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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981 - File 001. 1981-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2018/show/1997.

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(1981-02). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2018/show/1997

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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981 - File 001, 1981-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2018/show/1997.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 2, February 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date February 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript 2 CONNECTIONS C O N N E C T I O N S 2401 ~.anor Road #118, Austin, ?X 78722 512/474-1660 H?LJRS: 6-10 p.r::. .Editor/Publisher • Graphics ••• TypL'1g • • • • • Distrib.ltion ••• Jim Olinger • Don • Wayde Frey • Wayde Frey :iational Advertising Joe DiSabato 666 6th Ave., New York, ~Y 10010 (212) 242-6863 Articles - Ken Carpenter, Sarah Craig, Brannon Duane, Irrelda Dykes, Lars Eighner, Wayde Frey, Jim Olinger, Al Reinert, Troy Stokes , Rev. Wilson Wade Pictures - Wayde Frey, J.i.m Olinger, Will van Overl::eek, Alan Pogue, Carr Strong 1'1lhli-oations - Capitol Hill (GRNL), Dialog (Cx:;pc) , Gay Life (Chicago) , Texas ~nthly, This Week in Texas ~NECTI<l-JS is dedicated to providing a forum for the lesbia'1/gay ccmrunity of Austin and Texas . Pub­lication of the narre or photograph of any person or orga'1ization is not to !:e taken as any indication of the sexual orie.'1tation of that person or organi­zation. ca-..'NECI'IOOS -....elcares unsolicited news and/or feature articles, photographs , dra·.-,ings, and poetry. If return or ack.nowledgerrent is requested, please enclose a starrped, self-addressed envelope. CC?-l:lECTICl~S will not assurre responsibility for unsolicited material. Published by Gay Camn.mi ty Servi;ces, a :Pt"Qgram of the University YW:::A/~, 2330 Guadalupe, .Austi."1, Texas 78705 . Telephone: 512/477-6699 Gay Camunity Services Coordinating Co...ncil Se;ret.:iry . . . . . . . . Dav1J Kotara Tre ...rC'r . . . . . • • • ynn May Off le: • • • • • • • • • • Rob Sμ?u!Cer _ Bureau • • • • . Troy S+-okes Publications . • . • • . Jm Olinq r ') ;, '? ? q ?'? ~9.9 • ? ;:> • ') _;:) • ' '1, ? ,· Que s tio ns.~ q. • ? '1. ? ' .:J ? 'l ? _,) 1 ·? '1 ? ? GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES ? , HOTLINE , ;, • 477-6699 GAYS AND THE ffiAfT b y Ken Carpenter The resurrption of draft registration has created probleri.s for all young people, l:ut partic­ularly for gay ren. During previous military drafts harosexuals ...ere autcmatically exerrpted as rrorally and psych:llogically unfit. SO the decision facing gay rren was silrply whether to stay in the closet and l:e drafted or cone out and have a 4F classification permanently on their record. :-1any young rren assurre admitting gayness will still guarantee an automatic exerrption. Ho-....ever, that is not necessarily true. The Matlovich case and other recent court decisions make it uncertain whether the military can automatically exclude harosexual people. Furthernore, in the late 1960's, so many man clairred to l:e gay in order to avoid Vietnam that the Selective Service System J:egan demanding documentary proof, or rrerely drafted gay man anyway. Now gay rren, in addition to deciding whether or not to cone out to the governrrent, face the possibility that they will l:e drafted even if they do. And while the military may not l:e able to exclude openly gay people, it is likely that they will continue to make life pretty difficult for them. All this adds up to a very difficult decision for our young, draft-eligible gay brothers and sis­ters . The AITerican Friends Service Comnittee, a Quaker-related organization which has teen doing draft counseling since the First World War , is ad­dressing the special problems of gay people and the draft. AFSC and the Austin Draft Information Center have trained gay counselors available for confi­dential draft counseling in person or by phone. For nore information, call rre at AFSC, 1022 West Sixth Street, Austin, Texas 78703, 474-2399. BOT LIPS, INC. o&~ ART DECO CARDS GIFTS IJJJ~-· CONNECTIONS 3 NE\·1 GAY UT GROUP 1 a JJ FrelJ Gay ac~1v1.sn1 has re+---1.1rned to the un~crgraduate carrpus Jf t.r,t! L.i sity of Texas at Austin ir. the form of the l' il.VE: rs1ty Gay Students Organizati0n, which helc its fir t -lE:'nE:'ral rreet ing in mid-Dec€:-:tl:cr, 1980. A ocial organlzat~on for gay UT students, fac­ulty, and taff, the group was 1R.gw1 by Chai.rrrun Paul Gonzdle and :'acul ty Sponsor Dr. HichaC'l .Menefee to credte u r,ositive i; i:.lge ~or gays on campu_;, S1.Xty 1:cople attcn<lcd the JcU1uary 27 rreeting in the S1.rn..:lair Roan of the Texas Union to hear Dr. Helm­reich, u p.:;ycholoqist a+- l:T, speak on his findings on rms1.:u:::.1.ni +-y, femininity , and androgyny. Due ... arc $3 a serrester. General rronthly ITCE'tings are open to everyone. Separate rusiness m2E'tinqs arc for ~rs only. Officers of the group are Paul Gonzales , chainnan; Chuck Hickersor. , treasurer; Fred r-t:David, p..iblic relations; Tirr. Rogers , general officer; and Michael ~nefee, sponsor. The next ~ting of ! hv :• student gay group will oo from 7 to 10pn Wednesday, Feb. 18, at the Texas Union. GCS PHONE COUNSELORS NEEDED Gay Camunity Services currently needs volunteer counselors . Duties iv.elude telephone and drop-in peer counseling, as well as Il'aking referrals to various Aus­tin service organizations , rusinesses and professionals. \-le need mature , service-oriented individuals to v.0rk fran 6 : 00 to 1 O: 00 PM one night per week. You' 11 oo performi."lg a valuable service for Austin. Peer coun­seling is a lot of fun , too! Interested lesbians and gay rren should telephone the o::s office at 4 77-6699 any evening ootween 6: 00 and 10 :00 PM for rrore information. TYPEWRITERS · CALCULATORS - DICTATION EQUIPMENT SMALL COPIERS & CORRECTION TYPEWRITERS SERVICE - RENTALS - SALES ADLER · IBM · SMITH CORONA - SANYO OICT ATION 11M UCONOITIONEO rr,cwRITUS RENT PURCHASE PLAN AVAILABLE ON MOST MODELS SANYO DICTATION EQUIP. - HOURS - MON. - FRI. 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM ADLER SE-1000 N E W L O C A T I O N tz 2 8 l 6 N U E C E S ~al r[f .,udd.ilupt>, n xt. to /o/,Dor.Jld's) 474-6396 University Gay Students organization officers (from left): Chuck Hi~kerson, tr~dSurer; Paul Gonzales, t.::hdirman; and Frl'd N r>~vid, public relations. AUSTIN COUNTRY RE(FENS Hordes of gays fran Aust.in, Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, and points ootv.een packed into the newly reopened Austin Country on Wednesday, January 28, 1981 . The Wednesday night affair was billed as an "informal opening for invited guests" refore the formal Grand Opening Party featuring Hot Chocolate on Thursday. "We invited the State of Texas, al"ld they all carre," ooarred owners Bunch Brittain al"ld Keith F.dwards as they surveyed the cro..rled dance floor and packed bar, where hundreds ~e lined up for free drinks. By the tine CCN.--,'SCTIC!-JS arrived at midnight, people from alJrost all Austin clul:s and rusinesses had dropped in to pay their respects. Several people fran the Babylon Disco in Houston arrived ~aring t -shirts with the "Babylon" logo on front and "Wel­care back, Austin Country," on back. The festivities continued on Friday with a cos­twoo ball. Prizes , including a $250 First Prize, v-.ere awarded. The Austin Country will oo presentmg a~ filled with entertainrrcnt, Bunch a.'1Cl Keith told us. Friday and Saturday have been declared "costune nights . " Errployees will oo costurrect and patrons are encouraged to join in the fun . Every Sunday night will feature "Punk, Trash and Ca:edy wit'1 the Grease Sisters," Kitty Litter a."rl Albina Grease. 'l'he poμ.i­lar Sunday "Chanpagne Bnmch with Bunch" arid 'I'- jance will rcsll!Te in mid- February. There will re shows featuring J.\?xas ' finest entertai.nr.Elt every ... 'hursday. The bar will oo closed t-t:mdays. Since the Country closed in late 1980, "We've spent a lot of rconey reno:ieling, adding lights, a"ld generally irrproving things for our patrons," Bu.'1Ch said. The Austin Country has hosted l:enefl.ts for the Mc!tropolitan Ccma.mity Church of Austin tuilding fund, the California "No on 6" campaign, the March on i:ash­ington, and Gay CQ:r.Unity Services . The COU."ltry has also ooen one of CO.'