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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980
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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 001. 1979-12/1980-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1505.

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(1979-12/1980-01). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1505

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980 - File 001, 1979-12/1980-01, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1526/show/1505.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 1, December 1979-January 1980
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1979-January 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript FREEi AUsTr.N \/Ol.2 N0.1 LSTABLISIII D BY TEX \S GAY TASK FORCE THIS NOT£ JS NOT LFGAL. TF..\'DER STORY OH PA~ THREE PORN LAW HITS AUSTIN Travis County prosecutors spent five years attempting to determine a "community standard" in pornography cases . It was an exercise in futility. Now, armed with a tougher state pornography law, County Attor­ney Jim McMurtry is trying again. On November 16, police arrested Roy Stam­baugh at the Pleasure Shoppe, 603 W. Oltorf St., and Fred Dougherty at the Adult Theatre, 3401-A N. IH 35, on sealed indictments. One case deals with picture magazines and the other with sexual devices, which are inclu­ded for the first time under the new state statute. The county will also try to prove a case against a corporation distributing obscene material, another new provision. Although the decision here has been to first test community standards, that hasn't been the case elsewhere, McMurtry said. "In other jurisdictions ... they are seizing everything in the stores, and when they are a restocked, they're raided again ." The biggest crackdowns have been in Houston and Dallas . McMurtry said the last three obscenity trials in Austin resulted in mistrials , with the 18 jurors on the three panels split 9 to 9 on the issue. When the jury on the last case in 1977 deadlocked, Travis County prosecutors gave up. The cases "are very time consuming-­for preparation and for the courts. They're different from what our attorneys are usually trying so we have to invest about 100 hours of attorney time to prepare for one," McMurtry said . So, he advised Police Chief Frank Dyson he would recommend no more arrests or trials until society, the law, or distribution pro­cedures changed. some things have changed in the past 2 1/2 years, McMuetry believes. "The material is as offensive now as it was then, but the shops have moved out, closer to the neighborhoods. And, I.think society has changed . A few years ago, society was more interested in preserving individual liberties, but now it is more con­cerned with its own protection. The initial thrust of our effort will be to test the com­munity to see if they're willing to tolerate this type of thing." McMuertry is well aware of the difficulties in finding a jury that will return a guilty verdict. "Most people living in Austin moved here from somewhere else, bringing their own ideas. We have a large Mexican-American and black community with their own idea of obs­cenity. We have a large population of well­educated people and a larger liberal popula­tion than anywhere else in the state. Then there's a large segment of religious people, and they are by and large interested in im­posing morals through the law. We have people with no religious beliefs, including the world's leading atheist." "But we don't have anybody who is your typical Austinite. And when you don't have people of similar backgrounds, it's diffi­cult to determine a community standard--if not impossible~ Still , he's going to try. The new state law defines as "obscene" any material or performance that: --the average person, applying contem­porary community standards, would find that ,taken as a whole appeals to the prurient in­terest in sex and lacks serious literary, artistic, political and scientific value; --depicts or describes patently offen­sive representations or descriptions of ul­timate sexual acts, normal or perverted, ac­tual or simulated, including sexual inter­course, sodomy and bestiality. --shows or describes patently offensive pictures or descriptions of masturbation, excretory functions, sadism, masochism lewd exhibition of the genitalia, aroused m~le or female genitalia, covered maJe genitals in a· discernibly turgid state, or any device designed and marketed for the stimulation of genitals. CONNECTIO:lS Published by vay Community Services , a program of the University y·,,cf../Yt4CA , 2330 Guadalu-pe , Austin , Texas 78-05. Telephone : (512) 474- 1660. Pc1blisher Edi':or Distrib-..:.t.::.or. Jim Olinger Scott Lind ·,1ayde Frey ~arry PaL~er, Wayde Frey, Jirr: Olinger , Ron Moss .,ontr.i. bu.tors: Andre , Kathy Deitsch, Jianne Draper , Wayde Frey, Pay Kernistovsky , Scott L.:.nd, Judy Maclean, Ron Moss, Jirr: Olinger, Larry Palmer, G.P. Stojcevic Photo Contributors: Kelly Finke , Wayde Frey , Jim Olinger, Robert Welsch CO>mEC':'IONS is dedicated to providing a forum for the lesbian/gay comr.1unity of Austin and Texas . CONNECTIOllS welcomes unsolicited news and/or feature articles, photographs , drawings, and poetry. If return or acknowledgement is requested, please enclose a sta.~ped, self- addressed envelope . CONNECTIONS will not assu.~e responsibility for unsolicited materi al . CONNECTIONS is a member of the International Gay News Agency. ;) • 'l ? '? ? ? ? 'l • 9 q • 9 ;:> '1 .-=> • '\ '1. ? 1 "· Questions? q_ .. ? '? ') . 1,:) ·1,.) '\ :? '1. .,_ 1 . ? ? • ? • . . • ? ~ GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES , 1 HOTLINE , ~ '? • 477-6699 GAY MEDI A On October 14 , 1979 , a minimum of 125,000 lesbians and gay men marched on Washington. The WASHINGTON POST e s t i ­mated 25 ,000 marchers . The AUSTIN AMERICAN- STATESMAN "covered" the March wi th a single inside photo and a two-line caption . CBS News had stories they considered more important that ni ght . They devoted 3 minutes to a Berkeley frisbee class and never mentioned the March . This is typical of the treatment homosexuals have always re­ceived from the strai ght media. The practice of descr i bing media as "a mirror held up to society" is falli ng by the wayside. We now recognize the media as a searchlight, which illuminates only the place where its operators point it . On the occasions when that searchlight has been trained on homosexuals , it has almost always been focussed on mass murders , lurid political sex scandals or child sexual abuae . During the Elmer Wayne Henley trial , an Austin news director gave this response to a complaint about a news broadcast : "I feel arguments can be made for and against using the phrase , ' homosexual torture death plot '. It is a tool to sum up some of the pertinent facts in the case . I agree there is nothi ng homosexual or heterosexual about murder , but was not the torture in the Houston murders homosexual in nature? Possibly the phrase is an oversim­plification that could offend a segment of the community. However , I do believe to tell the story of one of the largest mass murders on record , one should mention the homosexual aspects of the case . . . . As for the news media never using the phrase , ' heterosexual murders ,' I would say we abbreviate it as ' sex murders ' . " This attitude is typical of a straight media person . I am sure that the majority of news people sincerely want to report the news fairly and accurately. But many of them have no perception of the bias inherent in the type of reporting they are doing on gay issues . In this case , the division of sexuality into "heterosexual" and "perverted" and the myth of the "homosexual child killer" are not even questioned. The way news is reported does mirror society ' s atti-tudes . News people are just as much a product of our homo­phobic society as anyone else. Reporters have their own personal prejudices , and constantly face social pres­sures , as well. When KTBC ran a 5-part series on the Austin gay cor:ununity recently, the president of Capital City Savings withdrew all his bank ' s advertising on the station because "I didn ' t want to support anything pro-homosexual. " The only way there will be gay news which is not sen­sationalized , distorted , suppressed, or ignored is for us to publish it ourselves. This is happening . Gay news­papers have appeared in many cities , usual~Y supported by volunteer labor and persona: funding . There are now a handfui of national and international gay magazines . The .lational Gay Broadcasting Service in Houston is now dis­tributing gay programs national:y . A wire service, the International Gay News Agency, has started operations . But these are sma:l beginnings and most of the work is still ahead . CONNJi:CTIONS is proud to be a part of this effort , but we need your help . In order to provide a forum for lesbians and gay men in Austin , we must have input, and we must encompass more of the community we .:.n our diversity are . Our editorial policy is open to all . We welcome news, fiction , essays , letters , black- and- white photos , poetry, drawings , and organizational events . We need reporters, artists , advertising representatives, columnists, layout people, and distributors . We need advertisers, because putting out a "free" paper is still expensive . We need you . Please help . For all of us . -- Jim Olinger CO.INEC~IONS December 1979/Jan~ary 1980 HUllAN RIGHTS ADVOCATES by Kathy Deitsch The Human Rights Advocates, the legislative lobby project for the Texas Gay Task Force, are concerned about the upcoming special legislative session. House Speaker Bill Clayton has said recently, "The Governor has assured me that he plans to call a Special Session of the Texas Legislature. Although he has not told when he will make the call, he has said it will include initiative and referendum, electronic surveillance (wiretapping), and tax relief measures." The HRA Legis­lative Committee has determined that our lobby should be present to protect lesbian/gay interests if a Special Session is called. There ·s a popular saying in and around the Capitol in Austin, "No person's life, liberty or property is safe when the Texas Legislature is in session." Du.:-ing the 1979 session, the Human Rights Advocates were in­strumental in averting legislation which would have increased harassment of gay and lesbian bars by forbid­ding "sexually oriented conduct", such as same-sex dancing and