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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979
File 019
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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 019. 1979-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 17, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1340.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-05). Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 019. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1340

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 019, 1979-05, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 17, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1340.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979
Contributor
  • Murray, John
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date May 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 may 1979 Gay Austin vol. 3. no. 8 Junk Peed Aicvies Continued from page 16 any similarities are coincidental. In The Champ, the fighter {Jon Voight) is retired, a habitual gambler and beer drinker, and sole parent to a precocious, highly impressionable little boy named T.J. (Ricky Schroder). The two live next to a horse-race track, amid other flunkies who seem to spend most of their time oohing and aahing at The Champ's eccentricities. Enter TJ.'s mother (Faye Dunaway, looking like the fat sister of Botticelli's "Venus"), who eight years earlier had left the family for life in the upper class with a more sophisticated hubby. Naturally Mother decides TJ. is adorable and wants him on weekends. Naturally, The Champ resists this notion fiercely, feeling her intrusion a blow to his self-respect and dignity as a man and a father. Naturally this leads him back to the ring to prove himself to the world, and naturally, (yawn) after a brutal contest, he gains not only the heart of Mom and the everlasting devotion of T.J., but a bout with that Supreme Heavyweight in the Sky. In between all this predictable melodrama, and often during it, TJ. either cries, or chirps "Champ! Champ! Champ!" After a while he begins to sound like an irritating parakeet, and you can almost sympathize with Daddy when he finally slaps the kid into momentary silence. Sadly, the stars of this fdm can do little to elevate their material. Voight and Dunaway make a useless pairing; they have no chemistry whatsoever. Voight, for his part, is affecting, but he never achieves the degree of sensitivity and warmth that distinguished his work in Coming Home. And the accent he has created for the role doesn't help any. It's a cross between Stallone and "Waterfront" Brando. Dunaway, of course, has never been warm, and in this film she looks particularly cold against the California tans of her co-stars. Still, she comes as close as she ever has to being sympathetic, especially in her climactic scene with Schroder. The problem lies partly in the character. In Eyes of Laura Mars, at least Dunaway played a vbrant career woman, a fashion photographer. In The Champ she has devolved into a languid fashion show emcee, and the part seems tainted with sexism. Small wonder the gifted actress gives less than an inspired performance. Schroder is a talented youngster, probably the best ofthe current crop of child actors, but he's not overwhelming as some would have you believe. For one thing, re mote-control tear ducts can only fascinate for so long. LEGAL SERVICES AT REASONABLE FEES The Legal clinic charges $15 for your initial consultation session with an attorney. There is no time limit. If you need or want additional services, we will supply you with a written fee quotation. If you don't wish to go on with a case after consultation, you are under no further obligation. t Uncontested divorce (no property or children) $100. t Uncontested divorce (with property or children) $150. • Uncontested divorce (with property and children) $185. • Name change $45. t Bankruptcy, individual $250. • Bankruptcy, husband and wife $300. • Simple will, individual $45. • Simple wills, husband and wife $70. Legal fees quoted above do not include court costs. These fees are for cases filed in Travis County between April 9. 1979-June 30, 1979. Fees for legal work outside Travis County will be higher. Job Injury. Personal Injury. Criminal and other Civil Cases not listed above are accepted. Please call for an appointment. No legal advice will be given over the telephone. LEGAL CLINIC AT 617 BLANCO Austin, Texas 78703 512-477-1700 Vivian Mahlab HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 9-4: Evenings & weekends by appointment The real problem with this movie is Zeffirelli. While there are some good moments (chiefly when he's filming Schroder or other children), there are more often bad ones. The Film has no subtlety (violins swell at every opportunity), and the way it demands that you cry, that you be affected, is insulting. You feel manipulated. By far the worst scene, however, suffers merely from a case of technical incompetence: the climactic fight is embarassing to watch, a mangled mess of poor staging, poor camera work and poor editing. ' Perhaps the best moment in The Champ is purely unintentional. During an early confrontation scene, there is a shot of Dunaway, standing rigidly, glaring at Voight. Just before the cut, a fly zooms in and kamikazis the dignified actress right in the eye. She blinks furiously, but manages to keep her composure. Miraculously, this take has ended up in Zeffirelli's film. That's entertainment? Two things worry me. First, the sight of Voight and Dunaway in this project. Are we to believe this is the best material they've been offered? Can they really feel good about playing in, and thus endorsing, this junk food movie? Is this the cue for Redford, Nicholson, Keaton, Hoffman, et al.? (Streisand has already taken a minor wade-in with A Star Is Born; Fonda likewise with an old-fashioned thriller, The China Syndrome.) Big-name stars increase the chances of a big gross. A big gross means more of the same kind of movie in the future. Which means more junk food, and probably fewer truly valuable or at least satisfying efforts. Is that what Voight, the star of the searing Midnight Cowboy and the ground-breaking Coming Home, really wants? Or Dunaway, Warren Beatty's co-star in that pioneering Sixties ballad, Bonnie and Clyde? Second, will audiences fall for The Champ? I'm betting they will. Voight is hot right now. The movie's got a talented little kid, an exciting horse race, and a grueling, punch-packed boxing match. It has enough bathos to satisfy even the most demanding sentimentalist. In short, it's the kind of movie America can't get enough of right now. The next question has to be, why? V Continued from page 17 new songs released each month to pick out the 10 or 20 with the most potential. They must then be played at the right times to familiarize people with them without losing the dance floor. The majority of disco spinners program their selections according to beats-per-minutc (BPM's), working up to a peak of around 140 (for example, Amii Stewart's Knock On Wood) and then gradually (or in some cases, rapidly) returning to a slower BPM (Do Ya 'Think I'm Sexy by Rod Stewart). This is done for variety, since a constant, rapid BPM becomes tiresome, as does a slow one. Variety maintains a higher interest level. This up and down progression is one reason the dj may tell people making requests that it will be a long time before their songs can be played. If the spinner is working up to a fast BPM and someone requests a slower song, it will take some time to work back down after reaching the peak. The mix or blend (segue) is another factor that comes into play since songs with conflicting sounds cannot be successfully mixed. Now to tie all this together with the question of requests. Through experience and knowledge, the dj is best suited to "read" the crowd and choose which songs should be played on which nights and at what point in the night. A brand new song would not usually be a good choice on a slower, more laid back night. It can be quite frustrating for a dj to receive a forceful request for a song when it's against his or her better judgment to play it, or even impossible to do so at that point in the night. If the dj plays the song and loses the dance floor, then he or she is not doing a good job. It is not possible to please everyone. A good disco dj is one who, through the ability to program the music, is able to please the majority. ^
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