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Community News, Vol. 1, No. 3, October 1974 - File 001. 1974-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1978/show/1969.

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(1974-10). Community News, Vol. 1, No. 3, October 1974 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1978/show/1969

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Community News, Vol. 1, No. 3, October 1974 - File 001, 1974-10, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1978/show/1969.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Community News, Vol. 1, No. 3, October 1974
Alternate Title Community News, Vol. I, No. 3, October 1974
Contributor
  • Reid, Allen
Publisher AURA
Date October 1974
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 27910176
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript COMMUNITY NEWS SERVING THE GAY COMMUNITY Fort Worth/Dallas October 197 4 Vol. I, No. 3 Coalition of State's Organizations TEXAS GAY TASK FORCE FORMS Delegates from 23 organizations from throughout Texas met August 2 at the Gay Community Center in San Antonio and gave birth to bright new hopes for Gay People in Texas - the Texas Gay Task Force. The organizational meeting had been called by a resolution adopted June 22 during the Texas Gay Conference in Fort Worth by a caucus of representatives of 18 Texas Gay Organizations. The resolution, introduced by AURA and seconded by Integrity/Houston, stated: 6. To insure human and civil rights of all Gay People. 7. To develop a program of public educa· tion concerning the structure and realities of Gay Life. TGTF Structure The structure of the Texas Gay Task Force was also established at the San An­tonio Caucus. The first item of business was to make the 23 organizations present charter members. The state was then di­vided into four regional areas: the North-em Region, consisting of Dallas and Fort Worth ; the Eastern Region, consisting of Houston; the Southern Region, consisting of San Antonio; and the Western Region, consisting of Austin and Lubbock. A Coordinating Council was established to be responsible for the implementation of the Purposes. The Coordinating Coun­cil will act as the "executive" body of the TGTF and will be comprised of one wo­man and one man from each region. The House of Delegates will consist of one del­egate from each organization and will act as the "legislative" body of the TGTF. The next meeting of the TGTF Council has been scheduled for October 5 in Aus­tin. 1975 Texas Gay Conference The TGTF plans an active campaign to educate the public concerning homosex­uality in addition to trying to encourage the repeal of oppressive laws. The Task Force will also sponsor the 1975 Texas Gay Conference which will be held tn San Antonio June 20-22. "Because there is no statewide Gay organization in Texas, and there is a serious lack of communication between the existing organizations, AURA pro­poses that a coalition of the state Gay organizations be established as soon as possible at a statewide meeting of dele­gates to be held at a time and place to be clctcrmined by this Caucus." GAYS PROTEST ABC SHOW OF BOY-RAPE ing out the diVJsion the program has caused within ABC. Cyr also pointed out that "Gay people are trying only to pro­tect themselves from prejudices which will be reinforced after the program is seen. We are doing the same as the Black Movement did in the sixties. We do not want censorship, but some things must not be aired publicly until our rights are protected by law." PSYCHIATRISTS AND TEACHERS JOIN IN PROTEST Statement of Purposes After two days of constant and some· times gruelling talks, a seven-point State­ment of Purposes emerged from the San Antonio meeting: I. To Bring together the various organi· zations in the State of Texas interested in working for the betterment of the Gay Community and to promote and assist the individual organizations and unify them for the advancement of their com­mon goals. 2. To establish a net work of communi­cation for member organizations. 3. To encourage and promote a topical action committee for the development of a positive self image through specific self­growth experiences. 4. To socialize, thereby creating a unified collective spirit among all Gay People. 5. To abolish laws which discriminate against Gay People and to implement beneficial legislation with adequate judi­cial enforcement. Fort Worth - A URA has joined in the growing national protest of a Marcus Wel­by, M.D. television segment entitled "The Outrage" and has called upon the member organizations of the Texas Gay Task Force to "immediately expend as much time and energy as possible" to try and convince local ABC affiliates to black out showing of "The Outrage" in their areas. "The Outrage" deals with the rape of a 14-year-old boy by his male science tea­cher and has been unanimously condemn­ed by gay organizations and individuals across the country. ABC Negoitations Break Down The gay community first learned about the program in early July when ABC sent the script to Ronald Gold in compliance with an agreement by all TV networks to submit scripts dealing with homosexuality for comment by the Gay Media Task Force of which Gold is a member. Gold ruled that the script was entirely unac­ceptable and should not be produced. You have encountered a homosexual. If I have been kind to you, please be kind to my Gay brothers and sisters. Selected Texans may soon receive one of these cards from one of the secret Gays among them. ABC refused to listen and the protest was on. Negotiations with ABC were held in Los Angeles and New York, and major changes were allegedly made in the script until negotiations broke down in August. AURA joined in the protest on Septem­ber 13 when AURA's director, Ken Cyr, learned from the Gay Media Action in Boston that ABC had approved an air date of October 8 for the program over the objections of its West Coast execu­tives. Members of the ABC Broadcast Standards and Practices Division in Los Angeles voted to "scrap" the program as unfit to be broadcast. However, execu­tives Richard Gitter and Alfred Schneider of the New York Broadcast S&P over­ruled the West Coast division and set the air date. Damaging to Gay Rights Cyr immediately sent a letter to Mike Shapiro, general manager of ABC's affil. iate station in Dallas, WFAA-TV, pro­testing the airing of the show and point- Cyr also pointed out that although he personally had not read the en lire script, he had been assured by reliable sources · that the program is very detrimental to the gay civil rights movement, that it plays upon the sensationalism of the Hou­ston mass murders and may leave an im· pression of "go out and kill a fag" with the less intelligent members of the pub­lic. It also creates a great deal of distrust of all single teachers no matter what sex­ual orientation they may have. WFAA­TV contacted Cyr on September 16 and said they would contact New York to learn more information and would then meet with. him to listen to gay complaints. A national boycott of all products ad­vertised on "The Outrage" will be launched should the program reach the air. Non-Gay Protests Spread Outside of the gay organizauons. sever­( Conrinued on Page Two) Area Gays Launch Unique Public Relations P roject Operating on the theory that even one have encountered a homosexual. If I hare changed attitude