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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980
File 017
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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 017. 1979-12/1980-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1521.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-12/1980-01). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 017. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1521

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 017, 1979-12/1980-01, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1521.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1979-January 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript LESBIANS AND THE LEFT by Judy MacLean continued front page . 9 Yet the reason marriages (and heterosexual relationships generally) continue to be troubled is not just that one half has been trained to oppress the other. Our most intimate relationships are forced to carry so many burdens—economic and emotional security in an increasingly hostile environment, adventure, fun, a place of rest and fulfillment, personal growth—no wonder the fragile craft of life founders and sinks. Because we have no other way to fulfill these needs, we try to fulfill them in our 'When I am talking to someone outside the movement, trying to link socialism and lesbianism means combining the unpopular with the taboo." personal lives. But we never quite make it; under capitalism our intimate lives are like a bed without enough covers; an arm, a leg, or even a whole person is always out in the cold. And this can be as true for lesbian relationships as heterosexual ones. The difficulty in creating good personal relationships is a social one. It comes about because our need for a loving community—a community that works together to provide basic things like food, shelter, safety, health care, security in old age, and less tangibly, good vibes and support around us all—is systematically denied. You can glimpse a shadow of what the fulfillment of this need would feel like. At demonstrations, when thousands come together with shared goals and commitment, the exhilaration we feel is a ghost of the feeling we would get if our society, with its its millions of people and vast wealth, were organized around the goal of caring for each other. In crises, like power failures, people often report feelings of happiness and exhilaration in spite of the inconvenience. People see the interrelated- ness of their lives and pull together. It is the belief in something like community love that has inspired revolutionaries the world over to brave all kinds of hardships, and even death. Building a "women's community" or a "lesbian community" is an attempt to come to terms with these needs, and to provide a support system around personal love relationships. But such a community, outside the society, doesn't have the material resources to really meet its members' needs, and much bitterness results. To really create a loving community of the kind I am talking about requires political power. We can only create it by transforming the whole society; such a transformation is what a struggle for socialism must be about. When a socialist movement becomes stronger in the U.S., it will involve our coming to terms with our long-suppressed need for loving social relationships. I don't mean to dismiss attempts to build a lesbian community. They are not substitutes for struggling to change society as a whole. But such attempts at community can be very nourishing, supportive places, where many of us gain strength to keep doing what we're ..doing. I want to conclude by talking about the importance of winning reforms for lesbian rights for lesbians, for all women, and for the revolutionary movement. 16 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 19? First, gay rights is a matter of human rights, of basic freedom. The fear of discovery most lesbians live with, the lack of rights to jobs, to custody of children to any kind of legitimacy, can corrode our lives. For lesbians and gay men, civil rights are urgently necessary. Reprinted from MNS Winning rights for lesbians can also help all women. Being a lesbian is tied up in complex ways with personal autonomy for women, with making choices instead of being chosen, with living a life, however precarious, independent of men in one fundamental, intimate way. By returning control of a very intimate aspect of our lives to women, the struggle for lesbian rights can make us stronger. Any reform that gives us more control can strengthen us, but especially one in a personal area about which we all, at one time or another, feel anxiety A reform like lesbian rights, which gives us a measure of control over an area of personal, painful, and often unacknowledged oppression, can give us strength to meet other challenges. Those whose daily experience tells them they have no control do not set out to change the world. Much as male leftists have accused us of conservatism, I'm not sure they are happy about the prospect of women within their ranks (and outside of them) becoming sure of what they want, becoming uppity. But it is necessary, if we want a socialist revolution that really reorganizes society to meet human needs, that one half of humanity feels strong and vocal enough to define goals. It's the only way for a socialist revolution to really make the meaningful changes we all need fiHTOLLVAH HcmNY £EV HM&OtL. O/CHESTNur
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