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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 7, July 1980
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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 7, July 1980 - File 008. 1980-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1915/show/1909.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1980-07). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 7, July 1980 - File 008. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1915/show/1909

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 7, July 1980 - File 008, 1980-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1915/show/1909.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 7, July 1980
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date July 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript 'CONNECTIONS5 James Farmer, the longtime civil rights activist, said at a news conference on the afternoon of the "Washington for Jesus" rally of right-wing fundamentalists in Washington April_28-29, 1980, that "if God looked down on /the Mall/ today, He probably would say, Thank God, I'm not a Christian." The organizers of "Washington for Jesus" did drum up a sizeable crowd. An estimated 200,000 showed up, according to U.S. Park Police. That was some 25,000 more than turned out last October to see the Pope give The leaders issued a "Christian Declaration" denouncing homosexuality, Mass, but all the same well below the one million promised by "One Nation Under God," the collection of video preachers, tent-show revivalists and squeaky-clean entertainment figures who put the show together. They sang and they prayed, come rain or come shine - mostly come rain. The red, white and blue bunting that festooned the bandstand from which the preachers held forth was streaked and stained from two days' drizzle, but the crowd remained in high spirits nonetheless. In fact, a picnic atmosphere prevailed, as the Faithful from all over sat in folding chairs and knelt in prayer on muddy blankets. They heard one preacher after another all day long, and the notion of American Paradise Lost got big play. According to the Reverend Bill Bright who heads Campus Crusade International, America "is disintegrating because we have turned from the faith of our fathers." But others insisted that there's still hope. "In time of crisis in our land, to come and say, God of our fathers, you will save us - that is why we are here," said the Reverend Pat Robertson who, as host of the Christian Broadcasting Network's "700 Club," doubles as the Johnny Carson of the Hookworm Belt. There was at least a trickle of politics on tap. Most of the preachers railed against abortion, homosexuality and "permissiveness" in general, and the Rev. Bright even took on Communism and the sad state of America's defenses. Specialists in the field say Robertson and his ilk reach some 100 million Americans each week on 36 wholly religious television channels, 1,300 radio stations and dozens of gospel television shows that buy time on commercial TV. Their entire constiuency nationwide may consist of more than 50 million "born again" Christians, mostly Protestants, plus 30 million "morally conservative" Roman Catholics and a few million Mormons and Jews. That's "enough votes to run the country," Robertson told U.S. News and World Report. "And when the people say, 'We've had enough,' we are going to take over." Washington lesbian and gay groups and assorted liberals had been bracing for the arrival of the Twice Born since planning began months ago. Back then the rally was to have been explicitly political, with Christian Voice - a Pasadena-based political lobby that re cently issued a Congressional report card rating elected officials on "moral issues" - consulting in the preparations. Senators Jesse Helms of North Carolina and John Warner of Virginia were active, too. The rally would feature sympathetic politicians who would be asked to address the throng. Original preparations also called for the platform from which the sermons were broadcast to have seats for every Member of Congress, with their names emblazoned on them. That way, one Washington- based Christian activist told me, the preachers could acknowledge the politicoes who showed up and "zero in on the empty chairs." In January, the leaders went so far as to issue a "Christian Declaration" that denounced abortion, homosexuality and excessive government spending. Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield, a "born again" Christian but a liberal, was especially outraged. He met with the leaders to express his misgivings. A source close to the planning says it was made clear at the meeting that if the right-wingers did not back off, the tax-exempt status of "One Nation Under God" would receive very close attention indeed. At that point, the leaders "did a 180-degree turn," announcing that there would be no political speeches and no politicians would be allowed to address the crowd. Even so, the rally was attended by Senators Bwith a fair amount of ackward Helms and Orrin Hatch (a Utah Mormon) and several congressmen.Pat Boone, who had come to croon at the stadium songfest, put in an appearance at a New Right fundraiser. At the rally itself, however, much care was taken to make sure the speakers didn't get too political - with a fair amount of success. by Alan Crawford from THE LIBERTARIAN REVIEW
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