is an improvement, in- been kind to you, please be kind w my dividual Gay People in Texas will soon Gay brothers and sisters. " start announcing their gayness to unsus­pecting strangers in a unique way. Many Gay People, not unlike their non­gay counterparts, often befriend strangers ... give a hitchhiker a lift, help a stranded motorist, give directions, or help with a heavy load. Now some of these people will be made aware that they have been helped by a homosexual. At the point of departure, the stranger will be handed a small card on which is printed: "You Hopefully, this revelation coming in so unique a situation may cause some het­erosexuals to reevaluate their stereotyped attitudes toward homosexuals. Only one changed attitude would be an accomplish­ment. (Editor's Note· Up to ten of these canl5 may be obtained free by wrir111g t1i Com­munity News, P.O. Box 7367, Fort Worth. Texas 76111.) NOW !'HE gHOE [g ON !'HE O!'HE/l FOO!' g1raifAfS' l'aS'fe HaraS'S'//JIJJf, etc. Gays have been concerned for years with the abuse of police power and the invasion of privacy by representatives of various levels of government. Our concern reached a peak June 22 during the Texas Gay Conference as Fort Worth police officers blatantly made a show of recording license numbers in an obvious attempt to frighten and intimi· date participants in the Conference. Hoo­ray for our side no one was frightened or intimidated. Not one person left the Conference site. Rather we were angry! We yelled loud and a few people heard us ... but, after all, we were just a bunch of fags. Now the shoe is on the other foot as non-gays are discovering just how men­acing our officers can be. Item One: Entire Dallas vice squad fired or transferred in nude photo scandal. Officers forced women arrested on pros­titution charges to pose bare-breasted for picture-taking sessions. Item Two: A Fort Worth nurse was frightened and shaken by four police of­ficers who burst into her apartment, uni­dentified and without warrant, but with drawn gun. It took her half an hour to calm the four down and convince them that she knew nothing of the man they were allegedly looking for. After first de­nying any knowledge of the affair, the Fort Worth Police Department eventually issued a half-hearted apology. Item Three: A 24-year-old man was so badly beaten by police during a fruitless "no-knock" drug raid on his apartment that he had to be rushed to a hospital in poor condition and his spleen surgically removed. Two Fort Worth officers were fired and their supervisor was reprimand­ed and transferred. The explanation given for the officers' actions was that they had "overreacted" - although no drugs were found, the young man did not resist and he was not even arrested. Officers left DIGNITY CHAPTER FORMED FOR GAY CATHOLICS DIGNITY, a national organization for Gay Catholics, has established a chapter for the Metroplex area. The local group meets on the second and fourth Fridays of each month. Fur­ther information may be obtained by calling metro number 469-6669. * ** * ** DIGNITY: STATEMENT OF POSITION AND PURPOSE We believe that gay Catholics are mem­bers of Christ's mystical body, numbered among the people of God. We have an inherent dignity because God created us, Christ died for us, and the Holy Spirit sanctified us in Baptism, making us His Temple, and the channel through which the love of God might become visible. Because of this, it is our right, our privi­lege, and our duty to live the sacramental life of the Church, so that we maight be­come more powerful instrument to God's love working among all people. We believe that gays can express their sexuality in a manner that is consonant with Christ's teaching. We believe that all sexuality should be exercised in an ethic­ally responsible and unselfish way. Allen Reid, 1'.ditor Staff" Ario, Jay Alexander, Jay Allen, Ken C)ir, Sue lla"is, Spiggot, and Kay Wilson Special Consultant, Wayne Ribble Community News is published by AURA (Awareness, Unity & Research Associa­tion), not for profit but as a service to the Gay Community. SUllSC'RIPTION RATE is $3 per year, mailed 111 plain envelope. As members of DIGNITY we wish to pro­mote the cause of the gay community. To do this, we must accept our responsi· bility to the Church, to society, and to the individual gay Catholic. To the Church - to work for the develop­ment of its sexual theology and for the acceptance of gays as full and equal mem­bers of the one Christ. To Society - to work for justice and so­cial acceptance through education and le­gal reform. To Individual Gays - to reinforce their self-acceptance and their sense of dignity, and to aid them in becoming a more ac­tive member of the Church and society. DIGNITY is organized to unity all gay Catholics, to develop leadership and to be an instrument through which the gay Catholic may be heard by the Church and society. There are four areas of concern: Spiritual Development. We shall strive to achieve Christian maturity through all the means at our disposal, especially the Mass, the sacraments, personal prayer and active love of neighbor. Education. We wish to inform ourselves in all matters of faith as well as in all that concerns the gay community so that we Mailing Address: P.O. Box 7367 Fort Worth, TX 76111 Correspondents and staff writers are needed, as well as artists, typists and other workers, if CN is to thrive and be able to effectively serve the Gay Com· munity him without even an offer to help him get needed medical treatment. Item Four: A decoy prostitute in Dallas was responsible for the arrests of more than 40 men before one of them had the guts to challenge the arrest in court. He argued he hadn't even had enough money to "buy a woman" and was just kidding around. He also charged the female offi­cer with entrapment. Although the judge found him guilty as charged, it is interest­ing to note that a woman who has been propositioned more than 40 times "in the line of duty" has never (she testified) never been propositioned on her own time. And they expect us to believe these men weren't enticed, encouraged and en­trapped. Yeah, just like unsuspecting Gays haven't been entrapped all these years by the enticement of vice officers. Item Five: Federal judge orders the clo­sing of the Gatesville State Schools for Boys citing numerous incidents of bru­tality and humiliation perpetuated on the may develop the maturity of outlook needed to live fulfilling lives in which sex­uality and spirituality are integrated, and to prepare us for service in the gay com­munity. Social Involvement. As Catholics and as members of society, we shall become in· volved in those actions that bring the love of Christ to others and provide the basis of social reform. Toward individuals ... We wish to lead a life of service to others, hoping to render visible the love of Christ and contributing our share to building a community of love. With gay groups ... We wish to work with other homophile groups for the cause of justice to the gay community and for the promotion of a sense of soli­darity. With religious and secular groups ... We wish to work with them, that they may better understand gays and recognize pre­sent injustices. Social Events. Activities of a social and recreational nature will be provided to promote an atmosphere where friendships can develop and mature, and where the gay's sense of acceptance and dignity may be