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The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984
File 002
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The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 002. 1984-03-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1464.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1984-03-02). The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 002. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1464

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 002, 1984-03-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1464.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984
Contributor
  • Hyde, Robert
Date March 2, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript Carl Hill, Longstaff Heading for Showdown with Supreme Court Over Immigration Cases By Dion B. Sanders Gay Press Association Wire Service SAN FRANCISCO-Two important immigration cases involving gays appear headed for a showdown in the U.S. Supreme Court. The stage was set Jan. 25 when the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals here refused to reconsider its ruling last September that the Immigration and Naturalization Service could not bar British gay journalist Carl Hill from entering the U.S. simply because he is gay. At the same time, attorneys representing another British man appealed to the Supreme Court a ruling by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans that the INS could deny him U.S. citizenship and deport him because of his homosexual orientation. The three-judge San Francisco panel rejected unanimously a request by the INS that the court rehear its case against Hill, who arrived here to cover the 1981 Lesbian/Gay Freedom Day Parade for the London-based Gay News and was detained by INS agents at San Francisco International Airport after the agents noticed two Gay Pride buttons Hill was wearing and Hill acknowledged his gayness when asked. The appeals court ruled last September that the INS could not keep Hill out ofthe country without medical certification from the Public Health Service that Hill suffered from a mental illness. But the PHS, following the landmark 1972 ruling by the American Psychiatric Association that homosexuality is not a mental disorder, has since 1976 refused to conduct tests to determine such a disorder. The INS has until April 25 to appeal to the Supreme Court. In the New Orleans case, the Fifth Circuit court ruled that the INS could deport Richard Longstaff, a permanent Texas resident alien since 1965, on the grounds that he entered the country under false circumstances. Longstaff s examination by the Public Health Service at the time of his entry did not include any questions about his sexual orientation, according to his attorneys, Don Knutson and Leonard Graff of National Gay Rights Advocates. When Longstaff applied for citizenship in 1977, he told the INS that he engaged in homosexual acts prior to his 1965 entry, in violation of immigration law. An INS exa miner nonetheless recommended that Longstaff be granted citizenship. A federal district court ruled, however, that Longstaff failed to prove that he is of "good moral character," and denied his citizenship application. Longstaff was examined by the INS again and was judged to be of good moral character despite his homosexuality—but because he acknowledged committing homosexual acts before his entry, he was in the U.S. illegally. Longstaff appealed the district court ruling to the Fifth Circuit court, which upheld the lower panel's decision on a split 3-2 vote. The Fifth Circuit's ruling was handed down only two weeks after the Ninth Circuit court upheld Hill, creating conflicting rulings on the entry of gay aliens into the U.S. Austin Pride Week Planned Austin will celebrate Gay Pride Week from June 4 through 10 this year, it was announced by the Gay Pride Week Committee this week. Activities already planned include skating on June 4, a picnic on June 9 and a parade on June 10. If you would like to contribute your ideas, as well as get additional information, call Joel Jacobson at 512/343-0435. Austi r-i/Sj XV n to n i o Gay -Go m m u n ity THEtSTAR ■Rutolistied fzLv&ry Other Friday This Year Will Test Gay Clout and Community By Larry Bush In 1984, with a focus on politics and a continued need to respond to the AIDS crisis, the major dialogue may be on why taue had to form a community, and what that community has as its goals. In concentrating on the most likely places and issues around which that debate may take place, last week, Larry Bush addressed the areas of federal government: the Presidency and Congress; and state and local developments of national significance. This is the conclusion to that series. Elections. Expect most ofthe lesbian and gay delegates to the Democratic Convention to try to get to San Francisco on Alan Cranston's ticket. In the first seven states where deadlines have passed for delegate filings, about 40 open gays and lesbians have filed for Cranston, and only about five each for Mondale and Jackson. Partly this is due to the rush to Mondale by elected officials who bump off their own constituents to get on the ticket, but some anti-Mondale sentiment may develop if it turns out gays are expected to elect non- gays to represent them in San Francisco The candidate positions seem firm, but expect them to undergo some shifts on gay rights between March 15 and April 3, when the New York State primary takes place. They will have the Southern states' primaries behind them and California still ahead. The most likely shift is that Mondale then will announce he is in favor of the federal gay civil rights bill, not just generally, but with some specifics. Also expect Mondale to firm his position on whether his pledged executive order will cover the military; at endorsement meetings in January, Mondale representatives publicly confirmed that Mondale currently has "no opinion" on whether military discrimination should be ended by presidential order, or at all. Among the other candidates, should Cranston still be a contender, expect some much heavier arm-twisting on gays to hit the precincts. Jesse Jackson's campaign ought to produce some gay supporters in the Southern states, most likely in the earlier primaries, but the lack of a Jackson campaign organization strong enough to mount a serious outreach beyond the black community u/M-ffl HoupAie. likely will hurt it with many gays. Much of the focus in the 1976 and 1980 presidential campaigns was on simply getting candidates to court gay support, and the diffusion of gay political power around the country means courting that support in nearly every locale. Speaking at one dinner won't transfer to gays in other cities. Balanced against that is the strong visceral appeal Jackson has for many gays, who may vote for him despite the lack of outreach, and despite the fact that they may be voting for delegates to represent their interests who have worked against them on the local level, John Glenn's campaign is unlikely to be strong enough to count as a major factor, but he has done what everyone felt was impossible: broken ranks with regular Democrats on the gay civil rights issue. Glenn may, when it is all over, have made the strongest contribution to gay rights simply because he gave pro-gay suppor- ters a focus. By late January, Glenn was appealing to Southern voters with an explicitly anti-gay message, enlarging on earlier remarks to make clear that he feels federal civil rights legislation infirmgeson individual rights to feel as they wish about others. In the general election outlook, there may well be a shift of gay voters to Reagan. This shift, which would primarily come from rank-and-file gay men, and not from gay organizations or lesbian voters, could come from two factors: Cranston will have established such a beachhead among gay activists that they will sit the election out if Cranston isn't nominated (particularly likely if Mondale doesn't move strongly to pick up the ball), and Reagan may pitch a fairly moderate libertarian posture on gay rights. Already the Reagan campaign appears on the verge of picking a "religious liaison" unconnected with the fundamental- ^aSTAl. <^[RY HART ist activists (althought acceptable to them), and gay Republicans can claim with some justification that Reagan never helped the New Christian Right with their antigay agenda (notably, he failed to meet their expectations of endorsing the Family Protection Act). Gay Democrats may have a harder time convincing gays that Reagan appointments of antigay conservatives, expected to be particularly heavy in a second term, could spell more trouble down the road. The argument is fairly subtle for swings through bars on election night with a bullhorn. Voters also will be choosing whether to keep all 435 members of the House of Representatives and about 35 ofthe 100 senators. Among House members, there is expected to be very little turnover. Probably gay rights sponsors will fare well, and the most attention-getting race will be Rep. Gerry Studds' re-election bid in Meis- continued page 4
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