drag shows, removing a rider in the general appropriations bill which denied campus gay organiza­tions use of university facilities, foiling attempts to make gays scapegoats in floor debate on child pornogra­phy and child sexual abuse, and bringing police haras­sment and brutality experienced by the lesbian/gay community to the legislators' attention. The governor is not required to give advance notice of a special session call. Therefore, our community wou d have no time to raise money for a lobby presence after the call. It could come as early as January, 1980, although '!arch or September--months which would put the most l! ·ess ire on the legislators--are, politlcal]y, more likely. A special session is limited to 30 days, but another can te ca::.led immediately after the first. GAY lRANfAN~ FAOINO DEPORTATION: THERE I~ A WAY OUT Iranian lesbians and gay men who face deportation~ be able to use their homosexuality as a defense to remain in the United States. Because of the executions of gay men in Teheran ear::.ier this year, openly gay students may assert they would be in danger by returning to Iran because of their sexual orientation. Anything that can establish politicaL refugee status may be succe,ssful to delay or de­feat deportation under these circumstances . Unlike the Immigration and Naturalization Service, and more recently the State Department, regulations that bar entry into the United States because of an individual's homosexuality, any alien already in the country who has passed through immigration is entitled to limited statu­tory procedural safeguards. Hearing examiners, further­more, have stayed deportation of homosexual aliens in the past where political refugee status was determined . The International Gay Association will work with local American groups to assist those lesbian and gay Iranian students to secure legal counsel at their hearings. If a student is nevertheless deported from the United States , or feels it impossible to raise her/his homosexuality as an issue during a publi c hearing, then the International Gay Association will attempt to locate through its Euro­pean member associations another host country. Interested gay students should contact the Laison Of­fice in ijashington at (202) 234-6268. Your identity will be kept strictly confidenti al. If you are an attorney who could volunteer your services during this emergency , please call t he Liaison Office . (IGNA) The HRA is attempting to raise enough money to pay off the last session's debt and budget $6000 for the Special Session presence. 'lhe Human Rights Advocates have been organizing "Lobby Nights" in Texas bars. The first one took place in Houston on October 6, 1979, It netted approximately $2200 toward the elimination of the 66th session debt. Lobby Dollars were traded for actual dollars. Those purchasing the Lobby Dollar were encouraged to mail it back so their name could be added to the HRA consti­tuency network. More fund raisers are planned. The upcoming year is going to be very hectic poli­tically with the candidates and their campaigns for office, the political party conventions and the actual May primary and the November general election. Deci­sion maktrs statewide look upon the lesbian/gay community as a growing force in Texas politics. Texas is considered to be one of the best organized states in the nation, being one of the two states that has been able to fund a lobby program for a full legis­lative session. The National March on Washington served notice to legislators that the lesbian/gay community is a force to be reckoned with in the 1980 1 s. Some 2500 to 3000 Texans participated in the March, and approximately 100 of us visited 20 of the 26 members of the Texas Congressional delegation. Many of the Texas legis­lators had never spoken to an open gay or lesbian constituent before the visits October 15. It is vital that we join together in the 1980 elections and say very clearly, and very strongly, NO MORE DISCRIMINATION. We are everywhere and we intend to be an influential force politically on all levels . We urge your help in our continuing to have an effective voice in Austin. • Metropolitan Community Church Pastor: Rev. Candace Naisbitt I Sunday Services: 12:00 noon and 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Prayer and Communion: 7:30 p.m. Bible study: Tuesday 7:30 p.m. Rap group on all subjects: Tuesday 8:30 p . m. Counseling: Monday - Thursday by appointment Pot luck supper: January 19, 1980, 7:30 p.m. REACHING OUT TO THE GAY COMMUNITY OF AUSTIN 81• E. 8th ST., AUSTIN, TEXAS 78701 (512) •TT·TT•7 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 3 .... V.D. clinic In th::.s iss1e I would like to report back to you, the Gay co::-.:'. ... r.ity, the results of the blood- drawing ef­fort. The re2ponse to this blood- drawing project has been m~ch tetter than any past attempts at this kind of effort. The openness anu support of the Austin-Travis County ::ei;._~h I,epartr.-,ent and the Gay Nurses Alliance has rr.aae tr.is ros.;;ible. '.-le, from both sides of this project, have Leer, o·,., r.ihe lmed ! 7he tArn- around time for your results have been im-proveu ty ~ore than a week by the second week of drawing bloou. : .;5..·.'e you an example to show you how this is accomplished.: the Gay llurses A::.liance draws the blood specimens on Saturday night at some location within the gay CO[L~mity. : myself take the specimens to the state lab early tJ,onday morning to be run, and results are re­turned. to the Austin/Travis County Health Department by ·,,reJ.nesJ.ay afternoon. The results can be obtained by cal.in~: 47,-6581, Extension 307 or 309, Other questions or complaints can be referred to the VD counselors at EXT . 2 34, or to myself at 837-11425 after 5 pm weekdays, and anytime Saturday or Sunday. ~he results by any other process takes 10 days and up to two weeks in most cases. So getting your blood drawn at any of the locations covered Friday nights is a better deal than going down to the VD c~inic yourself . VD TEST RESULTS ARE IN We, with the volume of testing we are doing are, in fact, coming up with a few positive tests. The confi­dential nature of, and respect for all persons involved, in every level from testing to reporting is good to remember. Everybody should be glad to know this so they can be treated--free, and confidential as well. Many people are aware of the possibility of exposure to syphilis by usually anonymous contacts, and get periodic blood tests at 3 month or 90 day intervals. Such a practice of being retested on a continual basis is very wise--especially if you are sexually active with more than one person, or if the person you are involved with is sexually active with others . NOT EVEN YOUR LOVER KNOWS by Larry Palmer false- positive reading , simply because I had the disease once. I want to remind you that if you ever have had syphilis , PLEASE let us know when you had it , and your telling us will save you from being treated for a false­positive. I look forward to the day vaccines are fully developed and used , and society quits puni shing people for communicable diseases. In the meantime , if you come up with a false- positive , only further lab testing will indicate a new infection. PERSONEL EXPERIENCE Larry Palmer I am a gay nurse . I was a gay patient. "I" pronouns are hard for me to use, and laying cards on the table, even harder. A sexual gamble with a 20%- -that ' s right, a 20% increase in syphilis rates in Texas from last year to this year- -makes a more likely bet. A skin rash, stage two in syphilis symp­toms, may be mistaken for some other kind of skin rash. In 1974 I was treated by my private doctor for a soap allergy. Later on, on my own, I correctly diagnosed myself with a blood test; I had syphilis . The reason I am concerned, as president of the Gay Nurses Alliance is that I have had a personal experience with this disease , but more than the disease I am concerned with. People ' s attitude toward venereal disease is very important. I was in a hospital twice last year: eight days for hepatitis , and four months later for surgery for another medical problem--so you might say I learned much as a patient that I never knew as a nurse . Ex­perience has helped me to understand health care from both sides . SERIOUS SETBACK FOR HOMOSEXUALS IN NORWAY (IGNA) The Norway Committee for Criminal Law , evalu­ating existing penalty codes and ruling out bills in con­sideration, has made a negative decision on a bill to give homosexuals judicial protection from discrimination. For years Norwegian gays have been struggling to obtain legal defense from discrimination. Both gay or­ganizations and individuals made great efforts to reach this goal. On the last Gay uiberation Day in Norway there were demonstrations by gays in the capita' demanding gay rights and they were extensivP. y carried by the press. I don't want to open the door of moral judgment; my report is not concerned with this . This process is not intended to separate lovers, cause ill or mixed feelings in any involved persons. All your special considerations can be worked out if you cooperate. Chances are, if you are con+a•ted by the Health Department, you were exposed to a positive case and need to be treated. Everything l:.eing c.:ir.f idential, none of the Heal th Department person­nel car te • you w!'.o name:l. you as their contact. I mysE' lf woull ike. to see this super-charg€J issue, or if you wi.l, XF.osive iss'le, Jefused. We don't punish people for •e++ing a ,oml'.!or. cold, mu.~ps, measles, chicken pox, or even hepat:tis ,which can also be sexual::.y transmitted). We on.y tnink it's funny if someone we know gets VD . We 11, ' I don't think it is so funny. For your sake, or your iover's, the disease should be treated. One thing to remember is that r.ot all positi·,e results mean that one does have syphilis. Let me explain. I was on~ of the positives on the fir?t list of the bloods drawn, but I·wasn ' t the only positive on the list . With a past history from 1974, I always will be run with a !-lost people thought a gay rights bi.::. would be enacted, especially si~ce a bill that outlawed discrimi­nation against persons because of religious, racial or ethnic reasons was passed by the committee. Proponents of the anti-gay discrimination bill contend it was not passed simply because two elderly, permanent members of the committee, both well-known lawyers , stated it would violate freedom of speech. Two specialists , one a sexologist and one a lawyer who testified before the committee , strongly disagreed. The legislatio~ wi l l now be taken to the Ministry of Justice . 