strengthened. (The national office of DIGNITY is at 755 Boylston Street, Room 514, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116.) LETTERS to the ~di tor of Com­munity News should be signed. However, name will be withheld upon request. All fellers are sub­ject to editing to meet space re­quirements and to remove possi­bly libelous statements. Publication of the name of any person, business or group in Community News should not be construed as any indication of the sexual preference of that person, business or group, or of their employees or members. inmates by prison guards and officials. Item Six: Causing the greatest uproar was the disclosure that the Department of Public Safety - now dubbed the "De· partment of Public Surveillance had routinely engaged in spying on individuals and groups who dared vary in their poli­tics, life style or attitudes from that dictated as "right" by the in powers. Vic­tims of the spying have included political candidates, churches, racial groups, en­vironmentalists, peace groups and others. The DPS issued an apology, the governor ordered an investigation, citizens were outraged - but somehow we get the feeling that attitudes of those types who head organizations such as the DPS have not really changed. Well, let the non-gays for once discover how it feels - police brutality, big bro­ther spying, police entrapment. Perhaps now they will be more willing to work with us to protect our freedoms and our privacy. WELBY PROTEST (Continued from Page One) al national organizations are also consid­ering action to stop the ABC network program. John SpiegaJ, president of the American Psychiatric Association, has asked his board of directors for permis­sion to work "with vigor" on stopping the program. Spiegal, when shown the script, immediately agreed with New York gay leaders that it would seriously damage the gay civil rights movement. The APA "gay is not sick" ruling includ~d a strong stand on gay civil rights. Albert Shanker, president of the Amer­ican Federation of Teachers, said his or­ganization is "mulling over" the possibil­ity of action against ABC. The AFT, according to Bruce Voeller of the 'ation­al Gay Task Force, is very concerned about the effect the program may have on all single male teachers, regardless of their sexual orientation. Anyone wishing to work actively on the "Welby" protest is urged to contact AURA at (817) 838-2095 or write P.O. Box 7318, Fort Worth, TX 76111, or con­tact your local gay organization. Concerned people are urged to call or write: Mike Shapiro, General Manager, WFAA-TV, Communications Center, Dal­las, TX 75202 and protest the upcoming airing of the show. Also, letters are ur­gently needed to all advertisers and ad agencies that have bought time on the "Welby" show. Congratulations to the TEXAS GAY TASK FORCE from Al's SHOP 4 1 6 3 East Rosedale (8171 534-1951 Wayne Ribble, manager Rev. Ron Anderson Is New Pastor At Fort Worth MCC By Ken Cyr FORT WORTH HAS A NEW MINISTER. "So what?" you might say. "Fort Worth gets a new minister almost every day." Ah, but not like this one. He has shoul­der length blond hair, is very attractive, and is Gay! He's the new pastor of Agape Metropolitan Community Church, Rev. Ron Anderson. This reporter interviewed Rev. Ander­son at MCC's new office and parsonage and found him quite pleasant and sincere in his ambitions to contribute to the Com­munity. Tried the Straight Route Rev. Anderson was born and raised in Kansas City, Missouri, where he had his first sexual encounter with another guy when he was nine. "I've always been gay," says Rev. An­derson. "I can remember watching TV shows and movies and admiring the male stars. I didn't have a name for it then, though." At 15 he decided he would try the straight route. He dated, went steady and had his first heterosexual experience. "I just didn't want it. I am just not at­tracted sexually to the female body." Rev. Anderson acknowledged to himself that he was a homosexual and always 'M>Uld be. His second love relationship ended after five years when his lover was drafted ; and Rev. Anderson found himself in San Diego, Califo rnia, where he discovered the Gay Community. Nowhere Else To Go "I had never had problems about being Gay until I found the Gay Community," he said. "Then I was hit with the phoni­ness, hypocrisy and materialism of much of the Gay Society, but I didn 't know where else to go." Rev. Anderson turned his back on his faith and set a course which too often un­happy Gays think will bring them happi­ness. He wanted nothing more than to make a lot of money and be a "sugar-dad· dy" to his lovers. He had two short love affairs and was becoming constantly con­fused. Discovered MCC Then he discovered MCC. He began ex­tensive Biblical research and concluded that what the establishment churches said about homosexuality just was not true. He knew his calling was sincere, so he joined the ministry of MCC. "The Gay Community has so much to learn and MCC so much to offer," stated Rev. Anderson when asked about his opinion of the Gay Community. Lover Killed in Accident Rev. Anderson met his first lover when he was 15, and they were together for three years until his lover was killed in an automobile accident. This was a very traumatic experience for him; yet he de­veloped the strength to overcome it. "The Fort Worth Community seems so plastic and non-acceptant of themselves. They still believe that something is wrong with them, so they try to compensate for it with material things and with tricks." ... promises to minister to all the people. During this time his faith kept growing, and he felt a call to the ministry. He en­rolled in Evangel College, an Assembly of God school in Missouri. At 21 , as he was still preparing for the ministry, he met his second lover. Rev. Anderson thinks the Community needs to be more honest and sincere, and needs more self-liberating. "When you liberate yourself as a beautiful person, and start believing in yourself, then socie­ty will accept us." We Have Nothing To Fear Rev. Anderson feels that MCC can be an example to the Community. "MCC offers WHAT'S A DOB? A REPORT ON THE WOMEN'S ORGANIZATION By Rob Shivers We define ourselves as a Lesbian/Fem­inist organization, but you don't have to be either to be a member, and you don't have to be a member to participate. Just being a 'Mlman is enough. Neither do you have to be an activist. There is room for you at any level of openness and in­volvement you wish to involve yourself. So what then does a DOB do? First of all, we seek to create an atmos· phere where "Gay is Good" and where we can enjoy sisterhood while expanding our experience and knowledge of the many facets of life. To this end we have first and third Friday meetings, usually featuring a guest speaker presenting one of a variety of interesting topics. We also have a Speakers Bureau to pro· vide speakers and panel members for schools and classes, churches, organiza­tions, TV and radio shows and other groups. We consider the Speaker's Bu-reau an important public education ser­vice. In this same vein we participate in valid research projects and interview sit­uations. Another important DOB outreach is GA YLINE, operating in conjunction with our Lesbian Resource/ Drop-In Center. The telephone line serves the gay com­munity and its families without regard to sex. It also provides help in locating re­sources, answering