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The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984
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The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 001. 1984-03-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1463.

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(1984-03-02). The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1463

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984 - File 001, 1984-03-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1476/show/1463.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 9, March 2, 1984
Contributor
  • Hyde, Robert
Date March 2, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Carl Hill, Longstaff Heading for Showdown with Supreme Court Over Immigration Cases By Dion B. S11ndcrs Gay Pres8 1\sliOC"iotion \\'ire Service !-iAN FRANCISCO-Two important immi· gration caAe;; involving gays 11ppear headed for a ehowdown in the U.S. Supreme Court. The stage was set Jan. 25 when the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals here refused to reconsider its ruling last Sep· tember that the Immigration and Natural· ization Service could not bar British gay journalist Carl Hill from entering the U.S. simply because he is gay. At the same time, attorneys represent· ing another British man appealed to the Supreme Court a ruling by the Fifth Cir· cu it Court of Appeals in New Orleans th11t the INS could deny him U.S. citizenship 11nd deport him because of his homosexual orientation. The three-judge San Francisco panel rejected unanimously a request by the INS that the court rehear its case against Hill, who arrived here to cover the 1981 Lesbi· an/ Gay Freedom Day Parade for the London-based Gay News and was detained by INS agents at San Francisco International Airport after the agents noticed two Gay Pride buttons Hill was wearing and Hill acknowledged his gay­ne11s when asked. The appeals court ruled last September that the INS could not keep Hill out of the country without medical certification from the Public Health Service that Hill suffered frotn a mental illness. But the PHS, following the landmark 1972 ruling by the American Psychiatric Association that homosexuality lS not a mental disorder, has sinre 1976 refubed to conduct tests to determine such a disorder. The INS has until April 25 to appeal to the Supreme Court. In the New Orleans ewe, the Fifth Cir· cuit court ruled that the INS could deport Richard Longstaff, a permanent Texas resident alien since 1965, on the grounds that he entered the country under false circumstances. Longstafrs examination by the Public Health Service at the time of his entry did not include any quPstions about his sexual orientation, according to his attorneys, Don Knutson and Leonard Graff of National Gay Rights Advocates. When Longstaff applied for citizenship in 1977, he told the INS thatheengaged in homosexual acts prior to his 1965 entry, in violation of immigration law. An INS exa· miner nonetheless recommended that Longstaff be granted citizen~hip. A federal district rourt ruled, however, that Longstaff failed to prove that he is of " good moral character," and denied his citizenship application. Longstaff was examined by the INS again and was judged to be of good moral character despite his homosexuality-but because he acknowledged committing homosexual acts before his entry, he was in the U.S. illegally. Longstaff appealed the district court ruling to the Fifth Circuit court, which upheld the lower panel's decision on a split 3-2 vote. The Fifth Circuit's ruling was handed down only two weeks after the Ninth Cir· cu it court upheld Hill, creating conflicting rulings on the entry of gay aliens into the U.S. This Year Will Test Gay Clout and Community By Larry Bush In 1984, with a focus on pol1til's and a continued need tn respond to the A IDS erisii;, the major dialogue may be on why #!DYS hat•' had to form 11 rommurnty, and u•hat that rommuntty has as its goals. In concrntrating on the most likrly places and 1ssurs around which that debate may take p/acr, last week, Larry Bush addressed thr areas of federal govern· ment: the Presidency and Congress; and state and local deuelopment.• of national signif1canl'e. This i• the l'rml'lusion to that sr.ne:;. Elections. Expect most of the lesbian and gay delegates to the Democratic Conven· tion to try to 1wt to San Franci,co on Alan Cranston's ticket. In the first seven states where d!'ndlines have pass!'d for delegate filings, 11houl 40 open gays and lesbians have filed for Cranston, and only about fhe l'llC'h for Mondale and Jackson. Partly this is du<' to th1• rush to Mondale b\ 1•lected off'it-i11IH who bump off their ow~ const1tu1•nts to get on the tickN, hut sonw 11nti·Mondalt• Hentlmmt may dev!'lop if it turns out gays are expe<"led to elect non· gays to rppresent them in San Francisco. The candidate positionN 8eem firm, but 1•xpect them to unclt-rgo soml' shifts on g11y nghls hctwf'en Murch 15 and April 3, when the New York Statt• primary takes pince. 'Ilwy will hav!' the Southern states' primaries h<>hind them and California still ahead. The most likely shift is that .Mondale th1•n will announce he is in favor of the federal gay civil rights hill, not just generally, but with some spedfic-s. Also expect Mondale to firm his position on whether his pledged exe<-utive order will cover the military; at endorsement meet in gs in ,January, Mondale representatives publicly confirmi:d . th.~t Mondale c~r· rcntly has "no opinion on whether mil· it.ary discrimination ~hould be ended by presidential ord(•r, or nt nil. Among the other r11ndidates, should Cranston still he a contPnder, expect some much hravier arm-twisting on guys to hit the precincts. . .Je.sse Jal'kson's campaign ought to pro· duce 11ome gay supporters in .the S?uth~rn states, most likrly in the ear her pnmanes, but the lark of a ,Jackson campaign organ· ization strong enough to mount a serious outreach beyond the black community likely will hurt it with many gays. Much of the focus in the 1976 and 1980 presidential campaigns was on simply getting candi· dates to court gay support, and the diffu. sion of gay political power around the country means courting that support in nearly every locale. Spe,.king at one dinner won't tr~nsferto gays in other cities. Balanced against that is the strong visceral appeal Jackson has for many gays, who may vote for him des· pite th1• lack of outreach, and despite the fart that they may be voting for delrgates to repreHrnt thl'ir interests who have workt-d against them on the local level. John Glenn'H campaign is unlikely to be strong enough to count as a major factor, but hf' has done what everyone felt was impossible: broken ranks with regular Democrats on the gay civil rights issue. Glenn may, whl'n it is all over, have made the strongest contribution to gay rights simply because he gave pro-gay suppor· tcrs a focu,;. Ry late January, Glenn was appealing to Southern voters with an explicitly unti·KaY message, enlarging on earlier remarks to make clear that he feels federal civil rights legi~lation infringes on individual righl.!i to feel as thev wish about others. · In the general election outlook, there may wt>ll be a shift of gay voters to Rea· gan. This shift, which would primarily come from rank·and-file gay men, and not from gay organizations or lesbian voters, could come from two factors: Cranston will have estahlished such a beachhead among gay activists that they will sit the election out if Cranston isn't nominated (particularly likely if Mondale doesn't move strongly to pick up the ball), and Reagan may pitch a fairly moderate liber· tarian posture on gay righls. Already the Reagan campaign appears on the verge of picking a "religious liai· son" unconnectl'd with the fundamental- Austin Pride Week Planned Austin ~ill celebrate Gay Pride Week from June 4 through 10 this year, it was announced by the Gay Pride Week Committee this week. Activities already planned include skating on June 4, a picnic on June 9 and a parade on June 10. If you would like to contribute your ideas, as well as get additional information, call Joel Jacobson at 5121343-0435. ist activists (althought acceptable to them), and gay Republicans can claim with some justification that Reagan never helped the :Sew Christian Right with their antigay agenda (notably, he failed to meet their exp<'Ctations of endorsinl!' the Farn­ilv Protection Act). Gay Democrats may have a harder time com'incinl!' gays that Reagan appointment>; of antigay conser· vatives, expected to be particularly heavy in a second term. could spell more trouble down the road. The argument is fairly sub­tle for swings through bars on election night with a bullhorn. Voters also "ill be choosing whether to keep all 435 members of the House of Representatives and about 35 of the 100 senators. Among House members, there is expected to be very little turnover. Proba· bly gay rights sponsors" ill fare well, and the most attention-gcttmg race "ill be Rep. Gerry Studds' r~lection bid in Mllii· continued page 4 2 THE STAR I MARCH 2, 1984 Dallas Gay Bar Burns By Don Ritz DALLAS-The Old Plantation at 391 1 Cedar Springs was completely destroyed by fire Tuesday, February 21. According to Denis Weir, general man· ager of the gay club, the fire started shortly after 3:00 a.m. The bar, which offered after-hours each night. had about 30 to 40 customers in it at the time the fire was discovered. Weir said that the Old Plantation disc jockeys announced the problem over the p.a. system and assisted