-JNEX:r:ra·s' ::ost consistent adver­tisers . \\'elcare back, Austin Country! 4 CONNECTIONS TRIAL Ill\1E SET FOR S000'1{ LAI/ Dallas - The trial of Donald F. Baker 's suit challenging the Texas Horrosexual Conduct Law (Penal Code Section 21.06) has l:xlen set for June 15, 1981 . Baker, who is president of the Dallas Gay Political Caucus, is hopeful that the courts will find the law unconstitutional, especially since New York 's sodomy l aw was struck down in Decernl::er, 1980. Recently, oral def.Qsitions were taken i r. which Dallcl!:> District Attorney Henry Wade and City Attorney Lee Holt were required to defend the state 's r.osition l.I1 maintaining Section 21 . 06 . lbst Texas city, county, arx1 district attorneys have teen certified as the de­fendant class in the suit. Section 21 .06 pena:izes sexual relations l:e­tween consenting adults of the sarre sex in private. The ~twas filed with the sronsorship of the Texas H~ !lights Foundation a"Xl seeks to have Section 21 .06 declared uncoru:;titutional and barred fran rnforcer:ent or the grou.""lds that it violates the individ,,ml ' s rights to privacy, due process a"Xl e­qt. al protection of the :aws guardflteed by the first, r,inth df1d fourteenth arrendrrer.ts to the u.s . Consti­tution. Baker explained he filed th€' suit "bxaU3e 21 • 06 is a blatant int.ri.lt;ior. into the individual's private affairs. ~he crux of the suit is whether tlr state ha3 the' right to intru:le into an i;;.ctivi­dua. l 's hare and p::--ivate lifEc. ::: -:ontend i+- dOE.c ... rot helve that right. L. a pcr...,on is suspected of rel.Ilg h:nJ_exua: und arre tea., th-:- re ~ t might 1..e the los.:: of a Job or the loss of child custody. Being gay is not a er~. " Baker, 33 , is a U.S. t,;avy veteran mo rolds a ~.aster's deqree fror. SOuthern •• thodist Ur.iver­sity. Th Dallas native gl:'aduated --= laude f.ran Sta ' iV£rsity of t,.Y. , College at Cortland. McCOY AARAIG!t-ENT IELAYED ou.:ton - ':'he arraignrre.."lt of Houstor. Police Off:Lcer K vin ~.:;Coy has b::?E...."! rostronro inu finitE'ly , reports HD1...::,;ton Gciy Political Caucus Presidf'nt Lee Harrington. Officer !-\::Coy 1s thEc 25-Ji"'ar-Old roliceman who soot HGPC Secretary Fred Paf'z o deatn in June, 1980 , on the eve of Gay Pride Week. H::Coy was to have app:?ared in co-..irt January 9, 19!31 , rut the Froeral :::>istrict Court granted a rost­ponerrent. A new date has not reen scheduled. M::COy is ref.Qrtedly seeking rore tine to solidify his case. !-teoy is to l:e eventually arraigned on charges of neg:igent hani.cicle. The deciswn was reached late last year by a grand Jury investi9dtion, after gay citizens spearheaded an .investigating task force to press City Hall for action. Alth::rugh the charge of negligent hanicide is categOrized as a misderrearDr , pressure had forced its upgrading in order that the case could l:e heard in felony court. The trial hinges on evidence that M::Coy was drinking the night of the shootl.Ilg and that McCoy has continued to re harophobic since youth. This Week in Texas Sen~your story to CONNECTIONS In 1973 the Texas Legislature adopted the 1-b-­del Penal Code of the Arrerican Law Institute and added Section 21.06 to it. The nodel code endorsed by the Institute does not recognize h:lrrosexual activity as criminal. Since 1960, 23 states have eliminated laws similar to Section 21. 06 . The Arrerican Psychiatric Association passed a resolution supporting the repeal of criminal sta­tutes singl ing out harosexual acts by consenting adults in pri vate, stating in its 1974 resolution that horrosexuality is not a rrcntal disorder and im­plies no inpainrent in judgerrent, reliability or general social or vocational capability. . Fo~ed in 1976, the Texas Human Rights Foun­dation is a non-profit public litigating corroration chartered to fight discrimination on the basis of sex, race, creed, national origin, age , handicap status, and sexual orientation. "Our God is not a womaa Our God is not a man Our God is both & neither Our God is I who Am" REV CANDACE A NAISBITT Pastor METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF AUSTIN Sunday, February 8, Congregational Meeting after wrship service (3 ~) • Saturday, February 21 , ~ship Day 11 am - 4 frn, Call for details. Christian Life Series (Wednesday, 9 ~) : Horrosexuality and the Bible Counseling by appointment, 477-7747 Worship Services: 408 West 23rd Street Sunday at 2:00 pm We dn e sday at 7:30 pm Mailing Addre ss : P . O. Box 18581 Austin, TX 78745 FOr rrore information regarding religious and social activities, prone (512) 4 77-774 7 CONNECTIONS 5 DANG:R - LEGISLATURE CPEN Austin - The 1981 Texas Legislature convened Tuesday, January 13, and once again the future of all Texas citizens hangs in the balance . Rep, Wright (R, Houston) has prefiled four bills concerning minors and obscene materials , In past sessions of the legislature, gays have been the scape­goats during floor debates of child p::>rnography and sexual ab.lse . Rep, Rains (D, San Marcos) and others have pre­filed legislation relating to the advertising and p::>ssession of drug paraphernalia. Rep. Smith has prefiled a bill calling for a constitutional amendrrent for initiative and refer­endum in Texas , which v-.0uld be a loaded gun in the hands of conservatives to use against the civil rights of gay ITEn/lesbians, Dialog (Dallas Gay Political Caucus newsletter) HQJC STARTS LOBBYING A delegation of 50 rrembers of the Houston Gay Political Caucus (HGPC) traveled to Austin for the opening of the 67th Texas Legislative Session January 13. The delegation received a briefing on prefiled legislation and has made contact with pertinent sen­ators and representatives , many of whan received the GPC errlorserrent. · The educational format of the trip was designed to prepare the participants for future lobbying ef­forts . "Our concerns very m..1ch reflect the interests of other Houston and Harris County citizens; they in­clude education, redistricting, civil rights for all who have been disenfranchised - with special emphasis for the rights of v.aren, and properly enabling law en­forceITEnt officials to provide for the safety arrl security of the citizenry they serve, " stated GPC President Lee Harrington. Future lobbying trips to Austin and grassroots constituency organizing will receive major emphasis by the HGPC for the remainder of this legislative session. This Week in Texas J1LGPC NEWS Austin Lesbian Gay Political Caucus (ALGPC) co­chair SCOttie SCOtt rep::>rted that ALGPC will have City Council candidate screening early in February. Call 478-8653 for information. Lesbian/Gay Derrocrats of Texas (LGDT) gave a reception at Austin Laml:da January 13 , 1981 , for rrern­bers of the Houston Gay Political Caucus , who were in Austin for the opening of the 67th Legislature. It looks like LGDT is going to have an Austin lobbyist soon, SCOttie told C<lllNECI'IONS. The organ­ization's name is Lesbian-Gay Rights Advocates , and it is currently firming up statewide supp::>rt for the lobby project. Scottie denied rurrors that Bettie Naylor v-.OUld be the Lesbian-Gay Rights Advocates lobbyist, and stated that negotiations to hire a lobbyist were still jn progress. Read your news in CONNECTIONS .'. . , . ..... " .