "assault." hut -..ould ha,e retained tht' sam,• 1wnaltit•s for the offense. Controversy has renlered on a provision allowing spouses and ro-habilanls lo be charged under the Houston GPC before Civil rights hearing HOlJSTO:'li Gay Po t.ca Ca 1cus President Steve Shiflett told a U.S. Civil Rights Commission June 12 that he had proof of at least 100 harass• ments of gays by police. Shiflett submitted a list of the alleged violations during the hearings on the Univt>rsity of Houston rampus. The cases. all occurring within the past eight months, involve exressive police forre. verbal harassment, perjured lestimon)' and one alleged murder cover-up. The commission's June meeting is a prelude lo full sealed public hearings September 10-12 in response lo rharges of alleged p, ,· ice misron duct. Shiflett said fe" of the ra,es had ever been referred to the police department"s Internal Affairs Di"ision because files ha\!' had a habit of disappear ing or officers have ,·hanged their reports. Police Chief Harn- Caldwell and other officers also presented evidence before the commission. involving officers as far back as 1970. Representa­tives of the Mexican-American rommunitv also appeared at the hearings. · proposed law. In the Senate. the sponsor of the measure, Gene Jones of Houston. agreed to amend ments which eliminated the special provision. The present law also precludes spouses and live-in males from filing rape charges against one another. "Every body has lost their enthusiasm since the special provision has been taken out," Bonner ex­plained. Several state·. among them Pennsylvania and ~tichigan, have already changed their defini· lions to "sexual assault," but none lo Massault.'" as the proposed bill would haH done. "The reasoning behind the bill was that by changing the name lo 'assault' more women would have reported it," Bell\ :,.;aylor, lobb~ist for the Texas Gay Task Force, explarned. She added that the Task Force did not take a stand on the bill. "Ont> of the oldest argum,•nt, "e've heard since the movement was begun lo revise the rape laws is that women are -.. illing until they change their mmds, and tht•n theJ'll hnllt>r rape," Naylor said. "They (the legislalorsl wanlt•d lo separate the stranger who rapes or assaults." ~\\':)TIN.id,~~ ~ ~'JJll.i3~f..~ ~~ . ~~cou\\\" . nd . . . . LoI GHTn eSwH0e\s1t1 ·· ·• .· •· '. ·. · .• .· ~ I . •, ·•. • . • • --.. .. ., . ..,,.,_..: .~ '.::- :.?: :!) :_\:::_-: :=.: \··. .... . · .· ::·. ·.: ·•. . ·"\ . , .. ··· N€W · : : •• •·., ·. QNuoietw Be~r ·_•"!'., -- · -·· · 472-04. .~.:..·.· 705 RED RM lt 705 RED RIVER 471-0418 4 ga>· austin _____ _ Viewpoints Legislative overv•i ew Compiled from Texas Gay Task Force lobby reports As the 66th session of the Texas Legislature adjourned, Texas gays felt success and pride that for the first time wt• maintained an advocate in the Capitol during one of the worst sessions in legislature history. Our advocate. Bettie :--;'aylor, found a willingness on the part of law maker, to talk openly and hom•stly about matters of concern to gays in Texas. I.a" makers are giving us an ear as they come to know more about u, Having an active and e\'er present lobby in the recent session clearly establishes our gro" ing strength and ability to raise the funds that will ensure us a, oice int he future. Our goal during the 66th session "as to ward off anti gay legislation and to lay groundwork for protectivP IPgislation in future sessions. We were "ell aware that lawmakers and Capitol observers had many questions and our intent was always lo put forth a professional e££ort that would causP them to question their ill conceived myths about us. For instance, the right-wingers havt• suggPsted we would amend the Equal Rights Amendment to include st•xual prPference. During this session, bills were introduced to ban poppers, raise the state's drinking age from 18 to 19 years, and put an outright ban on bars which permit ''sexually oriented conduct." The bill to ban pop pers, sponsored by Rep. Polumbo of Houston, £ailed, in part because Naylor picked up on the legislation when first introduced. The Human Rights Advocates alerted manufacturers, distnbutors and retailers. "ho in turn contacted members of the subcommittee on drug-related legislation. Naylor talked with Polumbo and found he lacked know! edge about the actual effects of poppers. The bill finally died in sub committee and never reached the House floor. The bill to raise the state's drinking age, sponsored by .Senator Mengden of Houston, passed the ~ en ate easily, but died in the Housp Liquor Regulation subcommittee. Since gay bars and clubs are often the first spot for younger gays and le bians to ocalize, the Human Rights Advocates monitored the legislation closely. There seems to h,· a movement afoot nationally to raise the age in other states. Although the bill to ban "sexually oriented conduct" was aimed at all bars selling alcoholic beverages. gay establishments would have had the respon s1b1hty of prohibiting drag attire and same-sex dancing. The bill was also inclusive enough to have affected dinner theaters. theater groups, and non gay disco,. The efforts of the state' club owners and the Advocate, helpl·d ensure that the bill ne\er had a hearing. The Advocates successfully worked with coalition supporters to get the Family and Domestic Violence bill on the House floor. The twelve state centers already in existence accept gay and lesbian victims of family violence. Attention was not drawn to this fact, since an amend ment would surely have been added restricting acceptance of these victims. TGTF l,ohbyist Bettie .Va1Jlor. Our greatest victory came April 23 when the Speakt•r of the House sustained a point or order against further consideration of a section of the budget which denied gay organizations on college campuses use of meeting facilities and other campus services. Rep. Lalor of Houston and Sl'n. Schwartz of Galveston carried thl' points or ordl'r and helped us