customers in clearing out the bar. Weir said that all of the customers were evacuated without injury. Weir said one employee received minor burns to the back of the neck and hair when assisting a woman in leaving the restroom. ''Total loes from the fire was $.500.000: $300,000 loss from the building itself and $200,000 from the contents," said Dallas Fire Department Investigator E.M. Rowe. "I don't know yet what caused the fire," said Rowe. "I'm still looking. It was possi· bly careless smoking; it wu possibly set. I'm not even sure where it started, the damage was so extensive. There was a gas leak, but the gas leak may have occurred after the fire or during the fire (as a result of the fire's heat). Or, it's possible the gas ll!ak may have started the fire." Rowe continued, "It's possible that the fire did start in the dressing room and when the fire was noticed, it already had a good start, so when patrons were cleared out through the front door, the air shot in up through the attic, and the fire really took off. The firemen had one hell of a time putting it out, the whole roof collapsed" Harriet Shaw. one of the owners of Moon Dreams, located next to the Old Plantation, said, "We were very lucky. We were closed and everyone was out of the building when the fire started. We had some smoke and water damage, but we've cleaned up and are back in operation already." Frank Caven, owner of the Old Plan ta· tion, said that no fire damage wu done to the buildings next door because of the fire walls on each side. GAY COMMUNllV STAR Nk>{Sal- A Voia Pllblulung <:ompany N~wo-r Published every other Friday Phone Austin (512) 448-1380 San Antonio (512) 737-0087 Voice Publi1l"ng Co CIRCULATION Gay Community Stw. 3.000 - t»-ly - VOICe IHouslOnl. 10.000 - -ly Dlllll Gay-· 6.000 - _.., &Ota~ Te.as at'W. 17.500 eopte1'lrMkty, 1vg eomo-,-..,,,.,. 33!7 --8hd <30e. ........... TX 77008. f7131 ~ Contents copyright c19&4 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg ,,.,,,,..,,., Robert Hyde -flfl ""'"'' Ace! Clark art dwecJor Jett Bray graph.co ~ Gay Prns Assod8tl0n New• s.n--ces International Gay N8W1 Agency Pacmc New1 Sernce, urry Bush CW"""'flflton. D C I SyndtU1«1 Futi.1r• S.roc•s & Wr1t•tS Jeffrey Wiiien. Randy Alfred Ston..1n Futurn Synchcate Brtan ~Naught. Joe &.Iler POSTMASTER Send address c0trections to 3317 Montrose •308 lious!On TX 77008 Sut:tsctipl/Of'J t•t• an US in .. aled .,,11_,cp. S.if.9 per yea• 152 - S29per1bmonlhll25-) orS125per-•tJ­t! lln26-I Bae•-S200NCll NatiOnal MherfialfJfJ repreantatw• Joe O&t>ato Rivendefl Mlr"Olong e66 8"' Avwnu. ~" York 100• ! (212) 2•2·M63 AdYerollltQ dNdl ne 9Yety cthet' Tuesday S 30pm tor tssue --lollc><oing Frldoy ..,.,.ng Ncttce ~o ~ittf3 Loca •dwerusmg rate Khedufe One we ett.dM N<71 tt 1913.. ~ry The Siii" d005 not assume rwponalbil 1y IOt _,.,.,,.""'ii da!rns ReadetS .-ild alert .,. ... Si.( 10 any deceCtM edlte~t'IQ Apply today to receive a Community Credit Card. I , . ' '' Your Community Credit Card from the Voice Publishing Company allows you to place advertising, order subscriptions or buy specially-advertised items in the Montrose Voice, Dallas Gay News and the Austin/San Antonio Gay Community Star-and charge it. When your monthly statement arrives, you have a choice of paying the full balance-or paying just 1/4 of the balance and carrying the remainder over to the next month. Your Community Credit Card will also allow you to receive special discounts at certain Houston, Dallas, Austin and San Antonio shops, stores and clubs. These will be announced in future issues of the newspapers. After passing our credit requirements or establishing yourself with a good paying record, your Community Credit Card can also be used for emergency check cashing at locations in Houston, Dallas, Ft. Worth, Austin and San Antonio. More benefits will soon also be available to Community Credit Card holders-including discounts and VIP treatment at gay hotels and guest houses in South Florida, New Orleans and California. They will be announced in Texas' gay community newspapers-and on brochures sent along with your monthly statement. Apply today for your personal Community Credit Card. APPLICATION Community Credit Card The Credit Department of the Voice Publishing Company MONTROSE VOICE-DALLAS GAY NEWS-THE STAR HOUSTON-DALLAS- FT. WORTH-AUSTIN-SAN ANTONIO Name ------------------------------- Home Address ------------------------ City, state, zip ------------------------------------ Date of birth ---------------Home phone--------------- Do you o rent or D own your apartment or house? How long have you lived there? ------- If less than 3 years, where did you live previously? -------~-------------- How long there? _______________ ~---------- Where do you work? Work phone_---- -------- How long have you worked there? ··--Job title ? ------------ If less than 3 years, where did you work previously? -- ---How long? ---~ ----- What other credit cards, if any, do you have? _ Where do you bank? __ • Checking account number ~ Are you a registered voter? __ Today's date -------­Signature ----- __ Did you vote in the last election? Drivers lie. (or other state-issued ID) state & no. ----- ---­Social Security no. - --- By signing here, you are certifying that the above information is complete, true and correct, and authorizing us to verify it at the sources stated and/or to obtain credit reports of you from commercial credit reporting agencies. You also promise that you will make your monthly payments when due, paying a minimum of 1/4 of your mo!1thly balance each mo~th, or the full balance when the balance drops below $10 00, and paying a monthly finance or service charge of 11'.% (equivalent of an annual rate of 18%) but a minimum charge of 75¢ a month on balances which are ca med over to the next month. There will be no finance charge or service charge when your statement is paid In full. SPECIAl NOTICES TO APPl.ICANTS OUTSIDE TE)(AS Monthly and oqulYalen! hnance or Mrvi<e chltge may .. 'Y. ICCOnMg IO IOcal lew NEW YORK ~ESIDENTS ConWl!llf reports may be requested 1n connectlOn w th me ptOCeUtng of lhfl appliuUon and any ruutting account Upon your requnt. IJofce Pubt11hlng wtll u·•torm you of tn. names anti aoor-nan of any consumer reporting lget'IC)CeS wf'Uch have prOWided us• th aUCh repons OHIO RESIDENTS The Ortic laws 1g111n11 dl9Cttmmati:on require tha1 au creditofl make Credit equally ava table to 1 t ctttd twortny customers. and that credtt reporting llQ4K'IC ... rnamla n separate credit hlstonn on .-ch incSMdual upon request The Otuo CMI Rtghtl ~ admfniaten compUance with ttMs •• MAIL TO Voice Publishing Company, 3317 Montrose, suite 306, Houston, TX 77006 MARCH 2, 1984 I THE STAR 3 Backstreet Basics Uses Personality Format Feature By Ed Martinez What makes a gay bar suc«essfuJ? l.Rt's face it folks. some bars are more successful than others, and soml' just don't cul the mustard. Austin is fortunate that all of its bars do quite well, each for it11 own particular rea· sons. Bachtreet Basics, just over a year old, has carved out its own particular mche in the gay business sc!'ne. In every town there's at least one, and often more than one, leather bar. Sometimes it's more vinyl than leather, but nevertheless it cat­ers to more of the leather, motorcycle, occas10nally older group of guys. Back­stre<> t Basics is that bar in Austin. This does not mean that other bars don't have some of the same clientele as Back­street. but every bar has its own rationale, and Backstre<·t is Austin's leather bar. Until recPntly, Backstn•et catered almost exclusively to gay m!'n, but that has changed. as the bar realiz!'d the need for more community between all parts of the gay population. The thing that makes Backstreet work so well, however, is the personalities of the manager and staff of the place. Chris Christoff, the manager, has worked dili­gently from the opming of the bar to ensure that customers would feel welcome, that their visit would be an enjoyable one, This is part of a continuing series on the gay bars of Austin and San Antonio that they would want to come back. Sound like common sense? Of course it is, but American busi nf'~S is Htrewn with the corporate corpses of those who didn't have brains enough to u .. e simple common sense 1n their business prac-tke.11. The bartenders, the doormen, the bar­backs are all chosen with the view toward pleasing the customer The layout of the bar, from the dance floor to the patio to the diffen·nt events featured throughout the week. have one simple goal: customer satisfadion. Backstreet is often the location for benefits, whether for different groups in the gay community, or simply for someone who has experienced fire or sickness. Mainly, however, the bar is a fun place to be. During the week, there are various fipe· rials, of course, ranging from steak night on Tuesdays to hot dogs and volleyball on Sunday. Tht•re are movies on Thursday-all cal­culated to make the customes feel at home and want to come back. It's good busineHS, but it's also good news for the gay com­munity to have bars that are so consumer­oriented. Wayne McCracken had a big heart-on for Valentine's Day Almost every single bar in Austin has a patio. Strangely enough, this is hardly standard equipment in many gay bars in other parts of the country. Even New Orleans, a Southern gay mecca. has few patios in its bars-unusual in a city known for its Spanish architecture and stunning patios. But Backstreet has a large patio which is used for the volleyball games and just casual !Wcializing. The dance floor itself opens out onto the patio diredly. The giant video .screen was rec•ntlv installed in a bow to video-addicts wh~ enjoy MTV and other TV events. As with other gay bars around the country, video­disco may be the next phase, although Christoff refuses to comment on that. • customer's needs. With an attitude like that, Backstreet is indeed stickmg to Ba,. lCl" . Bald Men Superior to Others Real men don't have hair. Author William Taylor claims in Tidbits MaRazine that baldies are sexier a.nd more ambitiou,. He believes chromedomc• are superior bccau!