questions, settling problems, getting your head together or whatever your need. We also offer (for women only) peer counseling by appoint­ment, a library and social activities. We publish a monthly newsletter, as you can see. As a member of the Fort Worth/Dallas Metroplex Gay Council and the Texas Gay Task Force we keep in the main­stream of what's happening in the gay community. As a member of the Wo-the love of Christ. We can be honest and sincere with each other. God loves all of us, but he down not love us for our ma­terial things; he loves us for what we truly are. At MCC we can be ourselves; we have nothing to fear." Rev. Anderson was asked about the problems which Agape MCC has had in the past, the resignation of its first pastor and a split in the church. "All churches have trouble at first," he said. "I think God is teaching us, helping us grow closer to Him. Agape knows the Spirit, and He is leading us. Everyone makes mistakes; it's human." Church Split ls Healed "The Friends of Jesus (the split-off group) has merged with Agape, and the men's Coalition we keep in the main­stream of happenings that affect us as women. We probably can't meet every woman's needs, but we try hard! We are convinced that our women are the most beautiful found anywhere (not just physically speaking) ... But then, come and see for yourself. You're always welcome! Daughters of Bili tis, P.O. Box 1242, Dallas, Texas, 75221. (214) 74~1947 (Reprinted with permission from The Monthly DOB'R, publication of the Daughters of Bilitis, Dallas) former pastor is returning to us as associ­ate pastor at the end of September. The members of Agape have realized some mistakes and were forgiven and forgave. They have been enriched by the Spirit and filled with love because of it. Our membership is growing and God's work is being done." Rev. Anderson is truly a dynamic per­son, and his pastorship is a blessing for Fort Worth. Agape MCC holds services every Sunday at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and every Wed­nesday at 7:30 p.m. The church office is open every day from 1 I a.m. to 4 p.m. Counselling or information about the programs of the church may be obtained by calling Rev. Anderson at (817) 534- 9406. ff (io~ be fous,w~ can be -;1 at::,aiMI- JM ? .,. 1\..crnuuu 8:31 AGAPE' METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH 2800 Purington Fort Worth, Tex•s Phone: 817·534-9406 Office Hours: Monday - Saturday. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. PASTOR Ret>. Ron]. -tnderson Who th' hell needs a Gay newspaper? - An Honest Appraisal from the Editor of Community News - It doesn't matll'r how many people nPed a Gay newspaper - unlt·ss there is a sufficient number of people who want a Gay newspaper. That means al least a few people who an• willing to givl' a little of their time, energy, talent and/or money to make such a newspaper a reality. After lht> first issue of Community 'Yews was distributed, there was nothing but praise. Everyone, it seemed, thought "our own paper" was an excellt>nt idea. Lnfortunatt>I}, words were just about all we got. Thrre was no mont>y lo help support such an ambitious project, and pre­cious little in the way of donated timr and effort. Our own newspaprr is a good idea. Very few of our Sisters and Brothrrs have any awareness of what is going on in the Gay Community or in our civil rights movement. Community 'Vews can continue not only to tell us what's happening as it relates to us, but it can also be a sounding board for the broad range of opinions and attitudes among Gay People themselves, and it can lwlp prrpare non-gays for the eventual acceptance of Gay Prople into oprn society. So Community lVews is a good idea. Is it a good enough idea for you to support it'( If C\ is to continue beyond this issue, we must quickly see some firm signs of support. lmmediatrly we need a part-time staff. Therr is no pay ... bu l shared among many people, the work won't be very hard or time consumin!!;. Wr need a photographer who can take and develop pictures, ''\ Kor IYJR LE~BIAK~ ONLY By Sue Harris Mother never told me that my prince might be a princess. Consequently, it was hard to rationalize wanting to kiss my high school journalism teacher in the darkroom. 1 t was even tougher to suppress dream­ing of getting married to one of our cheerleaders. The turning point in the realization of my lesbianism came when I asked a girl I had been playing kissy-mouth with if we were gay. She said that we had a strange and beau­tiful friendship. I guess she just couldn't break it to me, but I knew. It began to dawn on me. I like men, but 1 love women in a warm-soft-deep emo­tional way. You might know l found my princess - without the help of my mother. At least my mother did teach me how to be tender, love and care for someone. And she also taught me how to fight with that someone so that when something is wrong 1 don't just cradle it in my gut. Perhaps most important of all, Mother taught me how to forgive and make a go for the second round. 1 guess that's why I didn't move out after two months. All of these things work just as well with my princess as that prince that Mom kept telling me about. f and By Kay Wilson And my mother always told me that someday I might have mother-in-law problems. l have them alright, but not exactly the kind she was thinking of. I guess the main problem is that Sue's mother doesn't know she is my mother-in-law. She isn't quite sure what kind of an arrangement her daughter and I have, but whatever it is, and as Jong as it has no la­bels, it's OK. But that doesn't mean things can't get hairy. There was the time Sue slipped and said something about my side of the bed when there is another bed in the house. Then there are the little things that Mrs. Harris says whenever Sue and I do some­thing that parallels something in her rela­tionship with her husband. "That's just like your father and I," she says. Makes me wonder if she isn't a bit more aware than we think she is. (Whoever you ore, you ore welcome to look for this column in each issue of a cartoonist (just one cartoon a month isn't too much to ask, is it'?), an illustrator to illustrate CN's feature articles, a feature wri­ter to research anrl write articles on a variety of pertinent subjects - plus as many miscellaneous staff members a we can recruit: people lo distribute the paper, people to mail it out, people to help with editing, writing and layout, people to contact busine~~es about advertising, etc., etc., etc. If )OU can help in any way, please drop me a note to P.O. Box 7367, Fort Worth 76111, or call me at (817) 838-2095. This means you people in Dallas, too! Futhermort', we must have more paid subscriptions and we must have regular advertisers. C.Y is not intended to produce a profit, but if it is to continue it must pay for itself. We appreci­ate the sponsorship of AURA in publishing CN as a service to the Community ... but printing and postal costs are almost prohibi­tive, and AURA will not be able financially to subsidize CV be­yond this issue. We must pay our own way ... and that means we mu ·t have fai thful, concerned advertisers who want to see C.V succet>d for the berwfit of the entire Gay Community. If you have any influ­ence with any businrss (Gay or not), take a cop} of this papn and urge them to contact us about advertising. We need our own paper. If you want it badly enough, \\e can have it. What