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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979
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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 001. 1979-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1322.

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(1979-05). Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1322

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979 - File 001, 1979-05, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1343/show/1322.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 8, May 1979
Contributor
  • Murray, John
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date May 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript free! L...--GA Y AUSTIN----' may 1979 Pro-choice demonstrators: McClellan "a traitor to her sex:· Opening of 'Pro-Life' Center raws Protest me 150 members and supporters of the Reproductive Rights Coalition were on hand April 8 to demonstrate their disapproval o newly re-elected Mayor Carol McClellan as he cut a ribbon to mark the opening of Life­line, lnc., an affiliate of Alternatives to Abortion International. "You 're a traitor to your sex," shouted one demonstrator as the mayor arrived. McClellan has claimed in the past that she is not anti-abortion. "It's a woman' individual choice,' she told demonstrators after the ceremony. Park Patrol Lifelin , Inc., off r servi ·es to prt: · nan t worn n in housing, medical car , and legal problems but does not consid­er abortion an acceptable alternative and is generally supportive of pregnan­cy. Explaining the demonstrators point of view, Marian Edwards of Women­space said, "We feel that the Austin community has the right to know who supports choice and who doe not. Reproductive freedom means that the w man has the right to make decision about her own body. There just int any freedom of choice when women cannot obtain the information they need." V' Not Aimed at Gay Men by Lar Eighner Hetero exual flashers and rapist appear to be the target of a plain-clothes park patrol re ently instituted by the Austin Police Department. The patrol, involving officers in plain clothes and jogging gear, wa announced. amid an increasing number of complaints from women of men who expose them elves or attempt to molest women, particular­ly on jogging paths and hike-and-bike trails. Unofficial urcc in the Austin Police Department say that the entrap­ment of gay men is not the object of the new patrols, citing as evidence the fact that most of the plain-clothes officers will be women. The sources refused to ay h wever whether the several arre ts in downtown tearooms during the first month of the year would represent a continuing en-forcement priority for the APD. In the past, complaints of public sexual acts and activities involving minors had led to a campaign of strict enforcement and harassinent of gay men, particularly in Pease Park. Thi campaignwa halted when police be­came convinced that charges of activity involving minors were groundle s and when gay community leaders pressed complaints of haras ment. The removal of brush from certain area largely eliminated the complaints of sexual activity in the park. Park curfews continue to be strictly enforced against bot11 gay and traight people, who are often subjected to body searches if they are found in the park after curfew. Increasing demand for the use of the jogging trail in the Town Lake area, however has moved the City Council to lift the curfew there. "\/ vol. 3. no. s March Preparations Continue HOUSTO - Preparations for the October 14 Gay March on Washington will move ahead when the Interim Steer­ing Committee meets in Hou ton on May 18, 19 and 20 with delegates from the 42 regions into which the country has been divided. Each regional delega­tion will consist of two women and two men and will reflect as closely as poss­ible the region's ethnic composition. Texas consist of four such regions. Plenary sessions on Saturday, May 19 and Sunday, May 20 have been sche­duled as well as caucus meetings on the -.-..... y/~·---...irtlo.--~- 1 th and 19th. The caucuses include a leftist caucus a libertarian Republican qucus a campus organization caucus a business caucus a gay youth caucus, a rural caucus a Third World caucus, a women' caucus, and possibly, a men's caucus. The ational Coordinating Committee will meet after the Sunday plenary session to plan logistic for the march. Meetings will be held on the Univer­sity of Houston campus and housing will be available. Entertainment in the form of bar tours and a concert by Continued on page 8 Coalition Defeated in Paily Texan Election by Frank Proschan Gay and lesbian students at the Univer ity of Texas lost out in the April elections for Daily Texan editor and Texa Student Publication board member. An ad hoc coalition brought together gays, hicanos and Chicanas, anit·nuke workers socialists liberal Democrats and even a few Republican in support of editor candidate Charlie Rose and TSP candidate Mary Sue Galindo. Charlie Rose ummed up the de­feat: "Tiie opposition used a pre­cxi ting organized conservative voting bloc, and we were an ad hoc coalition. When you put individuals up against an organization, the organization will usually win. Charlie Rose. ' If a progressive coalition including gays is to compete on an equal basis, we·n have to be a organized as they are. That organization doe~n't exist at Mary Sue Galindo. Rose made "gay rights, lesbian rights, women's rights and minority rights" a major part of his campaign platform his leaflets and his can1paigning. Galindo promi d fewer ra ist and sexist' cartoons and a greater sensitivity to the repre entation of minorities on the staff and in the paper. In the TSP board race, I conducted an educational ampaign to raise the issue of racism exism, and ethnic hate and discussed the Texan 's pattern of anti-gay anti- Continued on page 8 2 may 1979 GAY AUSTIN vol. 3, no. s Anti-Gay Lobby Formed WASHI GTO , D.C. - Claiming to have 100,000 members and a budget of $1 million, an organization called Chris· tian Voice has been formed to lobby against gay rights pronography, child abuse and busing and in favor of the death penalty. The group, which has four lobbyists, is an offshoot of the right-wing fundamentalist American Christian Cause who e tax-exempt status bars them from lobbying di· rectly. Christian Voice promotional litera­ture links homosexuality, abortion, the ERA and pornography and states, "We believe that America's rapid decline as a world power is a direct result of these things." It claims that "homosexuals are rampant in our schools, our govern­ment and even in many churches." The organization's congressional ad­visory committee includes Senator Orin Hatch (R-Utah), Senator Roger Jepsen (R-Iowa) and Senator Gordon Hwnph­rey (R- ew Hampshire). It has been en­dorsed by eight House members inclu­ding Representative Larry McDonald of Georgia, well known for his opposi-tion to gay rights. Pat Boone, Lawrence Welk and Art Linkletter are also listed as supporters. The organization's office is headed by Gary Jarmin, legislative director of the American Conservative Union, who lobbied against the Panama Canal Treaty and SALT negotiations, and in favor of pro-South Africa and Rhode­sia policies. Steve End en of the Gay Rights ational Lobby says the new group should be taken seriously. "This is a very serious threat to our movement," he warned. "There is a strong possibil· ity that Christian Voice may not only scare Congress from legislation designed to guarantee civil rights for lesbians and gay men, but that the Christian Voice campaign could also result in the en­actment of specifically anti-gay legis­lation as well. While the immediate impact would be felt at the national level, Christian Voice's organizing and development of constituent support around the country could well even tu­ally have a profound impact on local gay civil rights efforts as well." '1 Puerto Rican Socialists Back Gay Rights NEW YORK - An overwhelming major­ity of delegates to the Puerto Rican Socialist Party congress held last Decem­ber in ew York City approved a res­olution condemning persecution and discrimination based on sexual pref­erence. The resolution states that homo­sexuals suffer oppression in living con­ditions, housing, and jobs and in public, cultural and political life. It calls for recognition of the rights of lesbians and gay men as citizens and individuals. PSP member Victor L6pez-Tosado said, ''The anti-gay movement has been ? ;> • ? ? • ? . using gays as scapegoats to divide the working class. It is very important for the struggle of homosexuals in Puerto Rico and abroad that a major socialist party has come out on their side. This is a historical resolution also because the party is mainly organized in a Latin American country where oppression, as a result of machismo etc., to homosex­uals is very common." The PSP is an important force in elections in Puerto Rico and is organ­ized in major Puerto Rican communi­ties in the United States.V' ') • ~ . ~ '} .~ • " '1. • ,· Questi6ns? Cl. ') ? ? ;:J '1. ~ ;:J : '1. '1. '1 • ? • • • ?. • ?. ? GAY COMMUNITY ERVICES ? HOTLINE 1 • 477-6699 IWY in Toronto: feminists demand lesbian rights. Canadian IWY Demands Lesbian Rights TORO TO - The coalition which organized Toronto's International Women's Day demonstration in March included lesbian rights for the first time among their four demands. Until this year, lesbian right had been only a subsidiary concern for the annual event. Canadian women and male support­ers demanded an end to harassment of lesbians, full employment rights for women, full funding of social services, and free access to abortion and contra­ception as well as an end to forced sterilization. The coalition stated, "Women are fighting back. This past year we have fought and are fighting for our rights in the work place. We have organized to oppqse changes in Unemployment Insurance legislation. We've fought against the attempt to shut down wom­en's services. We've organized to oppose the attacks on lesbians and gay men. Individually and collectively, we've organized to resist the attempt to take away the gains we've struggled long and hard to win." '1 GAY AUSTIN is published monthly by Gay Community Services of the University YMCA/YWCA, 2330 Guadalupe, Austin, Texas 78705. The Coordinators of Gay Community Services Include: Carr Strong General Coordinator John Murray Publications Coordinator Bob Prewitt Office and Peer Counseling Coordinator Gary Reese Media Coordinator Phil Conard Finance Coordinator Paul Guttery Speakers Bureau Coord inator Opinions expressed in GAY AUSTIN are those of the writer or editor and not necessarily those of Gay Community Ser 1ices, the University YMCA/YWCA, or the advertisers. The publication herein of any per· son's name, portrait or photograph Is not an ind ication of that person's sexual orientation. All contents copyrigh t 1979 by GAY AUSTIN . Material may be reprinted withou t prior permission if credit Is given to GAY AUSTIN. GAY AUSTIN staff: John Murra~r'--------------Managing Editor David Morris News Editor Phil Conard Advertising Man ger CONTRIBU TO RS AND COLUMNI STS: Frank Answers, Stan Bear, Rush Cheshire, Phil Conard, David Drake, Lar Eighncr Dennis Haney Amme Hogan, Scott Li nd, David Morris, John Murray: Bob Prewitt, 1 frank Prosc han, G ry Ree e, Georg Stoj· cevic, Scott Van Osdol, Dan Transmission. The followi ng publications were used In compll llng n tional and int r· n tional news for this Issue of GAY AUSTIN : THE ADVOCATE (Los Angeles) ; THE AUSTIN-AMERICAN