4 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 PHONE COUNSELORS NEEDED This message is for people who would like to do tele­phone counselling at Gay Community Services . I want, to encourage you to volunteer as a phone counselor and :co discover all over again how good it feels to help some­one else. We all have a need to be of service to our fellow human beings. Gay people and some straights, most of whom you will never meet face- to- face, call GCS daily at 477- 6699, seeking advice , help, or encourage­ment . Let yourself experience the joy of being helpful to a stranger. Help strengthen the gay community in the Austin area. Feel the excitement of entering the world of someone just coming out, or of encountering some new , colorful sister or gay brother. Troy Stokes does his part by recording the taped GCS message which answers the hot line number when a c0un­selor is not on duty . The University Y does its part by providing rent-free office space for the gay counseling center. Frank, Larry, Michael, and David do their part by staffing the phones Tuesday through Friday evenings. Would you like to do your part? We have telephone shifts open on Saturday, Sunday , and Monday nights from 6 to 10 pm. We make referrals to bars, bookstores, gay groups, baths, churches; and to doctors, counselors, and lawyers . We listen to people who need someone to whom they can talk anonymously over the phone . We share our life experiences and observations with people who feel lonely or who feel frightened of gayness--their own or ours. In short, we often help people put the pieces toge­ther again and find solutions in a fragmented, estranged world. OUT OF TOWN, OUT OF STATE ·If'< you'iv-e ever visited e, new city alone, you can appreciate the graciousness and convenience of having a free gayline that you can call to ask where the bars and baths are. Austin offers that service to visiting lesbians and gays , thanks to Troy , Frank, Larry, David, Michael , Wayde, and the other volunteers from the gay community who work to provide this referral service . Recently, I received a call at GCS from a young man in a downtown hotel who was visiting Austin for a week . He wanted to know where he could meet other guys like him­self. He was here from Guatemala. A couple of months ago I took a call from a lesbian and her lover visiting here from Venice , California. They asked if we have any womens ' bars in Austin , and they were delighted when I told them yes, we do , and referred them to the Hollywood. People can find our phone number easily because "Gay" is our first name. Lots and lots of Austin area teen­agers , most of them gay, call GCS just to have another gay person to talk to . They don ' t even have to know any other gay people to find help from Gay Community Ser­vices . All they have to do is look in the "G" section of their phone book . Many of you Connections readers came out through Gay Community Services. And for those of us who did not have a gay hotline to call when we were coming out , think how much easier for us it would have been if there had been one! What a shame and a waste it would be if Austin decided to allow the GCS hotline to go down the toilet out of sheer neglect . Yes , Gay Community Services has been, and continues to be, a great name . We ' ve been offering our phone counselling service for 4½ years. And yet , we are actu­ally hu~ting for volunteer phone counselors right now. You can help us to continue to provide gay hotline services for the Austin area. Your help is urgently needed. Now. You can be a part of the helping hand we give others by volunteering to be a GCS ph~ne counselor. Lonely, closeted people just learning to deal with their gayness need you. Gay teenagers need your atten­tion and encouragement. Out- of=town visitors need directions and information about the local scene. People who want to learn about gayness or who want to find out other ways to meet people, need you. Help make our volunteer phone counselling center more of a solid success, instead of being a marginally effec­tive outfit, open little more than half the nights of the week. THE BATTLE GOES ON You see, Gay Community Services is one of those things that everybody is glad to know we have in our city, but that hardly anyone is going to lift a finger to help with. We're glad GCS is there; knowing it's there makes us feel warmer and more secure. GCS is like the Salvation Army . We feel good, knowing the Salvation Army is there, caring for needy people, but we ourselves aren't about to get involved and actually give our time and energy to assist with the work of the Salvation Army. Well, folks, we Austin lesbians and gays have our own self- help community service agency, and it's called Gay Community Services. And unless some more of us do in­volve ourselves with our community agency, that warm, contented feeling of knowing it's there , may disappear, because Gay Community Services might well go down the tube. SPEAKING OF HOMOPHOBIA We GCS activists fought the straight men of the University Y Executive Board to get to keep our large green GCS sign in place above the Sommers Rexall Drug sign at 2330 Guadalupe. We won that battle; the women and a few others outvoted the men of the Joint Executive Committee in late September, 1979. The GCS sign stays where it is, instead of being removed, as the men of the Executive Committee had ordered. Now we GCS people face the dilemma of having only a little over half of our phone shifts filled. Our leaders are frazzled and dis­couraged. Won't you help us? Think about giving one evening of your time each week to be a GCS telephone counselor . We especially need lesbian and third-world gay phone counselors. All we have are gay white males! Help us fill those empty phone shifts and those vacancies that always occur a­round Christmas and New Years . Call the GCS office coordinator , Wayde Frey, at 474-1660. Wayde will dis­cuss being a phone counselor with you, introduce you to the peer counselor's job , show you the office lay­out , go through the referral files with you, and help you get started as a GCS volunteer. The added irony here is that I am imploring people to do something that is so enjoyable, once you've done it! The GCS phone counselor experience can be a thril­ling, rewarding way to spend an evening. People need you, and you can help give them the reassurance or information they need. Sometimes the phone doesn't ring for a long while, and sometimes there are lots of prank calls . But more and·more lately, it's serious gay callers who call us up . They won't have anybody to help them on Saturday, Sunday, or Monday nights unless you lesbian and gay Connections readers volunteer to be there when they call. Anybody out there still reading this? Anybody out there going to respond to this article by volunteering? I'm waiting to hear from you. CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 5 TEX'S COLORADO STREET BAR As I walked to.ard the newly painted two-tone gray buildir.g at ~at Colorado, I could hear the sounds of ha.~­mers, saws, j~ckhan.mers and al. kinds of power tools. They have been working day and night for months, transforming an old warehokse into Tex's Co:orado ~tree: Bar. Insiae, it looked like I had stepped into an apartment comp.ex under construction. ~t.L~ber, pipes, power tools, mac .. .:.nes an:i workers were everywhere. The old warehouse .a!: tee!'! gutted, leaving one cavernous two story space. A t al cony ar;:,una the entil'E' rerimet<"r is nearing comple­ti -.. r, raised platform b neat!o it, ·•hich will enclose •r aar.c ~l or fil_in~ most of tne roow has been started, as n 1,e. :;e,era~ cars. The "inisr.ed double staircase taking Uf tre ~vu+n wall waits for a per~aner.t sta~e to be built in fr.J-:t c." _:_ +. ':'!'le mair, entrance ~tands at t:1e other end of :'le bu.:. lair:-.;, openiLg into a lar·e courtyard off the a 1 y. A lar~e ~atio is b<"in· bu.:.lt nere. The stairway to tt,e- taso1ent is b~ocked off. It will be renovated and o_i:,er e-d later as "a surprise". ii , iling is a maz of electrical connections. But it wiil soon be hidaen by a grid hoiding hundreds of lig!-ts. be club will boast a 64-channel, computerized light J,stem which offers more than 3000 different light combinations. It can respond to sound vibrations and is capable of being reprogr8Jllllled to change the light show at will. Disk jockeys are Kerry Jaggers of Dallas and Austin's OPEN own David Drake. They will be playing the latest disco and dance- rock from New York, California and everywhere. If you were there, you ' ll know what I mean when I tell "If we think a song is ready for Austin, we'll play it as you that all the studs in Austin and the surrounding coun­much as they want." try were there under the roof of Tex ' s Colorado Street Bar Manager ~ark Williamson promises many weekly and night- ' on opening night. ly surprises and specials for Tex's patrons, such as bar I was still a block away when I started feeling it . drinks as low as 35 cents. Even though there will be no There was an energy in the air you could cut with a knife. plans for regular drag shows, there will be a SPECIAL The very sidewalk was pulsating with ·t . 