do you say? COME AND JOIN US! An Active and Growing Organization Dedicated to You • Publishers of Community News • Political Education Program • Social Activities • Rap Sessions second and fourth Fridays • Library and Reference Materials • Speakers Bureau • Referrals - Legal, medical, religious, psychological S 1 O/yr. - Active S 5/yr. - Associate (non-voting) Membership includes subscription to Community News and all other publications of AURA, including the Director's Letter. AWARENESS, UNITY and RESEARCH ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 7318, Fort Worth, Texas 76111 (A member orpnlu.tlon of the FW/D Metroplex Gay Council and the Texas Gay Tult 1torce. Northern Re&ion) Community News, because it's Not For Lesbians Only. --- If it gets a bit feminine and feminist around the edges at times it's because two lesbians ore writing it. The column will reflect a few memories, a few more though ts and a lot of feelings. What we hove to soy is for everybody - Goy women, straight women and men and our Goy brothers.) BARBARA GITTINGS BARBARA GITTINGS has been in the Gay Movement since 1958. A long time, isn't it? A time when homo­sexuality was not spoken of in polite company. A time when our society was being destroyed by puritans. You and I remember what it was like in Texas a few years ago; well, think about 1958. It took courage and more guts than most of us have today to stand up for Gay Rights in 1958. But Barbara had the courage and the guts, not to mention the intelligence, to lay a path which began the movement we now have. If our movement had had a Declaration of Independence, one of the s1g· natures would have been: Barbara Brooks Gittings. Ms. Gittings was born in 1932 to a very devout Catho­li~ family. In her primary and secondary education, she · did very well. She entered Northwestern and then prob· terns began. That was the year Barbara had to come to terms with her own homosexuality. Barbara began ignoring her courses and spent many hours in the libraries at Northwestern and in Chicago. life." "I wore drag because I thought that was a way to show I was gay. It's changed now, but in the early 50's there were basically two types of women in the gay bars, the so-called butch ones in short hair and plain masculine at· tire and the so-called femme ones in dresses and high heels and makeup. I knew high heels and makeup weren't my personal style, so I thought, well, I must be the other kind! And I dressed accordingly. What a waste of time and energy! I was really a mixed-up kid. "The only other models, the only other images of homosexual people I had to look to were in the books, and there, too, much was made of differentiating both lesbians and male homosexuals into masculine and ferni· nine types. This differentiating is disappearing very fast today, not only for gays but for straights, too. Now­adays people generally feel freer to look and act what· ever way they feel most comfortable , and they don't so readily follow set patterns. "It was nsky as well as inappropriate for me to be in drag. One night in Philadelphia, I left a mixed bar with a male gay acquaintance, and outside there were two ma· rines who put on brass knuclcles and attacked my friend. 'We'd beat you up, too, sonny, if you weren't wearing glasses,' one told me. When they left, I took my com· panion to the hospital where he had thirteen stitches put in his face." "I went to texts on abnormal psychology, to encyclo­pedias, to medical books, to every book dealing with sex, as well as to whatever I could find under card cata· log headings like 'sexual perversion.' I was so anxious to get to the material on homosexuality, I didn't even mind looking in categories like 'pervision' and 'abnormal.' And I half believed them anyway. "But everything I found was so alien, so remote. It didn't give me any sense of myself or what my life and expereince could be. It was mostly clinical-sounding disturbance, pathology, arrested development - and it was mostly about men." Barbara flunked out of Northwestern at the end of her freshman year. It was difficult for Barbara to move into the gay world she longed for. "On weekends, dressed as a boy, I'd hitch rides with truckers up Route I to New York City to go to the gay bars. At first I didn't know of any gay bars in Philadelphia. I had a lot of trouble getting plug· ged into the gay community. I spent agonized years try· ing to find a comfortable social life, and the bars were the only place I had to start looking. Since I didn't like to drink anyway, I'd hold a glass of ice water and pre· tend it was gin on the rocks. I'd get into conversation with other women but I'd usually find we didn't really have any common interests; we just happened both to be gay. I just didn't run m to any lesbians who shared my interests in books and hostel tnps and baroque music. They all seemed to groove on Peggy Lee and Frank Sina· tra and nothing older! It was only later, in other settings, that I found gay people I was really congenial with. In those days I felt there was no real place for me in the straight culture, but the gay bar culture wasn't the place for me either. It was a painful and confusing time in my Barbara since went on to join the Gay Movement. She formed the New York chapter of the Daughters of Bilitis and was editor of The Ladder for several years. While ed· itor, Barbara published such prophetic gems as "The In· visible Woman" in 1965, whose author pointed out that the lesbian is a dangerous subversive rebelling against the deepest injustices of our social order. Her existence brings up questions so uncomfortable that most people can't even bear to admit her existence . • • . To the frail male ego, the thought of a woman who has her own iden­tity, instead of getting It from her relationship with a man, is so destructive it$ unimaginable and must be ig· nored out of existence . • • • The modem woman has yet to emerge as a human being on her own rather than as somebody's wife and mother. The lesbian is that an~ maly, a free woman, legislated out of existence by 3,000 years of patriarchal culture ... • Bold \\<Qrds for that time! And Barbara is bold, and a qualified leader. She presently is on the Board of Directors of the National Gay Task Force and serves as coordinator of the American Library Association's Task Force on Gay Liberation. By Allen Reid Anyone who thinks that Gays are not better off in this state and this country than they were te'l years ago either hasn't been around very long or else has had head planted firmly in the sand. We've come a long way, Baby! Ten years ago the mere appearance of a man in blue in or near any of the gay bars was enough to clear the entire area within a few minutes. Very few of us even enter­tarned the thought of telling anyone "out­side" about our "gaity." By and large we were a people ashamed and fearful who didn't have enough faith or pride in our­selves and our identity as Gay People to even think about doing anything serious to better our situation. We didn't believe in ourselves ... how could we expect any­one else to believe in us? Today, we can effectively challenge op· pressive laws, we can successfully fight job discrimination, we can win the right to have custody of our children, we can know that by nature we arc neither sick nor sinful. We can even run for public of­fice and have a possibility of being taken seriously •.. and in some