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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1980
File 012
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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1980 - File 012. 1980-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1558/show/1552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1980-02). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1980 - File 012. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1558/show/1552

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1980 - File 012, 1980-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1558/show/1552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1980
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date February 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript connect", ons ii Although lying, in the path of the "bible belt," Dallas is no stranger to gay civil rights cases. A nationally publicized lesbian child custody case was tried there in 1977. In 1976 the Supreme Court upheld a lower court ruling that a state may prohibit homosexual acts between consenting adults in private. Without hearing arguments or issuing an opinion, the justices decided six to three to uphold a Virginia law aimed at "crimes against nature." Baker's attorney is using a somewhat different argument in this suit. Patty O'Kane says, "We are in a better position to win than in 1975 or in the 1950's, The movement is stronger, we have more communication." To Baker, the March on Washington was "one of the greatest experiences of my life." The Village Station, a Dallas disco which sponsored several March on Washington benefits, has already honored their newest celebrity with his very own benefit. After their regular 'show, the Bottoms Up Revue came to the Village Station to perform for the Don Baker benefit. "This is not my case, this is not Dallas' case. . . this case comes from all of our hearts," Baker stated. "I knew when people spoke of homosexuals, they thought of degenerates, perverts - all the negative things. But that's not true. It would be completely wrong, morally, for me to allow this kind of lie to continue in this society," Baker added. Don Baker had time for a quick cocktail and a conw versation at Baja Sam's with several of the people he had spoken to that evening, before flying back to Dallas. He'd planned to spend the night, but changed his schedule late that afternoon. For at least part of the weekend, Baker would be in Bryan, Texas, with his friend Bill Nelson, to show a new gay group at A & M University their slides of the March on Washington. And, of course, to discuss that new civil rights case just launched in Federal District Court in Dallas. (reprinted from UPFRONT) TEXAN APPOINTED TO NATIONAL BOARD Kathy Deitsch, Moderator of the Texas Gay Task Force, has been appointed to serve on the Gay Rights National Lobby Board of Directors. GRNL is based in Washington, D.C; its Executive Director and lobbyist is Steve Endean. Deitsch organized, coordinated, and served as fundraiser for the Texas gay/lesbian lobby (the Human Rights Advocates) during the last meeting of the state legislature. Deitsch said, "GRNL is our only voice and defense in the U.S. Congress. With the recent formation of several anti-gay lobbies who purport morality, religion, and the family, the New Right and the ultra conservative fringe need to be monitored carefully. Their constituency can produce thousands of letters to Congress, and they have millions of dollars to spend on insuring that gays and lesbians are singled out for discrimination. Gay Texans have supported and under- ' stood the need to have a voice in the lawmaking pro-' cess. Now it is time that Gay Texans do their part in extending support to this vital national lobby effort." Deitsch points out, "If federal laws are enacted to either protect or single us out for discrimination, everyone in the country is affected. Likewise, if state laws are passed, they affect all Texans. The point is we_ must take responsibility for our lifestyle at all levels of government. I believe the time has come for us to either prove up or shut up. The 8o's is the decade when our community will be under heavy attack. We need strong local, state, and national action to ensure our fair share." IMMIGRATION UPDATE American Statesman Opposes Ban The Austin American-Statesman came out strongly against the current federal law barring the admission of homosexual foreigners to the United States. In a January 7 editorial, the Statesman said, "By insisting on strict compliance with an outdated law, Justice Department attorneys have made a good case for congressional modernization." The editorial was a response to Justice Department attorneys informing the Immigration and Naturalization Service that it must enforce the law. The INS had temporarily lifted the ban last summer, in response to a Public Health Service decision that the government would no longer consider homosexuality a "mental disease or defect." But John M, Harmon, assistant attorney general for the office of legal counsel, says the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 must be enforced. "Congress considered homosexuality a disease" when it passed the act, and "not a word in the statute or its history suggests a congressional intent that the surgeon general be empowered in the future to eliminate homosexuality as a ground for exclusion by declaring his disagreement with Congress' determination," Harmon said. The American-Statesman concluded, "The solution is to bring that determination up to date by explicitly striking the sexual preference criterion. Medical and social perceptions of homosexuality, as well as legal regard for gay rights, have changed radically in the last 27 years, and Congress should make sure the law keeps pace." by Daniel Curzon San Francisco, Ca. (IGNA) A 1 million dollar damage suit has been filed on behalf of Jaime Chavez, the Mexican dress designer who was arrested, interrogated, and held incommunicado under armed guard at San Francisco International Airport because he was thought to be gay. The suit is against the United States Government, Braniff Airlines, Mexicana Airlines, Burns International Security Service and their employees involved in the detention of Chavez. The claim seeks damages for unlawful arrest, search and imprisonment, as well as intentional and negligent infliction of emotional distress. Speaking for Mr.Chavez, his lawyer, Donald Knutson of Gay Rights Advocates, said that he hoped that the damage suit would have "a dampening effect on over- zealous Immigration officials." Knutson added that the "gay community is up in arms over this harassment and won't let it rest." He expressed his pleasure—and surprise—that many newspapers in recent days have written editorials against the Immigration's anit-gay policy. IGNA spoke with Mr. Chavez through his interpreter, Edward Morales, and asked what might be the repercussions for Chavez in Mexico, his home country. He replied that he did not know yet if the Mexican press has picked up the story. He is worried if it has, because his income might be hurt by business lost from the adverse publicity. Knutson and associate attorneys William 0. Dill-, ingham and Jeff T. Appleman have been invited to Washington, D.C. to meet with representatives of the White House, the Justice Department, the State Department, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Public Health Service, and the Select Committee on Immigration on January 17 and 18, to attempt to settle, once and for all, whether the Immigration Act of 1952 permits the exclusion of aliens on the basis of homosexuality.
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