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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1980
File 007
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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1980 - File 007. 1980-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1558/show/1547.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1980-02). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1980 - File 007. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1558/show/1547

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1980 - File 007, 1980-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1558/show/1547.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1980
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date February 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript COlnilFCTIONS WHY MARCH? by Bob Warburton "If Wyoming is here, 'he vhole world is here", yelled a voice from the crowd. She was right. The whole world, including Wyoming, was represented at the Gay March on Washington on October 1-4, 1979. Literally every "type" of gay was represented. Groups ranged from Gay Mormons to Gay Atheists, from Wyoming and Texas to France and England, from Socialists to the anti-nuclear lobby. There were more women than men present. Estimates of the crowd size ranged from the Washington Post's 25,000 to the March organizer's 250,000, The police estimate was 75,000. The March was' conceived to focus attention on all aspects of the gay rights struggle. It was also a celebration of the progress made by gays in the ten years since the Stonewall riot. Washington D.C. Mayor Marion Barry had proclaimed the week as "Gay Rights Week". Speakers at the rally on the Washington Monument grounds represented Parents of Gays, Latino Gays, Gay Youth, and the National Organization of Women. The demonstration met with little resistance and no violence. One large poster called on the demonstrators to "repent", Anita Bryant prayed for the marchers from her Florida home while minister Jerry Fallwell equated homosexuality with drug addiction. Despite these negative aspects, the March progressed without a hitch and pleased most of the participants, "See you next October on the steps of the Capitol," implored one festive marcher from San Francisco. DENVER COPS ATTACK GAYS DENVER (IGNA) - Their heads were shaved with battery powered clippers and the police told them to "go back and tell the rest of the faggots that this is just a warning", Dennis Gross, 21, claims this happened after he and two other men were ordered into a squad car and the policemen decided they were gay. Gross had filed charges and taken a lie detector test to substantiate his claims. No verdict has been reached. The incident occured less than two months after a Task Force in Denver had made its recommendations on ways to reduce tension between police and Denver's gay community. The Task Force, which had been set up to assess allegations that the Denver police were harassing gays recommended: - that the police force actively recruit homosexuals - that city laws that are used to harass gays be studied and changed. - that gays be appointed to all city boards and commissions that deal with civil rights and public safety issues. Captain Jerry Kennedy, head of the Denver Vice Squad claimed many of the charges of harassment have come from homosexuals arrested for illegal acts, such as prostitution and public indecency. "They're naturally going to have a rub with the police department." I sat down on the sidewalk near the Tidal Basin behind the stage hugging myself for warmth and listning to the speakers. All I could see to the east was a huge mass of people and the Washington Monument looming out of the crowd. I was enjoying myself and the camaroderi'e I felt with the 100,000 other participants, but I still had a nagging question in the back of my mind. "What is this accomplishing?" In the late sixties and early seventies, I had ask asked myself the same question concerning my involvement with the anti-war movement. Did the demonstrations end the war earlier. Looking back:, I would have to say they did, over a long period of time. I believe the same can probably be said about the Washington March. There will be no automatic change. Congress will not pass an anti-discrimination bill this session. However, the pressure is finally being felt in Washington that might bring about change in the not too distant future. The Washington March proved that there were at least 100,000 people willing to pay the cost and brave the cold in order to support gay rights. The participants felt a unity never before experienced. The whole lesbian/gay nation was represented enmasse for the first time. The Washington March cannot be seen as a culmination of efforts. It is the beginning of a struggle. The speakers on the stage told us we must take the fight back home with us. At dinner that night, our Wyoming contingent spoke of what we had to do when we returned home. We all knew that by the simple act of going to Washington, we had come out to our families and to the world. There is no going back. We decided we had to redouble our energies in our local communities. The spirit of Washington Has to be spread throughout the world. (Bob Warburton is the third president of DIGNI|TY/Wyoming. He has been politically active since the late 1960's.) KENNEDY AND BROWN ANNOUNCE GAY SUPPORT Two major Democratic candidates for president have recently announced their support for the inclusion of a gay rights plank in the Democratic Party platform. Both have said that, if elected to the presidency, they would sign an Executive Order banning discrimination against gays/lesbians in the federal government. Governor Brown had pledged his support for an end to discrimination against gays/ lesbians at a Washington, D.C. fundraiser in November. Both candidates1 commitment are substantially the same. The recent Kennedy and Brown pledges all but ensure that the 1980 August National Democratic Convention in New York City vill hear and debate a resolution on gay rights. If passed, the gay rights issue would become a part of the national Democratic Party platform. Democratic candidates would then pledge their support to the platform for the November elections.
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