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The Star, No. 11, April 13, 1984
File 010
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The Star, No. 11, April 13, 1984 - File 010. 1984-04-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1751/show/1747.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1984-04-13). The Star, No. 11, April 13, 1984 - File 010. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1751/show/1747

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 11, April 13, 1984 - File 010, 1984-04-13, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1751/show/1747.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 11, April 13, 1984
Contributor
  • Hyde, Robert
Date April 13, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript Just the two of us If you've never driven to Key West, you really should do it at least once. Maybe even twice. It's beautiful, and a driving thrill. Driving down from Miami is quite simple: Once you leave the mainland, don't head right or left; just head south until you reach "The Last Resort." Some vacationers always fly to Miami and then rent a car to drive to Key West, but having made the drive a half dozen times in my life, the next time I will fly one of the commuter airlines that serves the island. For the main reason. I can't wait to get there. Once on the island, relax—have a Pina Colada and settle into the laid-back lifestyle. The restaurants and bars are great and varied, and every lodging place offers something different. It might be a couple of upstairs rooms in someone's quaint, little Conch house or a full-service guest resort or compound. There's more than 50 gay places to stay. Everybody's pocketbook can be accommodated. My favorite place is the Lighthouse Court, a compound of restored Conch houses nestled in lush tropical foliage. It has it all: old charm, modern facilities, pool and Jacuzzi, health club, bar, restaurant. Another favorite of mine is the Lime House, a smaller and more subdued guest- Soaking up rays at Lighthouse Court house. Owners Vern and Bill will pamper you like royalty, A friend also recommends the Sea Isle and The Pines. What's there to do in Key West besides lying poolside soaking up rays and drinking Pina Coladas? The world-famous Duval Street awaits your inspection and strolling: Old renovated homes, museums, theater, quaint ahops. artgalleries, restaurants and bars. Ride a bike, snorkel in the blue Gulf, fish or try your hand at sailing. For night-time entertainment, there are dozens and dozens of fine restaurants to chose from. Enjoy a leisurely dinner under the stars and watch the Key West world stroll by. Then dance the night away at The Copa or the Monster. A good cruise bar is 1 Saloon, while Michael's attracts a piano-bar crowd. The real Key West begins when the sun goes down. A man strolls by with an iguana on a leash. Mimes, jugglers, acrobats and magicians perform their feats. Some people keep time to banjo pickin', while others celebrate the jungle beat of congo players. Peddlers sell homemade banana bread and brownies. You are watching the Mallory Square rituals that accompany the world's greatest sunset. The incredible orange ball descends in a flash into the Gulf of Mexico right before your very eyes. Applause, please. And the hundreds of spectators do. Ahh, Key West. It really is an atmosphere of almost sinful indulgence and ease. Like Ernest Hemingway said, "Reach into the past for a little peace and solitude." Darn right, I'll be going back. Time and time again. ^|.^.|.,^.t,.,||||||),((((^.|||||..|||||,.^.|^.|||||^.|||)^.|||^.IIIM April 13,1984 / The Star 9 Pen Pal Scams Ripping Off Gay Men SAN FRANCISCO (IGNA) - Some gay men, seeking to help other gays behind bars, have recently found themselves the victims of some scams involving altered postal money orders. San Francisco Postal Inspector Mike McKim says that about 20 San Franciscans have reported being taken by the schemes. McKim explains how the scams usually work. A prisoner will ask a "pen pal" to cash a post office money order at a bank and give the money to a friend of the convict's outside the prison. Invariably the money orders have been altered to give them a higher value. "The Postal Service finds out about it when we get the altered money order from the bank," said McKim. The bank will charge the customer for the altered amount and, by then, the money the victim gave to the convict's friend is long gone. One victim lost $20,000 in the scam and national totals of the swindles are in the hudnrds of thousands of dollars. Letters from prisoners usually fill a page of the Bay Area Reporter, San Francisco's largest gay newspaper, and the page often carries a warning that readers may be "exploited" by their prison pen pals. Paul Lorch, BAR editor, said he knew some readers had been victimized, but that most of the writers are just asking "for another chance." "Some of these people are good people— they're kids in for drug busts," he said. "It's pretty obvious you shouldn't go cashing checks for prisoners.' Stay in Montrose Rooms from $40 Heated Pool'Jacuzzi™ Large Screen TV's Phone Service JUL. liHAvondalc ■ Houston, Texas77006 ■ (713)523-9004 All major cmtit cards aarprcd ■ Rtfcrmtions mommmdtd Pooiiid*
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