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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979
File 008
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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 008. 1979-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1329.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-05). Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 008. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1329

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 008, 1979-05, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1329.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979
Contributor
  • Murray, John
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date May 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript vol. 3, no. 8 Gay Austin may 1979 7 the gay movement in latin america struggle, growth BOSTON - A series of articles by Allen Young in Gay Community News of Boston describes a small but growing gay liberation movement in Latin America. Largely ignored by the media, the movement has developed within the traditional left in Brazil and Colombia as a counterforce to the narrow economism of orthodox leftist parties which persist in viewing homosexuality as bourgeois decadence and in labelling feminism and sexual liberation as petit bourgeois concerns. Implicit in the arguments of the gay activists is the assumption of socialist victory throughout Latin American in the next few years. In Colombia, the male-dominated Movimiento de Liberacibn Homosexual as well as radical feminist and lesbian organizations resulted from the founding in 1975 of Carreta Libertaria, a libertarian socialist magazine, by leftists who had become disenchanted with die authoritarian Marxist-Leninist parties. The MLH in turn has been publishing its own magazine, El Otro, has aided in the formation of several other groups in Colombia, and has organized discussions ranging from small secret meetings to a large public forum in the university, but has not yet reached the point of staging rallies and demonstrations. There are hopes of holding a national conference later this year. In an interview with Young, Leon Zuleta, the most prominent spokesperson for the MLH, commented that "in this asexual left, one discusses sex only to moralize about it in the most bourgeois way, while the left's own activists are considered to be abstract, without sex." Zuleta says socialists offer solutions to the economic plight of the workers while ignoring their "cultural and sexual misery." The MLH and feminist groups have found leftist resistance to their ideas strengthened by the left's attempts to bolster its own tenuous alliance with the Roman Catholic Church, the more radical elements of which tend to agree with socialists on economic questions but remain recalcitrant on the questions of contraception, abortion and homosexuality. In its discussions the MLH deals with prostitution, sexuality, sex roles and transvestism (widely practiced among the poor), and has taken positions against the nuclear family, in favor of legalized abortion and contraception, and "against virginity as a repressive concept." Meanwhile, Brazilian gay liberation has a history paralleling that of the Colombian movement. Like their Colombian counterparts, BrazUian homosexual activists represent a dissenting minority within the orthodox left, a position they share with Blacks, Indians and feminists. The Brazilian gay monthly Lampiao, recently the object of government harassment (See Gay Austin, March and April, 1979), is one product of the movement. A sign of progress for Brazilian gay activists was their inclusion in a week-long forum on "The Nature of the Liberation Movements" held last February at the Faculty of Political Science of the University of Sao Paolo. The forum was marked by a variation on a classic form of political polarization. Joao Silverio of Lampiao stated, "On the one hand, there were groups of white students and professionals expressing their loyalty to the class struggle, in the traditional line of the orthodox left, giving priority to economic phenomena. And, on the other hand, the representatives of the groups which suffer discrimination, affirming the originality of their situation, their criticisms, and their analysis, not covered by the class struggle but no less important in the transformation of society." Rejecting accusations that their efforts were divi sive, representatives of the United Black Movement Against Racial Discrimination insisted on the need for "ideological self-determination and their racial/ cultural identification as primary elements in confronting racism." The traditional left criticized feminists in a similar way, labelling their concerns as "petit bourgeois." Lampiao reported that "when one woman in the audience, a Catholic who rejected the feminist stance on abortion, declared that she was 'faithful to her husband, her nine children, and her housework,' the left-wing sector of the audience applauded with enthusiasm, unconscious of its own machismo and of the essential conformist position of this woman." But the liveliest discussion of the forum followed a presentation on homosexuality by staff members of Lampiao and members of the gay organization Somos (We Are). Lampiao reported that "when an attempt was being made by audience members to view the gay question through the prism of the left, someone in the audience rose to speak: 'I'm going to tell you what many of the people in this audience are dying to hear. You want to know if the gay movement is leftist, rightist or centrist, isn't that correct? Well, you might as well know that homosexuals understand that the right-wing considers us an affront to morality and the family. For the left, we are a product of bourgeois decadence. In truth, the objective of the gay movement is the search for happiness, and for this reason it is clear that we are going to struggle [alongside anti-government forces] for democratic freedoms. But we will participate in this struggle without following anybody's line, without linking up with so-called vanguards.*" Several speakers pointed out that in socialist countries discrimination against homosexuals and the virtual exclusion of women from positions of power are the rule. Yet while differences between leftists and the Latin American homosexual movement generate dialogue, differences with Latin American governments generate repression. So far, the Brazilian military regime has not been openly oppressive of gay social institutions like bars, baths and cruising places, but has attacked Lampiao, the first visible symbol of a serious gay political movement. And it is the politi- cization of the homosexual community, Lampiao editors feel, that may precipitate general repression of that community. -DAVID MOM IS V 3, Books on Dance, r JpV Poetry, Drama and other subjects to fill your needs Personable Individual Attention Monday thru Friday 8am until 10pm JSaturday 10am until 10pm & Sunday Noon til6C s
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