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The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984
File 009
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The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 009. 1984-03-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1471.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1984-03-02). The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 009. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1471

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 009, 1984-03-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1471.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984
Contributor
  • Hyde, Robert
Date March 2, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 The Star / March 2,1984 NGRA Enters Case on Behalf of Gay Judge National Gay Rights Advocates has filed a brief in the Minnesota Supreme Court urging that a judge not be dismissed simply because he is gay. The case involves Crane Winton, a District Court Judge in Hennepin County, Minnesota. The Board of Judicial Standards, in recommending Winton's removal, concluded that, "A homosexual may be a judge only if he or she is celibate." Leonard Graff, NGRA legal director, said Judge Winton was being subjected to an unfair double standard. "In Minnesota," Graff said, "the same sexual activity is illegal for gays and straights. Yet, straight judges have not been asked to vow not to engage in that type of sex." NGRA Executive Director Jean O'Leary said: "It seems fairly obvious that Judge Winton is being treated differently simply because he is gay. These outdated sex laws were never intended to be used as a measure of one's ability to serve the public." Judge Winton has been on the bench for 21 years. Casual Sex Taking a Dive Psychiatrists, public health workers and law enforcement officials say that statistics show promiscuity may no longer be the fashion for straights or gays in America. The reasons go beyond fear of AIDS or herpes, they say, and include a counter- sexual revolution to the 60's and 70's behavior patterns. It's a wind of conservatism, said Dr. June M. Reinisch, director of the Kinsey Institute for Reserach in Sex in Blooming- ton, Ind., who attributes part of the change to the declining economy. "Hard times tend to bring people back to their puritanic roots, and they become more moralistic about disease," she said. Although her theory is not widely endorsed, the trend shows people have a reduced number of partners, even persons who consider themselves sexually liberated. The shift is particularly discernable in homosexual lifestyles. Public health officials in New York, Denver and Los Angeles report that fear of AIDS has led to a marked drop in other veneral diseases among gays. A Madison, Wisconsin, veneral disease clinic reported that in homosexual men surveyed in 1982, each had an average of 6.8 sexual partners in the previous 30 days. In 1983, that number plunged to 3.2, and 7.4 percent of the men had been abstinent for the previous days, while none were abstinent in 1982. National Gay Group Investigates Military Discrimination Costs National Gay Rights Advocates has called for an investigation of what it costs the government to exclude homosexuals from the military, because the armed forces discharges about 1,800 lesbians and gay men annually, based solely on their sexual orientation. "Simple arithmetic shows that millions of dollars are being spent each year to bar gays from serving their country," said Jean O'Leary, NGRA executive director. "We've submitted a number of questions for a Government Accounting Office audit which will reveal just how much the public has to pay for this discrimination." NGRA has a suit pending against the Navy, challenging the constitutionality of its exhisionary regulations. 1 rank ?ia»w,i All \iu<ri«.-Mii Hoy* New books from ALYSON PUBLICATIONS □ THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Friedel, $7.00. The entertaining coming-out story of Burton Raider, who is so elegant that as a child he reads Vogue in his playpen. "The writing is fresh and crisp, the humor often hilarious," writes the L.A. Times. "The funniest gay novel of the year," says Christopher Street. a ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. One teenager in ten is gay; here, twenty-six young people tell their stories: of coming to terms with being different, of the decision how — and whether — to tell friends and parents, and what the consequences were. □ THE BUTTERSCOTCH PRINCE, by Richard Hall, $5.00. When Cor- dell's best friend and ex-lover is murdered, the only clue is one that the police seem to consider too kinky to follow up on. So Cordell decides to track down the killer himself — with results far different from what he had expected. D ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. "I've known that I was gay since I was thirteen. Does that surprise you? It didn't me. ..." So begins All-American Boys, the story of a teenage love affair that should have been simple — but wasn't. □ CHINA HOUSE, by Vincent Lardo, $5.00. A gay gothic that has everything: two handsome lovers, a mysterious house on the hill, sounds in the night, and a father-son relationship that's closer than most. □ THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDITION, by Patricia Sitkin, $6.00. When Evan Talbot leaves on a mission to rescue an old schoolmate who has been imprisoned by fanatics in the Middle East, he doesn't realize that the trip will also involve his own coming out and the discovery of who it is that he really loves. D DEATH TRICK, by Richard Stevenson, $6.00. Meet Don Strachey, a private eye in the classic tradition but with one difference: he's gay. TO ORDER Enclosed is $ ; please send the books I've checked above. (Add $1.00 postage when ordering just one book; if you order more than one, we'll pay postage.) □ Charge my (circle one}: Visa Mastercard expiration date:„ name _ address city ALYSON PUBLICATIONS, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St, Boston, MA 02118 Americans Unsupportive of Civil Liberties International Gay News Agency Apparently a majority of the American public does not believe in the basic tenets of the Constitution, to judge from the results of a recent study of attitudes toward established civil rights, such as free speech, right to assemble and due process. The study, Dimensions of Tolerance, done by scholars Herbert Mcclosky and Alida Brill, found that fewer than four of every 10 Americans in the general public consistently support the full range of established civil liberties. Between 1976 and 1979, the authors sampled opinion from a wide range ofthe general public and among select groups such as community leaders, government officials, lawyers, judges, educators and police. When groups lacking widespread popular support, such as gays, seek to exercise their civil rights, the amount of tolerance is startlingly low. "Civil liberties tend to be supported more in principle than in actual conduct," says the authors. "And attitudes vary considerably according to the particular liberty at issue." Most respondents believed, for example, that homosexual relations in private between consenting adults should be left to the individual,.but nearly 60 percent would deny gay leberation groups the use of a community auditorium to promote homosexual rights. But tolerance is much more firmly established among opinion leaders, who play a significant role in shaping decisions that affect civil liberties, and amoung younger citizens who are significantly and consistently more tolerant than older generations. Even such leaders, however, are inconsistent in areas of emerging liberties, that is, liberties that have not yet been fully articulated or endorsed by public figures and the courts, even when such liberties may be logical outgrowths of established freedoms. Homosexuality Becoming More Acceptable with Non-gays A recent metropolitan newspaper poll showed that just under half the persons questioned in a nationwide survey said a candidate's homosexuality would not influence their decision to vote for the person, and some 52 percent supported gay anti-discrimination laws. However, by a 2-1 margin, the same people said they were "unsympathic" to the homosexual community. The findings were published in the Los Angeles Times recently. Of the 1,653 persons telephoned for the survey, 44 percent said they knew someone who was a homosexual. Some 47 percent said whether or not a local candidate was gay would not influence how they voted. A separate poll of Californians revealed that the state is more hospitable to homosexuals overall, and 58 percent said they did not oppose the gay lifestyle. However, the national survey showed that 52 percent opposed the gay lifestyle, and only 44 percent did not. The East was the only region where more than half approved of homosexuality. The poll indicated a strong resentment of the political activism of gays, and strongest anti-gay feelings were evident in the South and West. Women were more positive about gays, and Roman Catholics were more tolerate of homosexuals than Protestants. The poll was conducted in September.
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