cases even win the election - not as make-believe hetero­sexuals, but honestly as ourselves, as hu­man beings. In our struggle for human dignity and legal equality, we now have the support of major religious denominations, pow· erful women's groups, the legal profes­sion, the American Psychiatric Associa· tion and numerous other influential groups across the nation. And not one of you reading this column has escaped being affected by all that has transpired around you. You, who have done nothing but enjoy the "gay" side of our lifestyle, will reap the benefits for years to come of the so-called Gay Move­ment. The vote by the American Psychiatric Association reversing its position on ho­mosexuality didn't come out of the good­ness of their hearts. That decision came only because a small group of dedicated (even fanatical) women and men spent years of their lives working to educate the leadership of the APA to the truth. Sodomy laws have been stricken from the books in state after state; cross-dress­ing ordinances have been dropped; equal protection laws for housing and employ· ment and housing have been passed in city after city. Why? Not because the public and law makers have suddenly come to love us ••. but only because a few dedicated individuals and groups have spent vast sums of their own energy, time and money because they cared not only about their own situation, but about your situation and the situation of generations of Gay men and women to come. Why have you turned your back on your Gay Brothers and Sisters and been content to idly sit, and if you take notice at all, only criticize the methods, down· grade the results, question the motives and complain about how your own "se­curity" has been jeopardized by the open· ness that has been created. Nothing changes without producing waves ... but I would willingly loose a hundred jobs and have a thousand pseudo-friends tum their backs on me, just for a glimmer of a promise of a brighter day for us all. That day is corning - but it could come so much sooner, so much easier, if you could somehow begin to see yourself as a part of us .. . and no longer as JUSt someone who is visiting here for his or her own pleasure. MALE RAPE LAWS PASS ED Lancing, Michigan - Recently enacted revision of Michigan's rape law redefines rape as "sexual assault " and does not differentiate between men and women. The new law can now replace the current sodomy statute in cases of males raping males and may pave the way for eventual repeal of the sodomy law in Michigan. It is uncertain what effect, if any, the new law will have on prevention of the forci· ble rape of homosexuals by other prison inmates. Boston - Gov. Frances Sargent has signed a bill which allows males to charge they were the victims of rape. Under the new law, males or females can charge assailants with forcible anal or oral rape. PreVIously rape statutes applied only to females at· tacked by males and forced to participate in sexual acts in the conventional "mis· sionary" position. The Massachusetts Bar Association feels that the bill (sponsored by NOW and supported by the Civil Liber­ties Union of Massachusetts) will lead to the repeal of the state's centuries-old sex­ual conduct statutes. Tll4 T' F\ TERT IF\\/£\ T /" Jay tlexander U'lll re ume ne\ i monlh. Beer, Wine, Set-ups, and Friendly People 2308 W. 7th Street :l:l!'i-O!'i86 Subscribe to COMMUNITY NEWS A Voice for the Gay Community $3 for 12 issues P.O. Box 7367 BEER BUST - Tuesday at 8 2 to 2 - Seven Days a Week Fort Worth Fort Worth, Texas 76111 FORT WORTH Other Place, 2307 W. 7th, 335·0586 Purple Lady, 3029 S. Main, 927-9000 Rawhide, 4016 White Settlement Rd., 737·0248 651 Club, 651 S. Jennings, 332·0417 T.J.'s Back Door, 5536 Jacksboro Hwy., (rear) 624·0630 DALLAS Act Ill, 3115 Live Oak, 824·9043 Barrel, 2406 Fitzhugh, 823-0408 Bayou Landing, 2609 N. Pearl, 742·9521 Bojangle's, 4117 Maple, 576-9524 Encore, 4516 McKinney, 526-9328 Entre Nuit, 3116 Live Oak, 823-0423 Gene's Music Box, 307 Akard, 742-0269 Half Dollar, 3220 N. Fitzhugh, 526-9320 Highland , 3018 Monticello, 526-9551 Marlboro, 4100 Maple, 526-9487 Ramrod, 3224 N. Fitzhugh, 526-91 10 Sundance Kids, 4025 Maple , 526-9173 Swinger, 4006 Maple, 526-9295 Terry's Ranch, 4117 Maple, 526-9524 T.J .'s, 3307 McKinney, 526-9368 Three Plus You, 3014 Throckmorton 526-9438 Villa Fontana, 1315 Skiles, 823-0372 ALSO in Dallas ... Studio 9 Theater, 4817 Bryan, Dallas, 823·0447 Bachelor Quarter Baths, 3116 Live Oak, Dallas, 823-0432 Oub Dallas Baths, 2616 Swiss, 821·1 990 AMARILLO My Way, 523 E. 10th. 373-4792 WICllITA FALLS Oub 315, 315 N. Scott, 322-0866 Carousel, 703 Travis, 322-0832 (Readers: If any of these listings are not correct, please contact Community News) -· METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF DALLAS :l8:-34 Ross Avenue 826-0291 Sunday Services: e I• I 11 00 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. I Thursday Services: 8:00 p.m. -· ··- Mailing Address ------------­Ory/ State/Zip------------- (Make check or money order payable to Community News. Thank you.) .............................................. . ................... . CENTRAL NEWS, INC. 205 W. Seventh Fort Worth Also, out-oftown ne.,vspapers, periodicals & adult literature (817) 332-0332 FW/D METROPLEX GAY COUNCIL Member Organizations: Agape Metropolitan Community Church P.O. Box 4589, Ft. Worth 76106 (817) 534-9406 AURA (Awareness, Unity & Research As­sociation, P.O. Box 7318, Fort Worth 761 I I, (817) 838-2095 Circle of Friends, 3834 Ross Avenue, Dallas 75204 Daughters of Bilitis, P.O. Box 1242, Dal­las 75221, (214) 742-1947 (Members of the Northern Region of the Texas Gay Task Force) Plaster your face & figure across the Metrop I ex. \·/e need people who are wi I l ing to have their picture in CN -- men and women (no nudes~ yet!>. Write P.O. tlox 7361 Fort 1forth, Texas 76111 , presents DADDY's G ffi.LS Every Sunday Night For Reservarions, call (817) 624-0630 LETTERS PRAISE FROM GAY RAIDER Dear Brothers & Sisters: While in New York for the Christopher Street Liberation Day Parade, I found a copy of "Community News." I was pleased to see how well the paper was put together. It seems that it gives all the news of the community that would otherwise be put aside by the regular media. I'm glad to see the Texas community developing a gay media. If it is possible could you please put me on your mailing list since we all can learn from each other. In return 1 will keep you informed on our projects that might be of interest to you. Mark Segal Gay Raiders 5536 JACKSBORO HWY. Fort Worth, Texas THURSDAY - SUNDAY 8:00 - 2:00 DRINK OF THE WEEK FREE Every Sunday 8-10 p.m. YOU CAN HELP STOP POLICE HARASSMENT! Gay men and women have long been victims of abuses by some homophobic members of our law enforcement agencies. Most have not reported such abuses for (l) fear that they would not be believed, and (2) fear that they would then be the target of additional harassment for vengeance. Today, fortunately, many law enforcement officials would like to work with us to end such abuses of authority ... but they can't do it without our help. In order to achieve changes in police practices and activities that are damaging lo gays, we must first be able to show that such inci­dents do, in fact, occur with regularity. If you feel you have been unfairly treated, harassed, discriminated against, or any of your rights violated by a law enforcement officer, please report the circumstances immediately to AURA (817) 838- 2095. Then complete this form and mail it to AURA, P.O. Box 7318, Fort Worth, TX 76111. IMPORTANT: Please report any activity by officials that you even suspect may be harassment, intimidation, discrimination or abuse of yourself or of another gay person. Such activity usually is illegal and is against official policy ... but it can only be slopped if you help! Date of Incident Time Location Name of Officer Badge Number _______ ,or Patrol Car Number ___ _ What agency of law enforcement did the officer represent (Fort Worth or Dallas police, DaUas or Tarrant Co. Sheriff, DPS, FBI, etc.)