•• ".' . y£1lJ(EtfD ANTI-GAY N'ENIM:NT PASSES Washington, D.C. - In a surprising and ccnq:>lete­ly unpredicted developrent, the House- Senate Confer­ence Camu.ttee of the legal Services Appropriations Bill has included an anti-gay amendrrent in the final rep::>rt of the bill. The amendITEnt is narro,...er and probably -weaker than the initial "McDonald AITEndITEnt" in the House of Representatives. But the Gay Rights National Lobby (GRNL) indicated that they will urge neml::ers of the House and Senate to opp::>se the Confer­ence Rep::>rt. GRNL Executive Director Steve Endean also stated that the Lobby had telegramred President Carter to urge him to veto the bill . The amendrrent was believed to be dead, since the Senate had dropped it in Subcamu.ttee and not re- inserted on the floor . And although the House had indeed passed the McDonald Arrendrrent, the v-.0rding did not originate in carmittee. Infonred soorces predicted that the House conferees v.OUld haWilY let . it fall by the wayside as they had in 1977 under similar circumstances. But when the Conference Comnittee net, the House conferees, sp..irred on by ranking minority rrember Rep. George O'Brien (R- IL) , remained adamant aro.it retain­ing the McDonald amendrrent. As the Corrmittee began its proceedings, the conservatives-weep on November 4 was clearly on the minds of the conferees. Sen. LOwell Weicker (R-CT) and Sen. "Fritz" Hollings (D-SC) argued forcefully that the anti-gay arrendrrent v-.0uld constitute an abridgeITEnt of civil rights and a denial of justice. They stressed that the issue wasn ' t approval or disapproval of harosex­uality, :tut basic fair play. However , it quickly became clear that the House conferees v-.0uld not back down . With the House con­ferees present and many Senators who had supp::>rted deleting the amendrrent fran the Senate version absent, it looked as if the t-t:r::x::mald anendrtent ,Olld remain in the bill. Faced with this reality, Senator Weicker sugges­ted ccnq:>ranise language to narrow the scope and mini­mize the damage fran the amendrrent. The initial McDonald language prohibited legal services fran litigation for "praroting, protecting arrl deferrling harosexuality." The Justice Departrrent indicated that the impact was unclear and that it could be interpret­ed to deny gay citizens access to the Legal Services program. The Weicker carpranise v.OUld substantially narrow the prohibition to only those cases which seek the "legalization of harosexuality." The House conferees imrediately resp::>nded favor­ably. Rep. John Hightower (R-TX) and Rep. Bill Alexander (D-AK), who had pushed the McDonald amerxl­ITEnt, agreed to the corrpranise. Rep. Bill Hefner (D-NC), said that maybe even MJral Majority wuld agree to the Weicker prop::>sal. Senator Weicker smiled and said he doubted it. Gay Rights National Lobby Executive Director Steve Endean said, "Let no one make any mistake arout it. Senator Weicker is deeply carmitted to justice for lesbians and gay ITEn. While -we are, of course, unhappy that any anti-gay rreasure passed, Senator Weicker effectively rroved, in our interests, to min­imize the damage. " But Endean -went on to say, "While -we can take sore solace in the fact that it isn't as bad as it could have been, -we rrust not lose sight of the fact that this is the first tine in many years that anti­gay legislation will pass Congress. Unfortunately, -we will face similar fights in the near future . To avert these defeats -we rrust organize as -we never have before. We at Gay Rights National Lobby do not want to act just as a 'damage control' operation." - CAPITOL HI!.L (CRt.'1'J 6 CONNECTIONS II CABARET CABARET V I C T O R Y FOO!'ER ffilS<ILL 0.-~lERS PAY UP The fonrer o..mers of the :::>riskill Bar and Gr ill have plead no contest to t;,,.o counts of violating . Austin's Public kx:atm::xJations Or lllci. ce by rE'fusing to a::.::.a.., two gay couples to dance tociether in the Drisk1l::. 1s Cabaret disco. I.aral Hotel corporation, d restaurant- bar holding corrpany from Avila Beach, California, !::ought the Driskill Hotel fran Braniff Inrernational 1n July of 1980. Driskill Bar and Grill Inc., d subsidiary of Braniff , paid $200 in fines and $85 in court costs on Q::tol::er 1 , 1980 , because , as a dissolving corpor­ation , it had no interest in further litigation, ac-cording to their attorney , Mark Levbarg. . . Betv.een the tine the two gay couples filed dis­crimination charges against the Cabaret, a disco bar in the Driskill, an<l the tll!1(> :.:>riskill Bar and Grill Inc. paid its fines , t;,,.o years and seven nonths had elapsed. During that period, an Austin Jury found the :::>riskill guilty of violating Austin ' s Public Accm­rrodations Ordinance, Municipal Judge Steve Russell iss..ied a 16- page opinion dE'nying the defendant' s rrction for a new trial , and county Court Judge Brock Jones found Driskill Bar and Grill guilty after their pl~a of no contest. The Cabaret c l osed on November 1 , 1980, :or re­m: xlellng. It wil'.I. reop:m around March 1 , 1981 , a., a restaura'1t- bar called "The Driskill Bar and Grille. " rt will not l::e a disco , nor will it have dancing on the premises . What is the significance of these courts uphold­ing Austir. 's Public Accamodations Or~inance, which says proprietors of μ.iblic acccmro:iations cannot re­fuse anj,One on account of n1cE.' , color, religion , :c,x, sexual orientation, national origin, age , or physical hardicap? Presumably, gay COuples car. row go to their favorite Austin nightspot , hold hands , dance together, and l::e themselves , knowing that if the proprietor tells the."'.I they can ' t dance toqether like straight couples, the proprietor risks a $100 fine . Mark Levbarq, attorney for Driskill Bar and Grill , told ro,..~, CTior-.:S he le lieves the nost useful thinq anyone learnC'd in this case was that you can pick a Jury 1n Travis County that is not biased aga.m:.;t hOrrOsexuals . He recdlled that many. prospec­tive Juror ir. the 1979 trial said they_ l::elleved that hatosexuality wa:, a sin, rut not a particularly great sin. Levbarg also stated that the Driskill Bar and Grill he.Id an a"Oncrru.c ll!terest in continuing the Cabaret's rule aqai.ns t sar.c- ex dancing. He said the house rule predated guy dan ·ing at the Cabaret. The i.:1ea was to have rren bJy drink., for ....aren. ~\'hen -:o.'Nll:'.Ia.s asked Levbarg if it is not true that g..1ys also ruy lots of m1xed !rinks, he replied that of coursE:. gays bJy drink& , too . He sc1i<l Austm bar o..mer wrry that .if their bar attracts a primar­ily g.:iy clientE'le, the gdy cra.-.d will eventu~lly novc on to another Austin bar . Levbarg says Austl.Il tavern owners tol hun i A tu' gay poμ.ilation v~e twice as ::.urge, there • .ould b:> enough rusines~ to keep them out of bankruptcy. It v.OUl ITCan that when one gay cro...d left a particular bar, anoth"r ¼Ollld cc.uc take its place. Perhaps economics wa:: the reason the Driskill fought its case for b...o and a half years . Perhaps harophobia was also part of the notivation. Levbarg doesn ' t think the issue of discrimination against sarre- sex dancing ooing equated with discrJ.ITlination based on sexual orien·.a· .i..,:. v.ould stand up to further litigation. But that i. , a:ter all , the opinion of the forrrer Driskill own, •r . ' attorney. The fact is that the> .;ri kill Bar and Grill chi," not to pursue its case further . It paid its fines , and Austin's Public Acconnruations Ordinance has heL.1 up in court, setting an i.np:)rtant precedent for ruture ga discrimination ca~Ps . CHRONQOGY a= THE STAJE a= TEXAS Y.S., DRISKII L PAR AND GRILL INC. APRIL NOVEMBER FEBRUARY l 9 7 6 Austin City COUncil passed the Public Accamodations Ordinance forbidding discrimination based on "sexual orientation. " l 9 7 7 The Cabaret asked tv.o ITCn to leave tecause they ~re dancing together . The Cabaret wasp rt f th Driskil Hotel, then own d by Driskill Bar and Grill Inc . , a subsi1i r~ t ranitf International. 1 9 7 8 Anne Hogan , Dennis Nilan, Norma Funder- 1:org, a:xl Bruce Aleksarx..ier v-x.•nt into the cabaret as mixed couples and tcgan dancing. Th y soon switched to their natural arrangerrent . saro c-1..wtarers stared, bJt they .~re tolerated until th flr..;t sla.., danc lx>gan . Ar. cmployE:e then approached Dennis and Bruce and told them a house rule prohibited sarrc­sex ancing . Gay activist attorney Woody Egger, who had accompanied thf' two couples to the Cabaret. told the 8 CONNECTIONS 7 VICTOR~ II THE LANlJltll.RK IICISION REJECTING THE DRISKILL'S /1PPEAL Exc:erpt.cd bl/ Jim Olingf'r VAGU'~1',L_,ss !Jctendant first contends that the term "sexual orientation" is ". . . so vague that m:>'1 of ..::ornron intelligence f!Ulst necessarily guess at its rreaning and differ as to its application. . . . " ll~ver , the phrase is cornronly fouoo in the law l::ooks and is c.-or.tained in civil rights ordinances of other citie::; . "Sexual orientatio11" is also a term of (.,'Qmror. usage outside of legal li tcrature , including the Austin Arrerican- Statesman. A term so widely used in publications of general circuldlion cannot h' "total babble ." Defendant argues that since sexual orientations cone ir. infinite variety and cannot re determined by vfaual iuspectior. , an innkeeper may unknowingly blunder into a ·riminal lawsuit. However, religious orlentations are no·less nurrcrous and no nore dis­coverable by visual inspection. Yet discrimination in places of p.ililic ac<.