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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1980 - File 001. 1980-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1321/show/1300.

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(1980-03). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1980 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1321/show/1300

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1980 - File 001, 1980-03, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1321/show/1300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1980
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date March 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript s.f. cops sued COPS SMASH WINDOWS FURNITURE AND HEADS IN GAY BAR RAID 'Wriu. NIGHT' RIOT surrs FTLED The first group of damage suits stemrnln· from the disturbances that followed the May 21 verdict ln the Dan White murder case have been filed in San J<"rancisco Superior Court . The suits, which range from assault, battery, intentional infliction of emotional distress to negligen~e, have been filed against the city and county of San Francisco, the Police Department, former Police Chief Charles Gain. Mayor Dainne Fein­stein, former :::>istrict Attorney Joseph Freitas, and a number of unnamed police officers. More than 20 plaintiffs are seeking $1 mi~lion each in damages from each defendant . In addirion, the plaintiffs are expected to seek medical expenses, general damages, and damages from alleged loss of civil rights . Among the cases are suits emanating from what has come to be known as the Elephant Walk Incident . After midnight on the morning of May 22, police stor med into the Elepant Walk , a gay bar, and destroyed property and beat several patrons . Attorney Ann Menasche said that no criminal charges resulting from the White Night riots are pendin~ against any of the plaintiffs in these damage suits . NEW YORK SODOMY LAW UNCONSTITUTIONAL NEW YORK--(IGNA)--The New York Penal Law pro­hibiting private sexual conduct between consenting adults who are not married to each other has been declared unconstitutional by a New York appelate court . On January 24 , the Appelate Division of the Supreme Court of the State of New York unanimously declared the New York sodomy law unconstitutional in the case of People v . Ronald Onofre , Case No. 914/1979. Onofre , 35 , had been convicted of sodomy when his 17 - year- old partner accused him of using force . The partner later recanted his story and admitted that the sexual acts were co=itted voluntarily. But Judge Ormand N. Gale refused to throw out the sodomy charge when the other charges were dropped , even though the sex took place in th~ privacy of Onofre ' s home . The five justices of the Appellate Division stated that "personal sexual conduct is a fundamental right , protected by the r~ght to privacy because of the t ranscendatal importance of sex to the human condition , the intimacy of the conduct , and its relationship to a person ' s right to control his or her own body. The right is broad enough to include sexual acts between nonmarried persons and intimate consentual homosexual conduct . " Therefore , the Court held that Section 130. 38 of the Penal Law "is an unconstitutional exercise of State power insofar as it prohibits voluntary sexual conduct between adults in pri vate." (continued on page 9) 2 - --------------------···-· - CONNECTIONS ------ - -·- -- - .. -·· -- ------- COtlNECTIONS Published by Gay Corr..~unity Services, a prograr.i of the Uni ·,ersi ty YW'.:-A/Y:~CA, 23 30 Suada::.upe, Aus-:in, Texas 7870). Telephone : <5~2\ •7 4-'66G. • , r+. i •.1,r .i , v rf ·• · r • 'HTJ Pa rr,p,• Frey l•t'PJ' ot+Pr . or• Ii ,·atato ·v,,n,J<> ll'.irketinv C'·1 . {(,6 6th Aven 1e '!ew York, T!Y 10;11) ), _f'.;86·1 + · r · ·om· i I lf -r-•,: i-,- • • • • • • ·J, F.t, ert '1 rr , 14, J' • f .. , r • • ••• ,;/ I'll /\<Jay '-'rr ,'tr mr ~hy J Fn"y . ir )1 i rtrrer ~'r< :f , t kes "'ur tr-· J ,t,c, .... _;: J i·i·,r. l'·i:;:.;irrv u11..;0Ji, 1i:mne Draper , Wayde Frey, I< ktc,r, or ·4, ;. , . l!-1 1 in •f_r, • arry Palmer, David roy . 'tvke..;, '•,1.1T J+ ronv. retz, 14ar·i.c. EwPl, Ke y Finke, ,Tim r~rry ~ ner, ~Jedan .tone, Robert Welsch . rs: , Kirby, Rnn II r.s . . l · P,1l .:.l"it ior. : !cws let tE:'r, l\w:::t in :.WTitcta !1P'W'Slet ter, Capitol ( ;Rr, }, ;ai,, :t e. 'J."I, Di·• o· (DGPC'), Examiner, :t ·e V . , • NNh' N.' is de ii .. ,. e l proviclin' " 0 or..un for the le.;biar,/ "'J.Y ·ommunity of' Austin and Texas . Publication 1 • ti,, name or photo1•raph of any person or organization i..; r,ot t,1 be taken as any inuication of the sexual orier-tuti')n or that person or Or/'anization . CONNECTIONS welcomes unsolicited news anct/or feature articles, photographs , drawings, and poetry. If return or acknowledgement is requeste·d, please enclose a stamped, self- addressed envelope . CONNECTIONS will not assume responsibility for unsolicited material. CONNECTIONS is a member of the International Gay News Agency. ') ;, • GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES 'J 1 HOTLINE 'I '? • 477-6699 WQITE trn QClfl8 heir names are c, p: u»: "The Mora Majority," " e tlation Under Scd" and "' 'he '.tristian Voice . " Their cl'lims are so pre+entious : "We have the onopoly on mnra.ity, r~ligion and the fami:y. We have the - le p ~er t iPciJ what id right and decent in Arreri~an . ·"e . " Their actions are .,c, dangerous: with the ful' support of the New Bight, they are preparing to spend mi11ions of dollars cpreading visious dis­tortions of the truth . Their goal is so frightening : total supression of homosexuals in our culture . ~he anti- gay forces have already introduced House Resolution 166, which would eternally ban any gay civil rights legislation. They are currently mounting a letter- writing campaign against H. Rs 2074 , which would amend the existing civ ' l rights la'W' to prohibit discrimination based on "affectional pref­erence or sexual orientati.on" in employment , housing and the military . Several years ago , an anti- gay amendment to a bill passed overwhelmingly in the House . Fortunately , it didn ' t pass the Senate . It passed because the Representative perceived (due to constituent letters) that public opinion supported such an anti- gay vote . Texas is one of the key areas in the coming struggl- for lesbian/gay rights and we have been tar­geted for special attention from the "Moral Majority" section of "Christian Voice . " Our congresspeop~e will be key votes in any upcoming .egislation , ~he anti- gay forces are ready +o flood their offices with hundreds o' 1etters . We must fight back with letters of our ,wn . Write your representatives and urge them to supp rt H.R. 20(1 aP1 oppose the anti- gay House "oncurrent Re.:;, .1tion .66 . YOUR LETTER WILL MAKE A JIFFERENCE;! Po.'ticians m'lk( many of their decisions by counting letters . They ~1st make the right de~·s1,n thi ti~e . Here are th~ names and addre,;ses or Aua;tin ' " representatives in Congress : The Honorable J .J . Pickle, 242 Cannon House Office 3ldg., Washington , DC , 20515; The Honorable John .. Tower , 142 Russell Senate Office Bldg. , Washington , DC , 20510 ; and The Honorable Lloyd Bentsen , 240 Ressell Senate Office Bldg., Washington , DC , 20510 . Please send copies of your letters and your representatives ' response to TGTF , PO BOX 39406, San Antonio , TX 78239 , --JIM OLINGER GCS BENEFIT AT THE AUSTIN COUNTRY MARCH SIXTEENTH THE place to be in Austin on Sunday , March 16 will be the Benefit for Gay Community Services at the Austin Country . rragedy Ann, Miss Gay Austin, will be Mistress of Ceremonies . Specia ~uest 6tar~ are Jabrina, Austin ' d E;1terta.iner of the Ye'l.r, and Miss Riki, f?rmer Miss Gay Au.,tin . .he B and..,crew Sisters w·' 1 make a special ·Jp:,+ appE''l.l'/lnCf • A. 1 tin l u. ir eases have eontri buted many i terns for ·1u •ti '.1, C' me b.i. l •·or vintage clothing for m€.n anJ women frori Henry ' s Me~ryr, a mask anl eape from Bo ' s F-1n ..,hp, .l·1ves, aPi ,.,urpr.i,.,e item .. "hanky .1, very r,e . 'pee·· l thanks t1., the Austin Country •·or lonatint'; th<• r 'l' ~ it ies a.nu FREE f,f.'R i'rom 9 to 10pm, Tr e ~bow 1· 1n" from o: iOpm to 12: Gllam on Sunday, •·ur ·h '1 t. I' l , ' •hc1;r P · ~ only $.:', 00 ·1nd the p1· ' "'CIS "rom the l, r u'"' t0 ,, . v , C'',me Jp + •i:, or ,anizllt ·on anJ. h·we a won- . r ~ · t . at the \ 1 mtry on !ar ·n lf. , CONN_ECTJONS 3 AUSTIN GAY RADIO BEGINS MARCH 2 "A Different Drwnmer," a new gay- oriented radio program , will debut in Austin on Sunday, March 2 , at noon , on radio station KUT-FM, 90. 