? Please describe briefly what happened. Any physical abuse? _ yes no If yes, please describe. Any verbal abuse ("queer," "faggot," "panzy," etc.) __ yes no If yes, please quote to the best of your knowledge the exact language used: Were you arrested? __ On what charge? ---------­Your name -------------- Phone _____ _ Street Address or P.O. Box ----------------- City and Zip ----------------------- Please fill in the form as completely as possible. We must have your name a11d a way to contact you - but this information can and will be held in strictest confidence. You do not have to become person­ally involved in any way. Unless you wish to pursue the matter your­self, the report will be used for statistical purposes only. Thank you. It is of great importance in a republic not only to guard the society against the oppression of its rulers, but to guard one part of the society against the injus-tice of the other part. .fames ~1adiso11 W fil[K]1f ADSW fil[K]lrADSW fil[K]lrADS THIS SPACE IS FOR YOUR AD ... sell it, give it away, or just meet new friends. Ads free to individuals and Gay or­ganizations. Only 5 cents a word for businesses. Payment must be in advance. Com­munity News, P.O. Box 7367, Fort Worth, TX 76111. DON'T HAVE ANY MONEY to help support the Gay Movement? Collect aluminum cans. AURA will accept either the cans or the money. Call (817) 838-2095. CONGRATULATIONS to Contact­the fastest-growing Gay newspaper in the country. GOOD GAY '\1USIC from Paul r~agner Paul's Album: TO RH A U4N featuring "But I Love You" "No One But You" "As a Friend" "To Be a Man" "Need Your Gentle Love To" and more Only $4 postage paid from AURA, P.O. Box 7318, Fort Worth, Texas 76111 BOOK REVIEW BY KEN CYR the LIBRARY ''THI\ G 11 llICH GO TOGETHER \ I Tl R ti,/, Y. DOX'T YEED TO BE TIF:D." I Have More Fun With You Than Anybody by Lige Clark and Jack Nichols "We examined jealousy and concluded ii as a neurotic disease. Sensible people don't go around asking, 'Has anybody besides me shown an interest in you?' We saw that only misery lay ahead if we concerned ourselves with ne>-noes. We knew we were best fulfilled when pleasures of any sort were offered us, whether we were alone or together. "When real sexual freedom exists, we found it's seldom used to excess. The an­cient Q1inese philosopher Lao Tzu had writlen: 'Things which go together natur­ally, don't need to be tied.' We believed him." Tlus is the philosophy of the love affair extraordinaire of Elijah Clark and John Nichols, more commonly known as Lige and Jack. Their book, I Have More Fun With You Than Anybody. is the story of their meeting, their separating, their reuniting, their philosophies and their adVJce. The book is full of humor, even in the chapter titles, such as "Bugger Thy Congressman," "Why Isn't Uncle Sam Married?," and "Jesus Wants Us for a Sun­beam." Lige and Jack never miss an opportunity to explain their personal philosophy. The book could have had several titles. "How to Have a Loving Relationship" could have been one of the few along with "Hypocrisy of the Current Morali­ties" and "Personal Liberation as Opposed to Gay Liberation." Before reading their book, I had always pictured Lige and Jack as leaders of the Gay Movement. That was a misconception. They are leaders of Human Libera­tion. They express that Human Liberation can be achieved through homosexual­ity. In their chapter attacking masculinity, they state: "The intuitive homosexuality in each man can be used, if he wishes, as a device to meet the opposite sex more fully by identifying himself with her feelings. With­out such a device, his empathy is limited and his contact, less fulfilling. Her joy in his body remains a ~ague mystery to him, and her unrestrained passion is confus­ing. Bisexuality can be seen, from one perspective, as a walkway between oppe>­sites; nature's way of giving us the physical equivalent of the old maxim: 'To love another, you must first love yourself' Very simple, really." Not only do they attack rigid masculinity in non-gays, but also in gays. They attack both gays and non-gays who have set up rigid beliefs, especially sex­ual ones. They urge people to free themselves and enjoy all things in life. Th.is is a beautiful book wh.ich might just cause you to reevaluate your own phi­losophy. Some readers will become indignant, some will never finish the book, some will vehemently denounce it, but a few will be enriched by the love which Lige and Jack have for each other and their friends. These are the people this book was written for. LA WYERS DECLARE SUPPORT FOR GAY LIBERATION Minneapolis - The 4400.member Na­tional Lawyer's Guild at their annual convenllon August 11 in Minneapolis unanimously declared support for "the struggle of gay liberation and lesbian liberation" and promised to take "an active part in opposing gay oppression." The resolution adopted on the clo­sing day of the three-day convention was drafted and introduced by the or­ganization's Gay Caucus and represent· ed a significant reversal in the Guild's attitude since the Caucus formed four years ago. Methodists Challenge Church On Homosexuality Issue Dcm·er Legislatton concerning homo­sexuality is being formulated by the Na­uonal United Methodist .::ouncil on Youth Ministry for the 1976 General Conference of the UMC. The proposed legislation would remove language condemning homosexuality from the church's laws and would add a statement saying "sex, race, marital status or sexual orientation shall not be a bar to the ordained ministry of the United Meth· odist Church." The 32-rnember Council last year cre­ated a stir throughout the denomination when it passed resolutions asking that homosexuality not be a bar to the minis· try and declaring that "homosexuality in itself not be in any way synonymous with immorality." Rev. William R. Johnson, only known homosexual ever ordained into the Christ· ian ministry by a main-line denomination, , spoke to the Council at its semi-annual session in Denver August 16-22. "Gay people are in the church," he said "beeause we have faith in Jesus Christ. No one has the right to tell us we can't stay in the church. The Good News of Jesus Christ was given to every person." Johnson was ordained by the United Church of Christ in 1972 and is now a staff member of the Council on Religion and the Homosexual based in San Fran· CISCO. L.A. GAYS ZAP POLICE CHIEF Los Angeles About 50 California Gays, led by Reverends Troy Perry and Bob Sinco of the Metropolitan Community Church and Morris Kight of the Gay Com· munity Service Center, picketed August 17 in front of the home of L.A. Police Chief Ed Davis. The demonstration was designed to pressure Davis, who has pub· licly referred to homosexuals as "lepers," to