-'O!Tll'Cdation based on religion is dearly unlawful under the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The Jury found reyond a reasonable doubt that Defendant knowingly limited the use of its facili­ties by complainants on ac..:ount of their 5exual orientation. ::>efer,dant ' s contention that the Austin p.1blic m::COim(.)(;lations ordinance is vpid for v,gueness is overruled. FOURTEENTH AMENDMENT; CRIMINAL TRESPASS Defendant next ar'_lUes that its p:>:i_icy banning si:JITC- sex dancing on its premises is protected by the Fourteenth Arrendrrent to the United States Con­stitution, Article 1 , Section 19 of the Texas Con­stitution, and Section 30. 05 , Texas Penal COde ("criminal trespass"). The sixties sit-in cases establi,hed that ". . . places of public arruserrent. . . are estal:r li:hcrl and maintained under direct license of the law. The authority to establish and maintain them conc from the p.1blic. . . . A ll.cen.,e from the publit; to establish a place of [<ll li, amusem;nt, llllf..Ortr , in lc1w, equality of r igh , a such places , w:ony all rrcrnlx-rs cf that public." 'ity PJ,blic a--:1..'0I1110dat ion_. ordinances arc nuw nurrerous, and seV0ral haw ~urvived constitutional attack. llonosexual conduct is a petty mi.: <lcrredJ10r ur c-r 5c'ction 21.06 of th0 Tc-xa:; Penal Code. A p0tty misk"I"Ci.1110r is , of course, 'till a crirre , rut the tcltute p-,:.nll: h(_ conduct, not th status of having dJ1 h<.JrO. cxual orien'Ultion. It i highly un l ikrly th..it tl.c .: ta tus could l.(_, crirnir,.i.J.ized. Ci~n tn ,~ the status of hO!JD,.,oxuality is no+- 1-llpq ur r,robably cannot. Jx, mad so, was the Au tin 'Hy cou: cil rational wt1Pr, it includoo 11arO­xu< 1' w . . ir. th protection of a civil riuht.. r l Lnc.Ul\.'t'? Def n:.r,g "horroscxual" as a persor. w1.th "norp them LnC t ,+-al" narosexua::. 0xperi(•r,cc, it cun lX' c t im,itcu +-~at the re dI"e alx:mt tvK>r,ty mil:: ion hono­sc xual -n • c lJ::1 ited Statr>s. Thi sutstclntial r.urnlx?i:- of Arrt:".rica11 1:iti2en, has b:>C'r, subjected to discrlminutory trcat:m:>nt r1valinq that i.rrp:;sed on ar,y rc1cial minority, starting with the privileges of entering tile legal, rredical , military, and teaching professions and continuing through err:- •,· .RiQym;mt in ~;!!'l~;.~~-~ Uie rl)st ba:c:i,G , !upi;~~, constitutionally protected ir.terests in freedom of association , religion, speech and the right to raise children. The Austin City Council has had the p:>litical courage to outlaw sorre discrimination agair,t hon'O­sexuals. This Court holds that the City may prc­tect its ir.habitdl1ts and visitors fr<r di ·crimina­tion rof.ed on their sexual orientation, .::ind thut an ordinarice to assure such protection 1_ not arbitrary, capricious or irrational. CRIMINAL TRESPASS Defendant next argues that the ordinance in this case p.rrp:>rts to create a dcfe;~e to the charge of criminal trespass, violating the ~exas constitution. This argurrent is not based on the facts of this ca:::e. The prosecutior.:: herein Me based up:>n Defendant's limitation of ccnplainants' use of its facilities , not on denial of access . Complainants ,~re free to stay so long as they did not use the dance floor for its custanary purp:>se, as it was lx!ing used by heterosexual couples . Ir, the case !:€fore this Court, .r.suming that the p.1blic accorrrrodations ordinance may not L'Onflict with the criminal trespass statute, a rational read­ing of the ordinance is still !X)ssible: "You may allav, halosexuals into your place of rosiness or not, rut if you allow them in you may not then insult them by limiting their use of the facilities ." Contir,.icd on page 1:1 Jud~c Stf'Vf' Rus~ 11 8 CONNECTIONS 0. R I S K I L L C H R O N O L O G Y Continued from page 6 Cabaret officials that they ~re vio­lating a city ordinance and that can-­plaints ...ould l:e filed . The Cabaret rranagerrent again asked Dennis Milam to cease dancing with Bruce and asked Norma Funderrurg to cease dancing with Amre. They l:x:)th complied, rut later charged Driskill Bar and Gril l Inc. with violating Austin 's Public Acccm­m:: rlations Ordinance . Dennis Milam and Bruce Aleksander subsequently moved to Houston. Amme Hogan moved to Dallas . Woody Egger moved to New York City . ;:orma Funder­burg ' s whereabouts are unknown to CON­:: ECTIOHS. :-tilam, Aleksander , and Hogan returned to Austin to testify when the case came up for trial in 1979. l 9 7 9 JUNE After challengir.g the validity of the Public Accormodations Ordinance, Driskill Bar and Grill dropp:x1 its injunction against the city, Of€ning the way for a trial. JLLY A rrunicipal court Jury corrp:>sed of three w::rien and three Ire.'1 took less than half an hour to decide the Cabaret's house rule against sal;£'-sex dancing violated the Austin Public Accaw.Odations Ordir.­ance. Driskill Bar a'ld Grill was fined $200. APRIL Jl.LY Matthew Coles , who is rt::M in private practice in Sar. FrancL;co, was the attor­ney fran Gay Rights Advocates who helped direct the Driskill case . He called the case the first of its kind in the country where the issue of discrimination concerned a ~son's sexual preference . Driskill attorney Mark Levbarg said he \.\Ollld seek an appeal on the grou.'lds that the ordi.na."1Ce was "too vague to enforce ." 1 9 8 0 Municipal Court Judge Steve Russell overruled the Driskill 's rrotion for a new trial. Driskill Bar and Grill then apf€aled to a county court. Braniff International sold the Driskill Hotd to Laral Hotel Coq::oration. SEPTEMBER 23 In County Court NO, 1, Driskill Bar and Grill plead no contest to the charges . Because the hate 1 had l:x!cn sold, there was no reason to litigate any further . Judge Brock Jones fined the coq::oration $200 plus $85 in court costs. OCTOBER 1 Driskill Bar a'1C1 Grill paid the fines in the county clerk's office. NOVEMBER The Cabaret closed for rem::rleling. ·1981 The Cabaret, n<::M renam...c>d "The Driskill Bar and Grille," was scheduled to reof€n as an "elega."lt tum-of- the-century semi- rustic restaurant-bar, like a 1900 's saloon- restaurant. " .It,will ~ . hav e d anci. na . _,,_,..,._~,,,# ' ,1 •-.~ > - ~ • , ¥ • L A N D M A R K D E C I S I O N Continued from page 7 -HOUSE RULE 001' DISCRIMINATIOO Finally, Defendant argues that its p:::>licy is rrerely a rule of conduct and does not in fact dis­criminate against persons on account of their sexual orientati on. This is the sarre (rejected) argurrent as the one that c l a:irred an anti-miscegenation statute was not racially discriminatory l:ecause it applied to blacks and whites equally. Defendant's rule !l'a.Y l:e one of conduct, rut it is not applied equally to persons of differing sexual orientation. Alrrost twenty years ago, when black and white students ~re going to jail in astonishing numbers for the right of black Arrericans to eat at departrrent store lunch counters, the issue was not the quality of the cuisine at Woolwrth ' s . The issue was and is one of hurran dignity, of the right to go arout one's daily life without l:eing p..iblicly marked as inferior, less than hurran. The Austin City Council faced this issue, as did the Jury in this case. This court can do no less . Defendant's rrotion for new trial is overruled, and its notice of appeal is entered this 16th day of April , 1980. 