STATES· MAN (Austin); THE BODY POLITIC (Toronto) ; GAY COMMUNITY NEWS (Boston); GAYSWEEK (New York); OFF OUR BACKS (New York) ; SEVENDAYS (New York). v G NE Ne ori ser vol. 3, no. 8 GAY AUSTIN THE GAY PRESS Gaysweek, The Body Politic, Gay News NEW YORK - The publishers of Newsweek have threatened court action to prevent a three-year-old New York publication from registering the name Gaysweek with the US Patent and Trademark Office. Newsweek attorneys told lawyers for the gay publication that "unless Gaysweek is prepared to change its mark and withdraw its application for registration, Newsweek Inc. will proceed with its opposition in the US Patent and Trademark Office and will take the necessary steps to restrain the further use of the mark Gaysweek by your client as well as for damages, court costs and counsel fees.,, · Last year Patent and Trademark officials rejected Gaysweek 's original application for registration of its name on the grounds it was "immoral or scurrilou" '\! Lobbyists Warn of Ant·- ex Bi I The Human Rights Advocates Lobby has called to the attention of gay activists and bar owners propo cd legislation by Houston Senator Walter Mengdcn which would regulate sexually oriented conduct in establishments serving alcoholic beverages. Originally aimed at heterosexual bars featuring topless dancers, the bill (SB558) would outlaw nudity or exposure of the female reast , the cl ft of the but to ks, the vulva, t 1 nitals, or the anu of any patron employee or entertainer in any e tab­lishmcn t licensed to serve alcohol. In addition, it would ban patrons or entertainers in drag where drag is already prohibited by local ordinance and would outlaw touching, fondling or caressing of the breasts, buttocks, an us or genitals by any person on the premises. The bill places the burden of prevent­ing such activity on the bar owner and violation of it provi ion would be a Class C misdemeanor punishable by up to 6 months in j ail and a 200 fine. Texas Gay Task l·orce lobby coord­inator Kathy Deitsch and Human Rights Advocate Bettie aylor claim that the fact that the bill was sent unexpectedly to the Senate State Affairs Committee increases the po sibility of its passage and that it should therefore be of con­cern to the gay community. Other ob crvcrs, however, point out tlrnt Mengden has authored many similar pi ce f 1 gi lation in the a t but th t few of them have been taken seriou ly by other legi lators. The bill is currently in a subcommit­tee of the Senate State Affairs Commit­tee. Meanwhile, a bill by Hou ton Repre­sentative Tony Polumbo (HB907) which would make substances contain­ing butyl nitrite and i obutyl nitrite ("poppers") available by prescription only, is in a subcommittee of the House Criminal Juri prudence Commit­tee. (See Gay Austin, April 1979 . -DAVID MORRIS \l A M0fHER'S DAY CONCERT WITH I me8 christian AND AUSTIN ARTISTS debradew marce lacouture lisa rogers SUNDAY, MAY 13 HOGG AUDITORIUM 8:00PM ON THE U.T CAMPUS ADMISSION $4.00 A BENEFIT FOR THE CHILD CUSTODY DEFENSE FUND TICKETS AVAILABLE AT WOMENSPACE. THE "Y."COMMON WOMAN BOOKSTORE TORONTO - Ontario Attorney General Roy McMurty announced March 6 that he had authorized an appeal against the acquittal last February of The Body Politic on charges of "using the mail for the purpose of transmitting or delivering anything that is indecent, immoral or scurrilous." (See Gay Austin, March 1979). The charges against the gay monthly resulted from the publication in its December '77 - January 78 issue of an article on child-adult relations called "Men Loving Boys Loving Men." The article has been reprinted in the 1arch/ April '79 issue. · The appeal alleges that Provincial Court Judge Sidney M. Harris erred in holding that the entire issue, and not just part of it, must be found indecent, immoral or scurrilous in order to con­vict; that he erred in holding that the issue must be capable of causing clear incitement to unlawful action; that he erred in refusing to interpret the term "immoral"; and that he erred in apply­ing the test of community tolerance. The appeal is expected to be heard this fall. V ma\/ 1979 3 LO DO l - Gay News, the largest circulation gay newspaper in the world, has filed a formal complaint against the British Government with the European Commission of Human Rights in Stras­bourg after the House of Lords in Feb­ruary decided to uphold the paper's conviction on blasphemy charges. The· conviction, which resulted from the paper' publication of a poem con­taining erotic references to the body of Christ, is the first use in SO years of the British law against blasphemous libel. It was prompted by a campaign led by anti-pornography crusader fary White­house. Gay ews argues that the bla phemy law, which singles out the Anglican faith for special protection, discrimin­ates on the basis of religion and there­fore violates Article I 4 of the Euro­pean Convention on Human Rights. It i not clear whether a ruling by :the Commission could overturn British law. If o, and if Gay el s wins it appeal, the British government would be forced to drop its blasphemy laws entirely.'\? 4 mav 1979 GAY AUSTIN \' )J. 3. l Man/Boy Love Association Meets EW YORK - The second meeting of the orth American Man/Boy Love Association AMBLA), founded last December in Boston, was held Saturday, March -4. at the Church of the Beloved Disciple in ew York. The conference, reflecting what orgainizers called "a new sense of solidarity and mutual support" among youth and adults, wa designed "to spur the further organization of men and boys to lend each other sup­port and to fight for our freedom, and to exchange views with the lesbian and gay community and to raise conscious­ness on the subject of man/boy love." The controversial nature of pedophi­lia resulted in limiting the con ferencc to those specifically invited to attend. "We arc not afraid of a frank exchange of views; indeed we welcome it,'' the letter of invitation read. "However, we are not interested in exposing our participants to hostility and bigotry from others in the lesbian and gay community. ' Brydon Denounced David TI10rstad, member of the Coa­lition for Lesbian and Gay Rights and well-known writer (he co-authored The Early Homosexual Rights Movement), said many of the arguments used against transgenerational relationships were the same "as were used against the early gay movement." Countering feminist criticism, he said "There's an anti-sexual strain running through much of the women's movement. Women must listen to men's experiences before rushing into judgment." Charles Brydon. SEATTLE WASHI GTO -A Seattle gay organization has published an open letter denouncing Charles Brydon, re­cently appointed to replace ational Gay Task Force co-executive director Bruce Voeller. The Seattle Committee After Thirteen (SCAT), formed to oppose local anti-gay Initiative Thirteen, accuses Brydon, founder of the business-oriented Dorian Group, of activities "aimed at preventing parti­cipation of those whose view differ from his. He constantly sabotaged any efforts to create coalitions of the various scgmen ts of the gay community. He monopolized access to the media, often slandering other factions to prove h1s ·tegitimacy' as a gay leader and spokesperson." The letter claims specifically that Brydon red-baited o1her gay activists; opposed the Gay Pride March of 1977 and the Lesbian Gay Rights March of 1978; refused to cooperate with SCAT or Women Against Thirteen (WAT in fund-raising efforts against Initiative Thirteen; convinced bar owners to in­stitute a bi-monthly cover charge for THE STUDENTS' Depa Read all under on " • Textbooks & Study Aid • School Supp/let - • II • C./culators & Typewrl • Art & Engineering Sup • R«ords & Ta~s • Sporting Goods • Jewelry & Class Rings • Genera/ Books "''°'~ ,,,. to pay your .°''"l'IJ'11 ? ,,,. to c.1h • check? P.il ... H>are/ Shop - Men & Women .... '!d. ,Jna.rtment Shop reos & Tape Recorders ,,,. to make • purchaae with VISA or Mastercharge? ,,,. to •tart• Co·Op time payment plan? If you have any of these needs; come by the Co-Op and give us a chance to help. The University Co-Op, a Texas tradition since 1896. We want to be your store. -~ 476-7211 2246 Guadalupe ,_ the sole benefit of Brydon's own organ­ization, Citizens to Retain Fair Employ­ment (CRFE), without informing bar patrons; and prevented lesbians from serving on the Seattle Women's Com­mission after lobbying for and winning a position as the Commission's only male member. SCAT cxpre sed hope that "this letter will serve to strengthen GTF and enable it to play a more progressive role in tha national gay movement," and, referring to Jean O'Leary, GTF co-executive director whose resignation takes effect this June, called for an effort to find a replacement for Ms. O'Leary who will balance "some of Mr. Brydon' tendencies." Brydon declined to answer specific allegations but said, " I am proud of the record of achievement I leave in Seattle. one of it would have been possible without the substantial support from the gay and non-gay components of ur city. At base I had no power other than what other people gave me. SCAT's quarrel, it would seem, is with success. That success was possible because substantial numbers of people gave me the kind of quiet support that made it happen." Kay Whitlock of the NGTF board of directors responded to the letter by saying, "We are confident that Mr. Brydon s leadership will help NGTF to continue to serve its broad range of interests." "\l 706L6tll l treet Cliff Bossert of Gay Youth said that in his own experience he knew of "no gay youth who were ever forced to have sex," with older men. "All the educ­tion was done by me." A 14-year-old speaker said "I wish it wasn't always the boy's deci ion to make all the first moves, but I guess it can't be helped until the age of consent laws are abolished." Tom Reeves, a representative of the Boston/Boise Committee, placed the blame for "treating youth as property' on the "evil values of capitalist and male hierarchical ociety ." He declared that "humans belong to themselves, inclu­ding their bodies from ages zero to one hundred." pavid Thorstad argued that "it is morally wrong and politically foolish for the gay movement not to support the rights of gay youth." And Gay Youth of New York repre­sentative Aner Canderario de cribed his own organization as Hone of the most vocal and visible of the militant activist groups." An organizational caucus agreed to send a statement to the ational March on Washington committee stating that NAMBLA will endorse the October March if the committee reinstates the demand for repeal of age of consent laws presented by the Gay Youth Caucus of the Philadelphia conference on the marchV AUITIX. TSXAS it to it nt U· to is sh rt vol. 3, no. 8 GAY AUSTIN 5 LETTERS Dear Friends: I'd like to exchange ideas and inspirations and, hopefully, work together to develop articles and books of religion and ethics that are suited to the real world and are favorable to non-exploitive sexuality, including homosexuality, and other humane attitudes and behaviors. ' I believe that the cultural revolution we are part of not only reflects our personal, individual needs for freedom and justice but also can lead toward a sane, balanced, cooperative, peaceful, lo!'ing world, the only kind worth having, the only kind that will survive. However, to people well-trained in conventional religions and moralities, the "Gay World" and "The Goddess" seem corrupt, elitist or diabolical. Legal sanctions and protections for deviance help but what we really need are respect and understanding. We need God on our side. To be