9 treams of hot EVENT NIGHT once a month which is set aside for shows men were converging on the newly gleaming gray building with "dazzle and brilliance . " Mark says the philosophy at 404 Colorado. The crowd sept vibrations, sweeping me behind Tex's Colorado Street Bar is simple: "W~ don ' t into the alley, through a courtyard with trees decked with intend to be the only gay disco in Austin. Just the , winking lights, past a sign saying, "Excuse the mess, it best." 1 takes a little longer to be best", and I was THERE. - -Ron Moss i Energy was at a fever pitch. Giant speakers pulsed THANKS AUSTIN! --------~ -~------ TEX'S COLORADO STREET BAR WOULD LIKE TO THANK AUSTIN FOR COMING TO OUR OPENING. rlease bear with us while we're finishing up! SEASON'S GREETINGS from the M,magement and Staff •o• COLOIADO STU fl J every subtlety of bass through the room. A superb treble blended with excited shouts. Imaginative dances were al­ready being performed on the floor. Strobes flashed to the beat. Racing spotlights and colored flashes mutated into a cooling rainlike haze, which suddenly changed to rythmically pulsing reds, whites and blues; seemingly endless variations, some spectacular, some subtle. All exciting. Tex ' s combines that distinctive Austin feel with the best of Los Angeles-Sunset Boulevard ambiance. Drinks were on the house and everybody was getting down on the dance floor, stripping themselves of restricting tight shirts and other clothes . Muscled bodies gleamed under the lights. Imaginative dancers rendered movements which revealed much skill. A cool heat attenuated each throbbing beat. This bar is definitely for those into heavy action, those who know the beat of LA streets, Sunset Boulevard stretched into the depth of imagination . It's for those who have sauntered down more than one dark boulevar& with full expectation that someone will answer their expecta- 1,.. ____________________________ _. tions. Tex ' s may also be for lovers--but beware. The mood 6 ~ONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 may well capture you, and who knows where or with whom you ' ll be when it does? Houston--move over . Your bars are only imitations. Dallas-- forget it . One hot bar and home of heavy action has moved to Austin-- the heart of LA-TEXAS. ART • DESIGN NOON-10 PM 316 EAST SIXTH STREET 478-5598 . . . ~ ' I I .. W!J!! fl{)t/ {/H Ull//11 / /Hl\.1 ) The movie ad in the newspaper for Why Not? appeals to a certain element, as a friend of mine once put it. The picture of the two men kissing certainly attracted my attention, no doubt about t hat. This film is not another version of Women in Love, however. There ' s not much brooding inthis film . The characters are kooky, quirky individualists and lovable eccentrics who have happy- go-lucky attitudes toward life, exempli­fied in the words of the picture's title . Although there are beautiful and tende:- love scenes between the two men in the picture, this film is not particularly a homosexual love story. Why not? Because the people in this menage- a - four are not homosexuals. They 're not bisexuals . They ' re not heterosexuals. They're just--people . Got that? I didn ' t think so. Let me try to explain . Louis and Fernand live with Alex and Sylvia. Louis and Fernand are men . Alex and Sylvie are women . Louis and Fernand are lovers. So are Fernand and Alex and Louis and Alex . So are Fernand and Sylvie . Now do you get it? A rich comedy and a study of relationships are two of the ways I would describe this film. The main characters have a rare gift for living life , every moment . They are by turns loony , exasperating, intense , and wonderful . I envy them their talent for living life to the fullest and I envy them for their cockeyed optimism . None of your anqst or existentialist despair here , thank you . Fernand , Louis , and company are in love with life and in love with each other . They work , they suffer , they survive , and they pay their rent . They attract friends like a flame attracts moths . Society may call Fernand and Louis faqs, but all four characters persist in their unconventional living arrangements , and thrive on one another ' s company . Alex and Sylvie have tender scenes in the film which only hint at a lesbian relationship as a possibility for them . Fernand , Louis , Alex , Sylvie, and the other characters in this film are neither "immoral " nor " amoral " as Rex Reed , Judith Christ, and other gay/straight/whatever film critics have suggested in the straight media . Rather , these people are in love with life, are in love with each other , and are fulfilling themselves in a profound way that most of the rest of us only think about or dream of. The fact that the screenwriter and the director of this film do not pigeonhole or categorize these characters according to sexual orientation, is what makes this film a breakthrouqh and what makes it such a special cinematic event . This is cinematic entertainment at its very best at the level of being a genuine work of art , because it shows us the truth about what we are and about what we can be . Why Not? is a French film with English sub­titles , rel eased by New Line Cinema in 1979 . Though it is no longer playing in Austin , it is a film well worth looking forward to when it returns for another engagement in Austin . See it . ---Wayde Frey CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 7 LAMBDA SLIDES SHOW MARCH on Tuesday , November 27 (the anniversary of the assas- The sound is difficult to understand in spots--and some sination of Harvey Milk), Austin Lambda gave a slide presen- of the slides are less than perfect in quality . But audi­tation of the National March on Washington for Lesbian and ence response was a prolonged and thunderous applause--and Gay Rights . The presentation was held at the Gaslight rightfully so. The slides, taken primarily by amateur Theatre on~- 4th Street . About 100 people attended. photographers, are beautiful visions of the event. The Response to the presentation was extremely positive and sound , recorded from the midst of the 200,000-person Austin Lambda is planning a second showing in January . Ten- crowd by a hand-held microphone, is the e~ement which tative plans are to hold the show again at the Gaslight, lifts the presentation from the level of a good home-this time on Tuesday, January 15 at 8 pm. Watch for pos- show to an artful immersion into the experience of the ters announcing final plans. March . As one viewer put it , "The sections that were dif- The 45-reinute presentation , involving 210 slides and a ficult for me to understand added to the sense of immediacy sound- track, was a month in the making . The creators of for me--like being in the middle of such a crowd--it made the show, Michael Fernandes and Cherese Campo , gathered the event very present . " Everyone seemed to agree that the slides and assorted tapes from among the 200 Austinites presentation was more than a viewing . It succeeded in who went to the March on Washington in October. Over 400 bringing home the experience. slides were loaned to Lambda for the presentation , from The original slides have been duplicated and returned to which the final 210 were chosen and assembled into the the people who donated them. Austin Lambda now can offer story as it is presented. More than three hours of unedi­ted tape was sorted through and edited into a 45-minute so'..IIld track which attempts to portray in sound what the slides present visually. the presentation permanently--and hopefully will do so in the future to college classrooms , civic groups, and others who would learn from the experience. No one should miss the January showing. Many of us will be back for seconds . NEW YEAR'S EVE & TIFFANY JONES!! FREE CHAMPAGNE & PARTY FAVORS!! GUEST APPEARANCE BY NEW YORK, NEW YORK'S D. J . FRED LEWIS AND II II " ~l~lf 1111~ COl~TIY 705 RED RIVER • AUSTIN • 4 7 8-6806 8 ,l comtEt:~10Ns· Decemoer 1979/January 1980 LESBIANS AND THE LEFT In the past decade, the relationship between lesbians and the left has been uneasy. In 1972 when the New Ameri­can Movement, a socialist organization of which I am a member, made gay liberation part of its political princi­ples, many leftists were dismissing gay liberation as merely a personal struggle. Some even called it reaction­ary. At that time, many lesbians who wanted to change the entire society were convinced the left was hopelessly dominated by men who would never even support feminism, let alone lesbianism. The tension also exists for anyone who tries to advo­cate both. When I am talking to someone outside the move­ment, trying to link socialism and lesbianism means com­bining the unpopular with the taboo. Small wonder people feel uneasy in our political statements about joining the two. In 1972, organizers of a Washington anti-war march worried that a group of lesbians would turn people off. By 1977, some participants in a Chicago march against Anita Bryant worried about the presence of a group called "Gay Socialists." Although I expect this tension to continue, there are some encouraging signs. There are fewer parts of the left that don't support gay liberation today. The left has come around, I believe, because lesbians and gay men re­fused to listen to criticisms of the early 7O's al have built a strong and progressive movement. Groups 1· e the New American Movement and individuals who have st ed within the left have also argued for support of gay liberation. And Ms. Bryant herself has probably helped by making the connection between right-wing politics and opposition to gay liberation so explicit. I believe the struggles for lesbian rights and many ~! the insights... o,! ,.iesb.ian feminism should be an impor­tant, integral part of the larger struggle to transform society, of a socialist revolution. I want to outline here why I think it is important, at this point in his­tory, and in this country. I am making a crucial assump­tion: that a revolutionary struggle that ·does not include a commitment to feminism is not worth waging. While all socialist revolutions have had sweeping changes in the status of women as goals, and most have put some of them into practice, none has ever included rights for lesbians. There are reasons why lesbianism (and gay rights generally) has come to the fore in the U.S. at this time, and I believe those very reasons make the struggle for lesbian rigbts a crucial part of a socialist strategy. In the past century, ordinary people have been encour­aged by the media and by the circumstances of their daily lives to find fulfillment through their private, personal lives. (Eli Zaretsky, in Capitalism, the Family, and Personal Life gives an excellent description of how this has happened.) As capitalism in the U.S. has developed and life has become more complex, people experience less and less ability to be creative or effective in the world as a whole. At work, even executives in the corporate world feel as much like cogs in a machine as blue-collar workers (or cogs without a machine, in the case of the unempioyed:) More and more, we are told by T.V., popular songs, and psychotherapists, we can find fulfillment, happiness and ourselves in our personal lives. In the 195O 1 s, the focus of most of this alleged happiness was the family; by the mid-sixties it had switched to sexual relationships, People are bombarded with the message that , . \ by Judy MacLean a satisfying sex life is the key to the good life, and _that it is achievable, for one and all, if only certain products ~~used, or certain the~~ies aEplied, : _ The feminist movement provided the great insight that the personal is political. As Shulamith Fierstone showed iU The Dialectic of Sex, love relationships between men and women repeat the same patterns--patterns perpetuated by the ways men and women are raised and enforced by unequal access to power over our lives. Our misery as women is shared, and it is not our fault as individuals. It is political in that it stems from the power relation­ships that are the basis of how our society is organized. And so the way to change our situation is through poli­tical changes in the society as a whole, not through changes in ourselves. Of course, we will be transformed, too, in the course 'of the struggle, by our very act of trying to change the world. 