7 MHz . This half­hour weekly program is being produced by the Austin Gay Radio Collective , a project of Gay Community Ser­vices . It is the first Austin radio program to be produced by and for the lesbian/gay community. According to series p r oducer Carr Strong, the purposes and aims of "A Different Drwnmer" are to pro­vide a means of communication to the lesbian/gay communitr; to provide an educational service about gays to the non- gay community; to promote cooperation , communication and participation between gay organiza­tions in Austin ; and to provide an outlet for the creativity of the Austin gay community, To accomplish these objectives , the Gay Radio Collective is actively seeking the participation of all lesbian and gay or­ganizations in the area, Strong said, "As the collec­tive grows, we hope that its membership will consist of both individua]s and representatives from lesbian and gay organizations , The collective will work closely with all of the groups , in order to stay abre~st of local gay events and to help publicize activities , " A "r11· - ma•az'PP11 style format has been adopted 1'01· "A · · 'e1·, nt Dr,imn p-," which pr0v' les .:;e mer ts for nPws, new ·r~ yais, c0ming events, and spe i3 fea­+-; res, Ah u• Ir f f each week ' s pr "T:.Ull .is devoted ·'.:lent, which ronsist 0f ·nterviews, , lp••urPs, poetry, mus.i ·, · Arytn·r ·"' s' Austin esbians :i.nd g-.y . rrem.ii>re program of' March 2 t,• " • fe:i.ture .;eg- (d "W • rE Everywhere - Part 1 , " t i. ·~ , - in- tl e - ..,t reet" · r: t erviPw.., with Au,,+- in ·~y ·md non- gay, wh · c I seek_, t answer q H'v i I', ",lb· has beep the t>l'fEct or the ger,eral put i<· 01' the ' r ·,·e-·,sit11"' vi sir i 1 i ty and outspoke!'lness •· esb'at1..; ur,1 ··i.y men?" Other programs in March in­clude: Mr;rcll 1, "Human Rights for Gays, " 'l. lt>cture by ··u"ch ,icott rE •.1 ·r · the human rights stru ·• es of "1·h min r'+ie. t0 the gay rights struggle; March 6, "·ay ''omrnunity .'ervices of Austin," wricb begins a i>ri .; or tuH v o · Aust· P pay or •tr izati<'n"; i.•· rch i, "The ' bar t ·1ve," a discussion vf A.1st'n 1 .., first c 11·• tr. t of •ay rights, featuring Matthew C'olP. o•· tne , y f< i •h• Adv rates of San Franc i co; Lnd Mar ·11 , "1 •.- Thef'l ir. C'pera - Part I," e. d ·ou ·se by ·tev h 1n-1 , w'th music·~ examples , F0at.1r i.n u1c mine; months w· 1 r · ude ud liver.;e t 1 • • · _ the re ationsh.ip~ of g·•y · -.1p es, t>.;hian r mipi m, ~h' d pornogr,phy , ay poetry, ·oll'.:.P • ut, the •-,y pre. s, a, :i gay role mode] s . In <l i scus_, · 1 u the 'uture o"' the Gay Rudi Collec­tive, Strong ,·1.:.d, "We need help from the lesbian and ay community. A f'Teat deal oJ' work remaius t0 be done ·rnd a vreat deal of talent and energy is nt>eded ... o do it . AnyonP interested in workinr on the radi0 project wi 1 be wEll'9med , Although on- air voicer and inter­viewers are sti.l needed, a person does not have to appell.r on the air . We have many beh.:.nd- the- scenes tasks to do as we'l, such as writing , collecting infor­mation, editing tapes, publicity, and even helping with the music , Or, assistance in cover'ng operating ex­penses would be appreciated, too. " Persons wishing to participate sr,ould call Carr Strong at 441- 4231 , or call Gay Community Services between 6:00 pm and 10 :00 pm at h77- 6699 . 24HR. GAY HOTLINE FOR AUSTIN In the near future , Metropolitan Community Church of Austin , with the cooperation of Gay Community Services , will be providing a 24- hour hotline for lesbians and gay men . The hotline program i s conceived as a new MCCA outreach to the Austin communi ty, It will serve a very real need , according to Phil , who originally thought of the program. He told CONNECTIONS that MCCA already receives man~ emergency calls , especially "between 2am and 4am , after the bars close and people get lonely . " He says , "We want people to be able to have a human response to their call (rather than the answering mach­ine used when G. C.S . is ciosed) any time of the '.day or night . " Calls to the hotline , which uses MCCA ' s current number , will initially be answered by the Church ' s answering service , They will ask the ca 'er for a MCCA will of+'er essentially the same services as GCS - peer counseling, referrals to gay businesses , organizations and professionals (such as doctors and lawyers\ , and generally providing "just an ear to +-'l k to . " Plans are being made for a psycho Fist t t~ain counselors frc,m toth broups in crisis c unsP in, fUCh as suicide preventiun , 14CCA w:i.::. a v xtersi. e r .he ·an be nt ct or:e e,f religious c 1n5eling during of"icE ho~" · phone number (even a phone b~oth)_~~e­reached. The answering service wi l c en the hotline ., 1 te rs, who wi 'l retur +r ca Durir:7 G. r . • • • fice hours, 6pm + t y, the answer'r \ se~ c will refer At C'l. erst all other t ·rne:, , ... ,ie 'l!CC'A vo unteer., w.i c acted.. by F< n Moss Human Rights Advocates P.O Box 39 406 San Antonio. Texas 78239 512/6 55-3724 YES! I believe In a professionai approach to legislative advocacy for gay civil rights in Texas. PLEASE INCLUDE MY NAME ON THE LEGISLATIVE ALERT LIST. Name _____________ _ ___ _ Address - ----------------- City/State ------------ Zip --- 4 The rexas r.eld in interes• Gay Nurses' Alliance at urses Ass ~:at.ion st· e convent.i.or wil: be r. P11 , mcxa..., , 4arch 1 to the; .Jt . Anyone ir participating i'l U is ·or.vc"ltion p ease contact P11yll · • 785 w.ill speci& ... sented. Fa::.mer or the Nationa Coordinator, u,Ky , P ox '015 , Brc,;mwvulle , Texas , ,ay nurses p,;rt.i.cip·i.ting in tr.is conventi0n s th pport nL+y to b >· J . u e t care n ed and concern ·~n be pre-e C e n y avai ... able S Jre plan~ are to xp rJ Vir 1~ 'l anu. Lercllll te~ting '::NAA re~ei d a tremeuoously favorab e response from or an.i.zations and gay establishment owners , as a~ the Au~tin gay community. Since ~ov, ... 7 th , over 3 · r.div.i.duals have been tested , The vo unteer. enj~y eet ·ng people and ofrering a valuab e service to a community that G!IAA cares about , For ore informati on , please contact : or Larry Pa mer , RN 5 8 2 North Lamar e , ~X 8520 #66A Astin , TX 7 8753 GAY FILMS SOUGH':' GAY BUSINESS COUNCIL FORMED A t!ew Yor.k- based council composed of the majority of gay and ... esbian business associations was formed :ast November . The stated purpose of the National Association of Business Councils is to support , assist , inform , and educate gay and gay- oriented business associat ' ,ns to gain increased respectability for their businesses , mhis is the only non- political organization of its kind representing gay and lesbian professionals , executives , and bus~nes.., owners from across the nation , Witriin ?ne month after NABC ' s creatior, its president , h , Gerald Schiff, presented a 51 , 000 sig­nature pet"tion t Prcsidert Car•er , asking for a ban on ctiscr ·minat ·on ir hiring po ici s •· gays · r the fc>Qeral fOVernmcnt system, Al~o , in an addreus to ./bite Hou..,e reprPsentatives , Sehi 'f asked that ays b ofi'i ·ia Iy t·Ec gnized a5 a min r·ty in order to qualify for various federa progr'llll.., , such ct-, funding ttrou ·h the :n:a BusinPSS Admiristra+ ion, whicr pro­videw oar. c,f 1,.p to $'.:,00 , 000 for startinp; · tusini>cises, usine~s owners inter sted in ,joining NAR' should ·orta ·t t.ABC' , F.O. Box 744 , 'he sea Statior , NPw York IY 1 0011 AUSTIN LAMBDA ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS CENTER OPENS Austin Lambda AA Center has openea a+ L403 Fast fi:x:th Street . :'he grand openin' for he nenter wi'l be Eat~rday , Marcri &, l980 , from 3 to ... 't''ll , rt£' lambda AA Center ls a nonpr, 'i 'vrporation organized for the purpose 01' providirg a m1=Ptinv pace 'or 'af groupr of Alcoholics Anonymous , Tte expenses r r •he c nter are met by the tax- dedu..:tiblP contribu-tions 01' mPmbers . "'he .,chedu e for the grand opening Marr·h 8 includer pen hour£' frc;m 3 to 6pm , a rovered dish dinner at 6pm, and'> "I st sp aker , Wiley 1 . of lf<'•i.c• •n , a+ 8pm. er­sons wi~hing apace to stay March 8 or needing Jther informati n may contact Wayne Sehultz, 16 6 West 6th # 5 , Am,+in 7870) , 5,2/472- 7904 , or Ray Mul en , 23 1 ' ~reek # U , Aust ·r /87'1, 51 / 115 i- 8 r or 51 / ll') 1- lj )9, at Lambda AA is - ,-3 r:. AUSTIN'S ENTERTAINMENT CENTER The Private Cellar 7CA easl 6th Austin CONN_ECTJONS 5 LAVENDER MONEY $$$ NYr--(IGNA)--gow do you ret large businesses to adver ... ise in gay p•1b' ications? Usua ]y they don't want to • . That i.;_tre problem of Joseph Di Sabato, thE. mar behind the Rivendell Marketing Company (666 6th Ave. , NYC 10010; ?12- 21126863) . But Di Saba to is convinced that eventually non- gay businesses from cigarette m~nufact1rers to film distributors to record companies wil: t~p a market that they have always ignored out of preJud1ce '.md ignoran,·e . . Di S~b~to does ~,.-t expect manufacturers to change t~e~ r pol 1c 1es overnight, partially because •dver-t1 s1nc budgets are set up to a year in advan~e ut he ~oes believe that pressure can be applied ... • make bus~ne~~~s spend money in gay markets since gays are a s1gn1i1cant segment of the buying public, , C~r~ently Rivendell Marketing is soliclt.ing udvert1~1rg for some 75 gay publications with a combined stated press run of 1 . 5 mil lion copies ,,r , a pass- ;...ong rate of .1p to .:'our times that n11mber D · c: b t feel .. h t · .l •• a a 0 . ~ , a _a company may choose to ign ,re '3.ny i~div- 1dua puol.tcation, but it cannot i~nore the tota represented here . '.o u~rl advertising money to find its way into gay publ1cat1ons (to change history as well as watch it occur), Di Sabata recommends : 1. _Pub ications should consider covering loca: and nut1cnql business news as it relates to the gay community. 2. '">ut ·rations should run stories about gay busiPesses . 