2512-A Rio Grande Austin 477 -7202 Steve Russell Presiding Judge 1 0 L O U S Y B U C K S G E T S Y O U : * Best Headj ob in Town * Year s o f Experience * Blown Unt i l Dr y on R€'quest * Free Fi fth Cut wi th same Stylist * Opi ni on on Any SubJect * A New Friend BIRTHDAY SALE!!!! Februar y 9 - 10 $2 Off Wi th This Ad (Ne,., Customers Only; CONNECTIONS 9 GAY LA\·/ STUIINTS PUSH FOO CIVIL RIGHTS AT U,T, by , 1d Fr Law Students for Human Rights i an active gay group for law students and other grc1duate students at the University of Texas at Au~tir. Now in its second acaderru.c year, the group has al:x:iut ·ix uctive rrcml:ers, all of whcm are tuder.t:.: in the tJl' Law Schaal . Their purpo.c is to provid a visible gathering point for gay law students, to educate straight law students al::out gay concerns, to cstab:ish a continuing gay presence in the tJl' Law School, and to bridge the gap oot'.A2€11 gays in the Law School and those in the rest of Texas . Law Students for Human Rights is the first , and still only, openly-gay group at the tJl' Law School . It was founded in April of 1979. Eight people, including three v.Orren , attended the first rreeting. Sage White was the only ¼Oll1aI1 law student at the first rreeting, and is the only remaining rrember of the original group. The first name the group chose for itself was the Gay-Lesbian Law Alliance. Feeling there was safety in numbers , five l aw school faculty rrembers signed as sponsors for the 1979- 80 school year. For the 1980- 81 school yea,r , people ~re "less freaked out by a gay law student group. " This year 's single faculty sponsor is Pat Hazel. the UITTI'Cr of 1979 , a gay Austin!.::' Law School t up a rreeting with the Gay-Lesbian Law Allium.: . H told ther.. he felt the group hould change tt nam::: so "there wuld not !:ea lot of heat μit on y 1 ry in • x~ . " He al o ted that th t -,:; 1 ha ~ 1.1.-"Ul y g ttln Jobs after l y so ':he group paranoia. "Good rroral character" is required for ad­mission to the bar, and this phrase has never been defined. Pro pcctive la·iyers are exc:1.'!'ined in the countv of their original Texas re~idence. County ethics • conmittee c..'OUJ.d define "good nora: character" arra..,ly and exclude a gay person frcm the legal profession simply for l::cing gay. Sage want3 the Lau S':Udents for HUl11i:lI1 ights to request ar; opinion fra-:i. the State Bar concerning sexual orientatior. and an E:>x<:i.ct definition o "good r.oral character." The gay la·., studer.t group makes referrals to syr.-pathctic :awyers ir Austin and ,.oulJ ::.ikc to canpile a list of syn-pathetic la\.yers in places outside the Austir. area. "Gay lm.yers are a resource that the gay conmmi ty needs," Sage White says . Law Students for Hurnar: Rights requested that a written non-discrimination policy trcm the law school l::e expanded to include sexual orientation. So far, that request is still i.~ limlx> , With such a small rrembership, the fate of Law Students for Human Rights is uncertain. Sage \~hlte , David White and Bill Brown will finish law schOOl in May, 1981 . Marvin Prevost and Walt Wilder have another year and a half to go. Unless rrore gay law students choose to involve themselves , there will be nothing rruch done in the area of gay people and the legal profession at the tJl' Law School . The rrembers of Law Students for Huma~ Rights are eager to develop coalitions with other law groups such as feminists and ACLU r:err.t-ers . David h'hite is having a hard tirre getting other gay law students interested in joining this group. Sage says there is a Na:en 's Law Caucus at the law schOOl , arrl sa:e of its rrembers are lesbians. She isn ' t sure why other ~;er.en haven 't gotten involved in the gay law student group. Marvin Prevost wants potential group rreml::ers to realize that. the Law Students for H - · qhts group is not limited to out-of- the-closet types or to polit­ical activists . Marvin says the group is glad to W=lcorre ,.orren, minorities, arid friendly straights . Law Students for Hu.":\a~ Rights can oo contacted days at their office in the Law School A.'1Ilex, 471 - 5151 ext. 210, and nights at 477- 7257, or 477- 7867 . Legal Services in Civil and Criminal Matters DOUGLAS~ BEHRENDT ATTORNEY AT LAW 111 est Anders,;, ·,a,<c Suite 207, Austin X 78 52 PhQn~: Office 458-9118; eside~ce 443- 246~ LICENSED TO PRACTI~E lAw I~ TEXAS SINCE 1969 Make money from Connectio s 35% commissio for ad sale Call Jim Olinger-474-1660 for details · ~ : 'J-,u k CONNECTIONS Chuck, from Corpus'Ch1isti, is 21 years old and is n Aris. Now a business student at UT, he worxs fc,r Southwestern Bell as an operatoi-. His hobbies include 1·acquetball, carpentry , and "carrying on . " Vi~ , trom aalveston , is 22 y ars old and is a Libra . A marketing mdJOr at UT, his hobbies include musJ~ , football , and rugby . 11 Photos by Carr Strong 12 CONNECTIONS THE MJSTANG PANO San Francisco, I.os Angeles, Phoenix, San Antonio , Corμis Christi, Austin, and Houston. We played by Jim Olinger places ranging fran the Twin Oaks , a gay dude ranch in Caliente, California, to sare joint with a sign Although there are certainl y hundreds of gay that said 'We do barl::ecue.' There were people Country and Wes tern rrusicians , there is still only fighting and shooting guns . We ran like hell. " one openly gay Country and Western band. Naturally, Other experiences on that tour included running they are Texans - the Musta11g Ba"ld fran Houston. out of gas on Hoover Dam and playing the rest areas The ori ginal Mustang Band was an offshoot of the of the North. "We had a carrper with a rc~r supply, .Musta'1g Club, a gay C&\'l club in Houston. Several so ,·~ 'd stop at rest areas , set up and try out new Musta'1g Club rrernr:ers , including guitarist Tan Groves songs . Truckers ,.ould stop and listen. It was a"ld keyl:oardist Larry Hodge, ~ga'1 playi.'1g together am3.zing." in 1977 . Their first paying gig was one night a ~-~ In July and August of 1980 , the band toured the at the Inside/Outside in Houston. A series of appear- \O:est Coast for six ... ~s. One stop was their second a'1ces at the Brazos River Bottxr.- and the t:xile folla~ , appearance at the Reno Gay Rodeo . "We played for 4500 a"ld then the Reno Gay Ro:ieo. people at a barn dance and for 9000 i n the stands , " The Mustang Band is currently playing gay clubs Tom Groves rerrernrers. Real People was there filming all over Texas . They are appearing every other Fri- the Gay Rodeo and tqey ta us ." That wrent hasr. ' t day night at tl-ie Red River Crossing here 1n Austin. l:::cen aired, as of mid- January , 1981 . However , the ''r:e 're really happy to play the Crossing," Tan Groves Mustang Band has appeared on the national cable tele-says. "~e way our audience here in Austin is wild- vision program What 's Up, Arrcrica? ing is very nice. " If you are goi.'1g to Mardi Gras in New Orleans The band ' s biggest probler., according to Groves , this year , re sure to catch the band at The Refuge , is "He really need to have flve Saturdays a week . a new restaurant/bar in the French Quarter. Other That's tl-ie night everyl:ody wants us . " The .Mustangs plans for the near future include a party in Manhattan are also <'.lppearing regularly at Snuffy ' s Saloor. ir. to μiblkize the Reno Gay Ro:ieo and Lane Star II - San A.'1tonio a"ld at :'he Saddle Club and Houston Co1.m- a Texas-·,ide rrotorcycle club rreeting in Dallas . try in Houston. The band is ,.orking full t.irre a"ld The Mustang Band, and its audience , is breaking none of the ITCJ11rers have outside Jobs . . down the myth of gays as high- fashion disco queens . The bar.d embarked on a 23- state tour early in There 's sare good, old- fashioned , HOT cowb:Jys in them 1979. "We did local bars frcr. coast to coast," there hills and the .Mustang Band is bringing them Groves and Hedge recall. . "Florida, St. :.OUis, :-!ash- out. !•bre fX)v~r to them! ville , Ohio, Denver, OJ<lahcma c 1. ty, Dallas , Reno, ._._ 1alatt bass) , Larzy H d 'keyboard) , Don BJinett (leadvocals1 , Joseph Siegel ( fiddle ) , Tvm Groves (guitar ) , and Kevin Dwyer ( drums ) CONNECTIONS 13- NINE TO FIVE Reviewed by Sarah Craig (GAY LIFE - Chicago) Good news, ladies and gentlerren! Here are glad tidings from (of all places) Holly,,-,ood: Good politics CAN make good art. The rrovie in question is Nine to Five, a light ~y with a heavy rressage that stars the unlikely tn.o of Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, and Dolly Parton. Each plays a very different type of ...onan in Nine to Five , °:1t each makes her staterrent al::out the everyday oppression of worren and minorities in the wrkplace. However , screenwriter Patricia Resnick never lets Nim~ t~ Five J::ecorre dour or preachy. In fact, this rovie is one of the funniest presented in a long long tirre. ' The plot is (alITOst) μrre fantasy . Fonda is a recently-divorced ...onan coming into the wrkforce for the first tirre in her life. Tomlin has ~lve long years with the c:anpany under her J::elt, and is a canpetent, ambitious careerv.oman. Parton ' s char­acter is sorrewhere in the middle: she 's a secretary, and wrks J::ecause she needs the rroney, rut she 's cer­tainly good at her job. She doesn ' t enjoy the con­stant sexual pressure she gets from her slimy, sexist ol:ooxious , conniving J::oss . ' The Boss, played by Dal:ney COleman, who p::>rtrayed the mayor of Mary Hartman ' s hone ta..m, is an amalgama-admission by itself. Add the priceless vision of Dolly Parton roping and tying him as if he .