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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981
File 008
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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981 - File 008. 1981-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1840/show/1831.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-04). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981 - File 008. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1840/show/1831

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981 - File 008, 1981-04, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1840/show/1831.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Olinger, James K.
Date April 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript CONNECTIONS St. Charles owner Jerry Shaw outside vandalized 'Peeping Tom" window please. This harrassment is the same kind of thing the Mafia does in New York City in running protection rackets. It's sad to think that misguided people in Austin sink to the mobster level of violence and vandalism to make a political point'' Peaceful opposition to the displays continued. Sally says, "Two women from Austin Lambda came to see me in November, 1980, after my windows were broken out They were very nice. We had a good, intelligent discussion, but. I'm afraid that when they left, they felt like they had not been able to get their point across. "They told me that there had been a lot of rapes and violence against women going on in this country. They felt my Halloween window encouraged violence against women. I did not agree with them." In January, 1981, the St Charles Gift Shop windows were shattered again. The female mannequin in the display window was bald and was wearing a simple red evening dress. The next morning a famous hairdresser showed models with shaved heads on the Phil Donahue Show on TV. He said bald women were the look of the future. Jerry Shaw says he never heard from feminists when he had a Gay Pride Week window in 1980 with two female mannequins wearing tuxedos, drinking champagne, and embracing. He adds, "Nor did feminists give me any en- ouragement or support when 1 did the March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights window in 1979. with the female mannequin, the suitcase, and the large travel poster with the U.S. Capitol in the background." In fact shortly after the St Charles store windows were ruined by the glue and paper displayed at Halloween help, both directly and subliminalry, to promote violence amongst people — especially, in the St. Charles display, against women. We understand that Art reflects . eluding violence! and that you are displaying Art But even Art when violent is subject to condemnation and rejection by the people it violates — just as. in the more obvious example, a public display in 1980 of Black figures being hung or dismembered by White Hooded figures would not be tolerated. The public would not permit it; Blacks certainly would condemn it In lhe same way. Women — and any other persons who become the targets of violence — are refusing to accept a folk glorification of violence to them. Art or no Art We want you to know that we equally abhor the violence that was committed aga We recognize the anger that broke your windows, but we oppose any destructive means of attempting to influence you. Vou are no more in 1979, the feminist radio program Face the Music on KUT-FM told their listeners to "boycott a certain gift shop on Sixth Street" Jerry responded with "a window that had the female mannequin smashing a radio with a hammer, and a sign that read Donna Louise faces the music' " After Sally's and Jerry's shop windows were broken at Halloween in 1980, an Austin TV station came to Sixth Street and recorded a videotape segment about the incident for the 6:00 p.m. news. Jerry and Sally also received the following letter; 4 November 1980 St Charles Gifts 316 East Sixth St Austin Texas 78701 Dear Friends. At our November 3rd Planning Meeung the Austin Lambda Coordinators (5 men, 4 women present) agreed to respond in writing to your window controversy. Responding in writing is not meant to seem impersonal, but to be sure that our communications ore open, accessible and clear. We want you to know that we have valued our relationship with your shop in the past and want Io continue that friendship. However we also strongly agree with the view expressed to you that the windows you deserving of violence than the victims your windows depicted. We look forward to continued friendship and would be happy to talk about this further We sincerery hope you will consider no longer depicting vtok-nce, ewn for the sake of Art. when it is dangerous to the lives of people Austin Lambda Coordinators 603 West 12th Street Contact: Michael Fernandes copy to: Henry's Memrys Emma Lou Linn Jerry Shaw resents the pressure being exerted against St Charles Gifts. He says, "Austin Lambda had no business corresponding with the owner of this building." Roy Oakes responded, Austin Lambda is not attempting to blackball anyone. The matter is between Jerry and his landlady." As we talk, we listen to a recording of Roberta Hunter singing: "I'm having a good time/Please don't blame me.. If I made my bed hard/That's my problem/Let me lay.,..Let me have my fun, I've got to have my fling...If I make my road rough That's the price I've got to pay/Not you..,." A pensive Jerry Shaw adds: "I think we gays should be working together on more important issues and helping each other," (§3 $500 REWARD For information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who broke the windows of Henry's Memrys, at 423 E. 6th and St. Charles Gifts, at 316 E. 6th on Halloween night, October 31, 1980. For details, call 474- 6428 or 478-5598.
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