Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979
File 017
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 017. 1979-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1338.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-05). Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 017. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1338

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 017, 1979-05, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1338.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979
Contributor
  • Murray, John
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date May 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 may 1979 Gay Austin vol. 3. no. 8 EIVER CITY CINE/HA JUNK FOOD MOVIES Something weird is happening in Hollywood. I realize that might sound a tad redundant, since Hollywood pratically invented the word "weird," so I should explain. Toss aside the usual Tinseltown stuff — earthquakes, "est," kinky sex, even the Oscars. This goes to the very heart of our film culture. To wit: in the last few years, the movie industry seems to have come full circle, returning after nearly three decades to schlocky, vacuous formula cinema. When television invaded the nation in the early Fifties, eroding the broad support cinema had enjoyed for decades, Hollywood was forced to re-define its intentions. By the mid-Sixties it had found a niche, providing an outlet for themes and ideas that T.V. couldn't touch at the time. Many films of the Sixties, whether great or small, expensive or cheap, concentrated in one way or another on the torment and upheaval that society was experiencing. Movies like Dr. Stangelove, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, Midnight Cowboy, and Kenneth Anger's Scorpio Rising surged with energy, innovation and, in some cases, an underlying contempt for the predictable, seemingly irrelevant cinema that for the most part had characterized mainstream Hollywood. This trend continued somewhat in the early, pre-Watergate Seventies, particularly in films like A Clockwork Orange, Cabaret and Francis Ford Coppola's The Conversation, which may be the supreme example of unrelenting alienation in contemporary American film. But somehow, in the last few years, schlock has found its way back to the wide screen. This is not to say there aren't any meaningful, powerful films any more, or films that don't compromise in dealing with society's ills. Nashville, Annie Hall and even Days of Heaven have continued the Sixties' imperative in their own masterful ways. And I also don't mean to imply that formula cinema has been completely dormant for twenty-five years. Seldom does any genre disappear completely; in this case, it simply diminished to insignificance. But the pendulum is swinging once again, this time in the opposite direction. More and more cliche-ridden, predictable movies are popping up, and I mean major productions. Lately it's become difficult to tell the features from the junk food at the concession stand. Both are prettily packaged, very sweet to the taste, and expensive as hell. But if you eat too much, you get sick. And America is currently suffering from an acute case of cinematic indigestion. Contemporary junk food cinema has murky origins, but I'm willing to cite Rocky as the trend-setter. This relatively cheap, seemingly harmless little film came out of nowhere to seduce movie-going America to a rather remarkable degree. Almost overnight everybody was talking about a talented young hunk named "Sly" Stallone and his marvelous, "old-fashioned" movie. Had the adulation stopped with the reviews and box office receipts, Rocky would have been a handsome success. But it went on to win the Best Picture Oscar, leaving in its wake such notable films as Network and All The President's Men. It was a spectacular triumph for Stallone. But it was also an ominous reflection of the tone of our times, of America's craving for hope and anachronistic values, and it started a trend that fllmgoers are now paying for dearly, in more ways than one. INDIVIDUAL & RELATIONAL COUNSELING Andrew Fono 2004V2 GUADALUPE 472-7690 by Bob Prewitt After Rocky came Star Wars (whose story everybody knows), The Goodbye Girl and, last summer, Heaven Can Wait, which stands as something of a turning point. Not only was "Heaven" the first modern junk food movie to feature a bonafide star, Warren Beatty, but Beatty produced, co-directed and co-wrote the film as well. When you consider Beatty's career prior to "Heaven" — in particular, the daring, renegade reputations of his best-known efforts, Bonnie and Clyde and Shampoo — it's enough to give pause. In a way, Beatty has single-handedly endorsed and legitimized modern junk food cinema. In the interim between "Heaven" and the present Superman has come and almost gone, vanquishing American rather unevenly, but nevertheless lucratively. And now we must endure yet another batch of schlock, the most syrupy and offensive offered so far. One of Hollywood's latest brainshowers is already in town: The Champ. Director Franco Zeffirelli (Romeo and Juliet; the wonderful television production of Jesus of Nazareth) has remade King Vidor's 1933 movie, and regardless of how you feel about junk food films, it's clear that he's botched it. The Champ is something of a Rocky Goes South. In fact it's safe to say that this version of The Champ would not be here were it not for Rocky's success. Both films concern the lives of ostensibly washed-up boxers, but beyond that, Continued on page 18 KUT-FM'S ROCK OF AGES PRESENTS TOWN BLOODY HALL a film by D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus A laugh-out-loud documentary with Norman Mailer, Germaine Greer. Direct from New York's Whitney Museum of American Art. Austin Premier showing! also TRICIA'S (NIXON) WEDDING by Sebastian with the Cockettes Wednesday May 2,1979 8:00 pm $2.00 Batts Hall UT. KUTI 90.7
File Name uhlib_5962538_v003_n008_016_ac.jpg