-..ere a rodeo hog, and there is no way to suppress the laugh-ter . SOile have criticized Jane Fonda for playing a "~ak sister" character; rut, if the role she chose is a reticent, civilized, tasteful ...onan, should Fonda play that character as a !:old, cannanding Amazon? It's to Fonda ' s credit that she plays a "tasteful lady" and pulls it off. To remake the character for the sake of Fonda's own personality wuld J::e grandstanding and a J::etrayal of the script. Anyway, she does get to J::e an "Amazon" in her fan­tasy sequence. Fonda is an excellent actor , and Nine to Five rrerely underlines that fact . Lily Tomlin's comic genius is once again dem::m­strated in this rrovie . After the dismal Moment by Moment , it's good to see Tomlin back and succeeding at what she does !::est. If she wants to try dramatic roles again, "rrore ~ to her , " rut let her ch<:x)se her vehicles rrore carefully. Dolly Parton, to the surprise of many, is quite a capable thespian . Certainly the sincerity and depth of errotion she conveys in many of her songs should have given the skeptics a clue as to her ability; rut her part in Nine to Five will delight even her detrac­tors . Her fans, of course , will J::e doubly thrilled. Since this is a fantasy, the gcx:xi "guys" win in the end ( in real life, no such things could ever hap­~ n) and the evil J::oss is al:x:lucted by a bard of aveng­ing Amazons. With a little suspension of disl::elief, ~ver, Nine to Five ranks as one of the top CO!Edies of the year. . ~ibera~ \-.areTI, of course, will take great delight 9 in this rovie , tut that's no reason for rren to stay at hone . The anti- sexist rressage is loud and clear, tut the rroral of the story never obliterates the μrre -'~-~-~~~~---enjoyment: of the story itsel . Nine to i.ve cares ~e~tily recomrended as entertainrrent as ~11 as p::>1- itics . Even the rrost macho leatherman in ta,m has got to guffaw when he sees the harness the ol:noxious TO 5 tion of all the rotten J::osses in the wrld. He orders Lily Tomlin around as though she ~re his maidservant, even though she trained him and made it p::>ssible for him to get his current job. He fires people for no go:xl reason; he clamps down on any expressions of individuality in the wrkplace to the p::>int where a coffeecup on a desk is grounds for dismissal. He ' s a cheat, a flirt, he hates everyone , and hP wants to rule his enployees with an iron hand. In addition to all that, he is King Chauvinist of all tirre . Feminists may dislike him for his sexism alone, tut everyone in the audience can find sonething al:ou t him that ' s ol:noxious • He ' s an equal-opportunity offender. When he pulls three major ~r-stunts in one afternoon , he succeeds in enraging Fonda, Tomlin, and Parton. Their separate miseries bring than together , and they rantasize over a joint of "Maui Zowie , " supplied by Lily Tomlin' s son, al:out how they 'd like to wipe this sleazy operator off the face of planet earth. The fantasy sequences are a caredy riot. To see Lily Tomlin dressed up as Cinderella, singing a happy little song to Walt Disney- type bluebirds as she stirs a po.isoh p:jtion into nis coffee , is ~rth the, t.(.ice o J::oss gets tied up in. Nine to Five is a thoroughly enjoyable rovie for everyone. Yes , Virginia - gcx:xi p::>litics can make good art! NINE TO FIVE: Story by Patricia Resnick. Screenplay by Colin Higgins and Patricia Resnick. Directed by Colin Higgins . Now playing in Austin at the Fox Triplex and Lakehills Cinema . •• 14 CONNECTIONS GAYS AND AGGIE TRADITION ------------ ----------- LARSATLARGE------­by Lars Eighner Quadding: Stripped to his shons, a cadet has barrels of water poured on his crotch from a second-story window . .Lllustratio:-;_, from TEX/w r-:JllTHLY, January 1981 hotos: , ill v"n Clverbeek Cdptions: Al Rein~rt spite- e orange £load at courses ou~h Your Rep:irter's veins, there is no joy in relating t.':e latest AGGIE JOKr.. . . . The Gentle Reader who picked JtJ fae Decenrer 19 cm: ll',ITY read a really first-rate accotmt of tl:e oppressive rreasures TEZAS At,:. U:.l:VEPS:::'.:Y is ta1<ing in atte:rpti.'1g to suppress Gl-.Y A....~S. or. ca"lμls . an exhuustmg crap-out a phyncal disctplme imposed by upperclassmen who get out of /me get uapped out So do fish who stay m /me. "Squeeze, Ags!" These yell leaders are-yes, it's true-squeezing their privates m, 1rder share pain with the team on the football field. Nobody knows who first came up with this idea, but it's never caught on with anyone but Aggies. CONNECTIONS Tbhaec kA tuos ttihne c f, unenstrt yb awre 1. co mes you Open Tuesda in Austin ..... . from s p.m. tY11t~~-~Sunday Shows eve . with rexas,rvfThu rsday Entertainers. 'nest Every sunda . Punk Trashy. with the Gr e, asned s ,~ sotmeresd y 15 16 CONNECTIONS ' C C:--­~ LOVE SCCPE - FEBRUARY by Brannon Duane Y-r-o"' your Aquar ian /1an . Because he is so •up front ," his friends can often accuse him of inciting negative reactions. The Aquarian has a busy social life and is always looking for new stimuli . Bars and bookstores are a part of his regular cruising routine. Anonymous sex is easy for the Aquarian Nan , but he rarely goes home alone o:: -che nights he wants sor.eone to sleep with . Aquariar.s love everyone. If you want one- on­o:: e love, you must stir his mind . But it may not last lo::g . You can please him most by being a loyal frier,d ar.d confidant, rather than trying to restrict !;i;- -co a :--onogar7ous relationship . You must be an Aq~arius ' f r iend before you go to bed , or you'll just be a::ot!;er one-night stand. Aquarius can be sexually faithful , but he must ::a·;e ,::o.-plete inder,endence and make this decision for ti:-self . If you demand his loyalty, he 'll be gone ir, short: order. A?IE:::; (!~arch 2~ - A[-,ril 19) - Responsibilities do not lesser. this mo::th, but you 'll be better able to cope ,,,:_ tf-. :::0.-;:._1.ca-ced con di t.ions . J; social e•;ent on the ,::: ;:i_l be i:-:portant to you . !lewly-met persons may ;;.a~e a sr.1.::ing to you . l-.n Aquarius Man of your past r.-,.:.-ch ;1::0:- ':JOU had very little in common suddenly will exhio1.t qualities you adpire. You 'll see each other ir. a r.e;1 light . Your high days are the 7th through tl:e 1 'Jth . • 'A'.JPU.'; (J.pril 20- May 2o; - Aroud the 18th , your sa­-::.:. a_ ,::a~e::dar ;1ill char,ge ir. your fa·,or . You need ~c E ~x~1.te:--:e:::t ir.. your lit€: and a Pisces !1an can h,. -I ,10~ ou~ of tr,e d:,11 9- to- 5 routine . One thing 3 ~~ de hOt ~eed is ~Agatl'l€ thin~1.ng! Your high ;Jays c,r": U,e 9th through thr: 12th . .,.,,, . . , ... GEMINI (May 21- June 20) - Career matters move for­ward energetically, starting on the 7th . The 4th would be a good time to visit an old love out-of­town . But , because your high days are the 11th through the 14th, it appears your Valentine ' s gift "'ill be at home for a very hot 4- day period . Could be a Cupid ' s arrow hit that man of the 4th. CANCER (June 21 - July 22) - An Aquarius Man will lift your spirits this month. He may be very apparent in your life for 5 days, because your high days are the 13th through the 17th. This man will appeal to both your sexual and intellectual natures . LEO (July 23- August 22) - This month gets off to a slow start , but with your high days being the 16th through the 19th , you can plan for a good end to this short month . You may want to spend quiet evenings at home after the 19th , because a man from your past will come back to renew some old fond feelings and good memories . VIRGO (August 23- September 22) - Tension and strain may cause you problems if you don ' t get enough rest from the 1st to the 18th. Your high days are the 18th through the 21st , with the 18th being especially good for you . You won ' t have to cruise . Try a new tactic and respond quickly to love ' s advances . The evening was meant for you , so get iff off to an early start. LIBRA (September 23- 0ctober 22) - Romance predominates from the 4th to the 28th. This will not be a one­sided affair. However , you will not have as much attention shor.