rpmove the discriminatory and unconstitutional addition to the state's General Appropriations Bill. Adding initiative and referendum powers to the state's Constitution was opposed by the Human Rights Advocates and £aill'd final passage. Since the Governor supports this l(•gislation, it will probably be in <•ludt·d in his sp(•cial session call. Early in the session, our Legislative Commitlt'l' d(•tl'rmin(•d to sel'k active ponsorship and introduction of a bill to rl'peal Spc•tion 21.06 of the Tt•xas l'Pnal Code. the "sodomy" statutt•, Lobbyist Naylor sear• ched £or II sponsor, but found much unwillingn<•ss among fril'ndly law makl'rs to do so. Rep. Sam Hudson of D,lllas would havt• introduct'd the ml'a un• and worked with us in any "ay. llowevt'r, RPp. Washington of Houston, who had introduced similar ll'gislation in the last two sl'ssions. thought it futile. Rt'p. Ron Waters of Houston agn•ed and advi ed us to hold of£ until we as a {'()mmunity and as a lobby lay the necessary groundwork to se<"ure enough vnt,·s to pass such a mt•,1sure. Tht• I.egi lat1"e Committee met again March B and decided unanimously not to spek repeal in any form during tht> last session. UltimatPlf our goal is to repeal 21.06 and l'VCnlually to pass prol1•c-tive lcg1slat1on that guarantees e11ual opportunitil's and rights under thl· law for gays and (pshians. Howl'ver, we must rt•illiZ<' that prt'paration must come bpforp our big push to repPal. Rural law makPrs still havP a lot lo say about what is done in tht• legislaturi•:'l'hrough interim work nnd subsl'quent political campaigns, we ean substantially in<·rt•ast> our chanrPs £or success in the £utun'. Education is the kt•y. among law makers and our community. The test will romp whpn w(• must show our numbers and overwhelmingly convinct• legislators that it is time to protect the rights of all Texas citizens. We urge you to join the Texas Gay Task Forrl' and support the lobbying effort during this important interim period. Basic member ships are $10 yearly. contributing ml'mh!'rships $25. Business mPmber• ships are available upon request. Address all inquiri(•s to: P. 0. Box 2036, Universal City, TX 78148. MEDIA WATCH initiated By Jim Olinger In response to the recent upswing in media use of terms such as "homosexual torture ring" and "homosexual murderer," Gay Com mumty. er vices is starting a .MEDIA WATCH campaign. Although Elmer Wayne Henley has been convicted in his second "Houston 'homosexual' torture-(feath plot" trial, his lawyers are already promising a third. "Chicago 'gav' mass murderer" John Wayne Gacy's trial will be coming up soon, too: Unless we fight it now. we can look forward to a nearly unending stream of "murderous homosexual child molester" images from the media. We have the power to prevent this. Thanks to the efforts of the .National Gay Task Force, the national media are now being scrupulously careful to report the news in ways that don't feed prejudice against gays. However, local news coverage, which does much more to shape a community's attitudes. is rife with anti-gay references. We are calling on you to help encourage responsible reporting towards gays in the Austin area. There are two things you can do when you encounter anti-gay programming. First, call the station and protest. I£ a radio or television or a newspaper receivt's several calls or letters about offensive programming. they will usually try to stop it. A phone call is a great method of curing an ignorant or careless an nouncer. A letter takes more work and is lt•ss imml'diate, but pven· tually reaches more people. Both are important. After contacting the media. call us. The Gay Community Services MEDIA WATCH program is now collecting evidence of anti-gay reporting. I£ you see or hear any "homosexual killer" rpferences, or any other material prejudicial to g~s. such as the routine denuncia• tions on some of the religious broadcasts, tell us. We would like to know the date, time, station or nl'wspapPr, program, announcer or reporter, what the offensive material was, and any response to com­plaints. Stations showing a pattern of consistl'nt anti homosexual broadcasting will be monitored for Fairness Doctrint• and public service violations. I£ such violations are found, MEDIA WATCH will reciurst equal time to counter these distortions. We may also register complaints against specific stations at FCC license renewal harings. con tan ued rm page 5 ,, Reports National __ sun1mer 1979 _____ 5_ Marchers turned down By White House aide WASHING TON - A request that President Carter endorse the October March on Washington was turned down by the White House June 5. Thirteen gays, including blacks, Asian Am(•ricans, and Indians, met with Jane Wales, a public liaison officer for the White House, for more than an hour. "I told them I would not recommend thl' prpsident endorse the march," Wells said. "That would cntainly indicate a break from precedent to rPcommend or not recomm1>nd a march." Wells said that the time was spent mostly "with civil rights and human rights concerns." "Their ret'ling was that minority, low-incoml' women have not heen made aware of the benefits ERA wO'Jld hring to them," she said. Although Wells stated that the met•ting "doesn't imply support or non·support" of gay demands. a New York based alliance of fundamental clergymen urged the president to cancel the meeting. The Rev. Rog1•r Fulton of the Neighborhood Church in Green wi1·h Village accused th,• governml'nl of (•ncourag ing immorality and homosexuality - specifically through a federal grant from the National Endow m(•nl for the Arts for a display or homos(•xual art in N1•w York City "with definite Sodomite qualities." S,•nator Gordon Humphrey (R N.ll.l said hi' had st•nt Carter a telegram "expn•ssing my indignation that th(• president is lending n•speclabilily to th(• hrl'.ikdown of moral values." W(•lls said. "We try to bA abh• lo meet with any organized interest group. (The clergym(•nl would h,• givl'n the same opportunity." Media subpoenaed Authorities have subpol'nal'd fift1•1'n n1•ws organ izations in the San Francisco Bay an•a lo producl' material they believe may assist in prosecuting par• il<·ipanls 1n thf" riot on May 21. Charl1•s Br<'yer, chief assistant district attorn(•y, said th(• materials included photographs. videotap(•s and tape recordings made during the riot when tw1•lve police cars were set on fire. The subpoenas wnl' i5'ut•d with the approval or a San Francisco grand jurv on May 23. Brl'y<'r added. N1•ws organiztions which havl' had thl'ir mat1•rials subpo(•naed include the Ba11 Area Rrp,irt, rand tht• San Francisco Sentinel (both gay nl'wspapt•rsl, arpa daily n(•wspapers. seven television stations, and thl' nt•ws wire services. JI.favor Diani' Feinstein indicatl'd on May 29 that sht• _;,ould appoint an indept•ndent commit!