'From Sidonie G. Colette's Claudine a Nco/e (1905?). So, we find ourselves impaled upon a contradiction. We are supposed to find freedom and happiness in our sexual lives; in fact, our every move has been choreo­graphed long ago. It is inevitable that with all the propaganda about sexual freedom that some women would actually try to seek some. And for some women, this means violating the heterosexual norms. Surely one of the most basic kinds of sexual freedom is the freedom to love another woman, to build this realm of personal happiness with someone who hasn't been programmed to oppress you. A hundred years ago there were probably just as many women with inclinations 'toward lesbianism as there are to- 1ay. But in a society that downplays sexuality, that doesn't preach fulfillment through sexual relationships, many women probably ignored those inclinations. Of course, some never did. But it is the contrast today, between a keyed-up culture, where sexuality is almost always the backdrop and where it is held as a panacea, and the rea­lity of what many of us would do with real sexual free­dom which makes the contradiction acute. continued on page 16 CONNE9TIONS December 1979/January 198~ 9 P-hotonotes 10 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 CONNECTIONS Decemb~r 1979/January 1980 11 GJ>ROSGE Dear Wayde and Jim, I am writing to you in this manner because even though I am not an active participant in any of the gay functions or societies, etc., I am nevertheless gay. I first stumbled onto your information bureau while thumb­ing through the pages of a phone directory. I start~d out this letter with one goal in mind, to mix, to mingle, to meet. Right now, I have no outside contact with the gay community, events, gatherings,whatever. How~ver; I am particularly interested in a sort of Black writers club based in New York City called Jemima since I am a writer by hobby and would enjoy receiving literature by others. This letter will be difficult for me since this is the first time I have attempted anything of this nature, The twenty- four years I have lived on this earth I have lived out my life in celibacy and at other times in sheer hypocrisy, knowing even in my childhood where my sexual preferences were concentrated. I was paralyzed between the two worlds of conformity and plain freedom, ridiculed as I knew it would be. Since, for me , there had remained for years only one person whom I truly cared about who also did not care for me, I saw no reason to make my life even more troubled by announcing to the world my differences. Thus I am a recluse, starved out by loneliness and yet fed up with it. Desperation beckons one to strange acts, wakening me at even stranger hours of the night to pace the floor, to drum my fingers upon the table. In that time, I am allowed other freedoms such as the one that had forced me to at last confront my situation or at least the reasons for my being alone. I knew all those reasons but none had merited investigating until I discovered a truth about myself as I worked on a book entitled, IF YOU TOOK A CHANCE WITH ME, to be hopefully completed by February. I believe that all truths are like that, face­less and retrievable only in times of our greatest needs for them. In relating this discovery to you, I must also tell you about Julie. Now I sometimes wonder why it is the nature of humans to cling so dearly to past pains, whether real or imagined, the years most certainly would have eroded them away. I think we hold on to them so that we can call ourselves the martyrs for ever having suffered them. And then there are the slaves to it that insist on carrying the weights over and over again so that future weights cannot be placed upon them. But quite selfishly, I've always felt that mine was a different case. True, it hurted as all injuries do, but because there were the ever increasing years separating me from the one I loved I held onto this particular pain, the true substance of my life and the most certain way I have of keeping my memories of Julie intact. I am now 24 years old but even while in school I never debated whether what I was feeling for her was real or merely something I had conjured up out of my wildest fantasies though I was aware that there were many other bigheaded people walking around that would have rather crudely explained them away for me. I simply loved her, however simple love may be. I simply cared about her, cried when she cried, laughed when she laughed no matter how bad things were going for me. It seemed as though everything she felt had been instantly transmitted to me, some sort of empathy, telepathy. Who can understand the mechanism of the mind that inspires one to love? I 12 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 can say that she was attractive, impulsive, different, but none of these provides any clues, because there are negative sides to her nature as there are in all of us, the complete individual being the result of such a balance. At this point, I shall abandon my definition of love, knowing that for all of those that have truly loved no further explanation is necessary. And yet there are some people out there who will never comprehend, no matter how many foreign languages, .hand symbols, or cue cards you may use in the vain attempt to convey your message . 11 •• she talked about it with me for awhile, chanting philosophies she probably thought were very wise, but the only statement that stands out in 11\Y meoory is her statement that no woman could do anything for her. 11 My mother is one of those people. Some eight years ago she discovered an anonymous letter I had written to Julie, she talked about it with me for awhile, chanting philosophies she probably thought were very wise, but the only statement that stands out in my memory is her statement that no woman could do anything for her. I remained silent, knowing that the slightest sound would have touched off an already volatile subject. It is taboo for her to discuss anything that acknowledges her or myself as sexual beings, much less homosexual. I sup­pose her doctrine was of a sexual nature but at the age of 15 I knew precious little about sex per se and was much too concerned about the spiritual aspects of my feelings to care less. I was mute and defenseless against her words but my mind cried out, 11I don't love her be­cause I thought that Julie could do something for me! Rather I wanted to be and do everything I could for her." Apparently, my mother thought little of my commitment to this attitude because she expected me to stop "looking" at her and all feelings would simply vanish. Later she had transformed into a different being, no longer my mother but an alien creat'.l.re full of stares and doubt. I cannot speak of the thousands of sensations that raced through my body as I endured the underlying resentment. It was a very difficult period for me. Time passed and when my difference did not resurface, I guess she felt that it was safe for her to be my mother again and we got along fine. My only consolation in those times rested in an un­tarnished faith that someday Julie and I would be toge­ther. I believed this if ever I was to believe in nothing else! My letters to her continued, anonymously, of course . . . I have no remembrance of their contents, though I am quite sure of the topic. So now you may ask, if this woman meant so much to me wasn't she alone worthy of my coming forth to reveal mysel[, To answer this, I must review the relationship we shared. We were buddies, partners in mischief in school . She was always the more daring and I followed her around to keep her out of more t~ouble. With words I could de­tail her every facial, bodily feature but when I say her name , one which I have become addicted to , I can only think of the energy she emits whenever she enters a room. Everyone is af~ected by it. There is an odd chem­istry to this woman. At times she could be wonderfully tender, a sort of childlike innocence envelops her and at other times she is earthy enough to be one of the boys. corrim11ed on ~ Je I~ Immediately I recognized what was happening to me . I began to feel very large, my mind seemed to encompass the universe, my heart pulsated frantically whenever she was somewhere near, and when she would leave the room I could return to normalcy. Again my heart could regulate its pumping, my hands could stop trembling and I wouldn't have to stutter into another explanation for the reasons fo~ my sudden paralysis . I think she sensed my uneasi­ness, in fact enjoyed it because she would ask me wnat was wrong and then touch my face, my neck or my hand with her fingertips . Once she declared rather flippantly that she uas in love with me but by then I had become so starved for words that it no longer mattered how they were delivered. A mixture of embarrassment and excite­ment brushed on my face as I turned to see if other people had heared. But Julie didn't seem to care if other people heard or not. I saw and loved in her as few people have, a fine rebellion against anything that confines her nature to predictability. The second time she uttered the words on another o~casion it was more of a confession. She said the words, I love you, softly and far away as if she read them from a distance. And it is to this day that I have never come closer to believing her than I did then. But I said something real stupid just to race over that moment like: "Don't you have enough love at home?" She collapsed inwardly, mumbling something she didn't know I heard, "That's what you think." This marked the beginning of a turning point for the both of us. There had been a time in our lives when you could not see one without seeing the other , but now we had become so much like strangers that even a glance risked displaying too much familiarity. Several months later, Julie was pregnant. Seeming decades passed before I was able to sift out those obscure ashes of emotions; those that dealt with Julie and those that dealt with this new world I was to face without her. Like most fools who think they can drown a fire with gasoline, I dealt with it by randomly takin~ a heterosexual relationship which seemed to paci­fy a society that would rather have me go through the r.iotions of a meanlngless male-female relationship than demonstrate the true love "or the one I had chosen or any other such absurd sentiments for that matter. I -,tood for this kind of shit for as 4ong as::: could un­til I Cina y shouted to this system of things to ~ust g<t of•' my ass ! And it did. ~ sti' ~ared for Julie and now that she was the on y unobtainable thing in my life I wanted her even more . But that was not possible. Thus I was left in a handicapped state of mind. I am lesbian, alohe, and yet nothing Jess than Julie will do . Chances are I could have found a reasonable degree of happiness with another woman but I would have no part of it . For some reason I fel"t that by daring to love anyone else it would lessen the dimensions of, the depths of what I had felt for Julie . Time progressed and I spotted her in various pla •e.