'ublications should run stories abou<:. companies that seek gay business . l . I'ublications should run stories •·bou busines­ses that r~fuse to advertise in the ;ay med·q . 3u~h information will let readers kn·w whg is going on in the business world and whether ohelr money is being spent with people who support the gay community or who decline to go after gay business. It remains to be seen how successful this lavender money trend wil' be. (Joe Di Sabata is CONNECTIONS ' na+ional adver­tising representat~ve ! ) CLUB DALLAS SUES POLICE DALIAG--(IGNA)--In what may be an historic turning of the tab~es , Club Dallas , a gay health club , has filed a $'00,000 damage suit against the Dallas Po:lce Depart­ment , charging that the vice squad is harassing its customers by making repeated , unlawful arrests . The suit claims that police have arrested 30 mlre­bers of the Club Dallas to drive the owner , J .W. Camp­bell and Associates of Texas , Inc., out of business . It also alleges that 30 persons were arrested Por public lewdness at the private club , where prospective members are advised it caters only to homosexuals . 'l'be •'ederal suit further challenges the s ... ate ' s lewdP.ess law , because its definition of a puhli.: place is "unconstitutiona .. Jy vague," Defendantf named in the suit include Dallas Police Chief Glen King , Fe.lice Captain Donald Mi ~liken , and Dal~as County ~istrict Attorney He~ry Wade . ANTI- GAY LOBBY COMING TO TEXAS The Moral Ma~ority recently divulged a pan to expana the anti- gay movement outside Washington, ~C . ':'hey claim Texas wil be one of the "first areas ... r. y will set up snop . " Texas is likely to be targeted because we rank ,w ,nr, the top three statef most active in our fight for equality. For example, the :lt.:nan Rights Advocates lobby is one of tne most orcanized and well supported .obbies in the cour<:.ry . The Mora" ~~jority is the atest ant' - ~ay 'obby to join Christian Voicr, begun a.J11ost a y , ~re . Its director is tre Rev-. Jerry Fa:w c. The lobby stated in :i. De~emrio· repC'rt that "i+ L, ~ = r1y kn.:>wn that some militant hoL"Of,EXua s vil" u.,e +re·r 1-~s.:. i"n as tead,ers to recri;it and cor.vinf'e ':.he 'f-- '..n a~t.:.vity which will use the±r which will be indirect opposition to +he mora~ be iefs of many parents . Tf this bi:" ~refC'rinr to the .,, ;y civil rigtts bill, 'JR .._07 .,) si pa "ec, it will set a preceden ... for our socie~y. ma~ine g~v.ng cni:u rnoJesters and rapists specia p~e"· rence .:.r the a~ because they , too, have a bizarre _,ex1;.al prefere ~e . " The se' f - proclaimed "pro- family, prc- ce,untr J, anti- gay" group is investigating the use o-:' a Cai. up poll to ,1pdate the "true members in .. he gay ccmmuni "Y. " The group says it doubts that "0% is an accurate count of the gay p ,1,1 a ion (the 10% figure is based on the Kinsey repor · The new J e rmect lobby cal.ed on .:.ts realerrhip of 99 ,COO (mos~.y pastors, who are expected to pass the message on their congregations) to write Congress. Steve Endear , Gay Rifhts Ni,.tiona .,obby lo'tb;r­ist warns the national ~esbian /!'lY co= 1r.it. of "the chillin,; effect their actionas w.y t,ave or vur pro­gress . " He says , "rh_y may very we .. l encourage anti­ray amendments to be Pacteu to non- related bil son the floor of both +he L'." . House and 3enate. " 6 ~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!CON N_E CT l O N S MAN BUYS HUGE AD TO CONDEMN GAYS FAULT TEXTBOOK DELE'l'IONS JERRY BROWN AND GAYS I,A--(IGNA)- -A Christian fundamentalist has paid $4000 for a full-page ad in the Los Angeles Herald­Examiner to say that Governor Jerry Brown is wrong to support gay rights. Yergil Grove used the head­line : "No , !lo, Mr. Brown ! God ' s Answer to Gays is Nay, Nay !" plus reproductions of recent news stories that show Brown ' s appointment of a gay judge and his pro- gay political stand , In a letter that is part of the full- page ad , Grove tells the governor that he is "headed straight into hell unless you allow r;od ' s grace to save your poor needy sou: • •• " He warned Brown that "over 50 million Christian people in America of all faiths" would not "allow such a person as you to become treir commander- in- chief , to be their leader when your own ::.ife ls one of confusion~ He also said that people have begun to call for Brown ' s ouster from office. "Surely you can see the handwriting on the wall by now, even now at this date , there are many thousands of signatures in for your recall, " Grove ci tes the Bible , of course , and adds that it "has the answer to every person ' s need and problem no matter how great or small . " The letter , besides quoting the Biblical passages that call for the death of homosexuals , :.:.s full of basic grammatica::. and punctuation err rs . In addition , tne credit for tne ad .:.s taken by a man "Who Believes in C'1rist , tJoe First Amendment , and Purity in Government." UT HOLDS "COMING OUT" PROGRAM by David Potter ~he Counseling- Psychological Services Center at U':' offered a t wo- week s eries on Transitions : The Challenge of Change, The series focused on coping with changes in many areas of life such a s the change of sexual roles , changing religious values , copi ng with divorce , and the changes one undergoes in "coming out of the closet . " ::Jr . Michael Menefee , a UT staff psychologist , and Lee Nico' off, an internist at -the C- PSC led the pro­gram ca.1.led "Coming Out : Out of · he Closet into the World" on Monday , February 18 , 19KO. The program addressed what it means to come ut and how to deal with it. The program leaders started by relating their own exper iences of coming out . Ms . Nicoloff identi­~ ied four stages that she ~ee s most gays go through when confronting their sexua~lty. They are : Stage One : Am I or am I not Gay? Often the best way to deal with this stage is to develop stronger friend­ships with both sexes . lhrough this , a person can begin to see if his or her emotional and physical desires definitely fall t0ward tno_e of the same sex or not . Sta~e T.o : I am •ay , ana I ' ~ scared ~nd a_t'llIIE • A "te-r qrl,;powled ;i'l · on ' s )WTI t i ty , ~Y be~t to Jis~ ss or ' f rt G .' Ho+li!l II .. /. Dallas- - (IGNA)- - The Dallas Gay Political Caucus attacked the Texas State Board of Educati on recently for voting to delete references to homosexuality in a health textbook approved for use in Texas public schools. The Caucus charged that the panel that made the decision "sacrificed sound education for political security." They added : "We recognize there exist seg­ments in our communities which would prefer that our children be kept in darkness about human sexuality. It is unfortunate that these extremist groups have pressured the committee on this point," The committee decided to remove two sentences from Health and Safety for You. They are: "Recently, though , there has been a great deal o~ discussion and study among doctors and psychiatrists about homosexu­ality . Some now believe that homosexuality is not a menta~ disorder but is another , less common kind of sexua.1.i ty. " 1ther references describing the subject were left intact . Those basically reflect a more traditional view of homosexuality as a malady. Mary Ann Leveridge, chairwoman of the textbook committee , is quoted in the Dallas Morning News as saying , "We have no objections to the subject of the book , just that paragraph. 11 She feels there is insufficient evidence to support the statements in the book . TWO POLICEMEN SUSPENDED San Francisco--(IGNA)--Two San Francisco poLice officer.., who were involved in a brawl in a lesbian bar last March were each ordered suspended f.or 90 days without pay by the Police Commission. Janie: Marr , 30, and Michael Kelly , 25 , were found gui ty of attacking the owner of a bar , Peg ' s Place. ~he members of the Poli ce Commission split 3- to­on whether the men should be fired or only suspended . Commissioner Jane Murphy was the vote for firing Marr and Kelly. of action these men took shows a fellow human beings. " only one to cast a She said , "The kind rontempt for their Stephen Bley, attorney for the t wo o~fi cers , said he disagreed with the commission ' s verdict , even though many feel that 90 days is a light sentence , and said that "both have been greatly wronged . " Bley added that the officers committed no "out­ward a · scr.:.mination against gays , but , •• an indis­cretion. An in discretion is not cuch a big deal. Police f~icers are people , too , and they make mistakes': Accurding tu The San Francisco Chronicle , 90 days suspensions are the max:iimum the Commission can impose short of termination . J 111 I \j ~ ....... ·. \ .. " . , . CONNECTJONS 7 GAY INMATES WANT OFFICIAL RECOGNITION MONROE, WA-- (IGNA)--The newly formed Sexual Minority Prisoners' Caucus held its first formal seminar Jan. 31 at the Washington State reformatory. The main goal of the Caucus is to gain official sanction from the prison administration , "It I s primarily a straight world in here, just like it is on the outside," said the groups director, Charles "Sandy" Ackert, a transsexual . "There's harassmen~ and there's ridicule and tbere's really very litt e programming designed for our particular needs . " As in the ourside worl~;,straights inside the prison often look down on homosexuals. The prejudices that exist in