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The Star, No. 11, April 13, 1984
File 002
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The Star, No. 11, April 13, 1984 - File 002. 1984-04-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1751/show/1739.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1984-04-13). The Star, No. 11, April 13, 1984 - File 002. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1751/show/1739

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 11, April 13, 1984 - File 002, 1984-04-13, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1751/show/1739.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 11, April 13, 1984
Contributor
  • Hyde, Robert
Date April 13, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript Date for 21.06 Appeal Approaching am mitt By Don Ritz The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans has scheduled April 17 as the date for oral arguments to be presented in the case of Baker us. Wade. The Baker us. Wade case was originally presented in 1974 to a U.S. District Court in Dallas by Don Baker, former Dallas Gay Alliance president. The case contested Section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code, commonly called the "homosexual conduct" law. The suit was filed against Henry Wade, Dallas District Attorney, as well as all other district attorneys in Texas. Section 21.06, put in effect in 1974, made it illegal for persons ofthe same sex to engage in oral or anal sex in the privacy of their own homes. District Court Judge Jerry Buchmeyer ruled the statute unconstitutional on August 17, 1982. In his decision, Buchmeyer wrote, "This statute makes criminals out of more than 700,000 individuals in Texas who are homosexuals, although they did not choose to be, and who engage in private sexual conduct with other consenting adults." Buchmeyer said that if the law had not been struck down, it would allow the state to intrude "into the private lives and bedrooms of heterosexuals and regulate the intimate sexual relationships of married couples and single males and females." Buchmeyer stated that the Texas law was actually harmful in that "the anxieties caused to homosexuals—fear of arrest, loss of jobs, discovery, etc.—can cause severe mental health problems." In November 1982, one day before the gubernatorial elections, Governor Mark White, who was Texas Attorney General at the time, filed for appeal of the decision. In 1983, the newly elected Attorney General, Jim Mattox, dropped the appeal. However, Danny Hill, District Attorney of Potter County (Amarillo), funded by a group calling itself "Dallas . Doctors Against AIDS," picked up the appeal. Jim Barber, the attorney representing Don Baker, said that after the oral arguments are made in the appellate court, it may take six to eight months before a decision can be made. Barber said that both sides will be given 30 minutes to present their cases. Barber explained that the main issue ofthe case is that the former Texas law was a violation of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, in that the law was a violation of equal protection to the right of privacy. Barber said that Hill's case will probably be represented by Dallas attorney Charles Bund- ren, who will probably attempt to introduce tbe AIDS epidemic and supposed venereal disease problems in the gay community as evidence. Barber said that a brief has been filed to strike this information as evidence in that none of the information had been introduced in tbe original trial and that the information is hearsay /specificaly, information presented out-of-court, not as testimony). Gay activist Don Baker said that although he is named as plaintiffin the case, the case does not belong to him. Baker said, "This is the date when all gay men and women (in Texas) will go to court. It's not a matter of my rights, but of our rights." Austin/San XK r~i "t o t~i i o Gay Community THEiSTAR April 13. 198-4 Issue .11 Published Every Other Fridpvy San Francisco Official Fights to Close Gay Baths By David Lamble International Gay News Agency SAN FRANCISCO-The threat by San Francisco's director of public health to close the city's 14 gay steam baths and to restrict activities at adult bookstores and private sex club.s has kicked off an angry debate in the gay community over how to cope with the AIDS health crisis, while at the same time preserving the political and lifestyle gains of the post-Stonewall gay liberation movement. The political crisis touched off this week stems from a long-drawn-out battle between opposing gay political factions over whether the estimated 5 percent or so of gay men who use the gay bathhouses for multiple sex encounters are responsible for the increasing number of AIDS cases reported in San Francisco. The first salvo in the week's bathhouse wars was launched by veteran activist Larry Littlejohn, who announced he was trying to place a measure on the November election ballot requiring the Board of Supervisors to make it illegal for patrons to