healthy and humane, people need ethics and energizing, uplifting beliefs. I believe it is conventional heterosexuality that is perversion and a cause of arrogant nationalism, militarism, excessive human popu­lation and other deviltries. But to overcome Leviticus and Paul so ·to convince the common person of the wisdom and righteousness of bi-sc uality and homosexuality requires time, effort, courage and miracles. If you have ideas to share, please write me. Abigail (Capaldi Brown) Women's rganic Health Farm Bertram, Texas 78605 Wins Custody, es to WI DSOR, 0 TARIO - A county judge ruled last January 17 in a divorce c sc that a le bian mother may retain custody of her two children but that no ne may live with her without the court's approval. The trial included tc timony from a child and family therapist to the effect that sexual orientation was not an important factor in determining a parent's inability to raise children or in the determination of the child's own sexuality and the judge seemed to agree. He stated, "The homosexual factor is in no way a determining factor - a factor that by it elf would require removal of the child from the cu tody of that parent." But the judgmcn t also declared that CAPITAL COIN COMPANY 3004 Guadalupe s "being rai ed in a homo exual atmos­phere by a homosexual parent openly associating with other homosexuals must be considered by the court as negative when one view the principles on which this country was founded and the beliefs of the majority of society in this country." he judge further stated, "I am attempting to improve the situation by preventing any open and avowed lesbian or homo­sexual relationship in the home." Tlie anadian ruling was made the same day the Michigan Supreme Court reversed four lower court decisions and restored cu tody of 12-year-old Jillian Miller to her mother argarcth. The Michigan case set the stronge t legal precedent to date in favor of the rights of lesbian mothers."V 472-1676 An extensive collection of CDINS and SUPPLIES OOLD JEWEIRY FROM AIL OVER 'IBE IDRLD also buying antiques and all gold 2CY% discount on gold jewelry and coin supplies with this ad. VIEW PO T If the mind goes, the body still functions, said a fonner Austin resident. I wondered if the might be speaking of the Texas legislature. Upon checking it out, I realized that while the first part of the statement could be so applied, the second had nothing to do with the legislature. You wnat bodies? You go to a g;1m or a racetrack. And peaking of horses, have you noticed how a spirited horse will shake its head even as it trots fonvard? Not to draw too many analogies, but did you notice how Gov. Bill kept sha'Aing his head, no he 1vould11 't get rid of GOMA, ei1en while he was heading straight for it? But really, folks, isn't it better that there not be an ofFzce for migrant affairs? As solid and steady a.citizen as Gov. Bill is, I feel certain that any affairs Jze has will be more than migratory. For instance, good solid Gov. Bill has volunteered his very own home state to be the site of nuclear wastes, which will plague, uh, be with us for years to come. Centuries. The Gov. must be intending to make our state a very solid place, stable in politics and government for a few thousand years to insure that nothing bad happens to that nuke waste (never mind what happens to our citizens), doesn't get in the possession of the wrong people (always worried about possession, our "law '11' order' officials). But I can assure them, the ''right" waste in the "right" places ·will insure tlzat there will be no one left to use the waste wrongly. And no one to te"orize. Sigh. But there's hope. Do you feel a desire to dress children in red, white and blue, force them into the fields to work? Do you want child molestation/abuse to be referred to as "corporal punishment"? Well, my friend, open some children's homes, donate about 68,000 to a ·winning gubematorial candidate's campaign, talk about god and Communists (or God and communists, isn't it?), and just start beating the kids with boards. Call it licks. You will be hailed as a Christian savior, folks will send you their hard-earned money to support your "cause." Now, if the public finds out you are gay, forget it. You will b~a pervert of gamy savor, your homes ill be closed, etc. You can only win at this game if you are ·white, male, Christian (OR Baptist), 11011-gay and over forty. Own e your name to ( 1o) Lester Ripoff. In the interest of tile public outcry, l ltope all you folk got out and voted again t t z nu · . I ·n v it · / 't 1 o . · i • o think "I told 'em so," in the mi/Ii ec before ve're all blown a vay. Isn't it interesting how conveniently the Mansfield Dam accident was timed? So some of our more intelligent council folk could say "No one died at Harris­burg." Yes, t1Ue, but wait till you see the new line of humanoids our power companies are designing to be released in a [el years or nine months after Harrisburg. And how astounding that 1ansfield caused a power failure in Northwest Austin which then tumed out hugely to vote FOR the nuke. o v, I'm not one to throw innuendoes or bandy accusations, but HOW CONVE TENT. How messy for the seven 1vho died - for the uke. -AmmeHogan French Cuisine, Courtyard, & Bar. Open 11 a.m. until midnight Bakery open Fridays & Saturdays until 2 a .m. 314 Easr 6t St. 6 may 1979 GAY AUSTIN vol.3, no.s Reproductive Rights Coalition· Twenty-five local organizations marked the International Day of Action for Reproductive Freedom on March 31 by announcing the fonnation of the Coalition for Reproductive Freedom. In a statement announcing its form­ation, the coalition explained, "We wish to call attention to the threat posed by a small but well organized and well financed group seeking to deny the basic right of choice . . . A woman's right to abortion, established by the 1973 Supreme Court decision, must be preserved by resisting attempts to limit the availability of abortion services. We cannot go back to the horrors of illegal abortions and compulsory pregnancy ... On this day of International Action, we especially appeal to lawmakers of the 66th session of the Texas Legisla­ture to be responsive to the needs of women and the right to reproductive freedom." Among the organizations making up the coalition are the Austin Lesbian-Gay Political Caucus, Gay Community Serv­ices, Womenspace, the Center for Battered Women, the Texas Abortion Rights Action League, the Black Citi­zens Caucus, Red River Women's Press, and the Mexican-American Business and Professional Women's Association.V TV Evangelist Fights Cancellation DALLAS - Evangelist James Robison, whose weekly program was dropped by Dallas television station WF AA-TV as a result of an anti-gay sermon (see Gay Austin, April, 1979), has hired a lawyer and asked for a hearing with the Federal Communications Commission in an at­tempt to have his program reinstated. If the attempt fails, Robison may follow his lawyer's advice and sue the station. Robison's program has been can­celled and reinstated in the past for anti-gay comments, but chances appear slim for his current effort. In accord­ance with the Communications Act of 1934, the challenge would have to come through the courts. David Lane, station manager of WFAA-TV, says the station has re­ceived about 3500 cards and letters concerning the case and that they run 40 to I against cancellation of the program. Of the 80 stations broadcasting Robison's weekly sermons, WF AA is the only one to cancel the program. v Tt-iE ()l-L~Jtl(){) Austin's ONLY Women's Bar ~ WE ARE NOW OPEN TUES-FRI FROM 4 PM UNTIL 2 AM SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS FROM 2PM UNTIL 2AM for your afternoon enioyment Disco Dancing HAPPY HOUR • Backgammon • Pool ·Checkers ·Pinball TUES. - FRI. 4 to 7 ·Dominoes ·Cards ALL WELL DRINKS HALF PRICE KEG PARTY at 2.:00 EVERY SUNDAY AFTERNOON AVAILABLE MONDAYS FOR PRIVATE PARTIES 472-0018 Election night: anti-nuke victory narrowly missed. Citizens opposed to Austin's participation in the South Texas Nuclear Project gathered election night to watch the votes being counted and to express their continuing concern. Although early returns indicated defeat for the nuclear power plant, pro-nuke votes edged their way to victory later in the night Opponents of nuclear power, including many lesbians and gay men, have vowed to continue the struggle June 2 at a rally at the STNP site in Matagorda Bay. For more information on the June 2 rally, call the Mobilization for Sur­vival at 474-2399. WOMENSP ACE is a non-profit organization devoted to providing a supportive environment where women can share resources, discuss alternatives, gain insight, confidence and strength. Free, confidential, walk-in counseling is available on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights, 7:00 - 10:00 PM, and by appointment during the day. In addition, WOMENSP ACE provides information and referrals for med­ical, legal or psychological help in the community. Every riday night, WOMEN PACE sponsors a coffeehouse for women in our main room with special programs or speakers on issues of importance to women. We are located above Sommers Drug on the drag. WOMEN SP ACE is a project of the University Y and Travis County. Our telephone number is 472-3053. BOWLING CAMPING VOLLEYBALL TABLE TENNIS }f .J .J CAVIT()L CIT~ ATtiL~TIC ASS()CIATI()~ ca MEMBERS & NON - MEMBERS re 1nv1t:ed to come out for t- a lot cf fun w1t:h boch SOCIAL & LEAGUE bowling ! u. ~ For more info: c... • 8 G) z G) CALL JOHN DOUCET 472 - 1718; Biily Fr zlcr 454- 7187 * TENNIS Covered Dish Socials SWIMMING * I f vol. 3, no. 8 GAY AUSTIN may 1979 7 the gay movement in latin america STRUGGLE, GROWTH BOSTON - A series of articles by Allen Young in Gay Community News of Boston describes a small but growing gay liberation movement in Latin America. Largely ignored by the media, the movement has developed within the traditional left in Brazil and Colombia as a counterforce to the narrow economism of orthodox leftist parties which persist in viewing homosexuality as bourgeois decadence and in labelling feminism and sexual liberation as petit bourgeois concerns. Implicit in the arguments of the gay acti­vists is the assumption of socialist victory throughout Latin American in the next few years. In Colombia, the male-dominated Movimiento de liberacion Homosexual as well as radical feminist and lesbian organizations resulted from the founding in 1975 of Ca"eta Libertaria, a libertarian socialist · magazine, by leftists who had become disenchanted with the authoritarian Marxist:i,eninist parties. The MLH in tum has been publishing its own magazine, El Otro, has aided in the formation of several other groups in Colombia, and has organized discussions ranging from small secret meetings to a large public forum in the university, but has not yet reached the point of staging rallies and demonstrations. There are hopes of holding a national conference later this ~ear. In an interview with Young, Leon Zuleta, the most prominent spokesperson for the MUI, commented that "in this asexual left, one discusses sex only to moralize about it in the most bourgeois way, while the left's own activists are considered to be abstract, without sex." Zuleta says socialists offer solutions to the economic plight of the workers while ignoring their "cultural and sexual misery." The MLH and feminist groups have found leftist resistance to their ideas stre·ngthened by the left's attempts to bolster its own tenuous alliance with the Roman Catholic Church, the more radical elements of which tend to agree with socialists on economic questions but remain