society are cften magnified by the forced colseness inside the institution. "Gays are ca::.led ' punks ' and ' faggots, ' says Ackert . Physical intimidation and violence some­times occur against them. The purpose of the caucus would be to provide a support group for gays in the prison, just as other prison clubs provide support for ethnic minor­ities. Walter Hyden, associate superintendent for treatment, said that the administration is not trying to stifle the new organization, but has to cope with the fact that the only floor available for office space is full and the budget for supplies is already overburdened. "You have to appreciate the fact that we 're running a prison here ," Hyden said. "This is a facility with all kinds of built- in restrictions , " Hyden said that the fact that the caucus held a seminar demonstrates that the administration is not opposed to the organization. Ackert, however, said his [lroup ho.d made some of its accomplishments in spite of, not because of, the administration , NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 'S MR . ANITA BRYANT DAVIS, CA-- (IGNA)--Davis , California, a small liberal college town fifteen miles southwest of Sac­ramento, has its own version of Anita Bryant. Jim Stevens, self- proclaimed libertarian and a lawyer in Sacrament9, has spearheaded the effort to rescind the city council ' s ban on discrimination against homo­sexuals. Stevens , a member of the Davis city council , has succeded in having the ban removed and has also obtained a promise from t he council not to consider it again for two years . Council members suppor ting gay rights balked at giving continued support because of Stevens ' threat to make an election issue, In a radio interview, Stevens expressed his opinion that "we each have the choice of who to associate with, Just like someone wouldn ' t be forced to hire a person who smells, no one should be forced to hire a homo­sexual against his wishes , " Local gay activists have since prepared an initia­tive that would force the city council to consider the issue immediately , not two years from now. The passage of the initiative would be a blow to Stevens ' opposi- · tion to the ordinance and a clear go- ahead to the city council. Mayor Tom Tomasi endorsed the initiative by becoming the first of 3500 signers required to place it on this June ' s ballot. Nearby Sacramento is also supposed to bring a gay rights ordinance before the city council. Stevens has said he will do anything he and his fellow "liber­tarians and Bible people" can do to prevent either ordinance from ever going into effect. MINISTER URGES CHRISTIANS TO FIGHT GAYS AS A COUNTER-RELIGION The Rev. Chuch Mcilhenny says God's word is clear- -"it's time for Christians to come out of -!;he closet and stand up against the sin of homosexuality," "homosexuality is sin; it's rebel~ion against Go ' s word," says this pastor of the First Orthodox Presbyterian Church in San Francisco. The Rev. Mcilhenny is taking his message on the road in order to raise funds to pay legal fees ar~sing from Mcilhenny's attempt to fire his gay organ"dt . The story behind the legal dispute,which The minister cal~s the clearest case of state- church con­flict in American history, is this: On April 11, 1978 a San Francisco ordinance prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation became law. Theat same month Mcilhenny hired Kevin Walker as his church organist after Walker convinced the pastor that he was a practicing, born- again Christian. Five months later, rumors surfaced that Walker was gay. When the minister queried him, Walker freely admitted that he was gay. He said that he was living with a lover, and believed in Jesus Christ as pis savior . The pastor said , "He gave me his interpretation (of the Gospel) and I gave him the right interpretation. " alker refused to admit any sin in his life­style and was fired . Gay Rights Advocates has taken on the case, because it is a clear case of discrimination against gays . According to the Rev. Mcilhenny , however, "We ' re not just picking on homosexuals; we happen to be under attack by homosexuals . The issue isn 't gay rights ' it ' s Christian rights , " he says . Walker is not seeking his gob back, but he is asking about· $1400 in damages and legal fees . The Rev is on the road speaking to various Christian churches in order to raise money to fight the law suit , Mcilhenny says that as a Christian he has no choice but to follow God's word. To follow the San Francisco law, his chUI'Ch would have to break what the members see as God' s higher law. And that is something the congregation will never do , he vows . The minister further said , "Homosexuality is a total world and life view. They' re worshipping the creature , not ,the creator , This is a case of two religions fighting one another . There ' s a war , goi ng on--a spiritual battle. "We don' t want to kill (homosexuals) ; we want them to come to Jesus Christ. Somewhere along the line , a Christian is going to have to take a stand, " GAYS AND AGING Fresno-- (IGNA)--The Ca' lifornia Commission on Aging met here recently and listened to testimony from a lesbian in her sixties. She informed the commissioners that there are more than 300,000 older gays and lesbians in California and they suffer hardships beyond those associated with the state ' s againg population in 6eneral. Some of the special problems of homosexuals are these : 1 . Lesbians and gay men who enter rest homes are discriminated against . They are often segregated because the staff feels threatened. 2, Elderly homosexuals are often forgotten by younger people . To help the Commission deal better with the issue of aging gays , the Commission has appointed Ivy Bottini , a woman active in the gay movement in Los Angeles . 8 CONNECTIO'NS FIRED GAY TEACHER DENIED REHIRING Seattle--IGNA-- The former Tacoma High School teacher who was dismissed in 1972 for being homosexual has reapplied for -- and has been denied - - a job with the school district. James M. Gaylord, who taught social studies for 12 years in Tacoma, applied for work as a junior/ senior librarian, social studies or resource teacher. As quoted in the Seattle Times, Peter Judge, the head of the klerican Civil Liberties Union, said, "There's no question in my mind he's been denied because he's a homosexual, and that seems to me a.'1reasonable." The ACL'T is analyzing the shcool district's decision and may file another lawsuit to retest the Tacoma School Board's court-backed decision that homosexuals are "immoral." The state-court ruling was left undisturbed by the United States Supreme Court in 1977. Gaylord himself has written to the school district saying, "I have examined this fall's minutes of the board of derectors and note that both junior high school social studies teachers newly hired by the district ••• and several of the new resource teachers ••• clearly have educational preparation and teaching experience far inferior to my own." Willie Stewart of Personnel answered Gaylord as follows: "The district does not respond to an ap­plicant: s request for reasons why some person other than the applicant was hired for aposition." Thus anti- gay employers are answerable only to themselves. Since his dismissal, Gaylord has been working part time as a combination business agent and clerk for the Tacoma Federation of Teachers, earning less than half what he was paid as a teacher . Gaylord has never been convicted of anything and that he is the one who brought suit, not the other wayaround. When the board members who fired Gaylord were asked their feelings about rehiring him, they made the following remarks: "I have not changed my position one bit. I wouldn ' t want him at all or anyone like him (because of) what he was convicted for, said Frank Gillian. David R. Tuell answered that he has to be concerned with thepotential for a harmful educational situation • ff 1 It posed by a gy:y teacher in contact with young peop e . Jim Boze said he would vote the same way. "It ' s the price they have to pay for being differ ent . " "The ACLU considers the Gaylord decision an abomination , " said Roger Winters , office administrator . WE'RE OK, YOU ' RE NOT--NO GAY FAMILI ES Tulsa--(IGNA)-A family is parents or a parent and children , not pomoeexual couples nor unmarr ied _cohabitating heterosexual pairs. At least , that was the prevailing opinion at the Oklahoma Confer ence on the Family, held in December in Stillwater. Participants included home extension and church groups , social workers , psychologists , educators , grandmothers, nuns , and Pro- Family devotees who brought their infants to the sessions . A number of professionals , however , expressed concern that the Pro- Family stan~e does not meet the needs of Okl ahoma families that do not fit the t r aditional mold. other highlights of this conservative conference were : "There's no word sweeter than ' mother ' and the nurturing of children is the most important career." "The place for sex education is in the home . " "Divorces are too easy to get . " Men , take heart from one item: "Men should be considered in child custody cases. " WHAT CAUSES ANTI- GAY VIOLENCE? BOSTON-- (IGNA)--Violence against gays usually takes one of two forms--attacks by groups