-,ered on you as you would like. A word to the wise - take time to gather all the facts before giving an ultimatum . Your high days are the 24th through the 27th . SCORPIO (October 23- November 21) - After the 7th, and until the 16th of March, you can expect to be drawn to various forms of strenuous physical exer­cise . Some of this exercise will be in the form of sex (not harmful) . In other physical activities , take care not to go beyond your usual limits and check all equipment to be sure it is working ~or­rectly . Your high days are the 23rd through the 26th . "l1ake it a point to know who your real friends are!" SAGITTARIUS (November 22- December 21) - A moment of ;ii tty sarcasm could create a lot of problems , when you only meant to be funny . Last month was hectic, so take this month to renew old feelings for old friends . Don ' t limit yourself; learn to be more ver­satile , This could be a fun month for you! Your high days are the.25th through the 28th . Pay back social obligations . CAPRICORN (December 22- January 19) - Your high days will be the 1st through the 4th and the 28th . They will give this month a good beginning and end . Be­cause of this, be sure you are at your best. A fine mind and a positive outlook are qualities you seek in a companion . Loot for these qualities in a Virgo . Open a new door that will allow greater freedom to explore a new subject . AQUARIUS (January 20- February 18) - During the first three weeks of the month , you 'll be the ruler of your kingdom. If errors occur , make changes without self­recrimination . No one is perfect ! Your high days are the 3rd through the 6th . A Virgo Man can make a bright new friend . The 18th is well- suited for nostalgic remembrances which can bring someone from the past back into your arms again . PISCES :February 19-March 20) - This month begins quietly , but ends on a hectic note . This may be the time to turn the old loose and start off with the new. You may find yourself arranging a truce bet;.,r:,en two people, but they may not decide to re­main friends . von ' t worry - you have done your part . Your high days are the 5th through the 8th. After the 7th you'll feel much more ambitious. A man born under the same Sun sign may lead to a las­ting relationship . CONNECTIONS 17 fvETf-ODIST CHURCH QUASHES IDl by Troy Stokes There is no way that I could write objectively dbout the cancellation of Martin Sherman ' s splendid play BENT. For the last ten years, a major focus of my energies has been att!empting to move the United Methodist Church in the direction of fairer treatment of its homosexual members. Changes have be~n minimal and slow, so the best I can do is advise the reader of my bias and proceed . In the fall of 1980, Rev. Wilson Wade , pastor of St. Luke United ~thodist Church in Austin. asked the Wesley Foundation, the Metho.::list Church' s camp..is ministry, to fund "pro.::luction of tv.o socially rele­vant dramas which \..OUld articulate the universal human situation of sin and salvation without the con­fusions occasioned by religious rhetoric ." A stated purp;:>se in the proposal was to involve those persons who do not attend church. The request was approved, and Wade attempted to secure rights to perform Elie \viesel 's :'he Trial of God. Max, left, played by Richard Gere, and Rudy , right, fran the Broadway play "BENT." He found he could not get those rights, and ob­tained Bent by Martin Sherman, which deals with the Nazi persecution and extermination of harosexuals. Instead, Rev. \vade's choice alarrood the l:x:>ard of di­rectors of the \•;esley Foundation. The chairman, Rev. George Ricker (pator at University l.F-C) reviewed the script and refused to sign checks to pay for produc­tion, which was already under way. A l:x:>ard rreeting was called, and funding was withdrawn by unan.irrous vote. The prevailing feeling was that, altho.igh, the play had rrerit, it was just too controversial for the United Methodist Church to sponsor. Dr. Ralph Seiler (Superintendent of the Austin District of the M=tho­dist Church) indicated that the overt sexuality in the play made it unsuitable. A frequent refrain was that a disp..ite over this play would re "bad strategy for the> ultimate full in­clusion of gay people in the life of the church." I find it depressing that this decisionJwas made witho.it asking any gay peopl • ti<) ~nl: ga'/ people serve on the \vesley Fourilation roarti, and none were invited to the m:!eting as guest, though it should have been obvious that the l:x:>ard's decision would have "needed interpretation" to the gay ccnmmity. This attitude l.S characteristic of the church's condescerrling ap­proach. It makes decisions a.rout px>ple's lives without consulting them. The feelings of conserv-..i.­tive-: nirrled fat cats are considered l.llpJrtant. ~ feelings of minority people are not. The "strategy" turned out to re bad ir. at least one instance: on Sunday, January "6, my friend a.nu corrpanion Ronnie Sawey confronted Rev. Ricker a.rout his decision rl.uring the eleven o'c.:loc::k worship ser­vice at University !-:ethodist. Although thl.S did :-x:,t cause the board to change its decision, it Ji call into question th- practice of n ~lecting th .::oncerns ~-"'. .... ...minOl(:.i..,t_y n e. I-<$<l2).t~~Ll...~-tl~ gJ. t.a-t. iOn . There are youths 1n and out of the 11.ietho:Jist Church who care ab:>ut l:eing Chrutian \-mile l:eing ::.n conflict a.rout their sexual activities und fcnlings. Honosexuals and many others are in this group. It is tragic that the church can't apply <::::e saire ~ c ntin~ a n page ~B IDl PRODUCTION COOTINUES HELP NEEDED by Rev. Wilson ad I am trying to raise $2,300 for a professional quality pro.::luction of. BENT this spring. _My_personal ccmru.tnent to producing this play in Austin is greater than ever, precisely becaμse an agency of the United Methodist Church has withdrawn support on the grounds that certain church people might l:e offended, . Sever~ hundred dollars of my own I!Oney will l:e p..it into ~us ~ffort. The production staff I have been working with is also making a financial c:amu.t­rrent. "!e also have the ccmnitrrent of sore of the test actors_ in town to make this play an outstanding theatr:-<=al event of deep social significance for the a:rrm.uuty. We have a grant of $1,200 fran the Austin Parks and Recreation Departrrent to stage BEN!' at center Stage Theatre and tentative agreerrent fran ur to stage it in their Drama workshop Theatre. Ten per­formances are planned. We need all the financial ccmnitrrents ~ can get as soon as possible, l:ecause "up-front" I!Oney is nec­essary l:efore ~ can get receipts fran ticket sales. Please help. Rev. Wade is pastor of St. Luke United Methodist Church, 1306 West Lynn, in Austin , phone 476-8164. 18 CONNECTIONS METHODIST CHURCH QUASHES Wf[ - continued from page 17 pathy for oppressed Jews to oppressed horrosexuals . After all , it is rruch rrore cormon for :-iethcxiist youth to suffer anxiety because they think they might be gay than it is for them to worry that they might be Jewish. The church wuld have reassured many people if it had the courage to speak out against the oppression of honosexuals. The controversy ~-.ould have been valuable in i tself . Every tirre I have sIX)ken publicly to decry the oppression of gay people , a hopeful result has been that several conflicted people have felt like they could rel y on rre to give them advice and reduce their pain. Other gay activists and pastors reIX)rt the sane. For this reason, I take heart in the fact that Rev. Wade wants to go for.-1ard and stage Bent if he can get comnunity backing. He will find that his efforts make him and the church be percei ved as a cormuni ty resource to which peopl e can turn when they need help. 1·/CWI.N-LOVI NG v/Q\EN Lave:,Jer Horizons is making available (for purchase or rer:t; ;\O:•lA.'.- LDVr.:G \·JO:-s:;, a 25-minute r:edia presentation which explores IX)pular miscor.