recalcitrant on the questions of contraception, abortion and homosexuality. In its discussions the MLH deals with prostitution, sexuality, sex roles and transvestism (widely practiced among the poor), and has taken positions against the nuclear family, in favor of legalized abortion and con­traception, and "against virginity as a repressive concept." Meanwhile, Brazilian gay liberation has a history paralleling that of the Colombian movement. Like their Colombian counterparts, Brazilian homosexual activists represent a dissenting minority within the orthodox left, a position they share with Blacks, Indians and feminists. The Brazilian gay monthly Lampitio, recently the object of government harassment (See Gay Austin, March and April, 1979), is one product of the move­ment. A sign of progress for Brazilian gay activists was their inclusion in a week-long forum on "The Nature of the Liberation Movements" held last February at the Faculty of Political Science of the University of Sao Paolo. The forum was marked by a variation on a classic form of political polarization. Joao Silverio of Lampiiiv stated, "On the one hand, there were groups of white students and professionals express­ing their loyalty to the class struggle, in the traditional line of the orthodox left, giving priority to economic phenomena. And, on the other hand, the representa­tives of the groups which suffer discrimination affirming the originality of their situation, their crit­icisms, and their analy is, not covered by the class struggle but no less important in the transforma­tion of ociety. ' Rejecting accusations that their efforts were divi-sive, representatives of the United Black Movement Against Racial Discrimination insisted on the need for "ideological self-determination and their racial/ cultural identification as primary elements in con­fronting racism.'' The traditional left criticized feminists in a similar way, labelling their concerns as "petit bourgeois." Lampicio reported that "when one woman in the audience, a Catholic who rejected the feminist stance on abortion, declared that she was 'faithful to her husband, her nine children, and her housework,' the left-wing sector of the audience applauded with en­thusiasm, unconscious of its own machismo and of the essential conformist position of this woman." But the liveliest discussion of the forum followed a presentation on homosexuality by staff members of Lampido and members of the gay organization Somos (We Are). Lampiiio reported that "when an attempt was being made by audience members to view the gay question through the prism of the left, some­one in the audience rose to speak: 'I'm going to tell you what many of the people in this audience are dying to hear. You want to know if the gay movement is leftist, rightist or centrist, isn't that correct? Well, you might as well know that homosexuals understand that the right-wing considers us an affront to morality and the family. For the left, we are a product of bourgeois decadence. In truth, the objective of the gay movement is the search for happiness, and for this reason it is clear that we are going to struggle [alon~ide anti-government forces] for democratic freedoms. But we will participate in this struggle without following anybody's line, without linking up with so-called vanguards.' " Several speakers pointed out that in socialist coun­tries discrimination against homosexuals and the virtual exclusion of women from positions of power are the rule. Yet while differences between leftists and the Latin American homosexual movement generate dialogue, differences with Latin American govern­ments generate repression. So far, the Brazilian military regime has not been openly oppressive of gay social institutioQs like bars, baths and cruising places, but has attacked Lampiao, the first visible symbol of a serious gay political movement. And it is the politi­cization of the homosexual community, Lampilio editors feel, that may precipitate general repression of that community. - °"YID MOH1sV Books on Dance, ,, .L - Poetry, Drama uoc,tran's llOOIC8 • and other subjects to fill your needs Personable Individual Attention Monday thru Friday 8am until 10pm aturday 10 am until 10 pm & Sunday Noon t il 8 may 1979 GAY AUSTIN 'SEXUAL STATUS' BILL PASSES CONNECTICUT SENATE HARTFORD, CO NECTICUT - A bill to ban discrimination on the basis of 'sexual status" in housing, licensing, employment and state services was approved by the Connecticut Senate on April 4 by a vote of 19 to 17. The term "sexual orientation," used in earlier versions of the proposed leg­islation, was changed to ''sexual status" to include cohabiting heterosexuals. The Connecticut Gay Task Force says the change in wording and coverage considerably improves chances for pass-age of the bill since it is no longer specifically gay. Senators also voted to approve an amendment to clarify the definition of the term "sexual status." Gay Task Force members consider the bill "a logical extension of the 1969 Privacy Act, which repealed Connecti­cut's sodomy law; behavior which is not criminal should not be allowed to be a basis for discrimination." Opposition ot the bill is expected to be much stronger in the House of Rep­resentatives than in the Senate.1\] Massachusetts Governor Fires Women's Commission BOSTO - Massachusetts governor Edward King fired all 40 members of the Governor's Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) last March 28 GAY RIGHTS DENIED AT JUNIOR PROM CUMBERLAND RHODE ISLAND - Seventeen-year-old Paul Guilbert plans to pursue his desire to take a male es­cort to the Cumberland High School junior prom despite opposition from his parents and school officials and abuse and resentment from his fellow students. A hearing on Guilbert's request sche­duled earlier by school officials was cancelled at his parents' insistence. immediately after the commission ful­filled its customary role by writing him a letter evaluating his proposed budget with respect to its impact on women. The letter criticized King's elimination of cost-of-living increases to welfare families, his opposition to Medicaid­funded abortions, his rejection of sliding-fee day care, his failure to fund a training program for displaced home­makers, and hie inadequate funding of home care for the elderly. The Com­mission praised King's efforts to clean up welfare fraud. King announced plans to name a new commission of 25 members serving con­terminously with him and at his plea­sure. Under the new plan, the group would be limited to advising the govern­or on violent crime against women, child abuse and displaced homemakers. ' o man should be selecting prior­ities for a women's commission," de­clared ousted CSW vice-chairwoman Sheila Clemon-Karp. "A women's com­mission should and always has chosen its own priorities. '1\7 STRAIGHT MEN Ray Hill. MARCH ... Continued from page 1 women has been planned, and religious services have been scheduled for Sunday. Ray Hill of Houston, interim chair of the steering committee, says that interest in the march is increasing and that if as many as 80% of the regions send delegates then a successful march is almost assured. He says he went to the Philadelphia conference at which the event was originally planned with no commitment to backing it but with an open mind, and was impressed. "The Philadelphia conference was the most sensitive, the most self-critical, the most self-analytical I have been to in 15 or 16 year of attending gay conferences," Hill said. "I've never seen a conference as open to Titird World and women's input. There was no fighting, no struggle for power." Other observers fault the conference as being dominated by those who could afford to attend, that is by well-to-do white men, and claim the Houston meeting will be similarly unrepresen­tative despite good intentions and sensitivity to the needs of ethnic minor­ities and women. Local activists point out the difficul­ty of choosing delegates to represent areas as widely separated and diverse as El Paso, Amarillo and Austin, all of which are in the same region.v Guilbert says his parents accepted his sexual preference when he came out to them but 'blew their top" at his request to take a male friend to the May 4 dance. "I feel I should be able to go," he said. "I have just as much right as any other junior to go. ' Guilbert was shaken by his school­mates' reaction to his request. "I'm very nervous," he aid. "They were yelling and screaming, practically the whole student body. Every class I went to, people stopped to look at me. They asked me for my autograph. It was kind of sick." 1\7 TO CHAIR NO.W CONFERENCE Aprll 25· M•7 2C w.ct.- Set. 8:00 pm Suncl•y 2:00 pm •I perlotmances $5.00 tlclrets now on s9 4'18·4538 «It & l.M'eca St. EW YORK - Doug Fraser, head of the United Auto Workers, and Thomas A. Murphy, chairman of General Motors, are among those selected to co-chair a ovember, 1979, conference on· the Future of the American Family spon­sored by the ational Organization for Women. Other co-chairs of the one-day event are Equitable Life Assurance Soci­ety president Coy Ecklund; Senator Charles Percy; and advertising executive Jane Trahey. Muriel Fox, co-founder of NOW and organizer of the conference, said, "I think it's very important to raise the consciousness of establishment people and I hope we get as many of them there as possible" The conference will feature a $20-a­plate luncheon at which Betty Friedan, lvin Toffler and Isaac Asimov will peak on the future of the family in "an era of growing equality."V I. 3, no. s ELECTION ... Continued from page 1 ethnic, and anti-women stereotypes," she said. Rose reviewed the election, noting, "Gays and lesbians didn't bother to vote because they are more interested in traditional party politics and did not seem to be so concerned about gay rights in the University." Rose conceded that there haven't been any dramatic issuesto mobilize UT gays. But, he aid, "there are issues that gays on campus could mobilize around, and the editor of the Texan could address those issues, things like the Texas Penal Code and other legislative matters." Rose and editor candidate Tom Kessler throughout their campaigns were an­swering rumors and innuendos spread by anti-gay forces, and both were victims of vandalism to their cars the night before the April 4 election. Rose observed, "It's somewhat ironic that gay people aren't more politically in­clined, because there's certainly a lot of anti-gay hysteria, of homophobia, on the UT campus. One thing that mobil­ized the conservatives in the race was their perception that someone who was sensitive to gay rights stood a very good chance of assuming the Texan editorship. "If a heterosexual encounters this homophobia, a gay or lesbian doesn't stand a chance as a candidate for anything." But, Rose noted, if gays and other minorites organized, they would have a decisive role in UT elections. "There are enough gay and lesbian people on cam­pus that if even 50% were to vote for a single candidate, that voting bloc alone would be sufficient for victory," Rose added. "A bloc of gays, Chicanos, and other minorities could easily win any UT election." The low voter turnout for campus elections and the anti-nuke referendum means that whoever is better organized to turn out voters will win. "The only organization on campus is conserva­tive," Rose observed, and something more than an ad hoc, improvised coalition is needed to mobilize pro­gressive forces. The winning candidate for Texan editor, Beth Frerking, did not take a gay rights stand during the campaign, but afterwards promised a change in the Texan when she takes office· this summer. "In the past," she stated, "coverage has been primarily concen­trated on entertainment events. I would plan to include the whole scope of concerns - legislative problems as well as campus activities.'' Regarding the stereotypes in this year's Texan that minorities have considered insulting, Frerking said that when she becomes editor, "biased writing or writing that stereotypically portrays groups nega­tively will be discouraged.'' Vicki Beal, winner in the TSP board race, aid she would like to see the currently vague TSP guidelines made more specific. Instead of requiring "good journalistic practice," she's Hke to sec "more spcci fie guidelines of what good journali tic practices are.'' As for insulting stereotypes, she noted,"The board's responsibility is to open our­selves up to complaint from readers if things are raci t or exist. If a real problem e i t then a policy change may be needed. 