of young men or sexual pickups where guilt is involved. The psychological thread that runs through bashers is called homophobia, a fear and hatred of homosexuals, and some say, of the basher's own homosexuality. According to a story in The Boston Globe , the average "average" gay basher the ages of 18 and 2 in Boston is a white male between Most often when blacks attack Police Lt. William J . Bratton, the robbery. "I can't remember a time have assaulted gays simply because said. gays, according to primary motive is when blacks might they are gay," he The largest nlll'lber of gay bashers are just picking fights with people they consider odd, defense­less, or unlikely to seek retribution. Gay bashers run in groups, work fast, and use hit- and-run tactics--either jumping from the shadows or wheeling in front of gays, jumping out of their cars and throwing a few punches and maybe bottles, then escaping before descriptions can be obtained. "These are frustrated kids who are poor students and who are drinking a lot and doing drugs," says Cliff Bair, a gay man who has been harassed twice by street toughs . His characterization fits generally tPe description offered by police and psychologists. "They'll Be sitting around and someone will say, 'What ' s there to do tonight?' and someone else will say' I Let Is go beat up some queers . I II Gay bashers, psychologist Dr . Jopn Money of Johns Hopkins University says , usually feel they can operate with impunity "because the social cliMate out there s~ys that homosexuality is a form of degeneracy. T]1e gay basher says , ' I 'm on the side of righteousness.' He feels very morally justified." The other main kind of queer- basher is the hustler,or his customer, who lashes out after engaging in sex. Although the sex between a customer and a hustler is by mutual consent , Dr. Money says that one of the two may feel guilt and revulsion at the situation, blame the other , and.strike out against his partner. The hustler often does not like to think of himself as gay , says Brian Miller , a Los Angeles gay counselor. "The receiving of money is the neutralizer of guilt. He can say, 'I do it for money.' The response of the hustler to his revul~ion is often more brutal than that of a gang . A five-year study of g~y murder victims by Miller and Laud Humphreys of Pizer ColJege shows that two- thirds of the 162 victims studied were killed by hustlers , one- third by gangs . The study also shows that "contrary to a lot of rumor and implications , w~ found almost no occurrences where gay lovers were involved in that kind of violence .against each other. " "Unlike in heterosexual marriages , there are no social sanctions holding th~m together . No law, no children , no church , no in- laws ," Humphreys said. As a result , breaking up a relationship is not as likely to be acrimonious . GCS BENEFIT AT THE AUSTIN COUNTRY MARCH SIXTEENTH -----·------- CONN_E_CTIONS WOMEN IN PRISON (IGNA) The Oregon Women ' s Correctional Center has a set of 14 rues . 1ne of the most contrr,versial forbids sexua~ activ:ty . Gayle Smith , an inmate , is quoted in the Ore,wn St'ltesman-Journal this way : "mhere ' s just a few lesbiars in here , but they act like a1 o"' us are lesbians . rwo people can ' t be even in the same bedroom together . You can ' t even visit your friend ' s room. " Inmate TJ,eresa King added , "They really magnify a lot of' little stuff. If somebody ' s having a problem, I ' ve learned the best thing to do is to 30 over and give them a hug, give them some supp ,rt . ut over here , you can ' t even touch somebody , :et a ,ne h ld their hand or put your arm around them. That ' s hamo-exu<>l activity. " Female Superintendent :.ee Gierloff said , "T' l'e seen a ot of touching , a lot or' hugging , and the s· , "'' does not de:o with it as sexua~ activity. It depends on who is doin' the touching and wJ,, is doirg the hugging" She added: "There are some who halfe been known to engage in h ,m sexual activity . ~hey' re probab~y going to be watched more closely, and they m~y feel harrass­ed und picked on . " While inmates generally rate Gierloft' ' s treatment as fair, many sai d that other staff members are too ri sr id . 'he pri sore rs believe that the sta"'f relates to them ,r ·, purent - chi ld i.eve instead of vn an adu t bus i .. . t'gt. R :eh•ffd Yelder of the stafr ackn,w' edeed that t},P · r mat€', l: ave a va i:i point, but he said tt at w:ben cu tr 1 w, lool:"E'r , "tre staff' felt ike they were jrt bing s rv·nt..; arc! they d .. un ' t huv" thE' control tl:e.v r ... ea . " tl: i , '"he Pd..ication eourdir·.1tc.1·, ,a· i tl: t rv :i 'ri +!:,, prison ' ~ Pd c·.1t.iona ar 1 v "i' i r ·J. p·o l" • 'he S'l.ia, "T'le pt i o~..,p'l.f · tJ,c i.n it 1+ · 'JD • ~ tr·· h, pr• •rams are there . B1,t they ·.11· v mt·.irJ . " .'he ·.1 ,,o sr.1id : "The wrimen wno ·ome h<'re ti· v 1Te1·y tr· ,lit .. or,'ll ' <lea!.i of wht..• women 1oul<l do. ~1e have .. pu 1 tee+h +o get ::myunE' to g·, over to tre r, "on Jtute '· ore ctional Institution for cot.rse~." ' NY SODOMY LAW UNCONSTITU"'IONAL cont ·r 1Ed from p·ge L [tis doubtfu: that the State A~torney General will appeal tJ,is rtiling because of his public stand tat sodo~y 'aw is that the sodomy Law is an unconstitu+ional infringement on ~re right to pr:v,.cy. Attorney r.cneral Abra~s ta~ed ast year at a conf,,rence at New York Uriversity on "L~w and tt F igr.t for Lesbi'l.!l ar. l Gey Pig'1tr," t11,+ it W'l.S his bP'icf the lew York £">domy law was unconstj•utloral . T o~as • Coleman , co- chairperson fotJ-c 1ational ommittee for Sexua: Civil Liberties , stated , ,,,.,his lecision r.as great significance. The New York Lep,i£­lature has sinsistently refused to decri~nalize pri vat~ sex between consentin17 a.lults , so 'egislati ve reform has not )een promisin17 . f the case is a:r,pealPd , New York ' s highest appelate court , the New York Court of Appeals , is likely to uphold this :iecision declaring the law unconstitutiona:. Finally , thi? decision shows a trend on the part of state appellate courts to strictly scrutinize the con­; titutiona'ity of statutes r egulating private sex. The Towa and 'lew Jersey Supreme Courts have reached s i milar conclusions . This gr owi ng judicial recog­nition o~ the right to sexual privacy can be used as precedent in states where other litigation of a s imilar nature is pending , such as Pennsylvani a and Oklahoma." The main brief submitted t o the Appellate Di v i sion was written by Ms . Mar got Karle , attor ney f or Lambda Legal Defense and Educat i on Fund in New Yor k . Mr . wi lli am H. Gardener of Buff alo , New Yor k submitted a Friend of t he Cour t brief on behal~ of the National Commi ttee f or Sexual Civil Liberties • • • • • • . .. .. .,.. >,-.• S1,.00 BAR .. DRINKS .ALL NIGHT · EVERY NIGHT 705 Red River Austin 4 7 6-6606 9 ·!ar\ - FREE BEER SUN 9-10 PM · TUE 10-11 PM WED 10-11 PM THUR 10 PM ROAD SHOW WITH MISS RIKI, TRAGEDY ANN, · SABRINA PLUS GUEST I ~~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!CONNECT JO N S _ 11 PHIL (L) and WARREN SIKES at MCCA 12 ------------- CONNEC_TJONS ------- --- WHAT' S A M. C. C. ? letr r: · +,, rr. · nister and as 1m:.m ri · i-lPen Pr poc i - ,. · T- /unend..-:ier t , bE"&!'lE a +hrPat iri "al- :i,ear.., ,a• , r.e fastel '-c J-."' p r-1ise part.i.::ipated ir a -..,hir ·,·n spe"k-tour • raise mJ, J fight that same e~i. 't.:. >I' . was in ·0od compa,y . he grour: .:.r~ uded Leun'lrd Mat lovich, av id KOV'-.t , ~rd De 'l'lr'" i!1 . Rev. Perry be,~an riti ife in the ~ay community the same way nany of u. rave . Beca ~e he wa· h mc- SE'Xua , he W'l. k.ickP ut of ti., ·n P''J-., his ·er se aw a mini ter was revokfct , he wa.., di,or"ed ly nic -.,if ar l 'orbidJP'l to see his ch ' ldren a •:o;.:.n . He c-ame out CV , tin· riev r ~1.,..t ity. 'a .:.forri · a, e in rina ut o · rv~ v pe p it , ar.1 tarted put- 'l ev. Ferry 11' S(XJ f l' J-avP stopped there , but .it did ' he .A. -rew - other congr ~at.ions ·,;en e:, "t­an Diego , San Francisco, Chicago , Phoenix , There are now MCCs in all 50 states , and in ·anada , England , A1.,.stra ... ia , New Zealand , and Africa. v .. treacr, p.._ans fur the 80 ' s inc"ude Western Europe , tJ-.,. lispanic Amer.ic-as , aT'd N' '"er.:.a. he cl:c1rc-h bee-an as a " te"lpurar:, measure" until the o+rE'r ciencminat.ions had their " consciousness" su •'''it'iently raiser! , and ber•an to ac"ept r.ay people .:.n+ their f rl!'er ·riurch,.s . "oday , that "temporary ch1.,.~ 0 h " i wor ,er 15' 'On •reg at ions , an c- er .Y i a thriving , erow ' ng .in.:+ it 1t.i~n , ·1crep+ in· everyone , r.ay and stra' •ht , •·rom every chur ·h background , aT'd •·rem n~ church back­- rour 1. "''C is a ' tt" e ike every church we ' ve ever been ,,_ i:a.rt of , and raa.i~al.y different at he same t ' me . Th<" 1' •P rrnce is practicin' what we pre9.Ch - and be · ve . "oday, we have a Washington , . C. field off:•c oP rhristian Social Action . Other commissions en! as~ ·orces within the churrh ' nclude Institution­" Fr iE n !'i'1; _try , the T·1sk Fnrce on Race Relations , tre ·sk Force n Men , th~ Task Force on Women , and Tr.no ,ative Minis+ r ies (ale oho ics, handicapped people) . These task for es and commissions reflect the sincer­ity ·md concern expressed in MCC aor ,mi ty among pP.op e w-' tt.iri thP. c-hurcJ-, i,nd wit1' 1t. Oth€r churches are w rk'ri• + -..,arJ .ome of these same •oal:> , but the UPi­E lowsh-:-;--~ Metropolitan Commc1n•ty Churches is .dedi·a~ect t mEet~T'g a the needs cf our pep e in -~y ·omrr 1r it. ·.md estal:. i shin11: a 1 a., · s "or ur rler-w. i t er::; or the ".;trai h+ " commun' y . en• to J-.um r r L •r + .i wa expre t part'cip·ti n .i.ri thE ,I rch 01 v.