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The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984
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The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 005. 1984-03-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1467.

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(1984-03-02). The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 005. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1467

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 005, 1984-03-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1467.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984
Contributor
  • Hyde, Robert
Date March 2, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript 4 The Star / march 2,1984 Year will Test Gay Community and Clout Like None Before from page 1 sachusetts after his disclosure that he is gay. In Iowa, the likelihood that Richard Eychner will seek the Republican nomination for Congress as an openly gay man may also become a major news story. Otherwise, by early 1984, there did not appear to be House elections of major significance; they certainly will change. Among the U.S. Senate, Republicans face more re-election battles than Democrats, and the most attention is focused on Sen. Roger Jepsen (R-Iowa), past chief sponsor of the Family Protection Act, and Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C), arch- conservative. Both were first rated underdogs, both are climbing in the polls, and both elections will energize gay interest and activity locally and nationally. In the Movement. The top story of the year may be the emergence of a noticable gay Republican effort. Reagan-Bush campaign officials have asked for gay participation in Washington, D.C. California Republicans, such as former Los Angeles Police Chief Ed Davis, are making a sincere effort to open discussions with gay activists and gay Republicans, the Houston Gay Political Caucus may well stop short of a presidential endorsement this year in deference to its Republican members (who likely will be an active caucus on their own in Texas Republican circles), and individual gay Republicans in Pennsylvania and New York are becoming bolder about publicly raising gay issues within the Republican Party. An extra incentive in one area will be the re-election campaign of Rep. Bill Green (R-N.Y.), the Manhattan gay rights bill co-sponsor who serves on the appropriations committee where he has pushed AIDS funding, and who will face a strong Democratic challenge from a gay rights supporter. Green plans to be at the Republican National Convention in Dallas raising issues such as the ERA, and gay Republicans at the convention surely will '... There may well be a shift of gay voters to Reagan' seek him out as an ally. In 1980, Green's district gave Reagan the lowest vote of any district which elected a Republican to Congress, and it's clear Reagan's feelings won't affect Green's chances—unless Reagan makes some gestures toward gays which help Green. Among gay Democrats, expect the effort to be primarily local, with little sense that there is one national voice for gay Democrats. While gay Democrats nationally formed a National Association of Lesbian and Gay Democratic Clubs, only about a dozen of the 100 or so eligible clubs have joined, and its Board of Directors has done little to meet its fundraising commitment. Director Tom Chorlton is credited with gays in some states, such as North Carolina, with being a prime mover in helping get them organized, and while he is talking with most of the national campaigns, there are too many powerful gay Democrats who want to keep their own hand in to allow any one person to be Mr. Gay Democrat. Look for a mostly tape-and- paste work here, with an effective national alliance still some distance away. A major ingredient still lacking, for example, is an accurate and timely ability to simply document the participation of gay Democrats at the local level, where successes are often remarkable. In 1982, when the group was just being launched, that was perhaps too much to expect, but by 1984. with a presidential election, it would seem valuable to have handy information on each club, its past record at raising contributions and putting campaign workers out, and the precincts it has identified. Among national gay civil rights groups, the National Gay Task Force has regained the drive and innovative approach to problem-solving that put it in the spotlight under the direction of Bruce Voeller, later joined by Jean O'Leary. New director Virginia Apuzzo is now 18 months on the job, and has solidified such programs as the Violence Reporting Project, which uses local groups to collect data on antigay incidents that had previously been merely anecdotal; inaugurated an AIDS hotline and trained federal employees on how to handle calls on their AIDS hotline; reestablished contacts with Washington and put in place Jeff Levi, an effective Washington representative able to deal with the Reagan Administration; and announced a job opening for a media director, the first since the days of Voeller and O'Leary, when Ginny Vida did an outstanding job and Ron Gold provided outstanding analysis of media opportunities. The Task Force in the