have sex at the baths. Little- John, a gay deputy sheriff and founder of the Pride Foundation, declared that he hadn't been to the baths himself for quite some time. "I ■topped two years ago when I got a lover and they began to become boring for me. New I (lo no) have a lover, but 1 stay away because I would be exposed to All )S You cannot tell who has it, and multiple contacts increase the possibility of getting it," he said Immediate reaction to the Littlejohn ballot proposal was sharply divided. Cay Supervisor Harry Britt gave public- health director Silverman a petition with the signatures of 50 gay leaders urging a "temporary close" to all businesses "intended to facilitate anonymous, high- volume, high-risk sexual behavior." Reportedly. Supervisor Britt and leaders of The Harvey Milk Gay Democratic Club were concerned that passage ofthe ballot proposition would mean a permanent bathhouse shutdown, while an action by the public health director could later be rescinded. Also Britt and Milk Club leaders were believed to feel that the Littlejohn close-the-baths ballot measure might threaten Britt's relection to the Board in those parts of the city where anti-gay sentiment has been fanned by fear of AIDS, At a meeting ofthe Harvey Milk Club, gay activist Gerry Parker leveled a blast at Littlejohn: "You have given the Moral Sex Banned in SF Baths Sexual activity in San Francisco's bathhouses was censored by the city, the Associated Press reported this week. Public Health Director Mervyn Silverman announced Monday that city inspectors will be touring the baths to ensure that sexual activity is nol taking place. The limitation to nonsexual activity in the baths was a result of an AIDS scare called by Silverman'"one of the most complex health car.' problems" in the city," AP reported. Silverman said that banning .sexual activity in the baths would not eliminate AIDS "There's always going to be a number of people out to kill themselves," Silverman said "There's nothing we can do for them." Majority and the right wing the gasoline they have been wanting to fuel the flames that will annihilate us." All along, one of the key players in the AIDS/bathhouse debate has been health director Silverman. Up until this week, Silverman has steadfastly resisted suggestions that he close the baths: "The exact cause or causes of AIDS is presently unknown, and because the facilities of most bathhouses do not present a public health hazard, I feel it would be inappropriate and, in fact, illegal for me to close down all bathhouses and other such places that are used for anonymous and multiple sex contacts. It is my belief that we would insult the inteligence of many of our citizens and it would be an invasion of their privacy to take such an action." On the heels of the Milk Club meeting, rumors began to circulate that Dr. Silverman was shifting his position in response to what he was said to believe was a growing concensus among gay leaders to close the baths. Dan Turner is a person with AIDS who has been close to the see-saw struggle among gay leaders. "Dr. Silverman has been a real gem—he really listens. Thursday night he attended a community meeting and began to realize that there was considerable sentiment to give the bathhouse owners a bit more time to get their act together." Turner says thai the next day at the public health department. Dr. Silverman conferred with San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein and later with gay leaders, while members of the media cooled their heels waiting for the expected announcement closing the baths Turner says that Silverman told them that Mayor Feinstein had urged him not to act until he knew all the ramifications, legal and otherwise. Turner quotes the public health director as saying, *T don't have all the ducks in my pond." A straw vote of the gay leaders present advised Silverman to give bathhouse owners time to implement some safe sex measures in' their clubs. These would include the closing of orgy rooms and "glory holes," the mandatory dispensing of condoms to patrons at check-in time, the placing of condoms in every cubicle, with attendants walking through the halls dispensing additional condoms. It was also suggested that San Francisco clubs follow the practice of some New York bathhouses and replace orgy rooms with "masturbation parlors," while providing brighter lighting and a more social atmosphere in the baths. Dan Durner thinks that San Francisco bathhouse owners have about two weeks to demonstrate that they can reform themselves, or else face a mandatory shut down. Cure for AIDS on Horizon? Doctors at San Francisco General Hospital are going to immediately begin testing a new drug on AIDS patients which they hope will signify a miracle breakthrough in treatment of the disease Called Interlukin-2, the drug is a laboratory produced form of a natural protein. The drug was effective in animals with cancer and AIDS, and the FDA finally approved of its use for humans.
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