~, d, wntown, concerts, standing in front of her mother ' s touse. Undetected, I hurried away. On my 21st bir 0.hday suddenly began to realize that time was pas­sing me by all the while I waited on it . And so, I was going to step out of this closet and slam the door be­hind me ! But there is the problem of being able to scrutinize it all under the lens to see the mere microscopic good that could come from this. If she accepted me then we would go somewhere to live happily ever after but if she did not, then what was there for me to hope for, to fantasize about . Being told to go away is much harsher than living your •life out never knowing what could have been. I began to realize a couple of things that were not revealed to me at first. One: the very secret of my being able to remain in love with her for so long pro­bably lies in the fact that our relationship had ended before it ever had a chance to get started; that had she been mine to love in the beginning it would have been over between μs by now and I could have gotten on with my life to fiqd som~one else. Secondly, in wanting to giv~ myself rea$ons to abandon this project, I told myself.that the only reason I still pursued her is be­cause l refused to admit that I had only wasted time being shackled and bound hand and foot to this woman. Rather than ending it all here and starting over again elsewhere, I chose to waste it all. I found her in a hospital bed from some minor inju­ries received after being involved in an automobile accident . We strolled over the bygone years and I took pA~t in a campaign to get her away from the cigarette habit. In my absence and in secrecy, flowers were sent to her room and other gifts. While congratulating my­self for being so bold, I was unaware that she was busy piecing together an old mystery, the identity of that person who had written those letters, who had remembered her birthday each year. Then with only half- suspicions, she asked if I was the culprit who was doing these things for her. And without much skill in lying, I said no. Ferhaps she believed me, perhaps not. At any event, I was not spared the silent ridicule in her eyes. The room was filled with her cold uneasiness as she sum­moned her male friend to her side to protect her from this pervert; the same guy she always complained trea­ted her so cruelly. I was crushed. She never felt that way with me before and I was the same person I was years ago when we first met. I think I could have han­dled simple rejection, but the way she looked at me as if I were something grotesque, not human , is more than I can bear. I said at the last reserves of what was left of me, "But I only loved you, ,Tulie," knowing that it was nowhere near all the things I could have said. I knew that her present situation was not working out for her and i~ she only TOOK A CHAN~E WITH ME we cou~d fly . I walked out, leaving ~.y sanity with her. Now some people may think tr.at it is all very noble and yet just plain crazy to love someone this long beyond all that which has happened. Sometimes I must • confess that this seems to be true. My mind comes and goes nowadays . But who can say which is reality and which is schizophrenia or for that matter which is nor­mal and which is abnormal. They are but two sides of the same coin . Constantly I have wrestled with the verdict and I have decided to go on loving her anyway. continued on page 1g CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 13 AI TAILINIA FCR ALL SIGNS: That lightness of the body aspect which carried you the past period now deepens in a somewhat in­trospective tranquility. Climactic factors do not cause this introspection, for those south of the equator who preser,tly are enjoying the near height of summer are also affected . This introspection does not derive from a melan­cholic humour , but from a far more affective region: the region of the mind , the spirit, as it dwells within our inner proto- cosmos. The body as real- being comes as a re­sult of a juncture between Uranus and Virgo. Likewise Venus has moved into sixth house affairs , splaying itself on the same cosmic "line" as Crab Nebulae . The body, therefore , feels heivier, more substantial. Our bond with the plasmic membrane called Earth deepens. Al<~ L'S: J f prime importance for you this month is care a,~ par.:per of your most prized, beloved possession : y lr uy . The stresses engendered by cleavage of L,ma and ~r5 akes body-active joys a necessity. Pay attention to $Upposedly mundane chores . But remember what your body needs . A martial arts regimen, or simply jogging , will 1o the trick. Unusual~y rigorous sexual activities may reqJire a balancing out of bodi~y flows. Get into it . ~...:.:.:_E:;.;.;c: Remember January 12. This day is extremely im­portant, because Uranus moves into the sway of Sagittar­L. 1s. Adopt a reconciliatory attitude toward "the evil nes" and use the energy created by anger to sweep nega­tivities away. A little more attention to rest will bring Joy when sensual possibilities appear before you on the .Lt . Exercise daily this period. Let it al. flow . A ._S: .he 8th looms ahead. It promises what few hclllla.'1s can ee.: an ecstasy of the spirit, transcendent blisss . .he lFaviness of your body as it feels itself a part of a L around it will bring outpourings of joy issuing from tr so.ar plexus . By the 8th, the cycle changes . Luna co.ntera~ting Venus' actions in sixth house affairs will r q~ire a different method of getting it out and in. Lover =-:'-"-'"-"-~-: Time evolves into a more natural state, less ~ir e""r than a:1 affecti.·e discourse between spirit and o ~ r proto- cosmos. Saturn ' s movement into fourth house irs bespeaks a turbulence to be seen in your rela­wi th persons met. ~Jars' I!lOvement into the third q r .:.r. :::a~es a!'! evocati·1e anger necessary . Fighting as r~ wi~l, interestingly enough, bind you to Earth. et .:t e;o. seventh house of marriage may not be open to JO as a result of the Uranus-Virgo juncture. Neverthe­less, they do promise fruitful interaction with others who feel the spirit f~owing . Daily, disciplined exercise wi.l be beneficial. Flexibility and strength are nece­ssary for you the interactive Gemini. The center of be­ing, your being, gives meaning to your strength. Don ' t forget your center. Give it and it will give you. 14 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 by Ray Kernislo ,f'k~' CAPRICORN: A caprice guides your actions this period because of your innate willingness to act with spontane­ous invention. On the 6th, an unlikely acquaintance will speak to you words which will appear as a riddle. It will not occur by accident . It is the Uranus-Virgo cleavage which opens up to you new intimations of meaning . Rooted as you are in Earth , do remember the difference between reality and invention. Much physical exercise will bene­fit you . Make peace with your bed , as it is influenced by Mars . CANCER ; On the 13th a turn- around will occur which will be extreme~y advantageous to your inner spirit . Ma:rs and Libra together inspire in your being a quickening o~ live­liness as a result of the awakening of your real self. Financial affairs may not improve much, and yet the spirit engendered by exercise wi.l suffice for the present . ~he sensual, the purely physiolo•ica , wi.l render introspec­tion into a more pleasurable activity . Move out beyond. SAGITTARIUS: Saturn links up with Crab in fifth house affairs . Therefore plan with expertise any ~orthcoming business ventures. On the 4th, the 9th, and the 16th, are times best for moving on. Re oc·it.ion or re-evaluation o•· old for:ns of living may be most fruitfu if pursued thi~ period and not the next . ,EC : Vir6o moving into second house affairs :::eans more attention to daily patterns. On the 11th and the ~th a person previously unknown will e"lter. pen doors wide. Financial affairs will take an upswin". Friend and 'over relations wi.l improve . Spirit ano flesh are cojoined. ~: Physical being has ar intimate tie with the cos-mic. 1,armic utterances proceed from the pulsations of the body. You may be inclined to forget that as your busy schedu~e on~y increases. llew pursuits in art, _;_r, general culture, are ne~essary--but so is the body . On tre 16th expe~• rommunication from a mysterious one. ~ - ~na inspires c'eavage between independence as idu a.,u intimacy as need. Romantic possi bi 1 ·ties, as a resu.Lt, rL.ay not bE> so war::tly welcomed . :::n any case, tt,c­~ ey tr.is period ~s self-satisfaction and return to your booy. On the 8th and the 13th ~he Joy of bodily returr wi.l triumph over any unneeded introspectory doubts . Your spinal column as it is affected by :una, is the key to your past and future . SCOR PT : The comine; zenith_ of Lunar influences means that the purely sensational', the feelings comprising in­ner being, must at the same time be directed by the body into a more active plunge .into depth . On the 7th an en­counter with another will result in an ecstatic reapprai­sal of what being actually is. Let it explode, but direct it into being. It all will be good. DECEMBER by Dianne Draper December-- The last month of the year the nativity we assign to Christ , A Ho1y Season and a Gift-Giving Spree all rolled up in one Celebration. It ~omes, replete with Santa and Three Wise Men, Their gift-bearing camels vying with a reindeer sleigh full of trains and dolls, Basebal.s :md games, jewelry, and something-- for someone--who--has--everything-­Gi~ ts far more