'V vol. 3, no. 8 GAY AUSTIN ma) 1979 9 FRANK ANSWERS Editor's Note: Frank is a professional family /relationship counselor with exten­sive experience in ef~ectively handling the unique problems of gay men and lesbians. We are providing this space as a service to the lesbian and gay community of Austin. Please address all correspon­dence to: FRANK ANSWERS, c/o GAY AUSTIN, 2330 Guada­lupe, Austin, Texas 78705. Dear Frank, My lover and I have been living together for the past three years in a mutually gratifying sexual and social relationship. The problem that has arisen is frightening to me because I don't know how to handle it. My lover has a drinking problem. He hits the bars every night and starts to drink for breakfast "to get rid of the hangover." I have stopped drinking in direct proportion to his increases. If I mention the fact that I feel his drinking is getting out of hand, he becomes very defensive and tells me to drop it. What can I do? I love this man very much and it tortures me to be so helpless. Please help me if you can. There is no other place that I can turn. - Worried Dear Worried, It is almost always a mistake for family and friends to focus their concern on a loved one's "drinking too much." Usually this will result only in recurrent arguments over how much is too much, while the problem gets worse. The fact is, an alcohol problem is not just a question of the amount of consumption, b~t is instead a ~om­plex socio-emotional issue that can best be dealt with by an unbiased professional. In order for you to deal at all effectively with the problem, yo_u will need to focus not on the drinking itself, but on the problems it creates in your relationship. You do not mention these problems. in your letter, but my background in this ar~a tells me they do exis~. Right now there may be only the occas10nal arguments over his drinking episodes, but progressive dependence upon alcohol results in a decreasing ability to cope with the demands of daily living. If this is what is happening to your lover, then the effects will soon show up in the way you two get along. If and when your lover's drinking does seriously interfere with your relationship, then y~ur best tactic for getting him to professional help will involve convin­cing him of this fact. COMING ATTRACTIONS MAY 4, 1979 HOUSE DETECT VE MONDO NEXUS FRENCHMEN POOL ENCOUNTERS LONG JOHNS CREME DE BANANAS Thursday Buddy Day Discounts for Stud.e..n ts and Militar Let me say further, though, that there could be a number of reasons for a rapid increase in an individual's alcohol consumption, and that not all of these reasons are cause for serious concern. If your lover only recently began drinking, or has only recently been free to drink as much as he wants to, he may only be experimenting with the new and exciting experience of an alcohol "high. ' In this case he will most likely adjust his consumption downward after the novelty wears off and after he has experienced a few hangovers. You have more serious cause for concern if your lover s drinking appears to be his way of coping with emotional problems such as depression, or if he regularly drinks alone. Any of the following may also be a warning sign that a mo~e serious problem is devel­oping. 1. Gulping or sneaking drinks because of shame over the amount consumed. 2. Decreasing ability to decide when to drink, with consequent drinking at "inappropriate" times. 3. Periods of consciousness while drinking which totally dis­appear from the memory (blackouts). 4. Hangovers involving severe physical and/or mental pain. Professional help for an alcohol problem is ava~able fro~ a variety of sources, although many of these are qmte expensive. Low cost services are available to UT students through the Coun­seling- Psychological Services Center, and to other Tra~ County residents through the Mental Health-Mental Retardation Center of Travis County. Similar services are available through the MHMR system in most areas of Texas. -Frank Continued on p a ge 14 .Cf BIRTHDAY PARTY & COSTUME BALL Live Stage Review COSTUME CONTEST Cash Prizes Tickets on · sale at all PRESIDIO THEATERS Fr i day Tickets at the PARAl«>UNT Saturday 10:00 a.m. til 8: 00 p. m. -- pi10tos by Rush Chesire --photos by Cindy Gillingham 12 may 1979 GAY AUSTIN vol. 3, no. s AUSTIN 130TANICAL Those plants with large pink flowers growing along with bluebonnets are named Oenothera (pronounced ee-noh-THEER-ah.) They grow wild through­out the south and u ually flower all spring. In my opinion they really ought to be cultivated and if I had a flower garden, I'd plant them. They have four petals, eaight stamens and a single pistil whose stigma has four branches. Close examination of a flower will reveal that the bases of the petals are fused with the sepals and together they form a tube, at the base of which sits the ovary. If you slit the ovary with a sharp knife, razor, or finger­nail, you can ee the numerous hite "ovules." The pollen is shed in a rather unusual way. Instead of individual grains sifting out of the anther, the pollen comes out in masses attached to long, thin, sticky strands of material like a spider's web. These plants are also called "primroses" and "buttercups" by some people, but this can be quite confusing because there are many unrelated plant species which have those as common names. Diagram of male and female gametophytes just prior to fertilization (the tissues of the pistil are all stippled) Mo t people have the notion that pollen fertilizes a flower and that makes a seed. This idea is simple-minded and not really correct. The more botanically accurate story is this: pollen is formed in the anthers and gets transported, usually either by wind or insects, to the stigma. There the- pollen grain breaks open (genninates) and a very small plant grows out of it and into the tissues of the stigma and ~tyle. This small plant, called the male gametophyte, is a rela­tively long, microscopic tube which contains two to three cells. One of these cells divides and makes two spenn cells. The ovule is not it elf an egg. Rather, it is the structure which contains the female gametophyte. The female gametophyte is an oval sac which contain about eight cells, one of which becomes the egg. When the male gametophyte has grown all the way to the female gameto­phyte, one sperm unite with the egg cell and an embryo begins to grow. The other spenn cell unites with two of the other cells of the female gametophyte and from this union of three cells grows the tissue of the seed which will pro­vide the nutrition for the embryonic plant. \l vol. b ere a go in the "An oft tens part but ad-Ii ro-vol. 3, no. 8 GAY AUSTIN ma;, PEQfOQMINC AQT& by Gary Reese One of the best kept secrets of this, or any, season of Houston's Grand Opera was the scenery and costumes which Paris-born stage director Jean-Pierre Ponelle ha9 created for the company's new production of Verdi's La Traviata. HGO officials weren't allowing very much, but one thing they did release in advance was the price - half a million dollars, more than twice the cost of HGO's opulent mounting of Der Rosenkavalier, revived earlier this year - and a hefty escalation, even considering today's inflation rates. Ponelle and his costume designer Pat Halmen brought with them a dramatic conception rarely realized in this country - where ab­stract, symbolic elements mingle with starkly realistic settings to create a total theatrical effect. Jn Ponelle's own words, "I am always going from the score." But, in the same breath, he explained that the composer's original intentions could not always be honored: "An immediate approach is not possible today" - the sensitivity of the 19th century and its customs are too far away. At times, the tension between these two polarized approaches to staging the opera created the sparks that brought the drama to life, and yet, very often, the director's intentions worked at cross purposes, producing absurd, even comical effects. The basic set design was itself a visual delight: a grisaille of white, grey and tan which extended into the wings and included numerous stairways and entrances hung with scrim or faced with mirrors. Ponelle refrained from abstract stage settings with minimal props, preferring lush cinematic detail: even in the final act, when Violetta has sold most of her belongings, there was nothing the director had forgotten to place on her bed table - all in tasteful Second Empire style. Ponelle's dramatic conception was also cinematic, the opera's act I prelude staged as a sort of flash back. Around a darkened stage before full-length mirrors wandered an invisible figure holding a candle and lighting the candelabra. Presumably, the action of the drama has already happened and the figure is actually Violetta's ghost. The figure eventually reached the dining table and, under dim spotlights, uncovered the courtesan's corpse stretched out upon it. Then, as the strains of the prelude died away, the corpse was again covered up, the stage bathed in light - footlights, no less - and the party guests sat down to dinner. (I thoroughly enjoyed this touch, but couldn't stifle a devilish wish that one of the principals would ad-lib, "E preparata la cena?" - "What's for dinner?" ... GAY AUSTIN needs you! GAY AUSTIN needs PEOPLE to: • WRITE • PHOTOGRAPH • PASTE UP •SELL ADS •DISTRIBUTE Share your talent! Call us at 477-6699 or write us care of GC$. 