<e they're further along the evolu­tionary ladder than lower forms, such as ape!< or guys v.;th hair. Says he "It's precisely a man's male­ne. s that makes htm balil" SMU Refuses Again ·to Recognize Gay Campus Group By Don Ritz DALLAS-For the third time the Gay and Lesbian Student Support Organization •GlSS01 at Southern Methodist Univer­sity • SMt.: 1 has been denied recognition by the i;tudent senate. It followed a four-hour senate meeting Feb. 14 The vote was 18· 14 Twenty-five student organizations app­lied for recognitiion on that day, with many diverse interests ranging from such religious groups as the Christian Science Organization, Baptist Student Union and Unitarian Universalist A!<soication to the Air Force-ROTC, the Association for Com· puting Machinery and Mademoiselles. Each of the organizations applying for membership had been reviewed by the Student Senate Organizationh Committee and had received a positive recommenda­tion for recognition from the committee­exctpt fo"I" GLSSO The committee claimed that too much out.side influence. One of th!' things that makes Austin unique is the good looks of the bars here. All in all, Backstreet has proven that it has the nght stuff for its segment of the gay market, and continues to improve its product, changing the mix of attractions constantly with one thing in mind: the Chris Christoff, far right, lend.• managerial panache to eVt'nts LACE :MONDAY-s1oo Call Liquor 8-10 TUESDAY _ s 125 Bar Drinks 8-10 WEDNESDAY _s 1°0 Long N eeks 9-11 THURSDAY-s1oo :Margarita 8-10 SATURDAY-50¢ Draft 2-5 SUNDAY-35¢ Draft 3-6 "Best in Country Sounds': Sister Bar to Snuffy's 115 Ckn. Krue r. S.A. .. 340--17 HAPPY HOUR :Monday-Friday 2-7pm Draft 50¢ ~0~~~~¥n~uL~¢ Bar Drinks s1°0 WITH l.D., NO COVER FOR ROCKIN' R & TGRA MEMBERS (SHOWS EXCLUDED) 4 T HE STAR I MARCH 2, 1984 Year will Test Gay Community and Clout Like None Before from page 1 sachusetts after his disclosure that he is gay. In Iowa, the likelihood that Richard Eychner will seek the Republican nomina· tion for Congress as an openly gay man may also become a major news story. 0th· erwise, by early 19!>4, there did not appear to be House elections of major signifi· cance; they certainly will change. Among the U.S. Senate, Republicans face more r~lection battles than Demo­crats, and the most attention is focused on Sen. Roger Jepsen (R-Iowal, past chief sponsor of the Family Protection Act, and Sen. Jesse Helms (R·N.C.), a rch· conservative. Both were first rated under· dogs, both are climbing in the polls, and both elections will energize gay interest and activity locally and nationally. In the Movemen t. The top stOT) of the year may be the emergence of a noticable gay Republican effort. Reagan-Bush cam· paign officials have asked for gay partici­pation in Washington. D.C. California Republicans, such as former Los Angeles Police Chief Ed Davis, are making a sin­cere effort to open discussions with gay activists and gay Republicans, the Hous­ton Gay Political Caucus may well stop short of a presidential endorsement this year in deference to its Republican members (who likely will be an active cau­cus on their own in Texas Republican cir· des), and individual gay Republicans in Pennsylvania and New York are becom· ing bolder about publicly raising gay issues within the Republican Party An extra incentive in one area will be the re-election campaign of Rep. Bill Green <R·N.Y.), the Manhattan gay rights bill co-sponsor who serves on the appropri· ations committee where he has pushed AIDS funding, and who will face a strong Democratic challenge from a gay rights supporter. Green plans to be at the Repub­lican National Convention in Dallas rais· ing issues such as the ERA, and gay Republicans at the convention surely will '. . . There may well be a shift of gay voters to Reagan' seek him out as an ally. In 1980, Green's district gave Reagan the lowest vote of any district which elected a Republican to Congress, and it's clear Reagan's feelings won't affect Green's chances-unless Rea­gan makes some gestures toward gays which help Green. Among gay Democrats, expect the effort to be primarily local, with little sense that there is one national voice for gay Demo· crats. \\'bile gay Democrats nationally formed a National Association of Lesbian and Gay Democratic Clubs, only about a dozen of the 1()() or so eligible clubs have jomed, and its Board of Directors has done little to meet its fundraising commitment. Director Tom Chorlton is credited with gays m some states, such as North Carol· ma, with being a pnme mover m helping get them organized, and while he lS talk· mg w1th most of the national campmgns, there are too many powerful gay Demo­crats who want to keep their own hand m to allow any one person to be Mr. Gay Democrat. Look for a mostly tape-and· paste work here, with an effective national alliance still some distance away A ma;or ingredient still lackmg, for eJCample IS an accurate and timely ability to simply document the part1C1pat1on of gay Democrats at the locnl level, where successes are often remarkable In 19S2, "hen the group wns ;ust being launched, that was perhap too much to expect, but by 1984, with n presidential election, it would set'lD valuable to hav~ handy in for· mntton on each club, its past record at raising contributions and putting cam· paign worker~ out, and the precincts it has identified. Among national gay civil rights groups, the !Ii ational Gay Task Force has regained the drive and innovative approach to problem-solving that put it in the spotlight under the direction of Bruce Voeller, later joined by Jean O'Leary. New director Vir· ginia Apuzzo is now 18 months on the job, and has solidified such programs as the Violence Reporting Project, which uses local groups to collect data on antigay incidents that had previously been merely anecdotal; inaugurated an AIDS hotline and trained federal employees on how to handle calls on their AIDS hotline; re­established contact.~ with Washington and put in place Jeff Le,;, an effective Washington representative able to deal with the Reagan Administration; and announced a job opening for a media director, the first since the day~ of Voeller and O'Leary, when Ginny Vida did an out· standing ;ob and Ron Gold provided out· standing analysis of media opportunities. The Task Force in the coming year can be expected to keep a focus on the national political arena, including lobbying such groups as the U.S. Conference of Mayors (which mny vote to endorse a gay rights resolution at its June meeting). The Task Force also is expected to take an active role lobbying congressional committees which provide oversight on the Administration programs where NGTF is lobbying; AIDS is doubtlessly the most important exam· pie. The Gay Rights National Lobby still hns a staff working in Washington, and a ma;or resource is its field coordinators who are committed to opening doors in Congress through their local represents· tives. The board, however, is at a virtual standstill 10 resolving the problems that led to the departure of Steve Endenn. V nr· ious board committees have backed off any senous examination of how gay inter· ests are represented in Washington. how Congress works and how gays should aim their lobbying efforts (is building the number of co-sponsors of a federal gay rights bill more effective than building relationships with individual committees overseeing programs that might be amended to include gays now?), or even how the group itself meshes with other gay organizations. Some board members have sought to dismiss those issues as simply a code phrase for a merger with the National Gay Task Force, and have lept to the conclu· sion that a merger inevitably means a takeover; comparisons with mergers in the newspaper field. for example, where morning and afternoon papers share the same production and advertising staffs. but have different news and editorial staffs, completely fall outside the discus· sions they hnve been willing to make pub­lic. Expect that the issues which have been nagging the lobby over the past year will continue, likely resulting in major diffi· culty finding a suitable replacement for En dean Conclusion. There remain some wild cards that could substantially affect the fortunes of gays in 1984 Clearly the most compelling concern 1s AIDS, it remains equally possible for the AIDS tSSUe to turn into a more political and ugly lSSUe that 1t has b('en, or for some breakthrough in the d1se1l!ll' itself The l'.S. Supreme Court, which now has taken a gay loitering case under advise­ment, could also spring a maJor surprise The dec1s10n on that case 1s due by June, and could come ewn earlier; there 1s nn outside chance the C'ourt could make a mn;or pronouncement on whether gays ha\•e constitutionally protected pnvncy rights at nil. The U.S. Supreme Court also now has been pt·titioned to hear nrgu ments on the anllgny immigration c>xdu s10n; another mnior opinion is possible> I.av.er court rulmgs on military dis· charges also ore expected this year In 1983, th•• Am('rican Bar Association narrowly