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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 11, November 1980
File 007
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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 11, November 1980 - File 007. 1980-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1857/show/1847.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1980-11). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 11, November 1980 - File 007. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1857/show/1847

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 11, November 1980 - File 007, 1980-11, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1857/show/1847.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 11, November 1980
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date November 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript CONNECTIONS! Anderson displaying a friendly auto bumper sticker at a rally in Miami JOHN ANDERSON Independent John Anderson has actively courted the lesbian/gay vote, speaking to gay groups and being interviewed by gay publications, such as THIS WEEK IN TEXAS. Representative Anderson has endorsed a bill which would forbid discrimination due to sexual orientation in housing and employment, especially federal employment. He opposed Congressman Larry McDonald's first anti-gay amendment to the Legal Services Corporation Bill in 1977. Anderson says, "Congress ought to be ready to enact legislation that would make it clear that the gay community should not be made to suffer discrimination in housing, employment and opportunities in society generally." He further states, "The State has no business interfering in a private, consensual relationship." Anderson has admitted that he retains much of his conservative philosophy, but insists he has seen the error of many of his early beliefs. He has never specifically addressed his three attempts, in his early days in Congress, to introduce a Constitutional Amendment recognizing "Jesus Christ as the Spiritual Father of our Country." The latest national polls give Anderson 9% of the vote and he now seems unlikely to carry a single state. An AFL-CIO poll released in mid-October gives him 4% of the vote in Texas, trailing Ed Clark. Barry Commoner Presidential candidate, Citizens Party BARRY COMMONER Barry Commoner is the Citizen's Party nominee. The Citizen's Party philosophy is a combination of socialist and libertarian. Commoner has approximately 1 percent of the vote nationally. He isn't on the ballot in Texas. ED CLARK Ed Clark, the Libertarian Party candidate, says, "The right to love the person you want, regardless of gender, seems to me a very basic freedom. I can't understand the mentality of a person who would try to deny that right." Clark states he is totally opposed to sodomy laws and would repeal them as soon as he was elected. When he was running for Governor of California in 1978, Clark campaigned against the Briggs Initiative. "I ran radio, television and newspaper ads highlighting my opposition. I insisted that gay people have the same right to teach in the public schools as any other Americans. At the same time, I believe that parents who, however wrongly, don't want gays teaching their children, have a right to select schools of their choice. That's shy I've proposed a system of education tax credits to allow more students to choose the kind of school they want." Clark promises, "As President, I would imredi- ately issue an executive order banning discrimination against gays in the military and other government employment." Clark also opposes sexual preference discrimination in child-custody cases and in inmigration. In fact, he opposes government intervention in almost any phase of a person's private life. "In the White House Conference on Families, for example, you have a situation where different groups feel they have to fight for control of some government prpogram. Instead of toleration and harmony, government encourages political and social conflict." "I think the principle ot equal rights must be extended to all people, gay and straight, tolerant and homophobic. People should be free not only to associate with others, but not to associate with them as well. Thus, I'm opposed to legislation that would force the individual who is prejudiced against gay people to employ them in a private business, rent or sell an aprtment or house to them, or allow them into his place of business. Freedom is for everybody." Essentially, the Liber-tar in Platform is reducing government intervention in private matters. Clark wants to transfer most government services to the private sector, repeal all laws concerning private, consensual conduct, reduce U.S. military intervention abroad, and substitute private retirement plans for Social Security. "I'm proposing to cut every American's taxes in half and cut government spending at the same time." Ed Clark has about 3 percent of the .vote, nationally. The AFL-CIO poll for Texas, which was released in mid-October, gives him 5 percent, leading John Anderson.
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