2330 Guadalupe, Austin, Texas 78705. Do it today! Ponelle handled the chorus in a way that, for the most part, hope will set a precedent for subsequent HGO productions. They never became just a sonic backdrop for the action or worse, self­consciously in the way. They added atmosphere in the first act, singing, dancing and mingling behind entranceways and created an illusion of merriment and partying on a grand scale. They parti­cipated in the basic stage action, reacting and pointing at the prin­cipals. In some scattered instances, this became a bit ludicrous as when the chorus bounced up and down to the music in act I, but the dimension this approach adds to the drama is immeasurable if judiciously applied. Of particular note in the gambling scene, Ponelle transformed the opening choruses from fatuous divertissements into a critical commentary on bourgeoisie playing at being gypsies and matadors. · In keeping with the visual emphasis of the production the cast was exceptionally handsome. o woman has ever worn blac - quite as stunningly as Catherine Malfitano in the gambling scene. Malfi­tano has a pleasant mezza voce which fills every corner of the house and a nice way with pianissimos, but hers is a voice that begins to kick when put under the slightest strain. Dramatic outbursts were delivered in a very thin, nasal tone and whenever she attempted to swell a proper crescendo, the voice lost both its focus and its pitch. Added to this, Malfitano wandered off pitch consistently and slid and edged onto notes where attack on the phrases should be clean. It made me wonder if Malfitano was able to hear hrself singing from the stage. To her credit, Malfitano is a ' thinking' oprano not afraid to try unorthodox vocal and dramatic touches on a orking horse role like Violetta, and could turn it to her favor once she settles into the coloratura of "Sempre libera' on h r own terms and avoids overuse of her chest register, which is most unattractive. As Violetta's lover Alfredo Louis Luma enjoyed most of the same advantages and disadvantages of her partner in "demi-monderie.' He cut an attractive figure as the impetuous young artist and has an equally attractive tenor voice - medium-sized, bu~is?ed . ton~ even if not entirely under control. While Lumas smgmg m his middle and lower registers was impeccable, his approaches to the top notes were only occasionall successful and he ·wisely avoided the interpolated high-C at the end of Alfredo s act H cabaletta. (I discovered later that this was after Ponelle's directive that the score be strictly observed - no cuts, no interpolations. This makes even more dramatic and musical sense in Violetta's case, where Malfi­tano sang the cadenza to 'Sempre libera' as written, ending on middle A and foregoing the stratospheric E-flat above high-C which is customary in performance.) Ponelle's presentation of Alfredo's father Giorgio - who breaks up the romance and precipitates the tragedy - was the most sur­prising single aspect of the drama. Usually portrayed as paternally burly, albeit loveable, baritone Brent Ellis played him as. a provi~­cial petit bourgeois, palsied and addled. The Sunday matmee audi­ence didn't know quite what to make of this approach and greeted his unsteady entrances with nervous laughter. There was nothing unsteady about Ellis's singing. He offered a firm line and flowing cantabile in his first scene with Violetta ("Pura siccome un angelo ·) even if he did not rise to the occasion of his scene with Alfredo ( 'Di provenza il mar"). Nevertheless, all roads lead to Rome and any successful presen­tation of La Traviata must logically culminate in the final act with Violetta's death scene. Here the succession of opulent sets which had escalated in brilliance with each scene ground to a halt Vio­letta's bed and nightstand before the divested central set piece forming a sort of "auditorium bedroom. What Ponelle had saved up for last was some interesting stage business that didn t always meet its mark and was ultimately unsuccessful. I especially liked the "hallucination" when the revellers usually kept discreetly offstage, invaded the bedroom and danced with the dying Violetta showering her with camellias. But the letter recitation - Verdi s own kind of "flashback' written into the score - was dispatched Continued on page 19 14 mav 1979 GAY A USTIN \ 101. 3. no. s Last month we got familiar with the kitchen and learned a bit about soups. In this month's column we will explore the fiendiShly tasty world of the casser­ole, or as it is often referred to, the one-pot quickie. There are few menu items so basic, so simple to prepare, so versatile as these. Yet these same dishes are looked upon with scorn and even derision and bring back the shuddery-horrid visions of university dorm food, and other less savory institutions. To prepare these dishes all one needs are earthenware, glass, pyrex, or metal deep dishes for the oven-baked types and a dutch oven or large stewpot for those prepared on the top of the stove. In the following recipes some tinned veggies have been used. If the time is available fresh is better but since most of us have harried and hectic lifestyles, I have used the path ofleast resistance and feel that the overall taste and quality have not been sacrificed. Do not let the strange and confusing lists of ingredients throw you off course. These are really simple and very handy for impromptu dinner parties and buffets. So onward into the fray - Texas Fandango This is a recipe that bites you (gently), not your wallet. Created by a Yankee, but still tasty. I lb. chuck or arm roast, boneless, cut into small chunks 1 large white onion, chopped 1 green pepper, chopped 1 can diced green chilies (small can) I can stewed tomatoes 1 can tomato paste 2 cans pinto beans Salt, pepper, garlic, cayenne I 5-oz. package vermicelli Brown meat with onion and pepper in about 2 tbsp. olive oil. Add tomatoes and chilies, and ~ cup water. Simmer about a half hour. Add spices to taste, and tomato paste. Let cook another hour. Cook the vermicelli according to packa~ directions. Add beans to meat mixture. Serve over the vermicelli (rice is also nice). Garnish with grated yellow cheese and chopped onion if you like. This is good with a marinated cucumber salad. Kung Phooey Chop Suey This little number is handy for buffets, freezes well, and is perfect when you're hungry but don't want something too heavy. The name of the recipe is due to the fact that it came to me while drooling over half-naked bodies prancing about in a Hong Kong Bruce Lee epic. Anyway ... 1 ~lbs. pork steak, cubed and cut away from the bone 1 bunch green onions, chopped 1 can water chestnuts, chopped 1 can bamboo shoots, chopped 6 to 8 large mushrooms sliced 1 tin or* lb. bean sprouts 2 tsp. ginger 1 tsp. garlic powder ~ tsp. white pepper 2 tbsp. soy sauce Salt to taste Brown meat in a dash of soy or peanut oil, add onion and rest of seasonings and veggies. Simmer for 25 to 30 minutes. Meanwhile take 2 cups water, 6 tsp. cornstarch, 2 tsp. soy sauce, and make a smooth mixture. Addto meat and vegetables and bring to a low boil. Cook until slightly thickened, stirring con­stantly. Serve over rice or chow mein noodles. A iourney into body awarene11. Open Sat. 11-6 -.C% Gu.dalupe Aueein, Teue 717G5 (512) 4n-6128 by G. P. Stojcevic Pork and Apple Dutchman Stew This recipe is very similar to one I ate often when I visited Amsterdam. With beef prices climbing faster than a squirrel monkey in heat, the lower cost of pork makes it a very viable alternative. 4 large pork chops or steaks 4 apples cored and sliced 4 large carrots liced 1 white onion sliced 4 medium potatoes, quartered * cup white wine *cup water 2 tsp. black pepper Dash garlic powder Salt to taste Brown pork and onion in a dab of butter in a deep casserole dish. Add veggies and apples, seasonings, water and wine. Pop in the oven at 250 to 300 degrees for I~ hours. Very good with steamed buttered cabbage, rolls, and dark beer. Continued from page 9 Dear Frank, I hear a lot of criticism from gay people I admire of straight men and the idea of having relationships with straight men. This concerns me because throughout my life I have always found more accept­ance, affection, love, and - yes - sexual gratification from straight men than I have with gay. And I don't mean closet cases or defen­sive bisexuals but straight men whose regard for me was translated into something on the affectionate-sexual scale and whose relation­ship with me was a unique departure from a straight lifestyle. It is not that I reject relationships with gay men - quite the reverse. No doubt my appearance plays a decisive role in this. But whether my appearance is the sign of some inner weakness or not, I have become convinced after extensive efforts - some of which left me temporarily psychotic -· that my appearance is likely to remain a part of me. And that means either I accept the affection offered by straight men or I wait for the return of Hailey's comet for a date. Have I got this all wrong? Am I to be drummed out of the ranks of the gay for hopeless heterophilia? Should I join the ranks of the celibate? - A Minority of One Dear One, As gay people, we have had a special opportunity to see the danger inherent in labeling any form of sexual expression abnormal or "wrong." Unfortunately, some members of our gay community appear to have missed this point. They would have us believe that in rejecting the rigid and arbitrary rules of a heterosexual culture we must accept the equally rigid and arbitrary rules of a homose ual culture. I believe instead that part of being gay involves going beyond narrow concepts of right and wrong in sexuality. Being gay involves believing that the mutual expression of affection or love is good, natural, and beautiful whenever it occurs, and not just when it occurs between "acceptable" partners. In seeking emotional and sexual relationships from those who offer them to you, I do not believe you have gotten the gay lifestyle "all wrong.' I would not favor your being "drummed out of the ranks of the Gay." I urge you not even to seriously consider joining "the ranks of the celibate." - Frank P.S. Since you do not give specifics on your appearance or on why it interferes in your relationships with other gay men, I will only say that all of us have some limitations which we arc unable to change. About the only effective way to deal with these limitations is to accept them and to live our lives to the fullest despite th m. This you appear to be doing. V 0. erdam. lower . Add 50 to rolls, t men cept­raight efen­slated a ti on-e the . But fOne vol. 3,no.8 GAY AUSTIN ma 1979 15 I. PERCEPTIONS by Amme Hogan Two years, you said, two years was the average cycle for staying with a woman; at the end of which time you ceased all activity until the next two years. Your cycle has run in fives and 1/4s with no two-year length anywhere. You insist on two years as average. II. In a crowded room, you rocked on your toes, staring into a glass, hands in pockets finally you appeared in front of me demanding to shake my hand, doubtful that I would. I did. In your city, we met your friends that night met them in your old haunts . So many people knew you, smiled into your eyes. An artist, you said, responding to a well-worn question; And looking at your strong square hands I knew you had an artist's soul. For all your friends, you went home alone. Do these things always start in crowded rooms? III. TRANSGRESSIONS Despite a growing certainty that we had met, in some previous life doubtless, I wanted to know you. We spent an evening together and you cried through a hard-shelled exterior about the movie. A friend had died in Nam and you still remembered. You then laughed at my youth, knowing that I had no friends killed in the war. Bristling, I informed you that my friends had had their minds fried in institutions for being who they are. My vehemence startled you and you hastened to assure me that you never cry, especially not at movies. IV. And how we strove to assure ourselves that we were just only notpossiblyanythingelse going to fall asleep together We were tired You were lonely (seven months since your last cycle) I wanted to hold you, make you feel better after your tears. When you finally hugged me your body spoke of comforting, not sleeping. You were beautiful in your hesitation, yet your d~cision was already made. You never got involved with people who were already involved you said after l told you l was involved. You stayed the night an additional guest where I was guest. Too far to drive home, you said. Later I found what a short distance it was. And even later it felt as if I were a transgressor. V. PREDICTIONS Familiarity breeds carelessness But we are careful with each other tonight in strangerways. If you knew me better you might be hurt by my care of a stranger. But tonight you are the stranger just as my lover was once a stranger. 