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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981
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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981 - File 010. 1981-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2018/show/2006.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-02). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981 - File 010. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2018/show/2006

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981 - File 010, 1981-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2018/show/2006.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date February 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript CONNECTIONS' GAY LAW STUDENTS PUSH FOR CIVIL RIGHTS AT U.T. by Wayde Frey Law Students for Human Rights is an active gay group for law students and other graduate students at the University of Texas at Austin. Now in its second academic year, the group has about six active members, all of whom are students in the UT Law School. Their purpose is to provide a visible gathering point for gay law students, to educate straight lav; students about gay concerns, to establish a continuing gay presence in the UT Law School, and to bridge the gap between gays in the Law School and those in the rest of Texas. Law Students for Human Rights is the first, and still only, openly-gay group at the UT Law School. It was founded in April of 1979. Eight people, including three women, attended the first meeting. Sage White was the only woman law student at the first meeting, and is the only remaining member of the original group. The first name the group chose for itself was the Gay-Lesbian Law Alliance. Feeling there was safety in numbers, five law school faculty members signed as sponsors for the 1979-80 school year. For the 1980-81 school year, people were "less freaked out by a gay law student group." This year's single faculty sponsor is Pat Hazel. ^mtssiusns'6 a*. S»«« i»'»r;i'. SaWtF* Law Students for Human Rights (from left): Bill Brown, Walt Wilder, Sage White, David White, and Marvin Provost In the summer of 1979, a gay Austin UT Law School alumnus set up a meeting with the Gay-Lesbian Law Alliance. He told them he felt the group should change its name so "there would not be a lot of heat put on gay lawyers in Texas." He also stated that the students would have difficulty getting jobs after law school unless they changed the name. So the group became "Law Students for Human Rights." In November, 1979, after Sage White and Ginny Cleaver participated in the March on Washington, Sage and Visiting Professor Mary Dunlap from Equal Rights Advocates in San Francisco, the first (and still only) • UT Law School professor to come out publicly on campus at the law school, reserved the law school auditorium ("because it had so many entrances and was so big and dark that people could come and go unobserved,") for a noon seminar on the rights of gay people. Forty or fifty people attended this first public gay function at the UT Law School. Although there are plenty of gay women and men in the law school, many of them did not attend this public meeting. ' A number of people lingered outside, but were afraid to actually go in, Sage White reports. People at the UT Law School are career-oriented and do not want to risk future jobs. Gay law students • Kb^VJs*craztf'S^titMi Taw^tudehts^"} ' Sage' says'." * 'she* points' out that there is 'some 'basis' "for paranoia. "Good moral character" is required for admission to the bar, and this phrase has never been defined. Prospective lawyers are examined in the county of their original Texas residence. County ethics committees could define "good moral character" narrowly and exclude a gay person from the legal profession simply for being gay. Sage wants the Lav; Students for Human Rights to request an opinion from the State Bar concerning sexual orientation and an exact definition of "good moral character." The gay law student group makes referrals to sympathetic lawyers in Austin and would like to compile a list of sympathetic lawyers in places outside the Austin area. "Gay lawyers are a resource that the gay community needs," Sage White says. Law Students for Human Rights requested that a written non-discrimination policy from the law school be expanded to include sexual orientation. So far, that request is still in limbo. With such a small membership, the fate of Law Students for Human Rights is uncertain. Sage White, David White and Bill Brown will finish law school in May, 1981. Marvin Prevost and Walt Wilder have another year and a half to go. Unless more gay law students choose to involve themselves, there will be nothing much done in the area of gay people and the legal profession at the UT Law School. The members of Law Students for Human Rights are eager to develop coalitions with other law groups such as feminists and ACLU members. David White is having a hard time getting other gay law students interested in joining this group. Sage says there is a Women's Law Caucus at the law school, and some of its members are lesbians. She isn't sure why other women haven't gotten involved in the gay law student group. Marvin Prevost wants potential group members to ( realize that the Law Students fc lghts group is not limited to out-of-the-closet types or to political activists. Marvin says the group is glad to welcome women, minorities, and friendly straights. Law Students for Human Rights can be contacted days at their office in the Law School Annex, 471- 5151 ext. 210, and nights at 477-7257, or 477-7867. Legal Services in Civil and Criminal Matters DOUGLAS D. BEHRENDT ATTORNEY AT LAW 111 West Anderson Lane Suite 207, Austin TX 78752 Phone: Office 458-9118; Residence 443-2461 Licensed to Practice Law in Texas since 1969 Make money from Connections 35% commission for ad sales Call Jim Olinger—474-1660 for details
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