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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981
File 007
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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981 - File 007. 1981-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1840/show/1830.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-04). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981 - File 007. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1840/show/1830

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981 - File 007, 1981-04, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1840/show/1830.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Olinger, James K.
Date April 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript CONNECTIONS The display windows of three Austin businesses, which have been accused of depicting and helping promote violence against women, have been repeatedly vandalized over the last two years. Anger, sadness and frustration are all evident when the three store owners discuss their window displays. They all believe their displays are harmless and feel they are what have made St Charles Gift Shop famous. Mayor Carole McClellan told him that when she brings visitors to Sixth Street she always points out Jerry's windows. In 1979, Jerry installed a Peeping Tom window display, featuring his mannequin Donna Louise. Vandals glued newspapers over the front of the St Charles display windows and painted "Depicting violence ^^^^ \ - \\\\\\\\\mm- Bkw;' ^H m ^^ * ^_ ^t, ^^L ^H I ^ p— ■*L "My windows are what have made St. Charles famous." — Jerry Shaw being attacked by a 'handful of crazies who think they are applying feminist principles.' All three business owners received numerous complaints about the displays, from both individuals and groups. Jerry Shaw, owner of St Charles Gift Shop, 316 E. 6th, and Sally Pharr, of Henry's Memrys. 423 E. 6th. received a letter from Austin Lambda, a gay organization, expressing the concern that "the windows you displayed at Halloween help, both directly and sub- llminally, to promote violence against people — especially women." Austin Lambda co-ordinator Roy Oakes tofd CONNECTIONS the letter was a response to the wishes of Austin Lambda members who had been offended by the displays. The violence is very unfortunate," he said. "We certainly don't advocate that" Jerry Shaw says his window displays are against women creates it" on the newspapers. The glue soaked in and ruined the glass. Jerry had to have it replaced. On Halloween of 1979, the display windows at The Maya, 1616 Lavaca, were smashed Owner Doug Martin says he gota lot of hostile criticism from women for that particular display (which had been done by a woman) for men's shirts. Three female mannequins were dressed in men's shirts with no pants. They had paper sacks over their heads, were tied together with a rope, and had tiny toy soldiers at their feet suggesting they were prisoners of war. Responding to the criticism and vandalism, Doug says, "Some women are more concerned about their identity, about who they are, than about their behavior, about what they are doing." In March. 1981, the display windows at The Maya had three holes in them, probably from air rifles. The management had let the windows remain that way for a month. Two of Henry 5 Memrys windows were shattered by a brick-throwing couple on a motorcycle on Halloween of 1980. The bricks broke a couple of arms off Sally's 1940s mannequins, Howard and Sally Pharr cleaned up the mess until 5:00 a.m. I he couple on the motorcycle broke out the St Charles display window moments later. Sally Pharr says the police told her it was "the same people, the same (type of) bricks." Sally reports she had received letters, phone calls, and visits regarding her Halloween window display throughout October. 1980. The windows, done by a friend of Sally's, were supposed to depict horror chambers. The fact that I had only female mannequins is what probably made the women so angry," Sally says. "If I had had some male mannequins, (which I've never been able to find in usable condition) it probably would have been different. I didn't even do the windows myself. As much of a feminist as I am, I didn't think anything about the windows other than gory, scary Halloween.' " Jerry Shaw says, "Any windows I've done that had violent aspects had humorous aspects as well. In the Peeping Tom window, a male mannequin was reaching through Venetian blinds and pulling flowers out of a vase. The Halloween window that was broken, depicted a woman hanging from a rope. I had ceramic eggs with arms on them crawling up the rope, which made that window very strange. Halloween is a time of the macabre. A friend of mine did that window. The suicide note left by the mannequin said Sorry I couldn't make the Halloween party. I got hung up.' " A woman was an eyewitness to the attack on St Charles' windows. According to Jerry Shaw and the Austin police, the woman saw a man and a woman on a motorcycle. She was nearly hit by one of the bricks the woman threw. She got a license number, but missed some ofthe numbers on it She had heard the sound of Henry's Memrys windows being broken two blocks away only moments before. Sally says leaders of large feminist groups in Austin like the Henry's Memrys windows. Sally has two letters condemning her window displays taped to her cash register. A woman lobbyist at the State Capitol saw them and told Sally she knows one ofthe letter-writers. Sally says "She said she couldn't believe that nice, sweet girl had written a letter like that. The lobbyist told me she had seen my windows and she loved them. She thought they were a hoot She said she would make some inquiries about my windows." Jerry Shaw and Sally Pharr are offering a $500 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who broke out their store windows on October 31,1980. For details, call 474- 6428 or 478-5598. Sally says. "We truly hope some nice, honest person will come forward to give us some information." "Austin Lambda fully supports this effort to catch the vandals," Roy Oakes stated. "We abhor violence, including the vandalism that was committed against these businesses." Sally feels like "the women who were involved with this believe they are working for equal rights. By resorting to violence against me, they are trying to take away my equal rights."' The Henry's Memrys owner had been receiving phone calls and visits before Halloween, "from small groups who came by the store to tell me they did not tike my windows. They said 1 must not have any sense to depict violence against women, I got several phone calls at the shop and so did my husband. I finally got tired of it and started hanging up." Sally does feel intimidated, but she says "I will continue to do my windows as I 'VIOLENT' WINDOWS VANDALIZED by Wayde Frey
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