16 rnay 1979 GAY AUSTIN \101. 3. n JUNK FOOD MOVIES Something weird is happening in Hollywood. I realize that might sound a tad redundant, since Hollywood pratically invented the word "weird," so I should explain. Toss aside the usual Tinseltown stuff - earthquakes, "est," kinky sex, even the Oscars. This goes to the very heart of our film culture. To wit: in the last few years, the movie industry seems to have come full circle, returning after nearly three decades to schlocky, vacuous formula cinema. When television invaded the nation in the early Fifties, eroding the broad support cinema had enjoyed for decades, Hollywood was forced to re-define its intentions. By the mid-Sixties it had found a niche, providing an outlet for themes and ideas that T.V. couldn't touch at the time. Many films of the Sixties, whether great or small, expensive or cheap, concentrated in one way or another on the torment and upheaval that society was experiencing. Movies like Dr. Stangelove, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, Midnight Cowboy, and Kenneth Anger's Scorpio Rising surged with energy, innovation and, in some cases, an underlying contempt for the predictable, seemingly irrelevant cinema that for the most part had characterized mainstream Hollywood. This trend continued somewhat in the early, pre-Watergate Seventies, particularly in films like A Clockwork Orange, Cabaret and Francis Ford Coppola's 11ze Conversation. which may be the supreme example of unrelenting alienation in contemporary American film. But somehow, in the last few years, schlock has found its way back to the wide screen. This is not to say there aren't any meaningful, powerful films any more, or films that don't compromise in dealing with society's ills. 1 'aslzville, , nnie Hall and even Days of Hea11en have continue the Sixties' imperative in their own masterful ways. And l also don t mean to imply that formula cinema has been completely dormant for twenty-five years. Seldom does any genre disappear completely· in this case, it simply diminished to insignificance. But the pendulum is swinging once again this time in the opposite direction. More and more cliche-'ridden, predictable movies are popping up, and I mean major productions. Lately it's become difficult to tell the features from the junk food at the concession stand. Both are prettily pack­aged, very sweet to the taste, and expensive as hell. But if you eat too much, you get sick. And America is currently suffering from an acute case of cinematic indigestion. Contemporary junk food cinema has murky origins, but I'm will­ing to cite Rocky as the trend-setter. This relatively cheap, seeming­ly harmless little film came out of nowhere to seduce movie-going America to a rather remarkable degree. Almost overnight everybody was talking about a talented young hunk named 'Sly" Stallone and his marvelous, "old-fashioned" movie. Had the adulation stopped with the reviews and box office receipts, Rocky would have been a handsome success. But it went on to win the Best Picture Oscar, leaving in its wake such notable films as etwork and All The Pres­ident's 1en. It was a spectacular triumph for Stallone. But it was also an ominous reflection of the tone of our times, of America's craving for hope and anachronistic values, and it started a trend that filmgoers are now paying for dearly, in more ways than one. INDIVIDUAL & RELATIONAL COUNSELING Andrew Fono 2004112 GUADALUPE 472-7690 by Bob Prewitt After Rocky came Star Wars (whose story everybody knows), The Goodbye Girl and, last summer, HcatJen Can itJait, which stands as something of a turning point. Not only was "Heaven" the first modern junk food movie to feature a bonafide star, Warren Beatty, but Beatty produced, co-directed and co-wrote the film as well. When you consider Beatty's career prior to "Heaven" - in parti­cular, the daring, renegade reputations of his best-known efforts, Bonnie and Clyde and Shampoo - it's enough to give pause. In a way, Beatty has single-handedly endorsed and legitimized modem junk food cinema. In the interim between "Heaven" and the present Supennan has come and almost gone, vanquishing American rather unevenly, but nevertheless lucratively. And now we must endure yet another batch of schlock, the most syrupy and offensive offered so far. One of Hollywood's latest brainshowers is already in town: T/1e Champ. Director Franco Zeffirelli (Romeo and Juliet; the wonderful television production of jesir of Nazareth) has remade King Vidor's 1933 movie, and regardless of how you feel about junk food films, it's clear that he's botched it. Tlze Champ is something of a Rocky Goes Sou th. In fact it's safe to say that this version of The Champ would not be here were it not for Rocky's success. Both films concern the lives of ostensibly washed-up boxers, but beyond that, Continued on page 18 KUT-FM'S ROCK OF AGES PRESENTS TOWN BLOODY HALL a film by D .A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus A laugh-out-loud documentary with Norman Mailer, Germaine Greer. Direct from New York's Whitney Museum of American Art. Austin Premier showing! also TRICIA'S (NIXON) WEDDING by Sebastian with the Cockettes Wednesday May 2, 1979 8:00 pm $2.00 BKatts UHallT U..T . BD.7 8 G es 2.00 vol. 3, no. s GAY AUSTIN ma~/ 1979 17 V~NVl~SMS EVERYBODY'S DOING IT DISCO! The list of rock stars dabbling in disco continues to grow. Recent releases include Cheap Trick's "Gonna Raise Hell," Wet Willie's "Weekend," Frank Zappa's "Dancin' Fool" (from the album Sheik Yerbouty) The Kinks' "(I Wish I Could Fly Like) Superman," and Elvis Costello's "Pump It Up." Further proof that disco really is a musical phenomenon and not just a passing fad. Warren Schatz, vice-president of RCA records, is denying reports that his company plans to release remixed versions of several old Elvis Presley songs for disco play. Let's hope he's right. Helen Reddy is making another play for the disco market, having failed last year with her cover version of Deborah Washington's "Ready or Not." This time she is releasing a twelve-inch single of "Make Love To Me," which many of you remember was first record­ed last year by Kelly Marie. Doing cover versions of other artists' songs is nothing new to Ms. Reddy, who has scored in the past with her own renditions of "I Don't Know How To Love Him" (from the roack opera Jesus Christ, Superstar), "Delta Dawn," and "Emotion:' May I suggest that, in order to obtain a degree of success in the field of disco, she try doing something original for once? Not to be outdone by her peers, Barbra Streisand is now planning to release a disco single of her own, written by Paul ("Last Dance") J abara nd Bruce Roberts. 11-ie song may or may not be used as the theme from Tlze Main Event, her upcoming film with Ryan O'Neal. Watch for a remix of the "The Runner" by the Three Degrees. The song is taken from their album New Dimensions, one of the best and most underrated records of the year. Spearheaded by super-producer Giorgio Moroder, the LP features several fine cuts, including "Giving Up, Giving In" and' Looking or Lc;>Ve." Chee it out. by Dennis Haney The Bombers have put out a new album entitled, appropriately enough, Bombers II, that features their hit disco single "(Everybody) Get Dancin' ." Watch also for Donna Summer's next albuni callt> Bad Girl. The single from that LP, "Hot Stuff," is already riding high on the charts. Sarah Dash follows up her current hit, "Sinner Man," with "(Come And Take This) Candy From Your Baby." Giorgio Moroder is producing Sparks' new disco single "La Dolce Vita.'' Panic! is the name of the new album by a group called French Kiss. Although a bit repetitious at times, the LP is notable for the title hit and the instrumental "Mischief." From Simon Soussan, producer of Arpeggio and Pattie Brooks, this disc should fa.re well with discophiles everywhere. Reprimands are in order for Polydor and RSO Records for re­leasing twelve-inch singles, pulling them from the market as soon as they begin to gain popularity, and putting out higher-priced albums in their place. In some instances, the twelve-inchers never even reach many cities. Recent victims of this unscrupulous prac­tice include David Naughton's "Makin' It" and Alton McClain and Destiny's "It Must Be Love." When will these record companies learn to stop abusing the people who keep them in business? It seems just about everyone wants a piece of the action: Engel­bert Humperdinck is dropping his last name and trying for a new image with his disco version of the old Elvis Presley hit, "Can't Help Falling In Love With You"; Andy Williams is releasing a disco version of "Love Story"; and, most unbelievable of all, Porter Waggoner is following in the steps of his old pal Dolly Parton with a disco version of "The Star Spangled Banner." When all else fails, try disco, right? '1 THE ~OLE OF §5! E D~SCO DJ The disco dj's function is quite complex and is greatly misunder­stood by most disco-goers. It involves much more than simply play­ing records and is determined by several factors. Because of the lack of understanding of the complexities of the job, there are conflicts between disco-goers and the dj that could be avoided with an in­creased awareness of the dj's role. These conflicts are usually cen­tered around requests; many people a.re quite puzzled by the dj's lack of enthusiasm in taking and playing them. The primary function of the disco spinner is to keep the crowd happy and the way the dj knows he or she is accomplishing this feat 705 RED RIVER 472-0418 by David Drake is by observing how active the dance floor is. The dj must be able to feel out the crowd each night and program the music in a way th:it will keep the people dancing. Programming involves deciding the order in which selections are played and the actual selections them­selves. It would be easy enough to do this if one played only estab­lished hits, but to provide variety and innovation the dj has to work in new songs whenever possible. Since people usually like to dance to songs they know new ones have to be carefully and selectively played. This also means making ones way through .the 100 or more Continued on page 18 --------------------~~ ,------------------- th 2 532 Guadalupe '~1t l/,,e adt1Je man'' b Is In a Aaywher • I I r al ••• 18 may 1979 GAY AUSTIN vol.3, n Junk t=()()d M()Vies Continued from page 16 any similarities are coincidental. In The Champ, the fighter (Jon Voight) is retired, a habitual gambler and beer drinker, and sole parent to a precocious, highly impressionable little boy named T.J. (Ricky Schroder). The two live next to a horse-race track, amid other flunkies who seem to spend most of their time oohing and aahing at The Champ's eccentricities. Enter T.J.'s mother (Faye Dunaway, looking like the fat sister of Botticelli's "Venus"), who eight years earlier had left the family for life in the upper class with a more sophisticated hubby. Naturally Mother decides T.J. is adorable and wants him on weekends. Naturally, The Champ resists this notion fiercely, feeling her intrusion a blow to his self-respect and dignity as a man and a father. Naturally this leads him back to the ring to prove himself to the world, and naturally, (yawn) after a brutal con test, he gains not only the heart of Mom and the everlasting devotion of T.J., but a bout with that Supreme Heavyweight in the Sky. In between all this predictable melodrama, and often during it, T.J. either cries, or chirps "Champ! Champ! Champ! After a while he begins to sound like an irritating parakeet, and you can almost sympathize with Daddy when he finally slaps the kid into momentary silence. Sadly, the stars of this film can do little to elevate their material. Voight and Dunaway make a useless pairing; they have no chemis­try whatsoever. Voight, for his part, is affecting, but he never achieves the degree of sensitivity and warmth that distinguished his work in Coming Home. And the accent he has created for the role doesn't help any. It's a cross between Stallone and "Waterfront" Brando. Dunaway of course, has never been warm, and in this film she looks particularly cold against the California tans of her co-stars. Still, she comes as close as she ever has to being sympathetic, espec­ially in her climactic scene with Schroder. The problem lies partly in the character. In Eyes of Laura 1ars, at least Dunaway played a vbrant career woman, a fashion photographer. In The Champ she has devolved into a languid fashion show emcee, and the part seems tainted with sexism. Small wonder the gifted actress gives less than an inspired performance. Schroder is a talented youngster, probably the best of the current crop of child actors, but he's not overwhelming as some would have you believe. For one thing, remote-control tear ducts can only fas­cinate for so long. LEGAL SERVICES AT REASONABLE FEES The Legal clinic charges $15 for your initial consultation session with an atto(ney. There is no ime limit. If you need or want additional ser­vices, we will supply you with a written fee quotation. If you don't wish to go on with a case after consultation, you are under no further ob­ligation. , Uncontested divorce (no property or children) ................. $100. • Uncontested divorce (with property or children) .............. $150. •Uncontested divorce (with property and children) ........... 