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Community News, No. 6, February 1975
File 006
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Community News, No. 6, February 1975 - File 006. 1975-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 3, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1929/show/1921.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1975-02). Community News, No. 6, February 1975 - File 006. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1929/show/1921

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Community News, No. 6, February 1975 - File 006, 1975-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 3, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1929/show/1921.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Community News, No. 6, February 1975
Contributor
  • Reid, Allen
Publisher AURA; Texas Gay Task Force Communications Committee (Northern Region)
Date February 1975
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 27910176
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript DRT's vibrant production, it's an experience that will leave you gasping. Salesman is a triumph for DRT producer/director Ed DeLatte - not only because he invests the events onstage with the intensity and pulse they require, but for his meticulous placement of each theatrical element in time, space, and sequence: the play of Michael Foutch's lights over Dejah Moore's ambitious set is dramatic in itself; Eloise Swanson's witty costuming of two amateur whores (sweet and dry) creates the characters as much as Mary Durall and Susan Coleman, the talented actresses who play the parts. It is in the acting that this production glows. From Cal Duggan's wordless Bus- boy to The Salesman himself, beautifully played by Bob Magruder, this cast acts, reacts, and interacts with the selfless conviction of a company of stars - for which we may thank DeLatte. Bob Magruder's Willy Loman is exhausted "to the death" before the play begins, a shuffling hulk vivified into flickering life by the ever-increasing visitation of past dreams. Dreadful as it is to see him moved to rage, it is when hope visits the sagging face that we want to avert our eyes in pity and horror. Joan Foy's fine-boned beauty and plangent voice make Willy's devoted wife Linda a thoroughbred too good for the man whose life's fate she tragically chooses to share. As son Biff, the object of Willy's fanatic devotion, B.J. Theus is the image of Corrupted All-American Boy, his firm-chinned, short-nosed handsomeness flawed by the self-doubt that haunts the wide blue eyes. Like Jon Voight in Midnight Cowboy, Theus displays a teddybear sweetness all the more poignant for being embodied in a loser's personality. On the other hand, Steven Linn as the oversexed younger brother Happy displays a tacky charm as insidious as it is amusing -until the sweep of events reveals the spite beneath the cocky grin, and beneath that, naked vulnerability. Linn's campily explicit pickup of "Miss Forsythe" in the restaurant scene, Handsomely assisted by Mary Durall and Clifford Samuelson's Waiter, is genuine comic relief. Riley Austin, Miles Mutchler, and Lynne Roots also provide lighter moments: the two men as Bernard and Charley, the son and father who, unlike Willy, don't need to talk about it because they can do it; Miss Roots as the Other Woman, younger and sexier than Miller's in- spiredly dowdy Miss Frances, and with a distinct touch of professionalism. Will leVison's Uncle Ben, Willy's dream- image of material success, is a monstrous old bastard, heroic in scale, all the more terrifying for his joviality. Rod Blaydes as Howard, the boss's son, is a bastard neat, with no scale whatever - which is just what the playwright ordered. Paula Gilbert as Jenny the secretary doesn't have much in the way of a part, but she looks spiffy in platform heels and Rosalind Russell pinstripes. It's always difficult to assign credit for a production as well-meshed as this; all theatre is collaboration. So let me end simply by saying Death of a Salesman will run through February 16 with Friday and Saturday performances and a Sunday matinee. After that you can prove your faith in fairies at DRT's Peter Pan (the musical version) at North Park Community Hall. Three Friendliest in Town JOE, TEX and TERRY Western Man's Bar COMMUNITY NEWS / FEBRUAR Y 75 / 5
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