defeated a proposal in the House of Delegates to endorse gay civil righL~ protections. Supporters have pledged to bring the issue to the floor again this year, sometime in July. Among those backing the proposal publicly i;; the American Bnr Association president, who also happens to be a conservative Republican support· ing Reagan. The major wild cards, however, are what they have been from year to year­the unexpected episodes of discrimination or-perhaps increasingly-and end to dis­crimination by some cities. Police crack· downs, pitches to hate during campaigns. employers who feel threatened when an employee comes out, lesbian mothers forced to stop everything in ther liveo simply to fight to be part of the life of the child they hrought into the world. Any of those episodes, predictable in general terms, could erupt on the national scene under the right circumstances. More important. the resoluteness of gay people to continue to work to make life fairer for themselves and the people they love, the drive to connc•ct with each other and form a community of shared concerns and shared goals, also has the potential to erupt into a major story. Much of the decade and more since Stonewall really has been the story of individuals whose heroism was in saying simply that human dignity insisted that they stand firm for themselves. Such specific events in 1984 can "t be predicted, but they can't be said to be a surprise when they occur, either. 1984 Larry Bush Take~~ out Of the closet:. open an IBA at Atlas Savings & Loan Assoc1at1on S90 million In -ts Depositors In 48 1tatat & 9 countries The world's first savings and loan owned and operated by lesbians and gay men. Save tor retirement. S.veontaxes. Open an 18-month ATLAS IRA account with as little as $100 and earn one of the highest interest rates in America. WhereWH' you live, your "financial home" can be San Fl'llnclaco. Atlas offers the services you want-checking, VISA, bank-by-mail, money market accounts, etc.-and one quality that makes us unique in all the world: O.yP"de. Call Jon Shearer. our IRA specialist, at 415/552~700 or return the coupon below. --------------------------------------------------- I want to learn more about how Atlas Savings can help me plan my fmancral future. Send me information about C Individual Retiremef'l Ac:COU<'IS (IRA) Name a Keogn Plans IOrutf~ Address ..... -...,~ C 01her A!las lleMC8S City/St.tl&'Zop Atlas Savings & Loan Assoc1atron 1967 Market St/Dept B3 •San Francisco. CA 94103 MARCH 2. 1984 /THE STAR 5 This, That and A Lot of Other Things Commentary By Joe Baker Time to dean off the top of my desk and go through my mail once again. The clip­pings really hav1> been piling up. -c- I received an interesting brochure in the ~ail. It was from Oklahoma City Univer· s1ty advertising its series of seminars on microcomputers for buainess. Discussions will center on pe.troleum engineering, oil and gas accounting, stock market analy­sis and financial planning. Wow! Heavy stuff!! Th.e instructor? J .W. King!!! Could he poss1hly hethesamcJ.W King who it< that hot porn star with the "big computer·'? If he is, that's one seminar I want to attt>nd. -c-l saw a cul<• personalized license plate the other day It said: N2WS2. Will the owner p)east• give me a call? Mv friend Ron wants to me1•t you · -c- Aftt·r a homosexual male has had a sex changt• operation and becomes a female, is he tht>n a heterosexual, bisexual or still a homosexual? I don't hnve the slightest id1·a, but Dear Abby does. She says: "If the sex-changed female chooses for her sexual partner another fpmale, she is a le~bian. If she perfers males exclusively, she is hetero· sexual. If 11he enjoys sex equally with both males and females, she is bisexual." Now, you know. -C-A reader writes that we should form an organization called Gays and Lesbians Against Drunk Drivers (GLADD). He says Vassar College Adopts Pro-Gay Policy Vassar Collegt> in Nt•w York has amended itll gem•ral anti-discrimination policy to include protl'C·tion based on sexual orien· tation, rrports National Gay Rights Advo· catt1s. The move to get this added protection was h1•gun hy the Gay People;; Associa· tion of Vnssar, a student organization. 'I'he policy has now been officially changed and will he published in the 1984- 1985 college catalog. E.K. Wecdin, Jr., an associate professor of English, hl'lped the students ahepherd the proposal through the proper channels. When he met resistance, Prof. Weedin called upon NGRA. the San Francisco· haM-d public intert'St law firm, for assist· anc·I'. Prof. Wel-din said. "AllofNGRA'sinfor· mation and advice was greatly useful and influl'ntinl on those doubtful and even hostile to the proposal. NGRA effectivf'ly unswen-d every one of their objections concer!'d with the law." Junk Queen of Peking Enjoys Trash Th1·y call her "the Junk Queen of Peking," reports the WashrnRlon Po~t . She's 4:1· yl'Ur-old Sun You Zhi, whose motto is "It's glor10us work to l'nllt•ct junk for social isn1." EVl'rY month shl' hrings in 60 tons of garb11g1~anything from USL'<I hottlc caps to rnl(gedy fineukl'rs-for recycling, C11Mt off m1•11t bon«>s from restaurants art• turned into glue. Humun hair from hnrbi•r shops becomes mt-dicine, nnd t•mpty tooth paste tub1•s an• transformed into sh1•t>t>1 of skel. Her only probl1·m is sorting out old newsp11p1•rn The P1·king Oaily is no prob· km: 1t l'an be sold to df'partmentstores 88 wrapping paper. But the government says foreign m•wspapcrs are too sensitive for n•use. They havf' to bl' sent to a pulp mill for reproct•ssinl(. ~he "community" with the biggest drink-ing problem should form its own self· protective association. He proposes GLADD minibuses to take us to and from the bars. Maybe .so. Bu.t here's another point worth noting while we are on the subject. There are gay Alcoholics Anonymous groups in Texas. If you have a problem or want more information. call them. Don't drive if you are drunk. I just got my car paid for. -c- Researchers now believe that you can con· tract genital herpes from the areas around hot tuh.s. Chlorine and bromine in spa water kills nny herpes virus introduced bv infected bathers, they say, but the virus may thrive for up to five hours on adiacent benches, seats and poolside areas. ,/ Isn't anything safe anymore? Now vou don't even have to have •ex to get those kinds of diseases. And what about toilet s~ats? Maybe all those claims about get· tmg VD from a toilet seat were true afte.. rail! -c- Many thanks to the readers who sent me the beautiful fresh flowers after reading my column on my "Christmas Wish List." Also, to those who sent the kind letters. -c- What's also going on at the New York Times? A recent obituary stated that the decea~ed. a bachelor, wassun;ved "by hi~ companion of many years." It listed a man's name. Put two and two together, and it looks prettv gav to me The federal go_vcrnment is taking steps toward regulating the popular and pros­perous "Dial-A-Porn" telephone sex servi­ces. A new law was signed by President Rea· gan in December, but the government still hasn't figured out how to enforce it. The law makes it a crime for any person or firm ~o operalt' a phone sen.;ce that has been Judged to be "obscene or indecent"-if available to mmors. ~ince there is no way you can stop mmors from making a private phone call it looks like l\la Bell may soon be ordered to start pulling the plug on a lot of sex services. Better make those calls quick On second thought, don't hurrv I see this t~ing dragging on in the courts for a long time\ come Also, don't forget our Sunday Brunch, noon 6 THE STAR I MARCH 2, 1984 Lesbian/Gay Conference Planned for Spring The Ninth Annual Southeastern Confer· ence of Lesbian and Gay Men, "Pulling Together and Reaching Out," will be held at the Holiday Inn-Medical Center in Bir­mingham, Ala., from Apr. 12-15. Conference co-chairpersons are Ms. Bootsie Abelson and Rick Adams. "We see a need in this region for gay men and lesbians to begin a closer com­munity relationship with each other and to build alliances and coalitions with sup­portive people in the greater community. In doing so, we will achieve a better under­standing of each other and our common needs," Adams said. The conference keynote speaker will be Virginia Apuzzo, director of the National Gay Task Force (NGTF), chief lobbyist and spokesperson for the 10,000.member NGTF headquartered in New York City. Among other speakers are Tom Chorl· ton of the National Association of Gay and Lesbian Democrat Clubs; Abby Rubenfeld, the managing attorney for the Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund; and Mike Rutherford, who is execu· tive director of the Gay Press Association. "We are fortunate to have a number of very active and nationally known figures committed to this conference," com· mented Abelson. Workshop leaders and speakers repres­ent politics, law, lobbying, mass commun· ications, musicians and athletics. On Apr. 13, fi banquet and fundraiser will be held by PRO-PAC. The Magic City Athletic AssOC1ation will sponsor a soft· ball game, dinner and marathon, and an all-woman band will play for a Friday night dance. Magnolia, the Birmingham Women's Art Collective, will hold an Artist-in-Concert on Sat., Apr. 14. Conference registration and fee; are being accepted. They should be mailed to Rick Adams; Lambda, Inc.; Box 73062· Birmingham, Ala. 35253. ' New York Not Favorite of Traveling VIPs Government VIPs junket all over the world, but there's apparently one place not on their 1tmerary. Harlem, reports the Nert York Post New York City officials have been