185. • ame change .......................................................................... $45. •Bankruptcy, individual ......................................................... $250. , Bankruptcy, husband and wife ............................................ $300. , Simple will, individual ........................................................... $45. , Simple wills, husband and wife ............................................ $70. Legal fees quoted above do not include court costs. These fees are for cases filed in Travis County between April 9, 1979-June 30, 1979. Fees for legal work outside Travis County will be higher. Job Injury, Personal Injury, Criminal and other Civil Cases not listed above are accepted. Please call for an appointment. o legal advice wi I be given over the telephone. LEGAL CLINIC AT 617 BLANCO Austin, Texa 78703 512-477-1700 Vivian Mahlab HOURS: on.-Fri. 9-4: Evenings & eekends by appointment The real problem with this movie is Zeffrrelli. While there are some good moments (chiefly when he's filming Schroder or other children), there are more often bad ones. The film has no subtle­ty (violins swell at every opportunity), and the way it demands that you cry, that you be affected, is insulting. You feel manipu­lated. By far the worst scene, however, suffers merely from a case of technical incompetence: the climactic fight is embarassing to watch, a mangled mess of poor staging, poor camera work and poor editing. Perhaps the best moment in The Champ is purely unintentional. During an early confrontation scene, there is a shot of Dunaway, standing rigidly, glaring at Voight. Just before the cut, a fly zooms in and kamikazis the dignified actress right in the eye. She blinks furiously, but manages to keep her composure. Miraculously, this take has ended up in Zeffirelli's film. That's entertainment? Two things worry me. First, the sight of Voight and Dunaway in this project. Are we to believe this is the best material they've been offered? Can they really feel good about playing in, and thus endor­sing, this junk food movie? Is this the cue for Redford, Nicholson, Keaton, Hoffman, et al.? (Streisand has already taken a minor wade-in with A Star Is Born; Fonda likewise with an old-fashioned thriller, Tlze China Syndrome.) Big-name stars increase the chances of a big gross. A big gross means more of the same kind of movie in the future. Which means more junk food, and probably fewer truly valuable or at least atisfying efforts. Is that what Voight, the star of the searing 1/idnight Cowboy and the ground-breaking Coming Home, really wants? Or Dunaway, Warren Beatty's co-star in that pioneering Sixties ballad, Bonnie and Clyde? ec n , · aud'enc fall for Tlze Champ? I'm betting they will. Voight is hot right now. The movie's got a talented little kid, an exciting horse race, and a grueling, punch-packed boxing match. It has enough bathos to satisfy even the most demanding sentimen­talist. In short, it's the kind of movie America can't get enough of right now. The next question has to be, why? \I D~SCO DJ Continued from page 17 new songs released each month to pick out the 10 or 20 with the most potential. They must then be played at the right times to familiarize people with them without losing the dance floor. The majority of disco spinners program their selections according to beats-per-minute (BPM's), working up to a peak of around 140 (for e ample, Amii Stewart s Knock On hood) and then gradually (or in some cases, rapidly) returning to a slower BPM (Do Ya 'J hink I'm Sexy by Rod Stewart). This is done for variety, since a constant, rapid BPM becomes tiresome, as docs a slow one. Variety maintains a higher interest level. This up and down progression is one reason the dj may tell people making requests that it will be a long time before their songs can be played. If the spinner is working up to a fast BPM and someone requests a slower song, it will tak some time to work back down after reaching the peak. The mix or blend (segue) is another factor that comes into play since songs with conflicting sounds cannot be successfully mixed. ow to tie all this together with the question of requests. Through e peri nee and knowledge the dj is best suited to "read" the crowd nd choose which songs should be played on which nights and at what point in the night. A brand new song would not usually be good choice on a slower, more laid back night. It ca11 be quite frustrating for a dj to receive a forceful request for a song when it against his or her better judgment to play it, or even impossibl to do so t that point in the night. If the dj plays th song and lo s th dance floor, then he or she is not doing a good job. t is not po sibL to ple ev ryone. A good di co dj is one who, through th bility to program the music, is able to pl < s th m jority. \I vc t t li n vol. 3, no. s GAY AUSTIN ma) 1979 19 La Traviala Continued from page 13 with an auditory trick: as baritone Ellis read the words backstage over a loudspeaker, Malfitano mouthed them in bed. Not only did this destroy the delicate mood established by the act III prelude, it had more to do with "The Exorcist" than any reinterpretation of 19th century operatic theater. More disturbing than this was the most energetic death scene imaginable, more worthy of Tosca, than a consumptive Violetta. After singing the duet, "Parigi, o cara," from opposite ends of the proscenium, Alfredo held an hysterical Violetta who stood up in bed and flailed her arms about. Had I not known better, I would have suspected the cause of death to be an epileptic seizure. ] olm DeMain led the orchestra with lots of briskness, which kept things moving while it glossed over many of the rhythmic subtleties of the score. Soft-loud-soft dynamics and slow-fast-slow tempi do not do this music justice although DcMain revealed many harmonic aspects - specifically in the orchestral preludes - that are rarely heard. As usual, the orchestra players themselves were up to their standard, which is to say, up to the caliber of any house orchestra in the country. V' ++ o++++oo••••<++++++•••••••••••••••••••••+++++++yt • • ~ CU\TUM~ i I * [)I cu IJALL I • + •• •• A < i • ••·:· Tired of the same old dance ? •.i. . •·:· Try us! •·:· • • A 0 i • •• •• •• •• :~: GCS sponsgrs ifs annual CostumeBall :~: + + :~: Friday, May 11, 9:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m. :~: ~: 300 East Sixth Street :~: • + <· $ 2 .00 admission + ~ y •• •• ••·:· BEER, MIXED DRINKS, FOOD .·•:- : .............................................. , ~FeSt~IOf~~~~ ~ Human Rights ~ ~ breakfast n rt , , n u plants show u .~ entertainment ~ ~ a gathering of all the people of Austin, ~ n who - by our presence, wish to celebrate n U human rights. U ~ Town Lake Park - Next to Municipal Aud. ~ ~=~~:6· g~~k, ~ Moving to AUSTIN? ~~:!! ~t~n-?uS~N~~~-l.:. _ _ "~~0 'rllJ!n:e ~llJiir s 1JR1 324 S. Congress /a part of Austin's growing gay community 2on1ay 1979 GAY AUSTIN vol. 3, n GAY AUSTIN CLASSIFIEDS Gay Austin reaches a very special audience which other Austin newspapers just can't match. To help you communicate with the gay community, we include a Classified section. As an additional service, you can remain anonymous and we will assign a number to your ad, notifying you of all responses. All ads must be submitted and paid for by the publication deadline which is the 15th of each month prior to publication. A.\tE ADDRESS CITY ZIP TELEPHONE Check one. c I would like 10 place a __ word clamfied m the --------- issue of Gav Austi!L SJ.00 for 20 words, 10 enu each addmonal word. I would like to place :in anonymous __ word classified in the ------ usue of Gay Austir:. GCS will keep my name conli· denual and noufy me of U responses. S4.00 for _o words, IS cents each additional word. --------/ ------/ -----/ 3 4 --------/ -------- -------/ ------1------- -/ 6 9 10 --------/ - -----/ --~----/ -------/ ---------/ 11 12 13 14 IS -------/ -----/ -------/ -------/ -·-----/ 16 Ii I 19 20 Add1uonal words: -·----------------------------------- MAIL THIS FORM TO: GAY COMM 'ITY SERVICES (ClaSS1fieds), ::?330 Guadalupe, Austm, TX 78705; or drop It off at the GCS office between 6.00 and 10 00 p.m. daily. Subscribe to GAY AUSTIN. If you aren't a frequent patron of the businesses where GAY AUSTIN is distributed free, you can receive the paper in a plain wrapper every month far a year for only 56.00. P•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••u11111••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••11••••••••••••••••••••••911 Mail to: GAY AUSTIN 2330 Guadalupe Austin, TX 78705 Name Street address .....C...i..t..y..,. .s...t..a..t..e...,. ..z..i..p... ................................................................................................ Private camping space in wilderness sanctuary in exchange for labor. Send SASE for details. Women's Organic Farm, Bertram, TX 78605. ews writers wanted to wear trench coats, put pencils behind their ears, niff out the news and write about it for Gay Au tin - 477-66 9. 19 year old gay male {UT student) would like to share apart· ment with similar starting in August. Must make arrangements OW. Reply to Box l 3K c/o Gay Austin 2330 Guadalupe, Austin Texas 78705 - 477-6699. People needed to write book reviews. Al o people needed to write news about the book and publi hing worlds. Gay Austin -477-6699. Art reviewer , music writers and/or reviewers, cartooni t , theatre critics poets artists, paste-up people, sports writers and columnists are all welcome at Gay Austin -477-6699. Counseling: Michael C. Menefee, Ph.0., 2 13 Rio Grande, 476·5419. Stable lesbian couple eeks country rent house. Will exchange carpentry, care taking. repair, remodeling for part or all of rent. Experienced. References. Phone 454.9740 or write Su an Galyn, 4900 Avenue G Austin, Texas 78751. 316 EAST SIXTH 478-5598 GIFTS • ANTIQUES • ART
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