·,1 - ·t b r, 'l79 . "'V• Perry .r, ke ,1t +re ral y t I· r ·h . le · r.+ inues to w rk t a 6P -mi e nr · 1 GCS BENEFIT AT THE- AUSTIN COUNTRY MARCH SIXTEENTH CONNECTJO'NS 3 UNITED METHODIST GAY STRUGGLE COMING by Troy Stokes Every four years the United Methodist Church gets together in a national meeting to have a huge , hyster­ical disagreement on the subject of homosexuality, This meeting is called the General Conference , which sets church law for the next four years, The focal point of contention when the conference opens on April 15th in Indianapolis will be a paragraph in the_United Methodist "Book of Discipline" ( church law), which states "Homosexuals no less than heterosexuals are per­sons of sacred worth, ••• Further we insist that all per­sons are entitled to have their human and civil rights ensured , though we do not condone the practice of h?mo­sexuality and consider this practice incompatible with Christian teaching," Gay activists and our supporters argue that the last phrase is mean- spirited and untrue and should be deleted. The Board of Church and Society has already called for the deletion of this phrase , However , most observers do not hold out much hope for softening this language , Conservative , "charis­matic" Methodists from the "Good News Caucus" will attempt to pass legislation which would have the effect of specifically barring the ordination of openly homo­sexual people as ministers , The politics of the Meth­odist Church is such that there are very few places where a person can be openly gay and remain a pastor. Paul Abels of Washington Square United Methodist Church is one of those few. Under the current rules , if a pastor has the local support, the United Methodist Church as a national body DISCO QUEEN TURNS EVANGELIST by Hektor An impromtptu religious debate broke ou+ in front of the Texas Union Building on Monday, Feb 4, as evanselist Cindy Lasseter preached from the Bible while students questioned her beliefs, "You people are headed for hell," tr e self­professed "ex-disco queen" told many members of the crowd, She 'ncluded "queers," "whores s.nd whore­mongers," "sissies," "adulterers," and sorority women.0 in her ~.i.st of the damned . ·.asseter said the majority of the world is going •c. ell, and "it's the law of God that compeis me to cGJmc: out here . '"'here's nothing I ' d rather do than be out here pre:.ching," When a woman asKed what was wrung with her making love with h~r boyfriend , Lasseter replied, "The Bible says it ' s wrong, you little har::.ot . You soroity g.irlu are all going to hel" with your fancy clothes and whoring with men," She also accused women of fal~ine; in love with "men" berause they are looking for Jesus and Fulfillmen• . Lasseter distributed pamphlets aoout "jews," athiests and homosexuals and wpy they wi.L::. "burn in the fires of Hell , " She claims homosexuals are made through a long period of "sinful" act.:.vit.ies , Before anyone becomes a homosexual , Lasseter claims, he or she masturbates . This creat feelings of emptiness, so the sinner beg.ins experimenting with anybody a·-iail­able , ~h~s only creates more emptiness, In search of fulfillment, a person is led to seek more sen­lsations leading to sado-masochism and, eventual::.y homosex' uality. ( What a crock of sh.i t!,' FOR THIS CAUSE GOD C,AVE THEM UP UNTO VILE AFFECTIONS, FOR EVEN THEIR WOMEN DID EXCHANGE THE NATURAL USE FOR THAT WHICH IS AGAINST NATURE· ~omons 1 26: Scof eld has no right to remove him (or her) from office. Church liberals oppose this conservative drive because they want to avoid further stigmatization of homosex­uals and because they don ' t want to get back into the business of policing the private lives of pastors. Lots of middle class Methodists think it would be too much like the Baptists, and therefore tacky, to say whether or not it was all right for the pastor to smoke, drink , be divorced , etc , Since the gay issue first surfaced in 1972 the Good News movement, based in Wilmore, Kentucky, has grown considerably. Experienced church watchers are not sure about the strength of this conservative group and are therefore unwilling to predict whether or not they will be able to specifi~ally bar gays and lesbians from the ordained ministry, My own view is that the United Methodist Church will stick on dead center, The Church is moderate and unlikely to embrace any position which could be called extreme , Most Methodists are really confused about the issue of homosexuality. Many of them are aware that lesbians and gays are not treated fairly. At the same time , they are embarrassed about most sexual matters and unwilling to address them honestly, It ' s interes­ting that, since 1972, the Church has been attempting to aid gays , For example , the Board of Discipleship has produced a resource packet to promote understanding between gays and their families . It has not, during the same time frame , produced any educational material which attempts to aid homosexuals in putting their homosexuality behind them, Those interested in following these developments may call the United Methodist Information Center after April 15 at 800- 251- 8140, • - , •• "I 14 CONNEC~TJONS CRUISING --Ron . .Moss [ Austin Lambda member CHERESE CAMPO (R) leaflets "Cruising" AUSTIN ORGANIZATIONS LEAFLET "CRUISING" Members of the Austin Lesbian/Gay Po1 itical Caucus and Austin ~ambda Cultural ~enter have been lea"leting tfie audiences o~ "Cruis ! ne;." ~he ~eaflet, which is titled '!Ts •rruising•· Unfair t Gayr?" urges viewers to keep an open mind . It states "we feel that , presented i.ith the "acts, you will accept that gays are people with the same kind of hopes , dreams , assets , and flaws as the rest of the members of our society. Since this may be your only exposure to movies which claim to represent aY lifestyles , we feel you shouid know that these fictional characters are no more representative of gays and lesbians than the Hell ' s Angels are repre­sentative of heterosexual society. " It urges seeing "Word is Out," a Lesbian/Gay documentary, for a realistic view of homosexual life, Scotty Scott , ALGPC Political Action Chair , told CONNECTIONS that Austin Lambda andALGPC began con­sidering responses to "Cruising" when controversy first broi{e out in New York. "We decided the most important thing was to bring positive images of gays to the public ," she said. Scott contacted Dick Chick of Presidio Theaters , the company which booked "Cruising." He explained they are required by contract to take all films their distributor offers , although the length of the run depends on audience response . He agreed to book "Word is Out" into Dobie Mall for the week starting Feb. 22. "We wanted to do something more imaginative than a boycott or protest . " Scott continued ," :::+ •s rea~ly good to have something positive to ~~er, like ' Word is Out ,'" The organizations were planning to present "Word is Out" themselves , but they could only show it for one night . Bunning it at Jobie for a week will ~et us reach :iany more people." Seven members of A~GPC and AusTin Lambda, includ­ing Scott , Steve Thomas , Janna Zumbrun , Michael Fernandes, and Cherase Canpo , attended the first showing of the film before making the finaL decision to hand out leaflets . They cvncluded that "Cruising" was unfair to lesbians and gays. The movie implies that homosexuality is catching and that homosexuals can easily turn into homicidal maniacs. This message is subtle , but it is there, despite the disclaimer that accompanies the film. Scott says the leafleting will continue on week­ends as long as "Cruising" plays in Austin . Thera was a long line outside the Village 4 ticket window on .3aturday, Feb. 16, the day after "Cruisin'" opened, There was plenty of time to read the foyers Austin Lesbian/Gay Poli~ical Caucus and Austin Lambda Cultural Center people were distributing. When I ''inally got inside, the only seats left were way aown in front . 