try· ing to rom·ince Assistant Secretary of Labor Jovcc Kaiser that things really are tough in the Big Apple, but they can't get her to come to Harlem or the South Bronx to see for herself. Says Ka1~er: "I make a point not to go to those areas. In fact, I makeita point notto go to NPw York, period." Jurors Are Predictable If you're ever arrested, hope for a jury made up of Black Italian social workers, advises the Seattle Times. A survey of prominent lawyers !!Bys they're most likely to acqlllt you. One the other hand, watch out for Mormon Ger· man military officer!!. They tend to see thmgs the prosecutor's way. The lawyers .say waiters like to stick it to busine~smen, who remind them of stingy tippers; while accountants, schoolteachers and postal workers dole out miserly awards to plain· uffs. Some stereotypes can be deceptive. Lib­erals may feel sorry for the underdog, but they come down hard on violent crime. And many prosecuters are leery ofloading a jury in a rape case with women, for fear they won't believe the victim. But all agree that having lawyers on the panel guarantees the hung jury Says one trial veteran, "Put two lawyers in the same room, and they'll disagree on the color of the walls." t One teenager in ten has a secret. O ne Teenager in Ten : Writings by Gay and Lesbian Youth EJ1tcd hy Ann Heron "For every generation that comes out, 1hesc essays will be invaluable - G"!I Community N,•ws "There 1s a rare 'ensibility displayed m many of these essay; !hat 1s nolhing short of aslonishmg lntern.it1on.il Gay News Agency OGNAI an important .ind necessary book powertul and very p01gnant " Womimews One teenager m ten'': according to Kinsey thats the proportion of gays to <tra1ghts in this country One Teenager 111 fr11· twenty-eight young men and women from all over the United Stall's and C.mada, from f1lteen to twenty-lour years of age. speal.. out about their coming-out experiences about what 11 is to be young and g.iy in our S<•ciety today SJ 95 m bool..stores. <•r use this coupon to order by ma: .. ................................ TO ORDER ................................. . Please send me Enclo<eJ IS S copies ol One Tcenu '<, 111 fr• at $4 50 each postp.1id city Zip ALYSON Publications, PO Box 2783, Boston, MA 02208 Myoullsve a personal compt;ter-ot data terf(linal. then ~ou should cheer out tlie latest Torm of erectroniq com· municatlons i1 the 9ay cqmmumty. . PS ThfJ GN{c Network is a rpulti-user - nsl"S, intormaponafld commun(;a/ions S8fV/C6 with local phOne access from over 250 cities m the U.S. & Canada! Our re$ponse t1~ are f.ast, and hobrty rates all low (only '5.25ttrr). 1 j • I I F1JJ1clibns you can coode flom incllkte: electronic""''· bul/fJtin bQard. gay news, 16fJal a'1viso~ a mqlti-u~r ch~t facibty. and mtJph. m,uch rr;ore. tou C8tl join ss a (uH s~. Mid we will mail ~ .YOt!' owtt P'!fgpnsl llJ number & paS$word( along with the Iota/ phpne access number m ypur area) the sam~ day ~e redeive tour af>plicalion. Or, yoJ can join on~ s~ial trial sut?scriJ:1ion and rel'f'ive ap the ~nefits of r~gular1mempershlp 2!Y§ two ftee hours of access. Then if you wish, you can join as a reg/Jlar member for 011/y $20 mote. • I I I I ' I I •, D"Y N~ • INFDRMArlDN • 1 I • COMMUN/CA Tl6'NS • ·--~-~--~----~-~- --------~---------~-· C Regular Subscription $30 D Trial Subscription $15 D Send me more information, please. Name Addre~-------~---~-~~~-----~ City. ___________ State __ Zip _____ _ TypeofComputer ____________ ------ Clip and Mail to: GN/C NETWORK clo Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 Italians Lighten Up on Gays By Richard Labonte Via GPA Wirt• Service Italians are tolerant in the abstract towards the fact of gay men and lesbians, according to a recent nationwide survey­but don't wunt their best friends or their daughters or sons to be one. A joint survey conducted by the city of Turin and by the Sandro Penna Founda­tion (a guy studit·s group) found that while 70 percent of the adult population believed Italian society was too harsh in its atti· tudes towards homosexuals, and 50 per· cent believed "the plight of homosexuals" should be east·d, three of every four Ital· ians said they would do anything neces· sary to change the sexual orientation of their offspring from gay to straight. In other responses, only half of those surveyed could define the word homosex· ual properly, hut 80 pt·rcent knew what "gay" meant. And in a country whose Pope-in·residcm·e continues to condemn homosexuality, only 1 pt'rcent of Italians opposed the Pontiffs attitude. The survey, first of itB kind in Italy, also found that while an overall majority equated gay life with drug abuse, sexual disease, child molestation, pornography and prostitution, a majority of respond· ent11 under ao years of age thought homo· sexuality an acceptable and a normal sexual pt'rsunsion. Independent Bathhouse Owners Debate AIDS-Related Issues Owners of independrnt gay health clubs and hathhous1•s addressed the current AillS crisis at their rf'cent fir•t annual convent.ion. Meeting in New Orlt'nns Inst month, they vow1•<l to e<lucnte th1·ir clil'nll·leabout the h11z11rds of the mys•erious syndrome, reports The \forks mng11zine. 111•yond that, members of the ARsoeta I.ion of Independt·nt Gay Health Clubs, of whiC'h the M1dtowne Spns in Texus are a part, felt that they were being unduly harassed by pt·rsons who subjected them to "self-righteous finger pointing and scapegoating" In n resolution passed unanimously 11t the convention, members stated that gay he~1lth cluhs form an important part of the social lifo of gay men guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution, and that their members will "resist any attempts by fielf-serving alnrmists to use the public concern about AIDS to accomplish their homophobic pol· it.ical agenda." Members also resolved to "disseminate objective information about AIDS to our patrons." In n later d!'velopment, the Interna­tional Gay :>iews Agency reported that the hrad of the federal AIDS research effort, ret;ponding to rl'ports ofincrea•es in vene­real disease among gay men San Fran· cisco, said that gay hathhou•es "should all go out of business." Dr. James Curran, coordinator of the AIDS Task Force at the Centers for Dis­ease Control in Atlanta, stopped short of saying health authorites should shut down the bathhouses. Objections were immrdiately raised hy Dr. Mervyn Silverman, director of the Public Health Department of San Fran· cisco, who said, "Closing the baths is not the answer, even though it might make me look good to a lot of people in the straight community." He went on to say, "History shows that government generally has not been very influential in changing people's sexual habits. Any action on this is going to have to come from the gay community, not my office." AUSTIN'S ALTERNATIVE A NfW CHOICE FOR THC Tf>:AS WOJllA"'t'1 (ANO £ Vf RVONE £I SE TOO') TUESDAYS ... · 75~ Tequilla Shots 75~ Schnapps WEDNESDAYS ... THURSDAYS ... Different Specials Every 15 Minutes SUNDAYS ... $1 Margaritas Soon to come-Keg Beer with lots of Beer Busts. Come join the celebration. Starting March 1, a Whole Month of Specials! Open Tuesday-Sunday 6pm-2am (closed Monday) 5500 S. Congress, Austin 8 THE STAR I MARCH 2, 1984 NGRA Enters Case on Behalf of Gay Judge National Gay Rights Advocates has filed a brief in the Minnesota Supreme Court urging that a judge not be dismissed simply because he is gay. The case involves Crane Winton, a Dis­trict Court Judge in Hennepin County, Minnesota. The Board of Judicial Standards, in recommending Winton's removal, con­cluded that, "A homosexual may be a judge only if he or she is celibate." Leonard Graff, NGRA legal director, said.Judge Winton was being subjected to an unfair double standard. "In Minnesota," Graff said, "the same sexual activity is illegal for gays and straights. Yet, straight judges have not been asked to vow not to engage in that type of sex." NGRA Executive Director Jean O'Leary said: "It seems fairly obvious that Judge Winton is being treated differently simply because he is gay. These outdated sex laws were never intended to be used as a mea­sure of one's ability to serve the public." Judge Winton has been on the bench for 21 years. Casual Sex Taking a Dive Psychiatrists, public health workers and law enforcement officials say that statis­tics show promiscuity may no longer be the fashion for straights or gays in Amer­ica. The reasons go beyond fear of AIDS or herpes, they say, and include a counter­sexual revolution to the 60's and 70's behavior patterns. It's a wind of conservatism, said Dr. June M. Reinisch, director of the Kinsey Institute for Reserach in Sex in Blooming­ton, Ind., who attributes part of the change to the declining economy. "Hard times tend to bring people back to their puritanic roots, and they become more moralistic about disease," she said. Although her theory is not widely endorsed, the trend shows people have a reduced num her of partners, even persons who consider themselves sexually liber­ated. The shift is particularly discernable in homosexual lifestyles. Public health offi­cials in New York, Denver and Los Angeles report that fear of AIDS has led to a marked drop in other veneral diseases among gays. A Madison, Wisconsin, veneral disease clinic reported that in homosexual men surveyed in 1982, each had an average of 6.8 sexual partners in the previous 30 days. In 1983, that number plunged to 3.2, and 7.4 percent of the men had been absti­nent for the previous days, while none were abstinent in 1982. National Gay Group Investigates Military Discrimination Costs National Gay Rights Advocates has called for an investigation of what it costs the government to exclude homosexuals from the military, because the armed for­ces discharges about 1,800 lesbians and gay men annually, based solely on their sexual orientation. "Simple arithmetic shows that millions of dollars are being spent each year to bar gays from serving their country," said Jean O'Leary, NGRA executive director. "We've submitted a number of questions for a Government Accounting Office audit which will reveal just how much the public has to pay for this discrimination." NGRA has a suit pending against the Navy, challenging the constitutionality of its exlusionary regulations. New books from A L y s 0 N PUBLICATIONS 0 THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Friedel, $7.00. The entertaining coming-out story of Burton Raider, who is so elegant that as a child he reads Vogue in his playpen. "The writing is fresh and crisp, the humor often hilarious," writes the L.A. Times. "The funniest gay novel of the year," says Christopher Street. 