acceptable than gold for a journey, or myrrh-and-frankence~se, incense-instilling perfumes ~or future sanctuary and shroud December-- the last month of the year, and the most frantic, at times-­Gift- bearing replaces Heart-Giving, cedar, pine, and other small green trees replacing that small manger as the focus of our adoration and joy. THOUGHTS by George Stojcevic I love men as I love the sweet strength of spring, the quiet song of the lute , the brash roar of the storm , it is a love that sweeps , runs free, and it is both very right and very natural . .. I reach out to caress his hard , lean body-­stroke the soft shadow of his ~highs- - let my tor.gue explore the sweetness of his coc-k, my fingers at play along every line-­and I am filled with joy , with love ; pulsing through my very core with the power of our sex- ­I am proud of my manhood , our manhood; I walk with head up and laugh those who are afraid to love , to cry, to live and be whatever they will be , I love men and I am a man . .... . and pity POETRY LOVE AND DENIM BLUE by George Stojcevic Eyes that dance, smile, frown, follow me along the hillside path, tracing ~;y every step, my every curve; I glance his way He smiles, hands planted firmly on smooth young hips clad in soft denim blue; Closer I move taking in his hair, dark sand, his chin, naked and clean, his shoulders loose and narrow, He steps forward with sureness, I tremble, he is like a dream, a dream in denim blue; His hand encircles mine , arms lock , lips brush , we press tighter and our tongues search in sweet hunger , We move into the br ush and fall on uncut grass ; denim falls like autumn leaves, flesh meets flesh and my lips move from lips to chest to his cock standing strong , We merge , we mate , and we lay spent , arms entwined , his hair loose on denim blue . ... .... ... . IMMOIITAL PERFOIIMANCES ... •Lo~~!~~l~~!~nd~!~~~~,nTox'fi, CA&Alu CAUAS 00MIHGO RAOSTAO M(lCNCJlt , Av4110m l'ONSRLE Sol.LS £TC • lorpst 1todi. ol HIS TORK: OltOif.SnM, AHO INSTIWMENTAt LP, "' Texos CANmu co,uu COlttOt FfU(~ FUl:TWAMGLa G000ws«Y Ml$$ HOffMAN MOIOWITZ ICllllSUlt I.AHOOWSll:A ~ ~ t~ WEWGNT.,._ llC. •Lorge 1.a.ct10t1ofGOOO USEOLP1-•1M •r eoct, • Auction 110 1 of odg,nol 78 rpm rec:Ofd.. • W• buy coll.ction1 of good c loukol rec:Ol'cfs - LP, ond 711. 1117fllllfflt ll'llff(l Woda .............. ½ ................... P.o .eoxn .. AUl,., llXAS 71111 G9-WN CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 LESBIANS AND THE LEFT by Judy MacLean Yet the reason marriages (and heterosexual relation­ships generally) continue to be troubled is not just that one half has been trained to oppress the other. Our most intimate relationships are forced to carry so many bur­dens-- economic and emotional security in an increasingly hostile environment, adventure, fun, a place of rest and fulfilm.ent, personal growth-- no wonder the fragile craft of life founders and sinks. Because we have no other way t0 ... u_fi__ these needs, we try to fulfil- them in our "Wnen I ar:; :alxing to someone O1..tside the movement, try·r)f" to _lr.k socialism a~d lesbia~ism means comb :..n.i...11€'. the ill1popular with the taboo." persona: lives. But we never quite make it; under capital­ism our intimate lives are like a bed without enough covers; an arm, a leg, or even a whole person is always out in the cold. And this can be as true for lesbian relationships as heterosexual ones. The difficulty in creating good personal relationships is a social one. It comes about because our need for a loving co=unity--a ~ommunity that works together to pro­vide basic things like food, shelter, safety, health care, security in old age, and less tangibly, good vibes and support around us all--is systematically denied. You can glimpse a shadow of what the fulfillment of this need would feel like . At demonstrations, when thou­sands come together with shared goals and commitment, the exhilaration we feel is a ghost of the feeling we would get if our society, with its its millions of people and vast wealth, were organized around the goal of caring for each other. In crises, like power failures, people often report feelings of happiness and exhilaration in spite of the inconvenience . People see the interrelated­ness of their lives and pull together. It is the belief in something like community love that has inspired revolutionaries the world over to brave all kinds of hardships, and even death. Building a "women's community" or a "lesbian communi­ty" is an attempt to come to terms with these needs, and to provide a support system around personal love relation­ships. But such a community, outside the society, doesn ' t have the material resources to really meet its members' needs, and much bitterness results . To really create a loving community of the kind I am talking about requires political power. We can only create it by transforming the whole society; such a transformation is what a strug­gle for socialism must be about. When a socialist move­ment becomes stronger in the U.S . , it will involve our co~ir.g to terms with our long- suppressed need for loving social relationships . I don't mean to dismiss attempts to bui:d a lesbian community. They are not substitutes for struggling to change society as a whole . But such atte~pts at co=unity can be very nourishing, supportive places, where many of us gain strength to keep doing what we'i;e~doing. I want to conclude by talking about the importance of winning reforms for lesbian rights for lesbians , for all women, and for the revolutionary movement . -- 16 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 198o continued from page 9 First , gay rights is a matter of human rights, of basic freedom . The fear of discovery most lesbians live with, the lack of rights to jobs, to custody of children to any kind of legitimacy , can corrode our lives . For lesbians and gay men, civil rights are urgently neces­sary. Reprinted Winning rights for lesbians can also help all women . Being a lesbian is tied up in complex ways with personal autonomy for women, with making choices instead of being chosen, with living a life, however precarious, indepen­dent of men in one fundamental, intimate way . By return­ing control of a very intimate aspect of our lives to women, the struggle for lesbian rights can make us stronger. Any reform that gives us more control can strengthen us, but especially one in a personal area about which .we all, at one time or another, feel anxiety A reform like lesbian rights, which gives us a ~easure of control over an area of personal, painful, and often unacknowledged oppression, can give us strength to meet other challenges. Those whose daily experience tells them they have no control do not set out to change the world. Much as male leftists have accused us of conser­vatism , I'm not sure they are happy about the prospect of women within their ranks (and outside of them) becom­ing sure of what they want, becoming uppity. But it is necessary, if we want a socialist revolution that really reorganizes society to meet human needs, that one half of humanity feels strong and vocal enough to define goals. It ' s the only way for a socialist revolution to really make the meaningful changes we all need I -- 1-rs vp TG us w HO REAU..'( VNDE.RSiAND RELIGION to Se.e. h;, I+­P1. Jt-J1 HI r; ~--• ~EV HAIR.oil 0 \CHESTNUT That which the dream shows is the sha­dow of such wisdom as exists in man, even if during his waking state he may know nothing about it .... We do not know it because we are fooling away our time with outward and perishing things, and are asleep with regard to that which is real within ourselves. ---Paracelus What is a dream? Some seem totally trivial, like the idle meanderings of a brain off-duty, and it is not surprising that skeptics say they are best forgotten. But others cannot be so easily dismissed. Usually dreams seem in some way to reflect things which have preoccupied our minds during the previous day or two. Or they may be fantasies, secret desires, or un­spoken passions. Or they may be somewhat of hogwash. Even so, all dreams, no matter how way-out and bizarre they seem to be, either have something to say--a message, an omen--, or they may help you through some difficulty. Some people think they are going through a rough time because of nightmares, when in reality the dreams are trying to help you through a rough time in your daily life. Have y~u ever thought of keeping a dream diary? It could be fun and it could also help you through your trials and tribulations. I will explain in our next issue how to decode your dreams and use them to solve problems. Right now, I'm going to give you a fP.w tips on how to keep a 1ream diary: 1) Pick up a spiral notebook at your local grocery store and a pen or pencil (a must!) 0 co °-i' H <IJ .a s <IJ (.) <IJ 0 Cl) z 0 H E-< 0 (ii :z :z 0 0 17 11•1 1 ·~ '• ...... \ .... I ·.( . .., \ N' 01-\ . AUNT ESMERALDA"S DREAM INTERPRETATION BY MARC 2) Always keep it by your bed when you do go to sleep (some of us don't go to sleep even if we go to bed early). This is valuable in case you wake up and want to write a dream down because some of us have a hard time remembering dreams. You might want to use a recorder. 3) Always date your page or tape in advance. 4) Encourage your dreams by means of suggestion of prayer. 5) Beware of procrastination. 6) Never dismiss a dream if it seems too trivial to record. 7) Describe your dream as fully as possible. In preparing your diary, use the first page as a title page with your name and date. On the second page, write a brief summary of yourself, so if you wish any­one to read it, he can understand why you dream this or that. Starting in the February issue I will be interpre­ting dreams. If you wish to have me interpret a dream for you, just send it, or bring it into the Gay Com­munity Services office. Leave your name and number or address so I can answer those which don't get printed. Um-m-ni-m, Ch icken ! ~ 00 IGNA --- ADVERTISERS Tell them you saw it in Connections. Austin Country . . . 705 Red River . . 478- 6806 444-6954 478-7220 478-9954 Bo's Fun Shop ... 2100 East Riverside ... Executive Health Club . 7th & Congress . Inmortal Performances .. 3007 Fruth . . Metropolitan Comrrunity Church of Austin . . .. 614 East 6th 477-7747 478-0224 478-2491 478-5598 474-7003 New Apartrrent Lounge . . 2828 Rio Grande . . Old Pecan Street Cafe 310 East 6th ... . St. Charles . . . . . 316 East 6th .. . . Tex's Colorado Street Bar .. 