initiate a liason with the Gay Commun­ity Davis was "on vacation" dunng the demonstration; and participants charged that officers assigned to the area appeared to be encouraging and assisting numerous teenaged hecklers. ENCYCLOPEDIC BIAS FALLS New York The Gay Activists Alliance of New York has been assured by repre· sentatives of Enclyclopedia Britannica that future editions of the reference work will contain affirmative information on the Gay Movement and the struggle for civil rights for homosexuals. According to Morty Manford, president of CAA, eight encyclopedia publishers have been contacted by the group. AJ. though Brit1111nica has been the only one so far to reply, it is considered a leader in the industry and other publishers hope· fully will follow its example. Manford emphasized the importance of this action when he pointed out that standard refer· ence books are often the only (or at least the most easily accessible) source of in· formation available to a youth searching for answers about his sexual identity. JOB CORPS DISCRll\UNATION San Marcos, Texas Eleven Gay Job Corps members at Camp Gary have filed suit in federal district court charging camp officials with trying to expel them because of their homosexual orientation. Judge Tom Gee has delayed a decision pending the results of new open hearin~ in the presence of consul between camp officials and the corps members. SEXISM ABOLISHED IN NATION'S SCHOOLS! Washington The Umted States Depart· ment of Health, Education and Welfare has proposed new rules aimed at prohibit· ing sex discrimination in the nation's schools from kindergarten through college. The proposed regulations are designed to assure equal treatment for females in admissions, athletics, housing, financial assistance, extracurricular activities and employment. The new rules would require coeduca­tional physical education classes and out· law different dormitory curfews for men and women and most single-sex scholar· ships. However, no attempt was made to deal with revenue producing sports, such as college football, or with the problem of sexism in the textbooks. The public has until October 15 to comment to HEW on the proposals. GAY LUTHERANS UNITE Lutherans Concerned for Gay People, a newly-formed group, will challenge the oppression of Gay People by the Ameri­can Lutheran Church, the Lutheran Church in America and the Missouri Sy­nod, which together have about S'h mil· lion members The group may be contacted at P.O. Box 11592, Salt Lake City, Utah 84115. Lesbian Wins Seat in Massachusetts House Boston - Elaine Noble , upfront lesbian/ feminist, has been elected to the Massa· chusetts House of Representa lives, de· feating four opponents in the September IO Democratic Primary. (She faces no Republican opposition in the November election.) Noble will represent the new Suffolk 6 District which included the Back Bay, Kenmore Square and Fenway areas of Boston. Sixty percent of the district's residents are women, and 73 percent of the households include only one person. There are heavy concentrauons of elderly persons and Gay People and members of other minority groups. Literature for the campaign stressed the need for a representative for all "minori· ties," and one "people's rights" pamphlet read. "Suffolk Six needs a representative NATIONAL HOTLINE BRIDGES GAP BETWEEN RUNAWAY YOUTH AND THEIR PARENTS Runaway youth anywhere in the nation can relay a message home to their families by waling a toll-free number being pro­vided by the federal government 24 hours a day as a channel of communication be· tween runaway youths and their parents. The National Hotline for Runaway Youth will also try to lessen the problems of the young people by offering referrals to other sources of help, such as social services or temporary shelter. The number is 1-800-621-4000. You Don 't Have To Go Home . . . But let Tllem Know You're Okay SEX BARRIER FALLS: "PLAY BALL, LITTLE W0'\1EN!" A victory for the rights of women, at least the younger ones, was achieved this summer as officials of Little League Base· ball, Inc., announced m Williamsport, Pennsylvania, that girls as well as boys be· tween the ages of eight and 1·2 are not eli­gible to play on Little League teams. According to Peter J. McGovern, board chairman of the League, the change was because of the "changing social climate in this country." The League had fought steadfastly against any attempt to allow girls and boys to play on the same teams, although a girl's program was organized a few years ago. The League policy had come under increasingly vehement attack from WO· men's and civil rights groups in recent months and several individuals and groups includJng NOW (National Organization for Women) and the American Civil Liberties Union had challenged the policy in the courts. The tum-about in the League's stance apparently came only after the New Jersey Supreme Court had ruled that girls must be allowed to play in that state. The new policy is effective immediately throughout all the 9,100 leagues in 31 countries. Supposedly any girl who is qualified by age and who demonstrates equal ability and skill must be allowed to play. Whenever possible, disagreements arc to be settled locally by impartial civil rights or human relations commissions. who will defend these minorities; who will help shape and change attitudes nega· live to these groups; and one who will work hard, very hard, to see that no per• son is abused because of race, color, age, sex, or sexual preference." Noble 1s a second-term member of the Governor's Commiss10n on the Status of Women, a member of the Massachusetts Women's Political Caucus, and was for· merly a moderator for the "Gay View" radio program on station WBUR in Bo.­ton She also 1s a member of the Ameri­can Association of University Professors, American Civil Liberties Union, Daugh­ters of Bilitis, ational Organization for Women and the Homophile Union of Boe· ton. A 1966 graduate of Boston Univcr· sity, she also holds masters degrees from Emerson College and Harvard University. DALLAS VICE GET CAUGHT 11" THE ACT A shakeup in the Dallas vice control sec· tion has been completed by Police Chief Don Byrd follo"mg an mvestigation of irregularities m handhng arrested prosti· tutes. Five women accused vice officers of forcing them to pose for pictures 1While nude from the waist up during interroga· lion on prostitution charges. Following the investigation, Chief Byrd fired four officers involved in the actiVJty and also suspended, demoted and trans;. ferred the head of the vice control divisi· on. Three other supervisors were also given five to I 0 day suspensions. All re­maining vice officers were subsequently transferred to other departments to en· able the unit to "start again with a clean house," according to one police spokes­person. Acting commander of the vice control dJvision, Lt. Mel Southall, told the press that in spite of the officer shortage, "we intend to enforce the law •.• • we are going to enforce liquor violations, por­nography laws, homosexual violatioru, gambling and prostitution laws." Asst. Chief Donald Steele said that while the vice squad was not "in bUSIIless as usual," they definitely were back in business. And back in business they were ... almost as he spoke, officers descended on Lee Park arrestmg numerous young men on various "homosexual violations."
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