0 ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. One teenager in ten is gay; here, twenty-six young people tell their stories: of coming to terms with being different, of the decision how - and whether - to tell friends and parents, and what the consequences were. 0 THE BUTTERSCOTCH PRINCE, by Richard Hall, $5.00. When Cor­dell's best friend and ex-Jover is murdered, the only clue is one that the police seem to consider too kinky to follow up on. So Cordell decides to track down the killer himself - with results far different from what he had expected. 0 ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. "I've known that I was gay since I was thirteen. Does that surprise you? It didn't me .... "So begins All-American Boys, the story of a teenage love affair that should have been simple - but wasn't. 0 CHINA HOUSE, by Vincent Lardo, $5.00. A gay gothic that has everything: two handsome lovers, a mysterious house on the hill, sounds in the night, and a father-son relationship that's closer than most. 0 THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDITION, by Patricia Sitkin, $6.00. When Evan Talbot leaves on a mission to rescue an old schoolmate who has been imprisoned by fanatics in the Middle East, he doesn't realize that the trip will also involve his own coming out and the discovery of who it is that he really loves. 0 DEATH TRICK, by Richard Stevenson, $6.00. Meet Don Strachey, a private eye in the classic tradition but with one difference: he's gay. TO ORDER Enclosed is $ ; please send the books I've checked above. !Add $1.00 postage when ordering just one book; if you order more than one, we'll pay postage.) 0 Charge my !circle one): Visa Mastercard acct. no.:---------- expiration date: ____ _ signature:------------------- name address city ____________ state ___ zip _______ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 Americans Unsupportive of Civil Liberties International Gay Newo Agency Apparently a majority of the American public does not believe in the basic tenets of the Constitution, to judge from the results of a recent study of attitudes toward established civil rights, such as free speech, right to assemble and due pro­cess. The study, Dimensions of Tolerance, done by scholars Herbert Mcclosky and Alida Brill, found that fewer than four of every 10 Americans in the general public consistently support the full range of established civil liberties. Between 1976 and 1979, the authors sampled opinion from a wide range of the general public and among select groups such as community leaders, government officials, lawyers, judges, educators and police. When groups lacking widespread popu­lar support, such as gays, seek to exercise their civil rights, the amount of tolerance is startlingly low. "Civil liberties tend to be supported mbre in principle than in actual conduct," says the authors. "And attitudes vary con­siderably according to the particular lib­erty at issue." Most respondents believed, for example, that homosexual relations in private between consenting adults should be left to the individual,. but nearly 60 percent would deny gay leberation groups the use of a community auditorium to promote homosexual rights. But tolerance is much more firmly estab­lished among opinion leaders, who play a significant role in shaping decisions that affect civil liberties, and amoung younger citizens who are significantly and consist­ently more tolerant than older genera­tions. Even such leaders, however, are incon­sistent in areas of emerging liberties, that is, liberties that have not yet been fully articulated or endorsed by public figures and the courts, even when such liberties may be logical outgrowths of established freedoms. Homosexuality Becoming More Acceptable with Non-gays A recent metropolitan newspaper poll showed that just under half the persons questioned in a nationwide survey said a candidate's homosexuality would not influence their decision to vote for the per­son, and some 52 percent supported gay anti-discrimination laws. However, by a 2-1 m11rgin, the same people said they were "unsympathic" to the homosexual com­munity. The findings were published in the Los Angeles Times recently. Of the 1,653 persons telephoned for the survey, 44 percent said they knew some­one who was a homosexual. Some 47 per­cent said whether or not a local candidate was gay would not influence how they voted. A separate poll of Californians revealed that the state is more hospitable to homo­sexuals overall, and 58 percent said they did not oppose the gay lifestyle. However, the national survey showed that 52 percent opposed the gay lifestyle, and only 44 percent did not. The East was the only region where more than half approved of homosexual­ity. The poll indicated a strong resentment of the political activism of gays, and strongest anti-gay feelings were evident in the South and West. Women were more positive about gays, and Roman Catholics were more tolerate of homosexuals than Protestants. The poll was conducted in September. Commentary High School Student Looks at Gay Bar Patrons By Kenny Pope does not have a cent. "Hustlers" go to the T'h , l · . bar to try and sniff out money. If a . e ,o lowing was submitted by a Texas "hustler" spots a man who appears to high school.s~nior whose English teacher have money, then the "hustler" leaches is entering 1t ma Junior L1terat.ure Essay onto the man immediately. If the Contest. Mr. Pope has been going .to gay "hustler" happens to discover that the bars for over four years, he said, smce he man does not have money, then the was 14. "hustler" restarts his sniffing routine. It is Friday night. Time to go out and These three types of gays are not too party. 1:'he bars are filling up with some popular. They are the ones who give the mterestmg characters. Dozens and dozens gay community a bad name. Although ?f men, pack~ within the bar and expect- these types of gays frequently go to the mg a good time. However, despite the gay bars, the other men at the bars toler­many quasi-decent people here, there are ate them. The gay community struggles some undesirables among us. enough with the prejudices coming from There are several types of people who go the outside to create problems within into gay bars. I, or most people in the gay itself. community, have grown accustomed to recognizing three types. The three types I have chosen to discuss are extremists in their personalities and are often consi­dered undesirable by the majority of the respectable members of the gay commun­ity. The three types that I would like to inform you about are the "butch" type, the "queen" type, and the "hustler" type. There are many people who fit slightly into these categories; however, I am strictly discussing the extremists. The first one on the agenda is the "butch" type. "Butch," in the gay com­munity, designates the he-man type. This type is very stereotypical. "Butch" struts ever-so-graciously around the bar, wear­ing his skin tight jeans and t-shirt and forever flexing his muscles. "Butch" con­siders himself"God's gift"; when "Butch" talks, people better listen. "Butch" cannot be approached by another man; "Butch" must be the aggressor. "Butch" does not fool around with someone who has approached him; his machismo will not allow it. When "Butch" carries on a conversa­tion, which is a rare event, he keeps it short and impersonal. "Butch" does not care to waste the energy it requires to com­plete a sentence. Consequently, "Butch" talks in fragmented sentences. However, the occasion may arise when "Butch" is forced to utter a few syllables. For instance, when he has to get another beer, he might say, "Be back; gotta get beer." If one looks, not too carefully, one can spot "Butch" in just about any bar. The next one encountered in a gay bar is the "queen" type. "Queen" too is a very stereotypical role to uphold. The term "queen" is often used synonymously with the terms "fag," "fruit" and "fairy." "Queen" types, unlike the "butch" types, have never heard of a fragmented sent­ence. In fact, "Queens'" entire vocabulary consists of run-ons that they sing. When a "queen" has to get another beer, the inci­dent is usually turned into a major produc­tion number: "Girlfriend! I finished my beer, I have to go and get another one, although I'm really not supposed to be drinking, but I don't think that a few beers will hurt anything, but I want to have a good time, and how can you do that if you don't at least have a buz. REALLY!" A "queen" always has to bethecenterof attention. He will prance around the bar with his hands on his hips as he sways his buttocks from left to right. A "queen" is the one who dances around the bar, since the bar does not have a dancefloor. Fortu­nately, most "queens" tend to go to the same bars in large groups, sparing the rest of the gay community. Lastly on the list is the "hustler" type. A "hustler" is someone who will take a man for everything he has got, and then move to the next victim in line. This type is often the most undetectable because they usu­ally fit into the "butch" or"queen" catego-ries. . "Hustlers" are infamous for buymg a cocktail and when they finish it, go into the restroom and fill their glass with water. This method results in the "hμstler" appearing as if he can afford the night out; while in reality, tne "hustler" Ill. I.. .. MARCH 2, 1984 I THE STAR 9 ,,-- '~ '';\; E.A.