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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 1, January 1981
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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 1, January 1981 - File 006. 1981-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1504/show/1492.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-01). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 1, January 1981 - File 006. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1504/show/1492

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 1, January 1981 - File 006, 1981-01, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1504/show/1492.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 1, January 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date January 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript 'CONNECTIONS' GAYS WHO VOTED FOR REAGAN Washington, DC - In spite of a Carter blitz in most gay publications across the country, many gays still voted for Reagan. Why? "They put their pocketbooks ahead of human rights," an observer noted. "Gays are no different from anyone else. They were as tired of the mess Carter had made in Washington and as tired of inflation as their straight brothers and sisters." There were a few gay groups for Reagan, but most were poorly organized. Most gays who voted for Reagan were not open. "We did it secretly," a Republican voter told TWT News. "We were afraid to tell other gays we weren't voting for Carter because they would want to argue with us and tell us we were anti-gay. "So, like many other voters in America, we simply said we hadn't made up our mind. But, when we got into the privacy of the voting booth, we pulled the lever for Reagan." All of these last-minute votes for Reagan are not all that surprising. Pollsters had said all along that Reagan's supporters were not extroverts. Reagan has always had a lot of "quiet supporters," even when he ran for Governor of California. At the moment of decision, election day, Reagan's magnetism, again, quietly drew another victory. - This Week in Texas IMMIGRATION LAW RULED UNENFORCEABLE San Francisco - Immigration Judge Bernard Horn- back has ruled that even an unsolicited, unambiguous,' self-acknowledgement of homosexuality is insufficient evidence for exlusion of a gay alien. Ruling on the admission of Carl Hill, a British subject visiting the U.S. for a two-month vacation, Judge Hornback held that a Class A Medical Certificate is required for exlusion of homosexuals under the 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act. This ruling, if upheld on appeal, eliminates the remaining area of contention in the long fight waged by the National Gay Task Force and Gay Rights Advocates to change anti-gay federal immigration policy. In August, 1979, U.S. Surgeon General Julius Richmond held that there was no medical or scientific basis for a diagnosis of homosexuality, and ordered Public Health Service physicians to decline referrals made by the Immigration and Naturalization Service for such determination. "We are pleased and gratified by this decision which we fully expected," commented Gay Rights Advocates Legal Director Donald C. Knutson. "Especially encouraging was the sensitive and compassionate language used by the court in its description of this dehumanizing law." In his opinion read from the bench, Judge Hornback severely criticized the Congress for attempting to hide violations of human rights behind the cloak of medical science. NGTF Co-Directors Charles Brydon and Lucia Valeska, who were present for this precedent-setting hearing, expressed their appreciation for the judge's position as well. "This victory is crucial, particularly at this time when many lesbians and gay men are concerned about the future of our movement during the next four years," they stated. "With Gay Rights Advocates, we will pursue the immigration issue through the appeals process and continue to press forward on other fronts as well," said Larry Bagneris of the NGTF Executive Committee. "The fundamental questions of civil rights and the right to privacy for gay people are unchanged, and we expect to build on this and other victories in the months and years ahead." MATLOVICH SETTLEMENT REACHED Washington, DC - Ex-Sergeant Leonard Matlovich, 37, a decorated Vietnam veteran discharged from the U.S. Air Force in 1975 for admitting his homosexuality, has finally settled his court battle with the government. The government agreed to end the five-year battle by paying $160,000 to Matlovich, who in return agreed not to seek further damages or to re-enlist in the service. In pressing his test case for gay rights, Matlovich had previously said he would try to rejoin the /Air Force to serve as an example to other homosexuals serving in the military. Justice Department lawyers planned to file the negotiated settlement in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Patricia Douglass, Matlovich's Washington lawyer, said "I think it's a satisfactory settlement for Mr. Matlovich's part." The settlement was prompted after U.S. District Judge Gerhard Gesell ruled in Matlovich's favor in his civil rights suit in September, 1980. Gesell ordered Matlovich reinstated, declaring that "without clear, reasonable regulations" the Air Force could not discharge Matlovich. The standards say homosexuals will be discharged except in "unusual circumstances," but the appeals court said the standard "never defines those circumstances." - This Week in Texas FORMER OFFICER CHARGED IN GREENWICH VILLAGE MURDERS New York - On November 19, 1980, a man started shooting at the doorways on a Greenwich Village street lined with gay bars. Many pedestrians and patrons were seriously injured. Two were killed. Charged is Ronald Crumpley, age 38. When arrested, he told officers he did it because "Homosexuals ruin everything." Crumpley, a minister's son, is a former Transit policeman. He faces a minimum of 15 years to life in prison if convicted on the most serious charge, second-degree murder. A hearing was set for December 19. He was to undergo psychiatric testing. In a report from the Cable News Network monitored by TWT News, it was revealed that Crumpley had paid a male prostitute for his services several years ago. The hustler appeared in a private interview on cnn and told of his clandestine sexual encounter with the now-accused murderer of two gay men. - This Week in Texas Make money from Connections 35% commission for ad sales Call Jim Olinger—474-1660 fordetails
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