('(' to studv th1• riot which caused an ('stima!(•d SI million in d,;magt•s and injurl'd 160 pPople. The demonstra tors W('rl' pro!(•sting the verdict of involuntarv man slaughter against former Supervisor Dan White. charged in the killings of Mayor George :',foscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk. Whit<' admitted he had killed Moscone and Milk on November 27. A plea to investigate the conduct of the jury during the trial was rejected by State Attorney General George Deukmejian. District Attorney Joseph Freitas made the request. He said he could not the probe the case himself because he has already sharply criticized the jury's verdict. 'Pride Day' in Ohio Political hot potato CI:,,'CINNATI - "L(•shian Gay Pride Day" will be drug through the political mud of this city's mayoral race, a political foe of Mayor Bobbie Sterne promised. James J. Condit, Jr., a candidate for the citv council on the slate of a new anti-abortion party, said he will make the mayor's decision to proclaim June 30 "Lesbian Gay Pride Day" an issue in the Novem ber election. "I have been sympathl'tie to homosexuals and ll'shians," Ms. Sterne said in h<'r defense. "I think they have a very difficult time in this world and that peopl<' should be sympathetic to thl'ir plight." Gay leader 'tested' NEW JERSEY The president of the New Jersey Gay Activist Alliance has agret•d to undergo psychiatric testing to deh•rmine his fitness as a teacher after seven years or legal appeals. "I am still firm in my beliefs on the right of human differences, and approach this examination accord rngly," John Gish said. Thi' 11 y<'ar old alliance l(•ader said he will consult with hi· attornev before he is examined by a school board appointed psychi• atrisl on June 25. Gish wa~ removt'd from the dass~ room and appointed assistant din•ctor of curriculum in 1972 when he was elected president or the gay alliance in New Jersey. Gish had fought the school board's decision to l'Xamine his mental competency all the way to the Supreme Court. which refused to hear his appeal in October 1977. He subsei1ut•ntly agreed to testing, but insisted on choosing his own psychiatrist. Although his doctor conduded that there was no indication of pathology, the school board has in ­sist1• d on having Gish examined by their own psychi atrist. Gish has never publicly proclaimed himself gay and said he considers the charges a violation of his f'irst Amendment rights. 'Sexless' gays okay :',!I:",NEAPOLIS - The American Lutherar Church plans to circulate a policy statement that gays are not in violation of church teachings so long as they abstain from all sexual behavior. The statement will be submitted to the church's 4,850 congregations for comment and will be revised on the basis of those evaluations. The final draft will be offered to the 1980 church convention. The propos<'d statement, as drafted bv the church's Standing Committee for the Office of Research and Analysis, ,ays in part, "Homosexually oriented persons who do not practice their erotic preference in no way , iolate our understanding or Christian sexual beha,ior . ... IBut, the church) regards homosexually erotic behavior as contrary to God's intent for his children ." One has to •"onder "hat "Christian sexual behavior'' must entail. So, t'Yerything would he peachy keen it we all b<'came practicing eunuchs overnight? Ammesty results in Discharge upgrade LOS A!\IGELES Gav mtn and women with less than honorable discharg._:, may have them upgraded to honorable as part or the amnesty accorded Viet­nam war resi,;;t<'rs. The American Civil Lib<'rtie. Union or Southern California - Gay Rights Chapter is distributing a brochure to th_ousands or organizations nationally in an effort to reach all gays affectl'd by the amnesty . The chapter estimates that between three and four thousand gays ma) be imolved. The provision will last only until the end or 1979. After that time, it "ill be extremelv difficult to upgrade one's discharge. • Copies of the brochure which describes the procedure may be obtained through the Am<>riran Friends Service Committee, Inc., 600 West 26th t., Austin. TX 7870~. phone - (5121 474-2399: or, by calling Gay Community S<>rvice . 477-6699. Anita on TV?! MIAMI Wonder what Anita Brvant has been doing lately? Why. working on her television special - what else! Gay Austin has b<'en unable to discover if the program L~ syndicated or going to be aired on a national network. A notice in the "Personal Men­tion" section of the Houston Chronicle, May 23. quotes Bryant as saying the special will be aired sometime this fall and is being financed by con tributors sympathetic to hrr views. :-:ow. what would that mean . .. ? .... rn11t111u1·d from pag, 4 aaa•aaa8a- Aft<'r making your complaint, call th<' Austin Gay Community Services help line at 477-6699, and give the phone counselor the in· formation for MEDIA WATCH. Please send copies of any letters you send or receive to GCS Media Watch, 2330 Guadalup<' #7, Austin, TX 78705. This effort depends on you. We must have those complaints of false reporting before we can act on them. We also need