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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981
File 014
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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981 - File 014. 1981-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2018/show/2010.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-02). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981 - File 014. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2018/show/2010

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981 - File 014, 1981-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2018/show/2010.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date February 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript CONNECTIONS' 13 NINE TO FIVE Reviewed by Sarah Craig (GAY LIFE - Chicago) Good news, ladies and gentlemen! Here are glad tidings from (of all places) Hollywood: Good politics CAN make good art. The movie in question is Nine to Five, a light comedy with a heavy message that stars the unlikely trio of Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, and Dolly Parton. Each plays a very different type of woman in Nine to Five, but each makes her statement about the everyday oppression of women and minorities in the workplace. However, screenwriter Patricia Resnick never lets Nine to Five become dour or preachy. In fact, this movie is one of the funniest presented in a long, long time. The plot is (almost) pure fantasy. Fonda is a recently-divorced woman coming into the workforce for the first time in her life. Tomlin has twelve long years with the company under her belt, and is a competent, ambitious careerwoman. Parton's character is somewhere in the middle: she's a secretary, and works because she needs the money, but she's certainly good at her job. She doesn't enjoy the constant sexual pressure she gets from her slimy, sexist, obnoxious, conniving boss. The Boss, played by Dabney Coleman, who portrayed the mayor of Mary Hartman's home town, is an amalgama- 9 TO 5 tion of all the rotten bosses in the world. He orders Lily Tomlin around as though she were his maidservant, even though she trained him and made it possible for him to get his current job. He fires people for no good reason; he clamps down on any expressions of individuality in the workplace to the point where a coffeecup on a desk is grounds for dismissal. He's a cheat, a flirt, he hates everyone, and he wants to rule his employees with an iron hand. In addition to all that, he is King Chauvinist of all time. Feminists may dislike him for his sexism alone, but everyone in the audience can find something about him that's obnoxious. He's an equal-opportunity offender. When he pulls three major power-stunts in one afternoon, he succeeds in enraging Fonda, Tomlin, and Parton. Their separate miseries bring them together, and they fantasize over a joint of "Maui Zowie," supplied by Lily Tomlin's son, about how they'd like to wipe this sleazy operator off the face of planet earth. The fantasy sequences are a comedy riot. To see Lily Tomlin dressed up as Cinderella, singing a happy little song to Walt Disney-type bluebirds as she stirs a poison potion into his■ coffee, is worth the/price.of admission by itself. Add the priceless vision of Dolly Parton roping and tying him as if he were a rodeo hog, and there is no way to suppress the laughter. Some have criticized Jane Fonda for playing a "weak sister" character; but, if the role she chose is a reticent, civilized, tasteful woman, should Fonda play that character as a bold, commanding Amazon? It's to Fonda's credit that she plays a "tasteful lady" and pulls it off. To remake the character for the sake of Fonda's own personality would be grandstanding and a betrayal of the script. Anyway, she does get to be an "Amazon" in her fantasy sequence. Fonda is an excellent actor, and wine to Five merely underlines that fact. Lily Tomlin's comic genius is once again demonstrated in this movie. After the dismal Moment by Moment, it's good to see Tomlin back and succeeding at what she does best. If she wants to try dramatic roles again, "more power to her," but let her choose her vehicles more carefully. Dolly Parton, to the surprise of many, is quite a capable thespian. Certainly the sincerity and depth of emotion she conveys in many of her songs should have given the skeptics a clue as to her ability; but her part in Nine to Five will delight even her detractors. Her fans, of course, will be doubly thrilled. Since this is a fantasy, the good "guys" win in the end ( in real life, no such things could ever happen) and the evil boss is abducted by a band of avenging Amazons. With a little suspension of disbelief, however, wine to Five ranks as one of the top comedies of the year. Liberated women, of course, will take great delight in this movie, but that's no reason for men to stay at home. The anti-sexist message is loud and clear, but the moral of the story never obliterates the pure enjoyment of the story itself, wine to Five comes heartily recommended as entertainment as well as politics. Even the most macho leatherman in town has got to guffaw when he sees the harness the obnoxious boss gets tied up in. Nine to Five is a thoroughly enjoyable movie for everyone. Yes, Virginia - good politics can make good art! WJWS TO FIVE: story by Patricia Resnick. Screenplay by Colin Higgins and Patricia Resnick. Directed by Colin Higgins. Now playing in Austin at the Fox Triplex and Lakehills cinema.
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