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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979
File 009
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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 009. 1979-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1330.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-05). Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 009. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1330

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 009, 1979-05, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1330.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979
Contributor
  • Murray, John
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date May 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 may 19/9 Gay Austin vol. 3, no. 8 'SEXUAL STATUS' BILL PASSES CONNECTICUT SENATE HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT - A bill to ban discrimination on the basis of "sexual status" in housing, licensing, employment and state services was approved by the Connecticut Senate on April 4 by a vote of 19 to 17. The term "sexual orientation," used in earlier versions of the proposed legislation, was changed to "sexual status" to include cohabiting heterosexuals. The Connecticut Gay Task Force says the change in wording and coverage considerably improves chances for pass age of the bill since it is no longer specifically gay. Senators also voted to approve an amendment to clarify the definition of the term "sexual status." Gay Task Force members consider the bill "a logical extension of the 1969 Privacy Act, which repealed Connecticut's sodomy law; behavior which is not criminal should not be allowed to be a basis for discrimination." Opposition ot the bill is expected to be much stronger in the House of Representatives than in the Senate.V Massachusetts Governor Fires Women's Commission BOSTON - Massachusetts governor Edward King fired all 40 members of the Governor's Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) last March 28 GAY RIGHTS DENIED AT JUNIOR PROM CUMBERLAND, RHODE ISLAND - Seventeen-year-old Paul Guilbert plans to pursue his desire to take a male es- coTt to the Cumberland High School junior prom despite opposition from his parents and school officials and abuse and resentment from his fellow students. A hearing on Guilbert's request scheduled earlier by school officials was cancelled at his parents' insistence. Guilbert says his parents accepted his sexual preference when he came out to them but "blew their top" at his request to take a male friend to the May 4 dance. "I feel I should be able to go," he said. "I have just as much right as any other junior to go." Guilbert was shaken by his schoolmates' reaction to his request. "I'm very nervous," he said. "They were yelling and screaming, practically the whole student body. Every class I went to, people stopped to look at me. They asked me for my autograph. It was kind of sick." V immediately after the commission fulfilled its customary role by writing him a letter evaluating his proposed budget with respect to its impact on women. The letter criticized King's elimination of cost-of-living increases to welfare families, his opposition to Medicaid- funded abortions, his rejection of sliding-fee day care, his failure to fund a training program for displaced home- makers, and hie inadequate funding of home care for the elderly. The Commission praised King's efforts to clean up welfare fraud. King announced plans to name a new commission of 25 members serving con- terminously with him and at his pleasure. Under the new plan, the group would be limited to advising the governor on violent crime against women, child abuse and displaced homemakers. "No man should be selecting priorities for a women's commission," declared ousted CSW vice-chairwoman Sheila Clemon-Karp. "A women's commission should and always has chosen its own priorities."V STRAIGHT MEN ELECTION... Ray Hill. MARCH... Continued from page 1 women has been planned, and religious services have been scheduled for Sunday. Ray Hill of Houston, interim chair of the steering committee, says that interest in the march is increasing and that if as many as 80% of the regions send delegates then a successful march is almost assured. He says he went to the Philadelphia conference at which the event was originally planned with no commitment to backing it but with an open mind, and was impressed. "The Philadelphia conference was the most sensitive, the most self-critical, the most self-analytical I have been to in 15 or 16 years of attending gay conferences," Hill said. "I've never seen a conference as open to Third World and women's input. There was no fighting, no struggle for power." Other observers fault the conference as being dominated by those who could afford to attend, that is by well-to-do white men, and claim the Houston meeting will be similarly unrepresentative despite good intentions and sensitivity to the needs of ethnic minorities and women. Local activists point out the difficulty of choosing delegates to represent areas as widely separated and diverse as El Paso, Amarillo and Austin, all of which are in the same region-V TO CHAIR NOW. CONFERENCE NEW YORK - Doug Fraser, head of the United Auto Workers, and Thomas A. Murphy, chairman of General Motors, are among those selected to co-chair a November, 1979, conference on the alt performances $5.00 tickets now on sale 470-4530 4th A Lavaca St. Future of the American Family sponsored by the National Organization for Women. Other co-chairs of the one-day event are Equitable Life Assurance Society president Coy Ecklund; Senator Charles Percy; and advertising executive Jane Trahey. Muriel Fox, co-founder of NOW and organizer of the conference, said, "I think it's very important to raise the consciousness of establishment people and I hope we get as many of them there as possible" The conference will feature a $20-a- plate luncheon at which Betty Friedan, Alvin Toffler and Isaac Asimov will speak on the future of the family in "an era of growing equality." V Continued from page 1 ethnic, and anti-women stereotypes," she said. Rose reviewed the election, noting, "Gays and lesbians didn't bother to vote because they are more interested in traditional party politics and did not seem to be so concerned about gay rights in the University." Rose conceded that there haven't been any dramatic issuesto mobilize UT gays. But, he said, "there are issues that gays on campus could mobilize around, and the editor of the Texan could address those issues, things like the Texas Penal Code and other legislative matters." Rose and editor candidate Tom Kessler throughout their campaigns were answering rumors and innuendos spread by anti-gay forces, and both were victims of vandalism to their cars the night before the April 4 election. Rose observed, "It's somewhat ironic that gay people aren't more politically inclined, because there's certainly a lot of anti-gay hysteria, of homophobia, on the UT campus. One thing that mobilized the conservatives in the race was their perception that someone who was sensitive to gay rights stood a very good chance of assuming the Texan editorship. "If a heterosexual encounters this homophobia, a gay or lesbian doesn't stand a chance as a candidate for anything." But, Rose noted, if gays and other minorites organized, they would have a decisive role in UT elections. "There are enough gay and lesbian people on campus that if even 50% were to vote for a single candidate, that voting bloc alone would be sufficient for victory," Rose added. "A bloc of gays, Chicanos, and other minorities could easily win any UT election." The low voter turnout for campus elections and the anti-nuke referendum means that whoever is better organized to turn out voters will win. "The only organization on campus is conservative," Rose observed, and something more than an ad hoc, improvised coalition is needed to mobilize progressive forces. The winning candidate for Texan editor, Beth Frerking, did not take a gay rights stand during the campaign, but afterwards promised a change in the Texan when she takes office this summer. "In the past," she stated, "coverage has been primarily concentrated on entertainment events. I would plan to include the whole scope of concerns - legislative problems as well as campus activities." Regarding the stereotypes in this year's Texan that minorities have considered insulting, Frerking said that when she becomes editor, "biased writing or writing that stereo typically portrays groups negatively will be discouraged." Vicki Beal, winner in the TSP board race, said she would like to see the currently vague TSP guidelines made more specific. Instead of requiring "good journalistic practice," she's like to see "more specific guidelines of what good journalistic practices are." As for insulting stereotypes, she noted,"The board's responsibility is to open ourselves up to complaints from readers if things are racist or sexist. If a real problem exists, then a policy change may be needed." V
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