you to contact the offending station or newspaper immediately when you encounter objectionable coverage. This immediate feedback is very importan_t in stopping prejudicial r1>porling. We also m•e~ volunt~ers to momt_or stations and prepare complaints. For further informat10n, contact Jim Olinger or Troy Stokes through GCS. . . If we all work together, we can (•liminat(• anti-gay preJud1ce from the media. --•• 2532 Guaclalup• ''6ot 1/,e acli11e man'' the ltest selection In aclult 11N1terlal ••• Anywhere I _6 ______ gay austin __ ________ ____ _ New bar I• D town • For those around town who haven't caught on yet, the management of the Prirate Cellar has opened an upstairs bar and dance floor - The Waller Creek Salo011. The Saloon plans to be Austin's first gay estab­lishment with a genuine Western atmosphere, which shouldn't be hard considering the surroundings. The building itself used to be a cotton storage firm during the '30s. The dance floor still has the original wood planks. It and the brick walls in the "new" facilities are at least 100 years old. The 18-foot-high exposed beam ceilings and rusty sheet metal igns advertising Pearl beer and other brews add to the rustic atmosphere. City survey reveals Anti-gay attitudes A survey of housing patterns in Austin has revealed prevalent atlltudPs among gays that they have been discrim inated against and denied housing on the basis ofthe1r sexual preference. The city's Human Relations Depart ment conducted the survey, which was primarily focused on racial and ethnic discriminations. Two questionnaires were mailed out - one to lesbians and gay tnen, another to the 11:e·neral public. The lesbian and gay survey used mailing lists from local 11:ay or11:anizat10ns. Of the 242 questionnaires mailed out. a significant number were returned (62%1. although surveyors do not consider it a representative sample of the gay com munlty in Austin. Because of the difficul ties involved in identifying members or the gay community. they concede that a truly representative sample cannot be determined now or in the near future. However, although the results have not yet been publicized, the newsletter of the Austin Lesbian,Gay Political Caucus has summarized them. One third of the respondents felt they had been denied the same choice as straights in choosing. housing because of their sexual preference. and slightly over half felt they had been discriminated against because of their marital status. In addi­tion. 28% felt they had not suffered dis• crimination because they have remained successfully closeted. A poll was also conducted among 1,432 voter• as to whether they favored a city ordinance to protect people from dis crimination in housing on the basis of sexual preference. Sixty-three percent favored such a law, those with annual 10comes below S30,000 tendin11: to favor it and those with incomes aboYe tending to oppose it. Significantly, blacks who were ·urveyed favored such a law as much as the lesbian and gay sample! These results should answer the argu ment of Mayor Carole McClellan and Council members Himmelblau, Cooke, and Mullen, who struck the "sexual orientation" provision from the city'! Fair Housing Ordinance two year ago. "Of cour e," the newsletter points out, "the reuom they had for opposjllg it were different and unstated. bot the study will give us good ammunition in future battles with homophobic public officials." • • 'WALLE\ __/ CREEK _ CATERING CO. 707 E. 6TH. ST The game room accommodates two pool tables and the Saloon is hosting tournaments every Tuesday evening at 10 p.m. Other weekly highlights are free draft beer for anyone wearing a Western hat on Mondays and Happy Hour well drinks on Tuesdays for everyone bearing their chests. (That u•as bad, wasn't it?) And the records in the jukebox on the dance floor? You guessed it - nothing but the West! Moving to AUSTIN? 3, · ~ Congress / a port of Austin's growing gay community GAY AUSTIN needs you! GAY AUSTIN needs PEOPLE to: •WRITE • PHOTOGRAPH •PASTEUP •SELL ADS •DISTRIBUTE Share your talent! Call us at 477-6699 or write us care of GC$. 2330 Guadalupe, Austin, Texas 78705. Do it today! ________________ summer 1979 ____ 7_ AUSTIN l30TANICAL NOTES As early summer comes to Austin, a large number of flowers will start to bloom. People who want to develop their botanical eye should look cardully at the various flowers and make comparisons of how they are different and whJt intuitively se(•med related to what. Botanists take similarity in floral struct un• to bet he basis for saying plants are related. Thus, a particular shrub and a particular vine which ha\e similar flowers may be more closely related than two shrubs with unlike flow('rs. The next few columns will describ(• som(• of the plant families commonly found in Central Texas. Howev(•r, for learning the plants of our area. there is no substitutP for getting outdoors and care­fully looking at and making sketcht·s of plants as they flower. THE ASTERACEAE This family, also called the Compositae, is one of the largest plant families and is among the easiest to recognize. It is the family to which daisies, sunflowers ands chrysanthemums belong and is quite promi· nent in Austin in the early summer. In the Asteraceae, what superficially looks like a single "daisy" flower is not a single flower at all, but rather many small flowers packed tightly together into a head. The heads usually consist of two kinds of flowers: those at the periphery which have large corollas and superficially make the "pet11ls" of the "daisy"; and those at the center which usually have greatly reduced carollas. Look carefully at the next "daisy" you encounter and this will be perfectly clear. A magnifying glass might be helpful, but is probably not necessary. CHIAN"' Books on . .. film, music, a11d Cochron's8001(8 foreig11 fashio11 rm,gazines perso1u,/ individw,/ attentio11 Monday thru Friday I am until 10pm aturday 10 am until 10 pm & Sunday Noon til d,u_jr-a.rn. of t5~)lC..ct l fls!'