11Cr,lising" begins with a written disc'aimer : "This film is not .intendeu to be an inc1.ictment of homo­sexua ity, It depicts only a certain +iny segment of gay cu~ture." ':'hat ' s certainly kind of director Wi lllar:1 Fr ledkin . Since many -1:ays are afraid of the S&:~ people, too, he 'll just take a cheap shot at them. Severa, ctan.. cters say "this is not common to gay cultlre." Whether they meP.n S&M or bruta.' murders isn ' t clear. ':'he disc~aimer is correct, "Cruising" doesn ' t really depict gay soc.ieyt at al ~t pr ,jects ,r1y a heterosexual ' s distorted view of homosexual li"e , I could almost feel the stereotypes reaching,th~ough the screen to stranfle my freedom and individuality as a proud American Gay. I won ' t describe any of the scenes, but ther are bloodily detailed and stomach­turning. The scenes weren ' t as bad as the giggles , laughter, ru:id jeering remarks from some (presumabl¥ straight) members o~ the audiences . I felt misunderstood, insulted , offended , and totally degraded . When I started feeling sick to my stomach , I got up and went into the bathroom. One of the straight men from the audience was standing at the urinal. He couldn ' t stop staring at my long hair, earrings , boots , brown leather jacket, dangling keys, and oversized wallet on a chain . I could see him frantically trying to remember what qn olive green handkerchief means . I just smiled at him , which made him even more nervous . While going out , I stuck my head back around jhe corner and leered at him. He freaked . He was locking himself into a toLet stall when I left . I do not recommend "Cruising" for anyone with a weak stomach, In fact, the only reason I would sug­gest going to see it is to find out how bad it is . We can ' t fight s, ,mething like this by turning our heads and ignoring it . "WINDOWS" - '1'.HE LESBIAN "CRUISING" Because of widespread rumors that the movie "Windows" portrays lesbians in the same derogatory vein that "Cruising" does gay men , a special screening of the film was attended by two members of the Responsive Gay Collective , an organization formed in New York to pro­test "Cruising." The rumors were mild compared to the reality. This picture is not only damaging to lesbians, but it also continues the sterlotype of women controlled and domina­ted by men , This aberration of humanity opens with a graphic disgusting rape of the straight woman , Emily (Talia Shire) that was choreographec1 and pa'd for by the lesbian, Andrea (Elizabeth Ashley) who is in " ve" with her . Thro;ghout the film Andrea proves her "love" by commit­ting a total of three murders includinp: that of Emily ' s cat (which is placed in Emily ' s freezer for her to dis­cover . ) ~ere is no "redeeming social value" to this gar­bap: e . ~he film portrays lesbians as demented and capab e of any act of degradation and violence in their struggle to allow feelings of love for another woman to surface. The portrayal of Emily suggests that women are dependent on men for their well- being and that straight women are easy prey for lesbians and men alike, "Windows" deserves to be protested along with "Cruising." Hol]ywood ' s bigotry does not di stinguish between lesbians and gay men - we can ' t afford to, either. CONNECTIONS 15 THE MOVIE "CRUISING" OPENS NY/San Francisco--(IGNA)--The hotly debated film about homosexual murders opened in New York, but the subsequent press conference with its director caused the most fireworks . Director Wflliam Friedkin, speaking in the Manhattan I , an upper E-=t Side cinema, stood hes ground before an array of microphones and TV cameras . He said : "What I saw in my research and what I por­trayed on the screen , I don ' t consider negative . There is probably less murder per capita in these gay bars than there is in many other aspects of life •••• It is about specific characters and not a general situation. " Friekin went on to say, "You may think that the way I see it is distorted , wrong , You may feel that it ' s going to cause violence . I don ' t . " Gay activist Arthur Bell at this point left his seat and walked down the theater aisle to confront Friedkin , "I condemn you for makin this "i m," Bell said. "It is trashy and hateful. It can do nothing but harm a lot of people." "The movies have always treated homosexuals as wooden Indians . You have done it again. I condemn you . You are the worm of worms . Your movie is a piece of garbage and should be put in the garbage can and thrown in the Hudson River." Friedkin replied, " I 'm very disappointed to hear tha+ , because Arthur Be~l ' s co~umns were very influ­ential in the research I did." He then proceeded to read a 1977 Village Voice article that Bell had written about gay martyrs along the New York water­front . A member of the National Gay ~ask Force , Tom Burrows , ater said , " I 'm aware of the free- speech argurnen . But censorship already exists in subtle ways. We never see the good side of g~y life . We ' re not denying anyone the right to make a film , but we would like people to know there is another side." Meanwhile , in San Francisco the movie opened at the St. Francis Theater on Feb, 15th at 11 A.M. A crowd of about 50 people gathered outside the theater , although no formal pickets appeared . Several gay men got into a loud argument with a man with a white beard, who told them that he ' d like to see them in the same situation as the victims in the film--with their "cocks cut off and stuffed in (their) mouths." The police , who were guarding the movie house , escorted the white- bearded man away from the theater . The lll.ll!nagement of the theater put up a hand­lettered sign in the box office , saying that al~ patrons wou:d be subject to a "voluntary" search , Those offering the film to the public expected dis­turbances and wished to prevent any from happening by checkin~ customers for rotten eggs, tomatoes , or other items , CRUISING By J im Olinger In 1970, William Friedkin directed "The Boys in the Band ," which dipicted homosexuals as clever neu­rotics whose sole pleasure was shredding each other emotionally. That same year , Geral Walker completed "Cruising , " a novel which described all homosexuals as potential psychotic killers or their willing victims . Eighteen publisher turned it down before Walker found one who would print it . Shortly afterwards , producer Jerry Weintraub read "Cruising, " liked it , and began pestering Friedman to write and direct a screen version • . It took eight years , but Friedkin finally ae-cepted the assign.~ent and went to New York to do research. Ile claims his representation of the New York S&M sre~e is authentic in every way and says "the participants in this world show enormous courage and freedom of choice. " Friedkin denies that "Cruising" is a statemtment for or against homosexuality. He describes Walker ' s novel as "a marvel.ous murder mystery with a terrific story." I read "Cruising" after seeing the film. It ' s a fairly suspenseful imitation of several "police decoy" stories of the period. ".ut straights shouldn ' t try to write about gay psycholoi:ry. The result is al-ways a disgusting mixture of old heterosexual stereo­ty~ es and Sunday Suppliment psychology. Walker would have us believe that all homosexua_s hate ourselves and are unconsciou$ly seeking punishment . It appears that the original srooting script , as reported in the Village Voice , ~allowed th~ novel very closely, Rookie policeman John Lynch , played by Al Pacino , goes under cover to trap a psychotic killer who is stalking the gay community , His assigrnent forces him to confront his own latent homosexua:ity and he ends up turning killer himself. Friedkin ' s ma~or change was to set the film in "a small segment of gay society" +,he New York S&M scene . All hell broke loose when the top secret script was leaked , and financers and star A1. Pacino began putting pressure on Friedkin. The script was rewritten and additional scenes were filmed . A heterosexual relation­ship is added for Pacino • The killer ' s moti v-ation becomes guilt over his father ' s death. John Lynch wounds the killer and offers him a dea~ ( "Flead guilty co killing five gays and we ' ll give you eighteen years . Otherwise , you ' ll get twenty years for attacking a cop. ") , rather than killing him and taking his p4ace. Friekin was cutting and recutting until the last possible second , but the end result is a murky , confusing film which is still derogatory toward gays . This is shown most clearly when Lynch ' s neighbor , who Lynch had been very attracted to , is brutally slain. In the novel , it is unquestionalbe that Lych killed him in a spasm of guilt and/or rage after they had sex , In the movie , the identity of the killer is arnbigout , but the evidence most strongly indicqtes it was his insanely jealous , knife- wie:ding roommate . ~hese two are neither S&M practitioners nor dr"~ queens , the "sma:l se 'Jllent of the g'.l.y community" tna~ "Cruisirg" said it would ctwnr on in +t0 iisc aimer that o~Prel the fii.!ll . They arc 11 1. rma " ,ay peop e , a · ear i!llp icatior. +hat ary 01' us c ll a t..irn ·razej kil er ri.t Ue drop of a bead. I real Y·i '1 1t ·>i~r,k wi iarn Frielk"r ·!lten e to make movie . t, w~th hi_, arr t , urJ r tans+ g CONN_E_C_TJONS BENEATH ARGENT LUTEN Beneath argent linen Strewn with. wear et rose , Lips in palntei part embrace The monument erect. A~l flame al' ash Both sin and sa·r~sanrt In breathles blush The heated river f ow., . Ritual abandonea The chalice ro~ ad red . ,Tim Green FACT IF Y ' FEEI C' MF RTA s L , - JUST THAr T' I N mJ-fE VAL S JEKT ~N MEMORY OF HARVEY MILK by Larry Palmer One l'ast ed , One prayed , One spoke , 1-'ar.y marched , ',!ary more didr I t care , A few nore sa'd it ' s not falr , is dead today. n·e 'T.Y neighbor , On·e my voice , Once my candidate, A ways w:y 'riend , \-1 i th my heart in his hand, What ls this master plan? He ,;as everybody' s friend , He now lies in state , Without choice. Love and labor , He was my neighbor. • Metropolitan Community Church • C ?.AP e<1. 'ar'.l.are Nai bl<:t V ES : 1 No0n and 7 : ~o FM AY 'PFAYFF ANL C' MMUNT N SERV CE : 7:~0 PM Tuesday 7: ,0 PM I or.'