coming year can be expected to keep a focus on the national political arena, including lobbying such groups as the U.S. Conference of Mayors (which may vote to endorse a gay rights resolution at its June meeting). The Task Force also is expected to take an active role lobbying congressional committees which provide oversight on the Administration programs where NGTF is lobbying; AIDS is doubtlessly the most important example. The Gay Rights National Lobby still has a staff working in Washington, and a major resource is its field coordinators who are committed to opening doors in Congress through their local representatives. The board, however, is at a virtual standstill in resolving the problems that led to the departure of Steve Endean. Various board committees have backed off any serious examination of how gay interests are represented in Washington, how Congress works and how gays should aim their lobbying efforts (is building the number of co-sponsors of a federal gay rights bill more effective than building relationships with individual committees overseeing programs that might be amended to include gays now?), or even how the group itself meshes with other gay organizations. Some board members have sought to dismiss those issues as simply a code phrase for a merger with the National Gay Task Force, and have lept to the conclusion that a merger inevitably means a takeover; comparisons with mergers in the newspaper field, for example, where morning and afternoon papers share the same production and advertising staffs, but have different news and editorial staffs, completely fall outside the discussions they have been willing to make public. Expect that the issues which have been nagging the lobby over the past year will continue, likely resulting in major difficulty finding a suitable replacement for Endean. Conclusion. There remain some wild cards that could substantially affect the fortunes of gays in 1984. Clearly the most compelling concern is AIDS; it remains equally possible for the AIDS issue to turn into a more political and ugly issue that it has been, or for some breakthrough in the disease itself. The U.S. Supreme Court, which now has taken a gay loitering case under advisement, could also spring a major surprise The decision on that case is due by June, and could come even earlier: there is an outside chance the Court could make a major pronouncement on whether gays have constitutionally protected privacy rights at all. The U.S. Supreme Court also now has been petitioned to hear arguments on the antigay immigration exclusion; another major opinion is possible. Lower court rulings on military discharges also are expected this year. In 1983, the American Bar Association narrowly defeated a proposal in the House of Delegates to endorse gay civil rights protections. Supporters have pledged to bring the issue to the floor again this year, sometime in July. Among those backing the proposal publicly is the American Bar Association president, who also happens to be a conservative Republican supporting Reagan, The major wild cards, however, are what they have been from year to year— the unexpected episodes of discrimination or—perhaps increasingly—and end to discrimination by some cities. Police crackdowns, pitches to hate during campaigns, employers who feel threatened when an employee comes out, lesbian mothers forced to stop everything in ther lives simply to fight to be part ofthe life ofthe child they brought into the world. Any of those episodes, predictable in general terms, could erupt on the national scene under the right circumstances. More important, the resoluteness of gay people to continue to work to make life fairer for themselves and the people they love, the drive to connect with each other and form a community of shared concerns and shared goals, also has the potential to erupt into a major story. Much of the decade and more since Stonewall really has been the story of individuals whose heroism was in saying simply that human dignity insisted that they stand firm for themselves. Such specific events in 1984 can't be predicted, but they can'tbe said to be a surprise when they occur, either. ®1984 Larry Bush Take your money out ofthe closet:. open an IRA at Any\s Atlas Savings & Loan Association $90 million in assets Depositors in 46 states & 9 countries The world's first savings and loan owned and operated by lesbians and gay men. Save for retirement Save on taxes. Open an 18-month ATLAS IRA account with as little as $100 and earn one of the highest interest rates in America. Wherever you live, your "financial home" can be San Francisco. Atlas otters the services you want—checking, VISA, bank-by-mail, money market accounts, etc.—and one quality that makes us unique in all the world Gay Pride. 0MC Call Jon Shearer, our IRA specialist, IfsDC1 at 415/552-6700 or return the coupon below. bf=SrJ I want to learn more about how Atlas Savings can help me plan my financial future. Send me information about: D Individual Retirement Accounts (IRA) Name ; □ Keogh Plans Hor aa^'-emptovwJ Address , indwidualS & empk?ya*M) D Other Atlas services City/State/Zip , Atlas Savings & Loan Association 1967 Market St/Dept B3 • San Francisco, CA 94103
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