­ceptio:. s atout lesbia'1s and shows h0v1 society acts UIX):-. these r'.'lisconceptions to oppress lesbians so­cially, economically, and IX)litically. I:. additio:,, the presentation shows the rich­ness of lesbiar. culture and documents the enorrrous contri::utions that lesbians of all ages , races, a'1d classes make to society. \·,O:-:;i::-WJI::G :-JCX·IE:. was created by Patricia A. Gozerr.ba a"ld :-:arilyn L. Humphries . Pat, a Pro­fessor of ~nglish at Salem State College, is on the Steering Comnittee of the ~ational l'lorren 's Studies Association and is a rrember of the Boston Area Lesbian and Gay History Project. Marilyn, a professional photographer, is a rrember of the :Jew :Sngla'1d Warren 's Studies Association and the Massa­chusetts ::orth Shore Gay Alliance. Purchase price is $225 for the 244-frarre slide- tape presentation and discussant 's guide; $125 is the price for the filmstrip version. Rental fee is $45 . For rrore infonnation, write Lavender Hori­zons , P.O. Box 806 , Marblehead, Mass . 01945 , 617/ 744 - 9141. In keeping with its philosophy of supIX)r­tfog feminist , lesbian, and gay organizations , La­vender Horizons directs 5% of the purchase price to Olivia Records in gratitude for their music in \-Ja.,lA..~ -WJI::G l·V.IE:J a'1d in support of their wrk. Lavender Horizons is currently soliciting rnanuscripts , slide/tape programs and videotapes on lesbian and gay ma.le issues . .., •-•~to T ... ..................... _ .. CONNECTIONS 19 CONNECTIONS CALENDAR F E B R U A R Y l 9 8 l Sun Feb 1 Austin Laml:x:la pot- luck supper for lesbians , lesbian co- parents , and their children. Call 479-0654 for info. Sat Feb 7 Reservations due for Austin Laml:x:la Valen­tine Supper 8: 30pn, Austin Laml:x:la lesbian dance 10i:rn-3arn, free STD screening by Gay People/Health Care at the Club Baths Sun Feb 8 3pn, r,ccA congregational rrceting after \'.Orship service M:)n Feb 9 Jeremiah 's Haircutting birthday sale. New custarers only. $2 off with COONECTIONS ad. 26th and Rio Grande. Tue Feb 10 Jeremiah ' s Haircutting birthday sale . Sarre as Feb. 9 Wed Feb 11 7pn, Law Students for Hurran Rights rreeting , UT Law School Annex 7:30pn, Austin Laml::x:1a alcohol collective rreeting Thu Feb 12 12 noon , UT-A:1stin Counseling Center pre­sents panel on "Issues in Gay and Lesbian Relationships , " Texas Union , East,.,Qods Room ( 2. 102) 5:15pn and 7:30pn, film "Word is Out" at Texas Union Theater Fri Feb 13 8i:rn-1arn, waren-only Valentines benefit dance for Austin Lesbian Gay Political Caucus, Unitarian Church ruilding , 4700 Grover Sunday M:)nday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday h£EKL Y EVENTS 2- 4arn, After Hours at Austin Country 12 noon- 3pn, Brunch with Bunch, Austin Country, beginning in mid- February 2pn, 1'-CCA \'.Orship service, 408 West 23rd 6: 30pn, free C&1v da"lce lessons , Red River Crossing 7pn, T-dance, Tex's Colorado Street Bar. Free draft beer. 8pn, Dignity liturgy. Call 477- 6699 for location. 10pn, Punk, Trash and Caredy with the Grease Sisters, Austin country 6: 30pn, Austin Laml:x:la rreeting 8-10pn, Austin Laml:x:la gay rren's awareness session. Everyone ;..,elcare. 12 midnight, New Wave Night, Tex's Colo-rado Street Bar 85¢ bar drinks , Tex 's Colorado ·street Bar 25¢ draft beer, Red River Crossing 5: 30- 6: 30pn, Austin Laml::x:1a rredi tation instruction 7:30pn, r,ccA \'.Orship service, 408 West 23rd 8- 10pn, Austin Laml:x:la therapy group. $5 per session. 9pn, r,ccA Christian Life Series: "Haro­sexuality and the Bible, " 408 \·:est 23rd 9pn, 35¢ well drinks all night, Tex's Colorado Street Bar ~~~---- 7: 30pn, Austin Laml::x:1a lesbian rrothers 9pn-1 : 30arn, The MUstang Band performs m">eting (chi dcare) • at The R2.d River Crossing Sut Feb 14 7μ:i, Austin Laml::x:1a Valentine Supper catered by S~tish Hill. $7.50 per person. Make reservations by Feb. 7 Performance by sinuer :>ebbie Jacol:s at T x' s Colorado Street Bar Wed F b 18 7-10pn, University Gay Students Organi­zation rreeting, Texas Union 7:30pm, Austin Laml:x.la work hop "or qays in the closet on their JOl:s ~hu Feb 19 7μ:i, Gay People/Health Care covered dish dinner, followed by rrceting at 8p-n. One- year anniversary meeting. Everyone interested in the health care of gay people is invited. 1501 Ullrich. Call 453- 0816 for info. Sat Feb 21 11arn-4pn, r,ccA rrembcrship day. Call 477- 7747 for details . Law Students for Hurran Rights pot- luck supper at Marvin Prevosts' s . Call 4 77- 7867 for info . 8: 30pn, Austin Laml::x:1a lesbian coffeehouse M:)n Feb 23 8pn, Austin Laml::x:1a discussion of lesbian lifestyles Tue Feb 24 7:30pn, Austin Lesbian Gay Political Caucus neeting, Austin Lambda. Topic: "Endorserrent of Austin City Council Candidates" Wed Feb 25 7pn, Austin Laml:x:la lasagna supper Fri Feb 27 9i:rn-1 :30arn, The Mustang Band performs at The Red River Crossing Fri Mar 6 C O M I N G EVENTS Performance by Divine at Tex 's Colorado Street Bar Saturday 8-10pn, Austin Lambda lesbian awareness session 85¢ bar dri."lks, Tex's Colorado Street Bar 10μ-::, ShowtJr.e at Austin Cow,try 2-4arr., After Hours at Austin Country 10am, Austin Laml::da run arouoo Town La1<e. ~t at gazebo near Municipal Auditorium. ORGANIZATIONS Austin Larnbda AA Center. • • . 1403 East Sixth 6: 30 - 10: 30pn nightly • • 4 72- 0336 Austin Laml::x:1a 603 West 'I\-.elfth 7 - 1 Opn t-t,nday - Friday . • . . . • • 4 7 8- 8653 Austin Lesbian Gay Politica~ Caucus • 603 West 'I\-.elfth P.O. Box 822, Austin 78767 • , , • • . • 78-8653 Dignity • • Box 4357 • • • • . • Austin,. Texas 18765 Gay Camunity Services • • • • • • • 2330 Guadalupe 6 - 1 Opn nightly • · • · · • , . . . • 4 77- 6699 Gay People/Heal th Care • • • • • • • 1 O 1 O-B Rcrrer ia Austin , Texas 78757 • • • 453- 0816 Law Students for Hurran Rights . 2500 Re:l River Austin, Texas 78712 days : 471 - 5151 ext. 210 nights : 77-7257 or 477- 7867 !'-Etropolitan Ccmnunity Church of Austin •• P.O. Box 18581 Austin 78745 • 477- 7747 University Gay Students Organization: . 477- 6699 Coming in :1arch T O M R O B I N S O N INTERVIEW ......_ _____________ __. ----~-~-------------..J ... 20 CONNECTIONS CLASSIFIED CONNECTIONS ca :::cr:ra-;s reaches a specl.a.i audience that other Austin publications don't. le' l.l ass1.g:1 a blind !::ox n~ to advertisers who wish to reIT'aL-: a>1onyr.ous . Classified deadlL'1e is the tv.enty- second of each rronth. Cl ass ified rate is 10¢ per v.0rd - minimum one dollar. Call 474- 1660 for further details. • -:AIL YOUR CLASSIFIED !IDS 'ID CQ:)lECTICNS 2401 Manor Road #118 Austin, Texas 78722 Name ___________ Phone _____ _ Address ___________ _____ _ City/State _____________ Zip __ --_-_,' -_--', ---' Totalwords_ Cost Volume__ No. __ All classifieds must be accompan,ect by payment In advance. EASTSIDE LIBERTARIAN HEAOOUARTERS Books, human rights and anti- nuke information, Chinese teas, incense, head supplies, i.rrp:)rted soaps , hairbrushes , embroidered cotton shoes. 2109 P.ountree , one block west of Airport Blvd., off Manor Road. 478- 7347 EXECUTIVE HEALTH CLUB Austin 7th & Congres 478-7220 San Antonio 723 Ave. "B" 225-8807 Ho Awa Fr Ho 24-l!~U (I'RY OUT) NE1bERSHIPS AT LAST! Your laumry hassles are ~r. We will pick up, wash, dry, fold and dell.-:r your laumry to your door . We' 11 also pick up and deliver dry cleaning. Call A BIT CLEANER at 385-7096 and enJoy being neat and clean without all the work . HENRY"S MEMRT'S Ylntal(e Clot h lnl( And C'o11tume., l'HOlll ( LI> IIY. T Iil, I'll \HH<.; l~-1, tirll ..,r \J'-,TJ\IIX\S PACIFIC SUNRISE (ANARCHODILLO): MARIJUANA pipes, Ku.,g Fu shoes , WJkn , natural soaps and sharrp;x>s , science fiction , Lil:€rtarian l:x)oks, Chinese ginseng products . 1712 South Congress . 441 - 4565 INTO WRITING? Call Jim at 474-1660 . Keep trying. M ICHAELC. MENFFEF. PH D. Psvcholo~i\t INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONSHIP COUN ELING 2813 R10 Grande Au\11n, Tx. 78705 (512) 176 5'119 . LIBERTARIAN MEETINGS Sunday Feb. 8, 6:30μn and Sunday March 8, 6:30pm at Pacific Sun­rise . Public welcorre. ~/ANTED: A PIAN IST with church service experience and ability to sight-read. 1'.eeded for Sundays fran 1 to 3: 30 and h'ednesdays 7: 30- 8: 30. 1·lill also play for choir. Small salary available. Call t-~troi:olitan Camunity Church of Austin. 477- 7747 . Leave ID3Ssage for Cheri Miller. CORPUS CHRISTI - A discreet, personal roormate service. HOOSE-:-11\TES (512) 991-1797 or Box 1011 , Corpus Christi, Texas 78403. SUBSCRIBE TO CONNECTIONS If you aren't a frequent patron of the businesses that distribute CONNECTIONS vou can receive the paper monthly for one year for NIAi L TO: $12 C tNNECTIONS 2401 MANOllt RD. 118 AUSTIN, TEXAS 78722 NAME ADDRESS CITY STATE ZIP
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