.l.ay- Tt..1r..,day by sippolntment , lpm- 6pm. 1esday · (W'lt~ •J .rch 11 - then 9pm) ~HR 0T NE DC'AT Mareh 1, Wr 'it H,c ., : uesduys ·r: 10pm ( bE' •inning :be says about the Second Coming MEMBE'lSHIP C'LASSEr' : Sundays 10wn F TL nK 0 ~r R Mar~h 15 , 7 :30pm J Ill U F n w "' IF AND FEL OWSl!IP 614 E. 61h ST AUSTIN, TEXAS (512) 477.7747 CONN_ECTJONS 17 C A L. E N D A R ' CONNECTIONS Calendar - March 1980 Sun Mar 2 12 noon - 12: 30pm, "We are Everywhere - Part I ," gay radio program , KUT- FM Mon Mar 3 11am - 1pm, "Hepatitis B and How It Affects the Gay Community ," lecture by Dr . Barry Hafkin , virologist with Tx Dept. of Health , at 1100 West 49th Street , Room T- 507 (state health dept . bldg. ) Lecture for GCS counse­lors , Gay Nurses Alliance members , and people in the state health dept . 6:30 - 8pm , Austin Lambda Cultural Collect­ive meeting . 'pen to visitors . Tue Mar 4 7 : 30pm, Women ake Back the Night meeting at Aust.in T,ambda Cu' tural Wed Mar 5 9pm , concert by Helen Hooke, formerly o~ Deadly Nightshade , at the Ho .ywood . r . 50 at the door . With Lyn!' t<:e .er on bass and Cherry Wolfarth on drums . Thu M·;r 6 Fri Mar r ,,at Mar 8 10:30pm, showtime fea1,c1r ·r, T,elon.i at the Austin Country Austin lambda Cultural ~~nter open house < - 10pm, grand opening ol' Austin lambda Alcoholics Anonymous Cente~ Jun Mar 9 10am, Austin Lambda Cultural coord'Pators meeting l? noon - l? : 30pm, "Human Figh .. s for Gays ," gay radic pr0gram , KUT- F'M 7pm , ~esl:,ian pot- l11ck s 1pper , 606 Pressler . All .i.esbians welcome . Tl-tu Mar 13 IO : 30pm, sh0wtime f'e,1tur ing Cr>'l.lllpagne from f.ouston at the Austin Cou'ltry Cat Mar 1) 7: 10pm , potluck supper at Metropolitan Community Church of Austin Sun Mar 16 10am, Austin Lambda c'u't<1ral steff tr'lining rneetin,; 1? nooP - l? : 30pm, "Gay Community Services of A'1st in II EZn radio ro ram KU'T'- FM WEEKLY EVENTS s,mo· y 1:4)'l.!11, A"'' . '''lnt.:.on Si..r. i'l.y ~ ·hoo " ass, Jniv r ·.,y Ur,ited l'ett. dir+ n'l -.-~h 'l on, A Di"'fer '1t Dr unrn r , < - Ir ·rute ay •·n ! · o pro •ram , K 'I'- >''-1 , 90 . Mhz , pr duec ! by C<J.rr tror" ani the A 1.;t in Gay 1i C lec- ­t ivc, a prcjec .. of ';ay C0mmur.i ty ,..,rvi ~e.., l noon and {: <Opm , wor~hip s•r,i'P., at !Je';­rop ,l' t·:m Comm mi ly Chur<.:,1 v Aust ir 'pm, i+ .1rgical servic" , P.oly "'rin.:.ty Chur,~h of Austin 8pm , Dignity liturgy. Call 477- 6699 (GCS) for weekly location. Monday 8pm, Austin Lambda AA open discussion meeting 8 - lJpm , Austin Lambda Cultura~ gay men ' s awareness group . $1 donation asked from non­sponsors . Tuesday 7:10pm , Bible study , MCCA 9pm , rap group on various topics , MCCA Wednesday €: 1pm , Austin Lambda AA women together mf'et­iP ~. Non- zay friends and others welcome at us ' n I,ambda AA Center and at meetlngs on wednesday s) • 7:30pm , prayer and communion service, MCCA Thursday 8 - 1 Opm, A.1sti I' Lambda Cult iral lesbian a­w1. rePess group. :fl dow1tion asked from n-::in - Friday .;ronsvrci . 8pm, r:ay "ornmunity :,ervices rap group , Uni­ve1 ·c" ·ty Y Auditorium opm, CAA bowl~r,;;, Bnwswick ~apitc, Bow in• C 'ltcw, 'i , 00 Grover A1 tin Lambd AA pen ct· 'l' n mect·n 'l Sat1rlay orly; 6: ')pm, A•1 +i'l a.mt'ia C Vt~ d dist ir "'l' Mon Mar 17 Tue Mar 18 Wed Mar l9 rhu Mar ?O Sat J\''.ar ?2 Sun Mar ? ; Tue Mar ?5 Thu Mar "r Sat Mar 29 Sun Mar 30 9P~ - midnight , B~NErT~ for , .C. f . at the Austin Country. $2 . 00 at the door. FREE BEFR 9 - 10pm. Enter .. ,ainment by Tragedy Ann , Miss Riki , Sabrina, and the Blandscrew Sis­ters . 1 : <~pm - midnight . Slave auction . ~lothing fr ,m Henry ' s Memrys and mask and cape from Bo ' s Fun Shop to be auctioned off. 6 :30 - 8pm, Austin Lambda Cultural Collect­ive meeting. Open to visitors . 7 :10pm, women ' s theatre meetinf , 1704 Kerr (south Austin) . All interested women welcome . 8pm, first meeting of Austin Lambda Cultural lesbian and gay parents support group 8pm , Gay ~ommunity Services F,eneral business meetinf 10: 10pm , sho,r4-ime featuring B~tte ~1-teba at the Aus .. in Country am, Austin Lambda~-~+ 0al speakers b~­rea.. i training workshop . b ... ic Tibrary. l? r n - l?:,Opm , " 'lbarc>t ase" fea-turinf Matthew Coies uf ,uy Rights Advocates cf San l'rancisco , gay rai:.o progrwr., KU'I- FM '1m , .'Prin· :Equinox Ce €1:l·a .. ion at Zilke:>:- C ubh 'I c KENEFTT ~or Au.;t' r a "-1' .. ura ar I A1'1F' . !!usic by Jub.ilat · n . ' 0 sh food­ar 1- beveni.,e bar . Dona+ ion r, q ., ed at the dour . Fossib e second meeting tf Au-tin Lambda Cultural esblar. and u.:i.y pare-r+s eup:i:ort group 'O : ~Opm, ~die Goldie ~peciJJ.l Sh w ~ith rpecia ruests at the Austin 'ountry 7pm, gay men ' s pot- lLck .;upper, Canyon ~im . Meet a .. A,1stin •,ambda ,'ultural c,y 6 :30pm. l(hun , Austin Lambda ('ul t11ral coordinatorr mePt ·ng - 1~ noon - l : 10pm, " ,ay rheMes in i.:e·q_ - Part I, 11 gay radi o program, h."l"I- 1 9pm , concert by Cherry Wolf·irtb , .olc; vibrc­phone , ar i :ane Goss , si'l •er- .,or fl':Wr • ._ 1·­gui tarist , at the lioLywood . $1.JO 'lt .. l:e door . AUSTIN ORGA.NIZAiIC:1S Aurtin 6 : 3v ',llllbda AA enter •••••••• O:<pmni•ty ••••••• 4t..stin ~amt a 'u tura nnnter •••••• r - 10pm ni~ht y . A.ustir L .,oian Gay F iti.ca &Jc1· •• Ai..stin , r xas 78 b ay Sornm•.u i ty Service, • • • • • • • • 2 6 - Oprn n · grtl_r •• • •• Ho:y ~rinity Crurch J" Ai.stin • '606 South Ccngress • • • • • • • • • 447- (~59 Metropolitan Commlil1ity Chu-re_ 614 East Sixth • • • • • • • • • • • • • 47- 7747 GCS BEN.EFIT AT THE AUSTIN COUNTRY MARCH SIXTEENTH ADVERTISERS Te ' tl-te'll you saw it 1,1 C'onnec".io!1., • Austin C mtry • A 'lJJlo 80 Meti-opul; t:i.r 'o • 7 05 ~ed R' ve~ . (loca+ ior. tc b anr. un · ur·ty n ,~C'l f 41~+i'l € Ea_ .. 6t ,'l. • S, 8 io rar.d • . Q t t - 6806 - .. 1 S~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!C ON NEC Tl O N s.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!~!!!!!! r··· . -- - - -- , I i I - -----------------. ALAMO '80 1st ------ ---··-- ----- --- - ·-CONNECTIONS ------·----------- 19 MOBILE HOME 4 SALE 10x56, priced to sell including cyclone fence and shed . $4,500 8222 N. Lamar 66A, 837- 4425 MAIL YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS TO 2401 Manor Road #118 Austin, Texas 78722 Name, ____________ Phone ______ _ Address _ ___________________ _ City/State ______________ _ Zip ___ _ . ___ / ---' -----'' ___ / ___ { ---' Total words_ Cost Cash D Check D # __ Volume__ No. __ All classifieds must be accompanied by payment in advance. MAKE CONNECTIONS Thank you, Austin , for your enthusiastic response to CONNECTIONS. We need your help to be a forum for Austin ' s lesbian/gay community. We must have input from YOU . EACH of you ! CONTRIBUTE TO CONNECTIONS There are thousands of stories in the Capitol City , We need your help to cover them . If you have news concerning Austin ' s lesbians and gay men, write or call us . Send us your organization ' s newsletter , We welcome your news , feature articles , editorials, fiction , poetry, black and white photographs, and drawings . ADVERTISE IN CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS reaches a very speci,il audience that other Aui,tin publications don't . Our rates are very nc>·~sonall~e. For information n.nrl rate car•l, contact Ron Moss (441-4586) or Jim Olinger (474-::.660): WCRK FOR CONNECTIONS rhere are many staf'f pos'tion., OIPn ·1t C'ONNEC'i'TONS; editors, reporter°' , photofrflphers, ,1rti.:,ts, gt·aphj_c designPrs, ·111<.1 more , Contact Jim O' ine;er ,.or more information, eoNNEC'TTONS 2401 Manor Road #118 '1st ·r, 'l'exas f87c'2 , -1660 gay musicians for band. Nu-wave R&R . The time is ripe . 442- 2536. AFFIRMATI N CLASS offers fe-- wship for United Methodist lesbians and gay men. 9:45 am Sundays, Room 320, University UMC, Aust:n . Call 47 4- 1660 ·for information, HOLY TRINITY CHURCH OF AUSTTN. liturgical service Sunday 1: O pm. David Charles, worship leader. 1606 S. Congress , 447-7359 . ANARCHADILLO - Austin ' s unique headshop fea­turing fine glass & ceramic pipes . Chinese & Korean ginseng teas. Natural soaps and shampoos . Libertarian books & science fic ­tion . pen 12 noon to 7:00pm. 401 Manor Road. 474- 5968 ATTENTION - FEMALE IMPERSONATORS AND ILLU­SIONIST AUDITIONS are beine: he4d for top rate performers of illusion for the New Part-Timers of Austin , :f int r, ·•ed, contact Ron or Susan. 44::.- 4 ,6. HENRY ' s MEMRvs VINTAGE ,.,. ":-· T·,c AND COSTUMES. 423 East 6th "t . • 74- 61 8 . ..OURS Mor - We 5:~ tpm, ~hur- Sat ~:jQ 'llll to CONNECTIONS reaches a special audience that other Austin publications .don't. We 111 assign a blind box number to advertisers who wish to remain anonymous . Classified deadline is the twen!y- second of eac::_h month. Classified rate is 10¢ per word-- minimum one dollar . Call 474-1660 for further details , SUBSCRIJE TO CONNECTIONS If you are11't a freqveet patnMI of the IMlsiRess' that 4istribute CONNECTIONS vOII can recieve the paper 1116Btllly for~ one )'ear for ORI} $9.00 MAIL TO = CONNECTIONS 2 3 30 GUADALUPE AUSTIN TEXAS 78705 NAME ADDRESS CITY STATE ZIP 20~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!C ON NEC Tl O N S COM I NG. MAYl 1980 24hour hotline METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF ·AUSTIN 477-7747 •
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