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The Star, No. 10, March 23, 1984
File 002
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The Star, No. 10, March 23, 1984 - File 002. 1984-03-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1737/show/1725.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1984-03-23). The Star, No. 10, March 23, 1984 - File 002. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1737/show/1725

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 10, March 23, 1984 - File 002, 1984-03-23, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1737/show/1725.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 10, March 23, 1984
Contributor
  • Hyde, Robert
Date March 23, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript Austin Prepares for AIDS Awareness Week The Austin gay/lesbian community is preparing for AIDS Awareness Week, scheduled to begin April 1, designed to educate the community regarding the killer syndrome and to raise funds for further educa- tional and community activities regarding .AIDS. Although initiated by Austin's Lesbian- /Gay Political Caucus, the committee for AIDS Awareness Week also includes other members of the community who are helping solicit cooperation from local lesbian- /gay bar owners and managers who have shown interest in holding AIDS Awareness Week events and activities. The caucus will discuss the AIDS Awareness Week at its regular meeting Mrch 27, followed by an approach to Austin's City Council on March 29 to issue an official declaration of the week. On April 3, an AIDS Update Forum will be held at 8 p.m. in the Texas Union building of the University of Texas; on April 7, State Treasurer Ann Richards will speak at a cocktail party and silent auction to be held at the Hilton Inn; and on April 8, a blood drive will be held from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. at St. Luke's United Methodist Church to create a fund from which at-risk people, who may have difficulty getting blood insurance, can draw should they ever need blood. "The week is planned in recognition of the serious nature of AIDS and its increasing incidence in the Austin area, according to Janna Zumbrun, Austin AIDS Awareness Week Committee coordinator. "We're trying to play a part in allowing Austin to avoid the unnecessary negative experiences which have occurred in some cities—unfounded hysteria, increased discrimination against gays in general, inadequate medical and social services for AIDS patients, and a lack of reliable medical information for persons at risk for AIDS." For more information, call 512/441- 1130. i/J Al i o <3i ___ y CDo nrt w~r~w t_j n i "t y THEtSTAR IVlaror. 23, 1984 Issue .10 Published Every Other Friday Authors of 'Male Couple7 Show Problems of Gay Guys in Love Lesbian/Gay Democrats of Texas to Meet The Lesbian/Gay Democrats of Texas will hold a statewide general membership meeting in Austin, March 24, to discuss its strategy for the 1984 election year. The organization, working within the Democratic Party toward the elimination of social, political and economic discrimination based on sexual orientation, will focus on candidate recommendations and endorsements in the Texas U.S. Senate race, the Texas Democratic Party officer elections and the U.S. presidential race- Also convention strategy regarding delegate selection, resolutions .and platform goals, public presence at the convention and advertising and hospitality will be discussed, as well as fundraising. The group will meet from 14 p.m. at the County Courthouse Annex. A two-year membership is $5 and may be purchased at the meeting. For more information, write LGDT at Box 64493, Dallas, Tex. 75206. By Robert Hyde "Our relationships get trivialized by the rest of the world and by themselves, sometimes," said David McWhirter, in town this week to discuss The Male Couple, a bonk he co-authored with his lover of )2 years, Andrew Mcttison. "It takes ihree years before even our gay world recognizes our relationships," he added. "We all yearn for one, and then trivialize them when they occur. We don't sanctify them enough. We don't value our relationships as I feel we should. We, ourselves, underestimate them. "When you get married, that's like, 'Oh, wow!'" he said, emphasizing the degree to which heterosexual marriage.s are recognized in this society. "We sort of stand in recognition of a heterosexual relationship, but ours are not important, and they are! Absolutely they are!" They are important enough to McWhirter and Mattison to have launched them on an extensive five-year study to produce the intensive data that is the backbone of this work. David and Drew, as they prefer to be called, interviewed 156 couples in and around San Diego, Calif., questioning them on their lifestyles and how their relationships developed over the years. Then while in Hawaii, the men had an intellectual frenzy regarding what to do with the material they had at hand and realized that gay men's couple relationships pass through various stages of development, not that far removed from Dr. Benjamin Spock'fl baby guide or the popular Passages. The writers divided the stages as follows: "Blending," the first year of a relationship with its high sexual activity and limerence; "Nesting," years two and three for building a home and finding compatibility, but also dealing with decline in limerence and increased, ambivalence; "Maintaining," years four and five, where male couples establish traditions but also have to deal with the individual they "married" along with certain risks and conflicts; "Building." years six through io, where couples collaborate and begin to depend on each other, m Ui'n as establish some independence "Releasing," where couples begin to David McWhirter at ■ for granted; and "Renewing," for beyond 20 years, where men still together achieve security, restore their partnership and remember how it was. Beyond the above six stages, the authors mentioned that there's a Stage 0 where guym can't get the *how <■: ground, and a Stage 7, where one partner survives following a death. But in addition to the simplification of the above "stages of male couples," the book is perhaps a more valid contribution to gay men because it examines gay life as no other book to date. Here guys can remember how they acted when they first fell in love with Prince Charming, as well as how they felt when that prince turned into a frog. It's also a literary crystal ball for gazing into an unpredictable future, as well as an "are we really like this" study" dissecting an immediate present. But David, the friendly M.D. with the glasses, was quick to point out that he does not want their book to become a standard, per se, by which male couples gage themselves. "We want to go back and back and back and say over and over again, 'Pleasedon't do that,'" he said. "We want to say that here is a model, and we haven't had many of those. We need lots of them. "We just don't need Ozzie and Harriet, we need Kramer and Kramer. As heterosexuals have developed, we need lots of different models, and very fortunately we're creating them," David said. But the creation should come from the gay community and gay couples themselves, the authors emphasized, not from the study. "One ofthe reasons we so strongly warn against it (comparing yourself to the book), is to understand how easy it is to say, 'Ah, here it is.'" But a reason to say, "Here it isn't," is that relationships are changing with the times, according to the authors, another reason not to hold the book up as a model for personal conduct or expectations. "I think that gay people are once again on the forefront of change in the development of relationships in different ways," Drew said. "We have lots of people we know who identify themselves as couples who live in different households and make it work, in different cities and say it works, the country and get together for continued page 4
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