~LEC:R.EST Il'-J":N" Eor Ultimate Accomodations Heated Pool * Jacuzzi * Cont- BreakEast Weekends 104 Avondale, HC>USTC>N (713) 523-9004 10 THE STAR/ MARCH 2, 1984 Fourteen-Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fo Sat MAR. MAR. 2 3 MAR. MAR. MAR. MAR. MAR. MAR. MAR. 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 MAR MAR. MAR. MAR. MAR. 11 12 13 14 15 For edd tiona mtormat.an or phone numbers tor events I sled below 10011. tor lhe sponsoring orgamza1 on under Organ zat1ons in lt'le The Srar'1 0 1rectcry Selected Events First UN 10 K'EEKS: 7th Annual Week Fund for Human D1gmty Dinner. May 14. Plaza Hotel. New York, honoring U.S. Rep. Gerry Studds (D-Mass.) •TUf.:'iDA Y: Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday, Mar. 6 Selected Events in Future Weeks u,-.· 2 WEEKS: St. Patrick's Day, Mar. 17 •IN 3 WEEKS: Austin Lesbian Gay Political Caucus meets 7pm Mar 27, Commissioner's Court, Courthouse Annex •l.V 4 WEEKS: Parents & Fnends of Lesbians & Gays regional convention Mar. 30-31, Houston • l.V 4 WEEKS: Apr. Fool's Day, Apr. 1 • IN 4 WEEKS: ALGPC sponsored "AIDS Awareness Week" opens, April 1..8, Austin U.V 4 WEEKS: UT-Austin Gay/Lesbian Student Assoc. & ALGPC AIDS Awareness Week Committee educational forum April 3 •IN 5 WEEKS: Hill Country Leathermen 1st anniversary party Apr. 6-7, "Black and Bluebonnets," Back Street Basics, 611 E 7th, Austin u . ...-6 WEEKS: A1lBtin AIDS Awareness Week party & auction April 7, Hilton Hotel 9/N 6 WEEKS: Austin AIDS Awareness Week blood drive April 8 • IN 6 WEEKS: 9th Annual Southeastern Conference of Lesbian and Gay Men, "Pulling Together and Reaching Out," Holiday Inn-Medical Center, Birmingham, Ala., opens, Apr. 12·15 •IN 7 WEEKS: Fiesta opens, San Antonio, Apnl 20 •IN. 7 Wl:..'EKS: Nat1onal Gay Health Education Foundation !st Southeastern Lesbian/ Gay Health Conference, Apr. 21, Atlanta • IN 9 WEEKS: Fiesta climaxes, San Antonio, Apr. 28-29 • 11V 9 WEEKS: First primary party elections in Texas and party precinct conventions, May 5 • IN 10 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans. May 12·.Sov 11 BERNIE •I.'V 11 WEE"KS: Texas Senatonal District Party Convenuons, May 19 •IN 12 WEEKS: Gay Press Association 4th National Convention, May 25-28, Los Angeles •I.V 12 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 26 •I.'\' J ,'1 WEf:KS: Run-off party elections m Texas, June 2 UN 13 WEE.KS: Austin Gay Pride Week begins, .June 4·10 •IN 13 WEEKS: Austin Gay Pride Week event; skating party June 4 UN 13 WEEKS: Austin Gay Pride Week event: picnic June 9 UN 13 WEE"KS: Austin Gay Pride Week event: parade June 10 UN 16 WEEKS: Texas Democratic Party Convention, June 15-17, tentatively Houston •EARi, l' JUI, Y: Lesbian and Gay Bands of America concert, Los Angeles • IN 16 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Foundation's !st International Lesbian Gay Health Conference, "Toward Diversity." New York, June 16-19 • IN 16 WEEKS: Dallas "Pride III 'R4" opens. "Unity and More in '1!4," Gay Pride Week June 2.1-30 • IN 16 WEF.KS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins June 24 in many areas, national slogan "United & More in '84" •I.V 16 WEF.KS: 15th anniversary of Stonewall Riots, New York, June 27, 1969, marking the beginning of the modem gay rights movement • I.•; 17 WEEKS: Dallas Gay Pride Week event: Oak Lawn Softball Association tournament June 3() • IN 17 WEEKS: Dallas Gay Pride Week event: Razzlc Dazzle Dallas, June 30 • IN 19 WEEKS: Democratic National Convention, San Francisco, July 16-19 • IN 21 WEEKS: "Hot Men. Hotlanta," anDual raft race down Chattahoochee River, Atlanta, Aug 3-5 •II\' 23 WEEKS: 21.06 Freedom Celebration, Dallas, Aug. 17·19 91!\" 23 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug. 19, San Francisco •I.V 2.'1 WEEKS: Republic.an .Sational Convention opens, Dallas, August 20 •I.V 24 WEEKS: ''Senes R," Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens Memorial Park, Houston, Aug. 26·31 •IN 28 WEf."KS: opening of Texas Freedom Festivnl, Dallas, &pt. 16-23 •I.'\' 29 WEf,"KS: Texas Freedom Festival event Human Rights Campaign Fund Dinner. Dallas, Sept. 22 (tentative) •I.V 29 WEEKS: Texas Freedom Festival event. Texas Goy Pride Parade and Rally, Dallos, St•pt. 2.3 Star Classified Store Owners Are you a STAR distribution point? If not, become one. There's no charge and you'll find it will bring people into your business. To be a distribution pom\, we require you to place the newspaper 1n a lighted, easlly·access1ble location, and be able to distribute at least 25 copies each Issue. (Some locations go through 400 to 500 copies each issue.) Your location will be printed in the paper each issue Yes, I'm still in love with you-you hateful son-of-a-bitch! ~' ! NEYER ~LD AA'IE ~ISEO BERNIE I'D START TWIS E'lCCERCISE ft!DGfW-1. UGff, OH I CANT 00 rr.'TMIS IS MORE 1lW-! A MAH CAN S'W-40. Gl'ff ME STRE.HGTIH NO, t MUST GO ()-J •1 r: HAVE 10 t(UP TIMMG, •v'1-l ™OlJGH I f1\INT A04 E1JW,IST... ... WILL YOU A£4SC &E.T ClJf ~ llW BEO. YOO STMrr '<OUR ftCCR.CISE f'F,OGAAM 1{)W>.Y •1 Gay Community Star Classified Advertising These rates apply only to advertismg in this section of the newspaper For regular display advertising rates, call our Display Advertising Sales Department, Austin 448- 1380 or San Antonio 737-()()87 YOU PAY BY THE WORD: You get up to 3 words in bold, all capital letters and centered on one line, for a total cost of $2. (Or up to 6 words, $4. Or up to 9 words, $6. Etc.) Then, each additional word in regular type, is 30¢. THIS LINE $2.00 Then each additional word like this is 30¢. THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $4.00 Then each additional word like this is 30¢ THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS, CENTERED, BOLD, $6.00 Then each additional word like this 1s30$ LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 issues or longer, make no copy changes during the run, pay for the full run in advance, and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 issues or longer under the same conditions and deduct 25%. BLIND AD NUMBER: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number. V\le'll confidentially forward all responses to your ad to you by mail. Rate is $3 for each issue the ad runs. (Responses will be forwarded indefinitely, however, for as long as they come in.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad in or phone it in. You can pay by c heck, MasterCard or Visa. Or you can charge to your Community Credit Account. (To apply for a Community Credit Account, call Austin 448-1380 or San Antonio 737-0087 and ask for an app licat ion form.) If you do no t wish to charge to a credit card or do not have a Community Cred it Account, you can still place an ad by p hone. VVe will bill you w ith payment due upon receipt. DEADLINE: Ads received in our office prior 5:30pm Tuesday on the week of pub lication w ill be p laced in that week's newspaper. Ads received later will be placed in the following edition. ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number, c/o The Star, Voice· Pu blishing Co., 3317 Montrose, suite 204, Houston, TX 77006. It w ill be forwarded, unopened, to the advertiser. Enclose no money. $2 bold line: $2 bold line: $2 bold line: 304 regular words: --------------------- Use additional paper 11 necessary CATEGORIES: 0 Announcements 0 Accomodations 0 Cars & Bikes 0 Commercial Space 0 Dwellings & Roommates 0 Employment & Jobs Wanted D Items for Sele D Models, Escorts, Masseurs D Personals 0 Pets 0 Services D Travel 0 Yard & Garage Sales ____ bold lines at $2 each: ----regular words at 30$ each: Blind ad number for $3? Com plele issue of newspaper with my ad in ii mailed to me, $1.25? TOTAL l'OR 1 ISSUE: Times ____ lnuea: Less 15'Mo discount for 4 to 12 issues or 25'Mo discount for 13 Issues or more equals COST OF AD(S) O Also, I wish to receive the Gay Community Siar home delivered each issue I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged, as indicated below) an add1llonal o $19 for six months or D $29 for 1 year TOTAL ENCLOSED or lo be billed or charged: -------------­METHOD OF PAYMENT: 0 Check enclosed 0 Money order enclosed O Visa charge 0 MasterCard charge 0 Community Credit Account If charging, card expiration dale: ------- Number - Signature: Name Address Phone(s), for verification of ad, 1f necessary MAIL TO: The Star, c/o Voice Publishing Co., 3317 Montrose, suite 204. Houston, TX 77006. OR PHONE Austin 448-1380 or San Antonio 737-0087 weekdays 10am to 5:30pm. O SEND A COMMUNITY CREDIT ACCOUNT APPLICATION FORM ANNOUNCEMENTS BUSINESS OwNERs\Yei.Stt-;ffeach week 1" this directory community organ1zat1ons plus businesses serving as d1stnbut1on points for the STAR e 1nd1cates ih1s lisl1ng 