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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980
File 005
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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 005. 1979-12/1980-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1509.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-12/1980-01). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 005. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1509

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 005, 1979-12/1980-01, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1509.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1979-January 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript VD. clinic by Larry Palmer In this issue I would like to report back to you, the Gay community, the results of the blood-drawing effort. The response to this blood-drawing project has been much better than any past attempts at this kind of effort. The openness and support of the Austin-Travis County Health Department and the Gay Nurses Alliance has made this possible. We, from both sides of this project, have been overwhelmed! The turn-around time for your results have been improved by more than a week by the second week of drawing blood. I give you an example to show you how this is accomplished: the Gay Nurses Alliance draws the blood specimens on Saturday night at some location within the gay community. I myself take the specimens to the state lab early Monday morning to be run, and results are returned to the Austin/Travis County Health Department by Wednesday afternoon. The results can be obtained by calling: -47^-6581, Extension 307 or 309. Other questions or complaints can be referred to the VD counselors at EXT. 23U, or to myself at 837-^25 after 5 pm weekdays, and anytime Saturday or Sunday. The results by any other process takes 10 days and up to two weeks in most cases. So getting your blood drawn at any of the locations covered Friday nights is a better deal than going down to the VD Clinic yourself. VD TEST RESULTS ARE IN We, with the volume of testing we are doing are, in fact, coming up with a few positive tests. The confidential nature of, and respect for all persons involved, in every level from testing to reporting is good to remember. Everybody should be glad to know this so they can be treated—free, and confidential as well. Many people are aware of the possibility of exposure to syphilis by usually anonymous contacts, and get periodic blood tests at 3 month or 90 day intervals. Such a practice of being retested on a continual basis is very wise—especially if you are sexually active with more ; than one person, or if the person you are involved with is sexually active with others. NOT EVEN YOUR LOVER KNOWS I don't want to open the door of moral judgment; my report is not concerned with this. This process is not intended to separate lovers, cause ill or mixed feelings in any involved persons. All your special considerations can be worked out if you cooperate. Chances are, if you are contacted by the Health Department, you were exposed to a positive case and need to be treated. Everything being confidential, none of the Health Department personnel can tell you who named you as their contact. I myself would like to see this super-charged issue, or if you will, explosive issue, defused. We don't punish people for getting a common cold, mumps, measles, chicken pox, or even hepatitis (which can also be sexually transmitted). We only think it's funny if someone we know gets VD. Well, I don't think it is so funny. For your sake, or your lover's, the disease should be treated. One thing to remember is that not all positive results mean that one does have syphilis. Let me explain. I was one of the positives on the first list of the bloods drawn, but I" wasn't the only positive on the list. With a past history from 197U, I always will be run with a 4 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 false-positive reading, simply because I had the disease qnce. I want to remind you that if you ever have had syphilis, PLEASE let us know when you had it, and your telling us will save you from being treated for a false- positive. I look forward to the day vaccines are fully developed and used, and society quits punishing people for communicable diseases. In the meantime, if you come up with a false-positive, only further lab testing will indicate a new infection. PERSONEL EXPERIENCE Larry Palmer I am a gay nurse. I was a gay patient. "I" pronouns are hard for me to use, and laying cards on the table, even harder. A sexual gamble with a 20$—that's right, a 20% increase in syphilis rates in Texas from last year to this year—makes a more likely bet. A skin rash, stage two in syphilis symptoms, may be mistaken for some other kind of skin rash. In 197^ I was treated by my private doctor for a soap allergy. Later on, on my own, I correctly diagnosed myself with a blood test; I had syphilis. The reason I am concerned, as president of the Gay Nurses Alliance is that I have had a personal experience with this disease, but more than the disease I am concerned with. People's attitude toward venereal disease is very important. I was in a hospital twice last year: eight days for hepatitis, and four months later for surgery for another medical problem—so you might say. I learned much as a patient that I never knew as a nurse. Experience has helped me to understand health care from both sides. SERIOUS SETBACK FOR HOMOSEXUALS IN NORWAY (IGNA) The Norway Committee for Criminal Law, evaluating existing penalty codes and ruling out bills in consideration, has made a negative decision on a bill to give homosexuals judicial protection from discrimination. For years Norwegian gays have been struggling to obtain legal defense from discrimination. Both gay organizations and individuals made great efforts to reach this goal. On the last Gay Liberation Day in Norway there were demonstrations by gays in the capital demanding gay rights and they were extensively carried by the press. Most people thought a gay rights bill would be enacted, especially since a bill that outlawed discrimination against persons because of religious, racial or ethnic reasons was passed by the committee. Proponents of the anti-gay discrimination bill contend it was not passed simply because two elderly, permanent members of the committee, both well-known lawyers, stated it would violate freedom of speech. Two specialists, one a sexologist and one a lawyer who testified before the committee, strongly disagreed. The legislation will now be taken to the Ministry of Justice.
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