!.ntee.ae ~ ra_j f\owe..r- ~ ~p,cc, l d,s~ ~ lower __,;;;8;..,..__ __ gay austin. __________ _ Human Rights Festival II i-----------------summer 1979 _____ 9,;,_ _1o_ ___g ay' austin_ _________ 4th OF JUL YI!! ______________s ummer 1979,__ ___11 _ Fourth of July festiuities at Avstin's Metropolitan Park. ---------------------------}. 12 gay austin, ________ _ drama Mass murders backdrop of drama By Ronald !\1. Sawt>y Wolfman Faries by Michat>I Wertin is a sincere and largely suc• cessful attempt to examine homophobia, fear of the unknown, and small town family dynamics through the lens of the Houston mass murders. "Little Doug" is the 18-year-old artist who has just fallen in love for the first time and who fears that his being gay must also mean that he is inclined to butcher his lover. Bert is Doug's older brother, head of the household, and manager of the family-owned drilling company. Deborah is Bert's wife. John (not a blood relative\ works for the drilling company, has been Deborah's lover, and is now Doug's lover. A reader (designated in the program as the chorus) reads ac­counts of the mass murders adapted from the Houston Post. The play is most compelling in those instances in which it shows us how a shocking event such as the murders can change our lives and cause us to grow. After being arrested in a bar brawl, Bert is drafted by the Houston police to help exhume the bodies of t he murder vie· tims. This experience, in combination with a verbal encounter with a man who likes to be fist fucked, causes Bert to begin to consider the erotic in a broader light than before. Seen as alternatives to stultifying small town mores, t hese experiences liberate Bert's thinking. By their extreme nature, they give Bert permission to think and dream beyond the narrow confines of conventional sexuality and sex-roles. Douglas must come to terms with the murders, too. His first step in d'o.ing this is simply to be afraid and to imagine that homosexuality and violence are somehow necessarily connected. The next step is to represent his feelings on canvas. He paints a huge portrait of John, his lover, gashed and cut, but standing and clearly alive. Deborah is shocked. John is protective and loving. Doug i. embarassed and Bert is impressed, realizing that Doug has pictured the intersection of eroticism and violence. The audience tends to side with Bert - largely out of relief that the latest work is not yet another dull, vapid picture of a pink horse. What begins as fear and self-hate ends as insight, artistic expression and recognition from others for those accomplish ments. SHAKESPEARE ·s THE Tlllllllllll aF THE SH•EU MY11-A~st4 Wed.- Sat. Bp.m. Sunday 6p.111. Actor's Benefit July '1.9 Air ·Conditioned Tickets: $4 adults, $3.50 students Children _11nder 12-- :)_2.50 on Sundays $1.50 f-o.- -VOIIOOS 476·4536 These are related, but secondary elements to the story. Both Bert and Douglas grow emotionally as their overbearing and autocratic father recedes (offstage) into coma and finally death. Deborah remains the most static character. She never seems to be phobic or resentful of the new relationship between Doug and John even though it neces­sarily displaces her. When she learns that the two are planning to move to Houston, she objects principally by repeatedly stating her opinion of Houston as a decadent and corrupt city. Her actions can be best understood as manipulative attempts to keep the boys at home. The play has two central defects. It is overly complex it is easy to imagine that Wertin will write another play which attempts lo cover less territory. Second, the author indulges in wishful thinking, weakening the play as a consequence. For examplt>, thought frightened at first, both Bert and Doug come to positive resolutions of the anxiety caused by their reactions to the mass murders. Also, Doug is n«.>ver hassled or ridiculed by his family for being different, artistic or later a homo~exual. This kind of enlightenment is mighty hard to find in a "small oil town seventy miles from Houston". These weaknesses, however, are weaknesses born of ambitious goals. Why shouldn't someone write about how human b«.>ings grow from encounters with dreadful events'? Why shouldn't someone write about how a family should love and support one of its members who is gay'? Also, except for the readings by the "chorus" (which may, after all. be int«.>nded to mirror popular sentiment) the play is remarkably lacking in sensation• alism. The author deserves credit for working with a subject that mo~t gay liberationists try to run away from. It is also fortunat«.> that the premiere was held at Southwest Texas State University, an institution hardly saturated by liberationist thinking. Criminal Justice is a popular major at SWT. Maybe the future police offic«.>rs have had a look at something other than conventional perspectives. I must confess that it is difficult for me to review t his play h«.>cause of personal reactions of mine. I grew up in a s mall South Texas town, and am in· timately familiar with matriarchs and patriarchs who are successful in cramping .and constraining the lives of their childr(•n, Also, I teach these children every day in my classes at Southwest T(•xas Stale Uni versity. Ronald Sawey has been a member of Gay Community Services since 1976. ~ Cafe French Cuisine, Courtyard, & Bar. Open 11 a.m. until midnight Bakery open Fridays & Saturdays until 2 a.m. 31 ~ Eosr 6rh St. religion ______ surumer 1979 ___ _ Reform i• n the Methodist church By Troy Stokes The week of Memorial Day was my ninth time to attend the yearly session of the Southwest Texas Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. The first time I attended was in May 1971. That year we went to lend moral support to Gene Leggett, a former associate pastor of University United Methodist Church, who had made public the fact that he was gay. The response of the annual Conference was to take away his ministerial