1s·a STAR d.str~t~n point COMMERCIAL SPACE FRENCH QUARTER BAR New Orleans, established, 35-years on busy street, excellent location, lucrative, low down with some owner financing Contact Fanguy and Associates. (713) 439-1334 GAY BARS AUSTIN- • Austil) Alternative-5500 S Congress- 442-9285 e Back Street Basics-611 f 7th_:iJ7-=33'9-1 • Boat House-407 Colorado-•74-9667 • Buddie's-1301 Lavaca • The Crossing-611 Red River_.76--3611 • Dirty Sally's-2828 Rio Grande-478-8782 CORPUS CHRIST/- Hidden Door-1003 Morgan Av-882-0183 Jolly Jack 2-413 Peoples Spanish Ganeon-517 N Chaparral-882-0Stu Sandbar-•08 Taylor-8&4-0277 Zodiac-617 S Staples-883-7753 EL PASO-The Apartment-804 Myrtle g:~~~~ar~:;i~ ~ ~r~~~~"e~vs4i-ik~18 Le Milord-207'i4t E San Antonlo-546-9327 Noa Noa-6726 Alameda Av-77~9273 Old Plantation-219 S Ochoa·-533-6055 Pet Shop 11-919 Palsano Or-546-9629 San Antonio Mmmg Co-800 E San Antonio- 546-9903 Whispers-601 N El Pa~"54_•_-1i-'96_9 _ _ McALLEN-Bumpers- 1100 Pecan Outty·s-1702 N 10th Mail Box-200 N 29th SAN ANGEL-o=--- Pha.se 111-2226 Sherwood _Way- 942-9188 SAN ANTONIO-e Ab's Westernatre-622 Roosevelt-532-0015 e Bogarts-115•1 West Ave-34~7167 • Bonham Exchange-•11 Bonham-271·3811 • Cahoots-~ McCarty-34'--9257 • Club Atlantis-321 N1varro-22s-i:M68-­• Club Heads or Taila-2526Culebr1~50 e Crew-309 W Market-223-0333 e EI Jardin-106 Navarro-22,,,3-:..7;.;1"-7'-7 _ _ iFaC8s-=-ili'-Ei M1Q.::-3• 1-43o::-.::=2_ ____ e Galleon-330 San Pedro- ·225-2353 e LJ's-3503 Wast Av- 341-9359 • "'•dam Arthur's-607 N St Mary's -22:;.9678 • Noo Zoo- 10121 Coachllght • One Nighl Saloon- 815 Fredencksburg- 73&9942 e Our Place-115 Gen Krueger-~~ e Perlect Blend--4326 Gardendal ..... 699-9631 e Raw Power & Ught Co-2315 San Pedro- 734-3399 • San Pedro Connectlon-826 San Pedro"":""- 222-0750 e Snufty's Saloon-820 San Pidro-~ ~a0ulevard-1430N Ma1nA;-~s-U54 • T•lk of the Town- 353o Broadway-826--9729 • 2015 Place-2015 San Pedro-7~- - ORGANIZATIONS AMERICAN INDIAN & non-Indian Hobbles! contact group for powwows nationwide & at Reno Gay Rodeo. Write to Box 150, 318 E. 6th St., New York, NY 10003 SELECTED NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS-Gey Prus Aasociallon- POB 33605. Washington. oc 20033-(2021 387-2430 Gay Rtghts NlhONI Lobby-POB 1892, W1Sh1ngton. oc 20013-(202) 546-11101 Human Rights Campaign Fund-POB 1396. Wasl'l­• ngton. OC 20013-(202) 54&-2025 Lambda L~I Oetense-132 W .-3rd New York. N 10039-(212) 94+.9488 Macha Fund !or Hum1n R1gh11 (Gey Press Assoc11t1on)-POB 33605. Wesh1ngton. , DC 20033-(202) 387-2430 National Assoc•ltlOt'I of Business Counc1ts~Box 1514.5 s.,, Francesco. CA 94115-(415) 885-6363 National Auociatton of Gay & Leab1an Democratic Clubs-1742 Mau Av SE. Washington. DC 20003-(202) 5-47-310.f Nlit>0n1! Gay Hettth Education Foundehon-POB 784. New York. NV 100345-(2121 563-5313 or Dr Greenberg •I (713) 523-5204 N•tional Gey A1ghta Advocalea-540 CHtro. S.n Francisco. CA 941U -(415) 863-3624 Ne11on11 Gay Task Force-80 51h Av. New Vork. NV 10011 -(212) 741-5800 NGTF's Cr1s1sl1ne-(800) 221-7044 (OU!Slde New Yoric State) Texas G1ytlutu1n Task Forc&-POB AK. Denton 76201-(817) 387-8216 AUSTIN- - ---- Austin Lambda-POB 5455. 78763-478-8653 women·scotfeehouse 7·11pm Mar9. 408W23rd with slide show ·From Spiral to Spear" ~esb1an1Gay Po1rtiC'a1 Cauc~s --P08e22 78767-0• -2717 meets 4th Tues 7pm Comm1ut0ners Court. Courthouse Annex. AIDS Awareness Week April 1-8 (Janet Zumbrun at «1·1130) with UT-Aushn Gaytlesbtan Student Assoc. & AIDS Awareness Week Committee educational forum Apnl 3, Hilton Hotef party & ~ct1~ -~~nl 7. blood drive April 8 Auslm Pnde Week Task Force- JlOB 13303 78711 ~Joe1 Jacobson at 143-0435 meels upstairs 302 W 15th. Gay Pride Wffk Jun 4-10 .,.,1th skalLng party Jun 4 picnic Jufl 9. parade Jun 10 MARCH 2, 1984 I THE STAR 11 Hill Country Leatherme~OTony R;t.n-POe 595. Mancha ca 78652-244-0261. 288-3088 1st anniversary party Apr 6-7 Stack and Bluebonnets."" Back Street Basi-cs. 6-11 E 7t-h CORPUS CHRIST/- Gay Bartenders Assoc1at1on-Cfo Zodiac Lounge, 617 Stapies-883-7753 Metropolitan Community Church-clo Umtanan Church, 3125 Horne Rd· as~-9698 meets Spm Sundays SAN ANTONIO-Alamo Human Rights Committee-150 Terrell Plaza #186. 78209--0S.-0074. 655-5485 Oignity-349-3632· meets Sun 5pm. St Patncks Church, 1-35 near New Braunfels & Pine Gay Switchboard-733-7300 Integrity/SA-PCB 15006. 78212--734:()]59 meets 1st & 3rd Thurs Lambda AA-1312 Wyoming-674-2819 - Lesbian & Gay People 1n Medicine-Bo)( 290043. 78280 Rockin' R RM:lers-eto Our Place. 115 Gen Krueger-340-1758 SA Gay Alliance-Bo)( 12063. 78212-733-8315 MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS TEXESCORT-OF COURSE! Many superlatives can be used to describe our guys; however, we do know the importance of your security and our discretion. Ma1or credit cards honored {713) 524-9511. PERSONALS GOT A CCC? What's a "CCC"? It's the Community Credit Card-a division of the Voice Publishing Co. Call Austin 448-1380 or San Antonio 737-0l87 lor an apphcat1on form GWM, 29, 6'1", brnlbrn. seeks sincere person to build lifetime relationship. POB 2574. Aushn 78768 SEEKING FRIEND/LOVER Me-WiM, 5'9". 150, 42, hairy. versatile You-under 40. smooth, slim body Skip 512/828-8481 STAR ADVERTISING WORKS Find that special person through a Star Classified. Call Austin 448-1380 or San Antonio 737--0087 And charge 1t on your Community Credit Card. MasterCard or Visa PRIVATE GAY CLUBS AUSTIN-e Club Austin Balhs-308 W 16th-476-7986 SAN ANTONIO- • Club San Anton10-1802N Main A¥· 735-2467 • E)lecutive Health Club-723 Av B-225-8807 RESTAURANTS, CAFES AUSTIN- ~7~~8~m Bob. Esq Eatery-607 Red River- SAN ANTONIO-e Sogarts-11541 West Av-349-7167 • Circles-107 w Locusl-733-5237 SERVICES, ETC. STAR ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through a Siar Class1f1ed Call Austin 448-1380 or San Antonio 737-0087. And charge it on your Community Credit Card. MasterCard or Visa. AUSTIN-Gay Community Star. Austin-448-1380 SAN ANTONIO-Am9fican Male (hair repiacemerits)-3438 N St "'•rys-73&9678 Gay Community Star, San Antonto-737-00S7 ThlOk Aheed Haircutters-52•7 McCunough-= 824-9862 Villa Monte Carlo-N St Marys at Mulberry- 73&9698 SHOPS & STORES AUSTIN-e Book Woman-324 E 16th-472-2785 e wax Attack Records-609 E 7th-473-8313 e Works--C13 E. 6th-474-451l SAN ANTONIO- • On Main-251' N Main-737-2323 e Hog Wild Records-182• N Main-733-535-4 • Record Hc»e-6431 San Pedro-349-1367- • Stnog of Pearls Vintage Ctoth1ncj...:1eoo N M11n-733-1•33 e V1deo Wortd-1802 N Main-736-9927 • Kevin Wagner Cerds & Gitts-1801 N Mal0- 733-~55 TRAVEL EL RANCHO VISTA Experience that special charm found only at a guest house. Spend the weekend in the country. POB 245, Glen Rose, TX 76043 (817) 897-4982. TRAVEL-GROUP LEADERS Consult us first about your group needs Various fares and rules may permit you to tavel free Travel Consultants, 1-800-392-5193 Horoscope For Friday. March 2. 1984, through Thursday, March 8. 1984 ARIES-Week's beginning should fmd you bemg domestic for a change. Clean house and expect company for dinner Cupid comes a-call in', so a good time is had by all. Later, the spring air finally arrives TAURUS-Household affairs are to the fore. Company, home improvements and spring cleaning may be on the agenda. too. Pay bills, make needed calls and run errands. A busy week GEMINI- Be honest with yourself No sugar-coating the facts, please. Be true to your ethics and conscience. You could be making out a new budget in light of recent financial information. Should be good. CANCER-Keep on top of all your affairs. Don't get behind and don't give anyone the chance to nag you. Look your best for a certain social function. Later, spring nights may give you pause for reflection with quiet self-appraisal. LEO-You'd better get with it, and stay with it. One who has the say-so will say so if you're found slacking off or playing around. I'm sorry, but at least you won't be able to say you weren't warned' VIRGO- The accent is on motives in the nights and days ahead. You may know what someone is doing but figuring out why it's being done will take doing on your part. LIBRA- This is a good time for blazing new trails. Just be sure you mark them well so that you can find your way back' Two propositions will be offered. The one involving money is apt to be too much of a gamble. SCORPIO- Like miners who pan for gold, you may need to sift infor­mation to separate truth from fantasy. Later, you can invite others to share your act. But don't let 'em steal your show. Or your thunder. SAGITTARIUS-Pool your resources with those of one certain other Each of you has talents that together 1n concert can produce beautiful harmony. Latter nights see a sharpened focus clearing the way for a new perspective. CAPRICORN- You're an optimist, sort's only natural that you notice the bright side. However, if you've been hiding behind rose-colored glasses, get ready. They're about to come off. Days close to gasps and snorts AQUARIUS- Develop a one-track mind for the next few days You know your priorities but sometimes it's easy to be sidetracked by others Do make time for romantic interlude before these days hustle to hectic halt. PISCES-Give gossip your whole-hearted non-support. Avoid trivia And take note of everything going on around you, not iust m your own circle Play your cards right and you get the pot. c 1984 VOICE PL!BUSHJNG COMPANY 12 THE STAR I MARCH 2, 1984 AUSTIN'S NEW BEER BUST AND T·DANCE NO COVER-BE THERE Time: Every Monday, spm Place: Back Street Basics, on the patio Bartender: Bobby D.J.: Richard BE THERE
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