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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981
File 012
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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981 - File 012. 1981-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 17, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1840/show/1835.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-04). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981 - File 012. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1840/show/1835

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981 - File 012, 1981-04, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 17, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1840/show/1835.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Olinger, James K.
Date April 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript 12 CONNECTIONS Man to Man Reviewed by Lars Eighner Since Dr. Charles Silverstein co- authored The Joy of Gay Sex, expectations of his latest offering are bound to be high. He meets them, Man to Man is an original, inventive, even seminal, work. Dr. Silverstein has completely reexamined the development types, and meaning of gay love, while largely freeing himself of the entrenched stances of both the ho- mophobe and homophile camps. There is an abundance of new light cast on the subject. In short, this is a must The subtitle "Gay Couples in America" may be a bit misleading. This is not another gay "marriage" manual nor a survey-and- tabulate book. Some of the "couples" described here are little more than one- night-stands; some are more like roommates than lovers. Much of the book is devoted to the development of loving within the individual. Man to Man is long on the "why's and how comes" of gay coupling, but a bit shorter on the "how to's" than I expect many readers would prefer. Part of this, no doubt is the general unwillingness of our community, including Dr. Silverstein himself, to rigidly define a gay couple." Perhaps that is a definition that should never be made. But if it is, work like Dr. Silverstein's must be considered, expanded, and debated. Man to Man reveals how truly complex the issues involved are, even though many of us have had pat political answers to most of these questions for years. For example, Dr. Silverstein considers the Distant Father. This hoary bugaboo has been handed down to us from straight psychiatry, which persists in the attempt to explain homosexual development as a result of an alienation of father and son. This has never explained why some sons with demonstrably poor relations with their father fail to become homosexuals, nor why some homosexuals have very good relations with their fathers. Gay activists have always rejected the Distant Father theory, but have failed to account for the fact that strained relations with the father is a very common aspect of the history of the gay man. Both sides have become deeply entrenched in their positions and nothing really new has been added to this debate for years. But suppose, as Dr. Silverstein does, that these causes and effects are reversed. If a boy is gay, doesn't it seem reasonable that a distant relationship with his father will result? Would not even well-meaning, accepting straight men have difficulty relating to gay sons? If we accept some version of the Oedipal theory, where a straight boy puts distance between himself and his mother, it doesn't seem so outlandish to suppose a gay boy contributesto the distance between himself and his father for similar reasons and by similar mechanisms. Even the dogmas of Gay Liberation are not safe from Dr. Silverstein's acute observations. The catechism goes: "gay is a preference; we choose to be gay.' Dr. Silverstein's heresy is all the more dangerous because it is true: we do not choose to be gay: we discover we are gay and choose to accept if The catechism goes: 'gay men do not have sex with teenage boys; that occurs only with deranged heterosexuals.' Now we all know Dr. Charles Silverstein that is a crock, if only because many of us had relations with adults when we were teenagers. Dr. Silverstein just flat out says gay men and gay boys do have sex with each other and maybe that is not such an awful thing. For folks still nervous about Anita Bryant and the Save Our Children hoopla, that is a very shocking and frightening observation. Dr. Silverstein's most surprising observations, of course, are not at all alien — they are new twists on old gambits. We are perfectly familiar with the facts and surprised we never thought to put them together that way. Sector 27 Tom Robinson by Debra Rae Cohen Tom Robinson used to make commitment look so easy. He was gay. proud and good-looking. His lyrics were raised-fist emphatic, his vocals full of hail-fellow-well- met heartiness. It was easy to sing along with "Glad to Be Gay," easy to stomp to his group's straight-ahead rock & roll — i.e., easy to approve ofthe Tom Robinson Band without ever really becoming engaged by them. Apparently. Robinson felt the same way. Sector 27 is more complicated — musically, lyrically and conceptually — than either of the TRB albums, and it's a more powerful political document because of it Intrigued by the strain of spacey British progressivism that runs from the Police to Joy Division, Robinson has made a fresh start, assembling a highly talented group that challenges him musically rather than simply supporting his words. In Stevie B especially, he's found an accomplished, intuitive performer whose lyrical guitar work - twisting atonal bursts, ringing notes cast into the void a la the Police's Andy Summers - gives the spacious, pulsing melodies most of their color and character. The rest of the band is strong enough to force Robinson to concentrate on singing, if only to keep pace. This music strains his vocal resources more than did the TRB's, but that's all for the best Tom Robinson s air of a man pressed and exhilarated by tension fits right in with the new LP's main themes. Sector 27's songs (mostly cowritten by Robinson and bassist Jo Burt) paint a portrait of an artist caught between moral imperatives and the knowledge of his own weakness. Instead of their old sloganeering, the singers lyrics are full of resonant ambiguity. The "invitation from the other side" that Robinson must consider ("What have we got to lose if we try it on/None of them bastards notice when we're gone") might be the temptation of treason, suicide or simple escape, while the responsibilities he must face ("'Not Ready") may be those of sexual or political commitment, rhetorical or physical confrontation. Probably all of the above. Several of Sector 27 s compositions are concerned with the problems - logistical, familial, internal - of gay life, yet this by no means limits them: such detail makes the whole record ring truer. Whether fighting off painful fragments of memory in "Mary Lynne" or clutching at the promise, worn by repetition, that he'll seize control of his life ("One Fine Day"), Tom Robinson isn't demonstrating perfect politics but how difficult it is to be a political human being. And that makes Sector 27 not only a fine album but a brave one. Rolling Stone Man to Man requires the reader to do a lot of rethinking and new thinking. That is not particularly comfortable or comforting to everyone. Clearly, a much more popular and facile book could have come out of Dr. Silverstein's very candid and incisive interviews. Instead, Man to Man will remain a cornerstone of the gay library when the current spate of pandering pop-psychology books has been recycled into shopping bags. MAN TO MAN. by Dr. Charles Silverstein. William Morrow and Company, inc.. 105 Madison Avenue. , New York NY 10016. 347 pages. $12.95. J iscoveri) records VISIT US TO SATISFY YOUR MUSICAL NEEDS * HEADGEAR & ACCESSORIES RIVERTOWNE MALI...443-2232 WESTGATE MALL 892 13*9 10% OFF Purchase of Non Sale Items With This Ad thru April 30.1981
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