orders. Dismal as that destestable show of homophobia was, I learned two valuable lessons: (1) Participation in historic events is a good way to make friends, and (2) Gay people frighten straight institutions. Assertive gays are even more potent. Just because we were willing to interrupt and label heterosexist humbug for what it was, we became the subject of the conference both in the mind of th!' delegates as well as in the coverage by press and broadcast journalists. I was delighted to see proper and decorous Methodists having to read about themselves in the San Antonio press as they "struggl(•d" with the issue of the church and homosexuality. (Struggle is a favorite Methodist buzz word. The struggle, or course, is a headlong rush to he first in line to avoid ('()Uragc, commitment, or Christian Witn(•ss.) Out of some personal bias whi1·h probably has its roots in some murky neurosis, I have usuallv, even in 1971, tended to shv awav from ronfrontation tactics -, favoring instead th(• conventionai appr~achl's of urging deh•gates to read thl' rl'port, vol(• in committee. sign th(• 1wtition. This approach has not bt•(•n ov(•rly su1·1·essful. Lesbians and gay m<•n are still umn•lromr in most positions of public trust in the llnit(•d !\frthodist Church. As !alt• as April of this vear. Joan Clark, an l'Xl'rutiv(• with thl' \\/omen's Division of the Board of Global :.1inistries "as fir!'d from her post h(•(·aust• sh(• rame out as a lt-sbian. Worth noting is tht• fa<'l that shl' caml' out on purposP hy writing a papt•r on homophobia and the church in which sht• rclat<•d personal experiences. Thi' unfair and arbitrary tn•atml'nt of Ms. Clari< was one itt•m on our agPnda as thl' United Ml'lhodist Gay Caucus made plans for the 1979 st•ss1on of the Southw!'sl T<•xas Annual Conferl'nce. The other main ih•m "'as to approach d<•legall'S and ask(•d th1•m to join us in a drive to pt•tition th(• Gl'm•ral Confl'n•n(·(•, a quadrrnnial mt'elrng which srts policy on a national ll'vPI, to change somt• of th(• official statements on homosexuality at the nrxt mretrng which will he hPld in April 1980 in Indianapolis. Two st'parate paragraphs of the Book of Discipline (!l were at issue. Paragraph 71-D makes some generally positive state ml•nts about gays and then t'nds with the disclaimer that the practice of homosexuality is regarded as "incompatible with Christian teaching". Paragraph 906.13 forbids funding on a national level for any gay caucus or any project which "might promote the acceptance ~f homosexuality." Our petitions call for the deletion of the negative language in 71-D and of all of906.13. We were forced into a posture of confrontation by the Resident Bishop, J • Chess Lovern, who is widely regarded by pastors in this l'Onference a.< a bigot and a fool. A routine request to have display space in which to exhibit the petitions as w(•ll as educational material about homosex_ulity was routinely approved only to be later with drawn by the bishop. The justification for this was that displays were to he germane to the business of the conference. When the Caucus discovered that outside groups having nothing at all to do with the official agenda had been given display spare, we decided to simply disregard the instructions of the Bishop and let him defend his unr(•ason and falsehood to the press if hl• chose to. He, in turn, decided to not have us arrested, but to ignor(• us. He was not able to success• fully pretend that we were not there. At the first press conference of the session, all of the questions dealt with homosexuality or the Gay Caucus. Mos~ news coverage concentrated on the gay issue, giving only superf1c1al treatment of other conference business. The summary dismissal of Joan Clark was the focus of a demonstra• lion at the ceremony of Ordination of D<•acons and Elders. As d(>legates left the service on their way to a reception for the ordinands, they had to walk past a Methodist passion play which likened the treat• ment of Clark to the crucifixion of Christ. The resul~s of all this activity are somewhat hard to measure. Clearly, lesbians and gay men are not available as role models in the churrh. Wear!' there, of cours<•, but we are seen as straight. This ripoff of the reputation of homosexual church members has to stop before the Methodist church can be said to be a friend of the gay community. On the other hand, there is some evidence of social change. Paul Abels is an openly gay Methodist minister serving the admittedly liberal Wash· ington Square United Methodist Church in New York. The Board of Discipleship has put out a resource packet designed to aid the parents and families of gay people. The Affirmation Class, established to provide Christian fellowship and nurture, is an ongoing program of University United Methodist Church here in Austin. Also, the United Methodist Gay Caucus is in good shape. There is a growing realization that radical and moderate, open and closeted gay people can work together to change things for the helter. "Burn it down" radicals like Ron Martinez and Pat Bro" n wen• able to work in concert with moderates like Gay Austin's tan Bear and me. We have com<• to the conclusion that rage and reconciliation in fact augment each other. Before the deadline in !\1arch 1980, the Gay Caucus will be circulating our petitions to Methodists in the gay community. In the meantime, the United Methodist Gay Caucus can be reachl'd by calling Gay Community Services from 6 to 10 every evening. 706L6 ........ AUSTIX,TZXAS • 14 gay clusrin _____ ______ _ music Tom Robinson Band 1• n town B} Jim OlinKtr Ga,· militancv Y.as alivt• and w,•11 ,1t th,• \rmadilln Thursdav night. Mav 10, dt•sp1tt' an almost tnt,1I la<'k of puhli<'1t, Tht• Tom Rohinson Rand. acliYl' rn ga, politic, sin,·t' 1977. plavl'd to a prt•dominat\'l_v ga_v croy, d of ,n er tOO. Although tre ,1udienn• "'asn't largt' h, \rm,ultllo standards, it was astronomical comparC'd to th<' I~ the, plav .. d tn in Tulsa thl' night before. But a, Tom ,aid, "ThPr<' an• gn•,1t nights. and thl'n tht•re an• FA ·T ASTIC nights." Th 1, thrl't' month tour. t·ovt'ring tht• Pntirt' U n:tPd State,. i, intentled tn hu1lrl an \mencan folloY. mg. The onlv rea,on thev rect>hed a recording contr,1ct in Britain was tht• hoard of loyal fans pal'krng their g1g,. On th,, tour the hanrl ha, P heen playing mostlv medium sized cluhs ,u<"h a, Toronto', El :\1ot·amho. The Au,trn pubhcit) eonsistPd mainh· of a spt of standard Armadillo radio spots, y, hich hailed thP TRB as "onP of tht• most important hands for human rights in the l'. K." Thi' aud1PnCP would have heen murh largt'r if mort' gays had ever h,•ard of the hand. Larger turnouts are expected in cities with largt'. Y.t•llorganiz1•d gav groups. Two nights .-arh have heen scheduled in Boston ,tnrl Washington. The TRB are frequently asso.-1att>d with punk rol'k. due to their rebellious stance, hut thP1r roots arc closer to thl' Engli,h musi1· hall tradition of shoY. manship. catchy melorlies, and clevn lyrics whi.-h bitingly at1rize the events of thr day. Tht• a.-tual mus1.- is straight for ward English rock and roll. Tht> me~sag1• 1s human. and gay, right Tom Robinson's dedil'ation to individual rights and frredom is rasy to understand. He spent most of his youth. until agP 2:3. t·ommittrd to a succession of institutions, as his parrnts tried to t·urP him of being gav. Somehoy,, hr survived. :\layhP it y,ns the• musil' he hrgan playing that saved him. Possiblv it wns the friendship of Danny Kustown, his com pan ion of "the refo;m school da vs," and noy, his guitarist, who he intro duced as "my ov. n Martin," after a song about growing up with a frii·nd and lover. Maybe it was simply his ov, n trength and determination Anyway, he survived. It's not urprising that his songs arc full of violence and rage. But the rage 1s justified ,rnd the, wiener 1s against oppression His mu,1e ts nothing le s than the dt•clarat1on of a n•volut1on agamst tvrannv, h1gotrv prejudice, fear, and ignorance•. Tht• maJoritv of the violrnc1• isn't on his side. e1thrr. :-.or are his con<·Prn merely English. It\ not a long Jump from a handcuffed drunk kickc•d to d1·ath in an English jail to a handcuffed Chicano "sw1mmrng" rn a Hou ton havou. Qurc·r hashrrs aren't confined to London strt'ets. Mary \\'hil\•houst• and Anita Bryant arr pintual isters, anrl our nt'\\ ly founded anti ga v lohhv, Christian Voice. 1 1kely to get just as ,carv ns the fasr1 t National Front. When your back's against the"' all, you fight or die. Tom Robinson is f1ghtmg with everv "'eapon he l'an find fists, clubs. rocks. politit·s. economics, songs. gay pr1dl', and solld.1r1ty. And hr isn't just fighting for ga, ,; no one 1s free until nil are frpc. The amazing thing ,1bout Tom Robinson 1,n't his rightt-ous in d1gnallon and rage, his dcd1cat1on. his shre\\ d sen st• of political rc.1ht1t's, or rH•n his con,iderahlr talents. It is h1 JOV in tht• st rugglc. He proJects an energy and rnten 1tv that galvamzPd thl' aurl1rncr rven before hr started playing. In I y,orld grown bored with thr campv antics of aging hetcro t>xual drag t1ul'cns Ike Rod StPY.art, 1t' almost h0<·king to ,1•t• an oprnlv gav rngPr performmg "'nhout posmg and affpt•tat1on. ,Just standing on stagP hr !'an make an ,1urlirnl'P fet-1 a song in a wav no dozen stngr struttrrs could t-ver manage Sincrr1tv 1s a big p,1rt oft has, hut it 1s also mu cal and al'ting tal!•nt. v, 1th nn un£nlt1•ring spnse of rlrama. Tom appeared in a mask of nn old. real'tionary. country gt·ntlt•man during "Power in the Darkm•ss" to give a rousing defpnse of th1• ST:-;"!' nnd nuclear power in general before calhng for a rrturn to the trad1t1onal American v,1lues of di c1phnc, ohedienct>, moralitv and freedom. 'Freedom from the Reds. black , criminals. pro t1tutes, pan 1e • punks, foot hall hooligan . Juvenile delinquents, lt>sh1ans. and left y, mg cum. Freedom from the niggers, Pakkirs, unions. gypsies and tht' Jpws. Freedom from tht> longhairpd layabouts on scooters. FrPl'dom from the likes of YOl1!" (And me," h1• sa_vs as he remoH'S thr m,1,k and hPgins singing to it.l Tht• most pow1•rful song of the rvPning was "(Sing if You'rrl Glad to ht> (;av," a <·t>lehration of surviving thl· oppression of poliCl', prrss, anti oh,1·t•nity crusaders. gangs of qu1•er hashrrs. and thl' homophobic qUPl'n who think "Gay Lib's ridiculous" and rontinul' to cowPr in their do,,•ts. ln spitr of all this and morr, "Sing if you'rp glad to ht• gay'Sing 1f\lH1°rl' happy that way." :-ing and fight hark. Tht• Tom Robinson Band is thr polar opposite of tcasy'closet_v groups like tht• \'illage People. You can danc1• to it. hut John Travolta probably couldn't. You sure can't gt·t up anrl mindlessly Hoogir Oogie Oog1t• to it. In fa\'l, you'll probably get mad. But if _vou don't. you prob• ably don't mind watching your frirnds grt their teeth kicked in or having your lifestyle. and even your own humanity. squasht>d. Thr TRB isn't any strobelighted dancrfloor fantasy. They art:> as rt:>al as tht• plain white stage lights they play undt:>r. As real as the people and rvents in their songs. And their affirmation of the gay lifestyle is real, too. Tht:>rl• are no "Macho ~1anll'm a Cruist•r" posturings. There are songs of oppression. pain and rage, violence and rehrllion. But there is also pridr and courage and hope and lovt•. Wt· finally have a ga_v hand that's r1•ally concerned with gay pl'Opl1•. It's about timP. This was intrnded to he a concert revirw. It isn't one. Tom Robinson "'ill ht> bark and you can go write your own. So go. You owt:> it to voursrlf. Find out "'by I was one• of four hundrPd <tUl'Pns shouting "Sing if vou're glad to he gay. Sing if rnu'r1• happv this way." t awn ~ay lhf'U I r iddl' 4 PIil tH 2 am w t uf'ddl' -" Swlddl' l attn lil .I dm musi• c summer 1979 ___ 1_5_·· 'Village People' should stay ho01e By Dan Carcrash We got a music scene of our own and it's really neat and flash and it goes by the name of disco! Look