404 Colorado .. :onnections Calendar Dec. 21, 1979- Feb. 2, 1980 DECEMBER 1979 Fri. Jee. 21 Gay Community Services office closes for the Christmas holidays . Will reopen Wed., Jan. 2, 1980, at 6pm. Sat. Dec. 22 7:30pm, Christmas Party, Metropolitan Community Church of Austin, 614 E. 6th 8pm, Hoe-down and vegetarian pot-luck supper sponsored by Austin Lambda at the Zilk~r Clubhouse. $2 cost-donation. Bring a non-meat dish. Plates/utensils provided. 10pm, ( No VD Screening tonight) Sun. Dec. 23 8pm, Dignity liturgy, St. Edwards Oblate Community Ha~l, Pete C., celebrant Mon. Dec. 24 11pm, Candlelight Christmas Eve Service, Metropolitan Community Church of Austin (MCCA) Sat. Jee. 29 lOpm-:2 midnight, Free VD Screening by Gay Nurses Alliance and Austin-Travis County Health Department at the Austin Country, 705 Red River uw .. Jee. 30 8pm, Dignity liturgy, location uncertain, Laurie R., celebrant Mon. Dec. 31 11pm, Candlelight New Years Eve Service, MCCA JANUARY 1980 *Actditiona: Austin ~a..T.bda activities for lesbians for January unavai~able at Connections press-time. Call Lambda at 478-8653 for a complete calendar. **Also, additional activities will be scheduled at MCCA during January. Call 477-7747 for more information Wed. Jan. 2 6pm, GCS office reopens for the new year 7-8:30pm, Austin Lambda Gay Men's Event­Planning Committee. Open to all gay men. Thu. Jan. 3 Austin Lambda sign language class (in progress) Austin Lambda office, 1304 W. Lynn Sun. Jan. 6 lOam- noon, Austin Lambda Steering Commit­tee , 1304 West Lynn 8pm, Dignity liturgy, 1706 Rabb Rd., Austin, Pete C. , celebrant ~on. Jan. 7 8-10 pm, Austin Lambda Gay Men's Awareness workshop. Open. ($1 non-sponsors) . (Jan. subject: Relationships) lOpm- 12 midnight, Free VD Screening by Gay Nurses Alliance and Austin-Travis County Health Dept. at the New Apartment Lounge, 2828 Rio Grande Tues. Jan. 8 7- 8:30pm, Austin Lar.ibda Concerts and Wed. Jan. 9 Social Events Committee. Open. 7-8:30pm, Austin Lambda Lesbian Event- Planning Committee. Open to all lesbians . Thu. Jan . 10 Austin Lambda Sign Language Class 18 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 Fri. Jan. 11 7:30-9pm, Austin Lambda open house--for persons wishing to drop in--refreshments 8pm, GCS Rap Group, University Y Auditor­ium, 2330 Guadalupe Sat. Jan. 12 lOpm-12 midnight, Free VD Screening by GNA and A-TCHD at the Private Cellar, 709 East 6th Sun. Jan. 13 7:30-9:30pm, Austin Lambda General Meeting for all sponsors and interested friends on the subject of MOVING TO A ~ARGER FACILITY BY APRIL 1. 8pm, Dignity liturgy, 737 E. Oltorf, Laurie R., celebrant Mon. Jan. 14 8-lOpm, Austin Lambda Gay Men's Awareness Workshop. Open. ($1 non-sponsors) Tue. Jan. 15 8pm, SLIDE PRESENTATION OF NATIONAT MARCH ON WASHINGTON FOR LESBIAN AND GAY RIGHTS. Set tentatively at Gaslight Theater, ~14 West 4th St. (See article, page 8 ) Wed. Jan. 16 8pm, GCS GENERAL BUSINESS MEETING, ;;.;s office. Plans for formalizing membership in GCS wil: be discussed and we hope to elect a Membership Secretary. 7-8:30pm, Austin Lambda Gay Men's Event­Planning Committee. Open. Thu. Jan . 17 Last Austin Lambda Sign Language Class in series Fri. Jan. 18 Sat. Jan. 19 8pm, GCS Rap Group, University Y Aud. 4pm, Austi~ Lambda Gay Men's Mini­Retreat: at ranch house near Austin; pot-luck supper, viewing of Word is Out; followed by dance. Call Austin Lambda for more info. 7:30pm, Pot Luck Supper, Metropolitan Community Church of Austin, 614 E. 6th lOpm-12 midnight, Free VD Screening by Gay Nurses Alliance and Austin-Travis County Health Department at Mr. Peepers Bookstore, 213 East 6th Sun . Jan. 20 lOam-12 noon, Austin Lambda Steering Com­mittee, 1304 West Lynn 8pm, Dignity liturgy, 7904 Peaceful Hill Lane, Austin Mon. Jan. 21 8- lOpm, Austin L81!1bda Gay Men's Awareness Workshop Tue. Jan. 22 8pm, Austin Lesbian Gay Political Caucus meets at Austin Lambda , 1304 West Lynn Wed. Jan. 23 7- 8:30pm, Austin Lambda Lesbian Event- Planning Committee Thu. Jan. 24 Therapy Group (Austin Lambda) for Gay Men. For information call 478-8653 Fri. Jan. 25 Deadline for application for Austin Lambda male coordinator Sat. Jan. 26 lOpm- 12 midnight, Free VD Screening by FAMOUS NOVELIST GAY by Johannes Werres (IGNA) Thomas Mann, the most famous German author of the twentieth century, a Nobel Prize winner, is shown to have been homosexual according to his "Day Books" (1918- 1921) , published in Germany in 1979. Mann's predilection was for youths, thus providing some clarification of the autobiographical nature of Death in Venice, one of his best-known books. However, apparently the author never engaged in real homosexual activities, remaining homoerotical instead. The "Day Books" also indicate that Mann fell in love with his son, Klaus Mann, who was also tiomosexual. C A L E N D A GNA and A-TCHD at Club Austin baths, 308 West 16th R Sun. Jan . 27 Interviews for new Austin Lambda male coordinator 7-9pm, "GAY RIGHTS AS A CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUE," 1980 Lay Academy, Univer­sity United Methodist Church, 2409 Guada­lupe, Austin . No cost. Pre-registration requested by Wed . , Jan . 9. Rev. Gary Reutninger, coordinator. (Other issues to be considered Jan. 13- Feb. 3 include desegregation, women in crisis, and rights of the elderley. ) 8pm, Dignity liturgy, 1908 Willow Creek #101, Austin Mon. Jan . 28 8-lOpm, Austin Lambda Gay Men's Aware­ness Workshop Wed. Jan. 30 7-8:30pm, Austin Lambda Gay Men ' s Event­Planning Committee Thu. Jan. 31 Austin Lambda therapy group for gay men. Call 478-8653 for information. Sat . Feb. 2 lOpm-12 midnight, Free VD Screening by Gay Nurses Alliance and Austin-Travis County Health Dept. at the Stallion Book- , store, 706 East 6th WEEKLY EVENTS I Sunday f. , "'Ihe room was filled with her cold uneasiness as she sumrroned her male friend to her side to protect her fran this pervert; the saire guy she always complained treated her so cruelly." cil:l I really have a choice? Do any of us? It is the very nature of love to last forever, unrequited or otherwise. Because of this discovery, I am complete, yes, immortal. Someday this typewriter will cease to function. In time, the paper I have written on will crumble to dust. Only a century or more will completely eradicate the present generations that exist on this earth today. Like any­thing that is fragile and requires nourishment, reader and author both will cease to exist. Only one thing is withstanding through life's heartaches and persecutions. And that is love. Had I TAKEN THE CHANCE with Julie ' when she first made her daring advances which in my youth I was not able to decode, I would have never known the things that I know now. --- -------------- EXECUTIVE HEALTH CLUB - S .F. fhas-l\o \-\ot..e.\- ~o.~e.~~nt. '-i1S-1~~o O?EN ~L\ \-\o~R~ 9 : 45am, Affirmation Sunday school class for coo"Z.E AlLowEl> IN THE CLtJ B - adult United Methodist lesbians and gay men, Room 320, University United Methodist Church, 2409 Guadalupe, Austin. Call 474-1660 for more information. - Ne 1>rucis oR \ \Je·re. \-\ere. \o S1Q~ ! Monday Tuesday Wednesday Friday 12 noon and 7:30pm, worship services at Metropolitan Community Church of Austin 61~ Eas~ 6th ' 1pm, Holy Trinity Church of Austin liturgical service, 1606 S. Congress 8pm, Dignity liturgy. (gay Catholics) See Calendar above fo1· weekly location. 8pm, Lambda Alcoholics Anonymous, All Saints Episcopal Church, 209 West 27th 7:30pn, Bible Study, MCCA 9pm, ~ap Group on various topics, MCCA 7 :30pm, Prayer and Communion Service, MCCA 8pm, CCAA bowling, Brunswick Capitol Bowling Center, 5700 Grover . 60¢ shoes, 90¢ a game. 8pm, Lambda Alcoho.ics Anonymous , 1614 East 6th 8pm (during university semesters) Gay Com­munity Services rap group, University Y Aud­itorium, 2330 Guadalupe, upstairs. 1.,__ _____________________ :a,aa;::1!.J 310 Eas.L6th. Delightful French cuisine libations & atmosphere CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 19~0 19 CONNECTIONS reaches a special audi&ncc which other au tin paers can't reach . Use your paper ard it's ad section. We will give your classified ad a no . so yoJ can remain anonymous. All ads must be sub ­mitted by the deadline . Call GCS for that date . c·ty,state,zip c~assified Ads are $1 .00 for the first ten words and 5¢ for each word over ten . Please send in your ad and money before the dead:ine.Ma~l to GCS and CONNECTIONS at 2330 Guadalupe Austin,Tx . 78705 or drop them by the GCS office bet\een 6 :00 and 10:00 p.m . daily . SUBSCRIBE TO CONNECTIONS If "\O" c::\C'e.n·+ A -Fre.i~e.nt ~~('Ov ()~ ¼e. \>vSI(\(~~· ~o..+ ~,~-\n~e. to\\nt:.C.TION~ \\O\.l C.f\n rtc.,tue ~e. \>0-,~e., <Y\6~l"'\ -ti> r t>oe. "\e,o..<" ~ c- tM\ \ "\ J! q. 0 0 c".'o~r".n "ttci)T ,onS c13io G ""G.dQ\uPE, f\\J $,-,f\-;T>t '1870S A/FfMf ADorcss C. IT'I ST~Tf. -zt, 20 CONNECTIONS December 1979/January 1980 CLASSIFIED AD SECTION looking for a ROOMATE aged 18- 25. Write me a letter and tell me a little bit about yourself . Please give your phone number and send a picture if possible. I will acknowledge all letters by calling you on the phone . (Box 269). GAY CARPOOLER WANTED. Alternate days driving or paying for gas . 8- 5 shift . From 183 and Lamar to East 7th or downtown . Reliable only. 837- 4425 . HOLY TRINITY CHURCH OF AUSTIN. Liturgical service Sunday 1 pm. David Charles, worship leader . 1606 S. Congress, 447- 7359 ROOMATE WANTED for 2-bedroom, 2-bath apartment . $137 . 50 plus½ electric . Graduate student would prefer nonsmoking , masculine , good- looking grad student , early 20 ' s to early 30 ' s . No fems , fats , or weirdos . Into music , jogging , and tennis . If interested , call 385- 2186 after 6:00 pm. ROOMATE WANTED for 2-bedroo~ house in North Austin . $120 plus½ bills . Furnished. Washer­dryer , plus babygran~ piano. Large yard for pets. Smoking toba~co or other herbs allowed. I am 25 , someone within 5 years of that age preferred. One-half block from city bus. Call Scott at (work) 453-9406 until 3, (home) 451- 0770 after 9. PIANOS TUNED IN THE AUSTIN AREA. Call Jayson Carver at 443- 4100 . Do you have a BLIND frien1? Could he/she use our servi ces? PRINT TO BRAILLE COMMUNICATIONS. 1900 Burton Dr . #115 , "Austin , Tx. 78741. 443- 4100 Affirmati on Class offers fellowship for United Methodist lesbians and gay men. 9:45 am Sundays , Room 320 , University UMC , Austin . Call 474- 1660 for information . BO'S FUN SHOP Hours M·F 10·9, Sat. 10·10 2100 E. Riverside Or. 444-6954 1,001 LAST MINUTE GAG GIFTS FOR THAT SPECIAL ONE YOU WOULD LIKE TO TRICK! Stop by and See our New Year's Eve Party supplies!
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