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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980
File 003
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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 003. 1979-12/1980-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1507.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-12/1980-01). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 003. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1507

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 003, 1979-12/1980-01, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1507.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1979-January 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript CONNECTIONS Published by Gay Community Services, a program of the University YWCA/YMCA, 2330 Guadalupe, Austin, Texas 78705. Telephone : (512) V7I4-I66O. Publisher Jim Olinger Editor . Scott Lind Distribution Wayde Frey Advertising Larry Palmer, Wayde Frey, Jim Olinger, Ron Moss Contributors: Andre, Kathy Deitsch, Dianne Draper, Wayde Frey, Ray Kernistovsky, Scott Lind, Judy Maclean, Ron Moss, Jim Olinger, Larry Palmer, G.P. Stojcevic Photo Contributors: Kelly Finke, Wayde Frey, Jim Olinger, Robert Welsch CONNECTIONS is dedicated to providing a forum for the lesbian/gay community of Austin and Texas. CONNECTIONS welcomes unsolicited news and/or feature articles, photographs, drawings, and poetry. If return or acknowledgement is requested, please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. CONNECTIONS will not assume responsibility for unsolicited material. CONNECTIONS is a member of the International Gay News Agency. ? ? 9 ? 9 9 * 99 .Questions? <i V ? l i ? ? GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES ? / i HOTLINE * p 477-6699 GAY MED I A On October lU, 1979> a minimum of 125,000 lesbians and gay men marched on Washington. The WASHINGTON POST estimated 25,000 marchers. The AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN "covered" the March with a single inside photo and a two-line caption. CBS News had stories they considered more important that night. They devoted 3 minutes to a Berkeley frisbee class and never mentioned the March. This is typical of the treatment homosexuals have always received from the straight media. The practice of describing, media as "a mirror held up to society" is falling by the wayside.' We now recognize the media as a searchlight, which illuminates only the place where its operators point it. On the occasions when that searchlight has been trained on homosexuals, it has almost always been focussed on mass murders, lurid political sex scandals or child sexual abuse. During the Elmer Wayne Henley trial, an Austin news director gave this response to a complaint about a news broadcast: "I feel arguments can be made for and against using the phrase, 'homosexual torture death plot'. It is a tool to sum up some of the pertinent facts in the case. I agree there is nothing homosexual or heterosexual about murder, but was not the torture in the Houston murders homosexual in nature? Possibly the phrase is an oversimplification that could offend a segment of the community. However, I do believe to tell the story of one of the largest mass murders on record, one should mention the homosexual aspects of the case. ... As for the news media never using the phrase, 'heterosexual murders,' I would say we abbreviate it as 'sex murders'." This attitude is typical of a straight media person. I am sure that the majority of news people sincerely want to report the news fairly and accurately. But many of them have no perception of the bias inherent in the type of reporting they are doing on gay issues. In this case, the division of sexuality into "heterosexual" and "perverted" and the myth of the "homosexual child killer" are not even questioned. The way news is reported does mirror society's attitudes. News people are just as much a product of our homophobic society as anyone else. Reporters have their own personal prejudices, and constantly face social pressures, as well. When KTBC ran a 5-part series on the Austin gay community recently, the president of Capital City Savings withdrew all his bank's advertising on the station because "I didn't want to support anything pro- homosexual." The only way there will be gay news which is not sensationalized, distorted, suppressed, or ignored is for us to publish it ourselves. This is happening. Gay. newspapers have appeared in many cities , usually supported by volunteer labor and personal funding. There are now a handful of national and international gay magazines. The National Gay Broadcasting Service in Houston is now distributing gay programs nationally. A wire service, the International Gay News Agency, has started operations. But these are small beginnings and most of the work is still ahead. CONNECTIONS is proud to be a part of this effort, but we need your help. In order to provide a forum for lesbians and gay men in Austin, we must have input, and we must encompass more of the community we in our diversity are. Our editorial policy is open to all. We welcome news, fiction, essays, letters, black-and-white photos, poetry, drawings, and organizational events. We need reporters, artists, advertising representatives, columnists, layout people, and distributors. We need advertisers, because putting out a "free" paper is still expensive. We need you. Please help. For all of us. __ Jim olinger -2 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980
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