at the Village People; they're gay and they get hit singles and it's all liberated as hell, right? Wrong. "Gay" disco music is a shuck and I hope you like getting fucked because t hat's what those charming Village People are doing to you right now. I've never liked disco but I remember when the V. People got started; they put out a record and got on Saturday Night Live. Boy, it was campy and I even liked it. We all knew what "village" the People were from. we all had seen the outfits at leather bars and the guys were hunky and the lyrics were semi explicitly gay. No one needed an interpreter for "Macho Man" and the only reason they didn't get more explicit was that they'd never get on the radio. We knew what the Village People were all about. We thought we did. Jacques !Vlorali. the creep behind the band, wanted us to think we did because, at the time, the discos that broke big records were mainly gay discos. Ht• saw that the gay disco market was big and influential. so he look a walk in Greenwich Village and saw the way to big hits and bucks. So he assembled a crew of good looking men, put some vocals (not necessarily their own) in front of a disco band and made the boys dance pn stage in costume. Mr. !Vlorali was not sat1sfit>d; th<' greedy n£Ver are. So he thought to himself, "If a band with gay overtones can sell X million albums, why !'Ouldn't the same band minus these pervy overtones sell even more?" This year the band started doing interviews everywhere: Rolhng Stonl', Creem, New Musical Express, Melody !Vlaker. Rend them tht•y've all been published in thl• Inst fl•w month, and they're very revealing. My favorite is New Musical Express of England's February 17th issue of this year. Randy Jon<"s (The Cowhoyl: "Look, this band has nt•vcr claimed to be a gay band ... Village People is a disco band ... Wha possible gay overtonPs does a cowboy have? . .. We just want to GIFTS * ANTIQUES * ART * DESIGN 12 NOON - 10 PM 316 EAST SIXTH STREET 478-5598 reach as many people as possible and that is the key concept of this group." (Carcrash note - In the music business, "reaching as many people as possible" is a euphemism for "selling as many units and concert tickets as possible" & THAT is the key concept behind Village People.) David Hodo (The Construction Worker): "No, I don't think we're a gay band." Glen Hughes (The Leather Man): "If you're talking of Village People as a gay group, no we are not." From Creem, July 1979: Glenn Hughes, on "In the Navy": "It's real, it's basic, it's clean-cut, it's All·American." All this from a band which two years ago was trying very hard to maintain an image that was anything but "clean-cut" or "All· American." No. the song isn't a campy put-down qf the Navy as a place for lots of maritime sex. No, we never meant any of those things you queers read into "YMCA ... No, say the People, we'te not gay and if we came on that way when we started out, well, forget it and bug off. We don't need you homosexuals. That's what gay disco is today a launching ground for people who will deny that they ever catered to us in a few years. Whenever they've reached success. all we can expect 1s a not so fond farewell. Listen to the new Village People album, GO WEST. How much homo innuendo do you hear there? How many ong that could be read as gay anthems, like some of the earlier st.iff including all of the first album - remember what those ong were about)? I didn·t hear any gay references, and don't expect to hear any more rn the future. The Navy dropped its plans to u~e "In the Navy" for a recrmting comm<"r cial when they heard of the band' rq\tltntion. You can be sure that Jacques Morali doesn't want that kind of thing to happen aglin. I bet the Village People clean themselve, up even further this year and next. Yeah, we've been screwed again, sow hat? Meanwhile, Tom Robinson and Tubeway Army, among others, are making honest gay music, but they don't play that krnd of mu•ic at the Country, so let's go back inside and dance and get exploited ome more. Yum yum, sure ao like ge t ing fuclce , e pee ally liy the o a1!red music establishment ... !Editor's note: D scophiles u ill have their chance to respond in the next ISSUC.I LEGAL SERVICES AT REASONABLE FEES The Legal chnsc charges $15 for your 1nst1al CO(lSutlat10n session with an attorney. There 1s no !Jme ~ml1. If you need or want add1bonal ser­vices, we will supply you with a written lee quotation II you don't wish to go on with a case after consultahon, you are under no further ob· ligation. • Uncontested divorce (no property or children) " .. " .. -" .... $100. • Uncontested divorce (with property or children) _ .. "."' $150. • Uncontested divorce (with property and children) ........... $185. • Name change ...................................... - ............ - .................. ~45. • Bankruptcy, Individual .................... ., __ .................. $250. • Bankruptcy, husband and wife ...... ... ..... _ ,_ .. $300. • Simple will, lndivldual .... ___ " .. "_ .... .. $4S. • Simple wills, husband and wife _ ....... .... ...... ........ $70. Legal fees quoted above do not include court costs These fees are for cases Wed in Travis County between April 9, 1979.June 30, 1979. Fees for legal work outside Travts Counly win be h,gher. Job lnJury, Personal ln1ury, Crim nal and other Civil Cases nol I sted above ara accepted. Please call for an appointment No legal advtce will be given over the telephone. 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IS cents each addttioaal • ord ____ _,_ --- 10 1• ll --,. -/ -----~' lO IIAIL TIii$ FOllM TO CAY COMMUNITY SrRVICU (Classal'...is) !IJO Cuadalupr A,.'111, TX 1a'OS ot clt09 uotra, lh•GCSolfkc kt...n (Ii OO and IO OO p.a daily CI,ASSIFIE:DS: Counseling: Mirhael Ylenef('(•, Ph.D~2Hl:J Rio Gra ndt>, 176 5119 Help wa nted. \"olunteer nPt'ded to work with finanr1• coordinator I organm~g I Call Tommy at Gl'~. 177 66!19. , --·-
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