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Together Gay, Vol. 2, No. 1, September 1974
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Together Gay, Vol. 2, No. 1, September 1974 - File 001. 1974-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1299/show/1278.

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(1974-09). Together Gay, Vol. 2, No. 1, September 1974 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1299/show/1278

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Together Gay, Vol. 2, No. 1, September 1974 - File 001, 1974-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1299/show/1278.

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Title Together Gay, Vol. 2, No. 1, September 1974
Alternate Title Together Gay, Vol. II, No. 1, September 1974
Date September 1974
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 847244490
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript AN INDEPENDENT PUBLICATION VOL. II, ISSUE 1 Sept.~ !974 SAN ANTONIO GAY COMMUl\JITY CEN1'ER N.o.w. HEARS LESBIANS 2. "Lesbians are your sisters, too!• The impact of this statement was realized August l in a positive, progressive step to break down the barriers of misunderstanding and 1ack of trust between lesbians and our straight sisters. Coordin­ators of the Sexuality and Lesbianism Task Force of t:he loca1 chapter of the National Organization for Women (N.O.ff.) pre­sented a program which included showing the filmstrip, The Invisible Minority, followed by a rap/discussion among the large mixed group of women present. Our objective was to dea1 with lesbianism openly, to destroy many of the myths and stereotypes falsely held, and to pr001ote a aore trusting, comfortable relationship with our straight sisters. As women are breaking out of predetermined, oppressive roles of a sexist, male-dominated society, they are becoaing aware of their own feelings as women and exploring their own individual sexuality and human potential. With this self- t. awareness and confidence is evolving an openness to the 1es-bian in realizing and accepting the lesbian's sexuality, worth, potential and contribution to the feminist issue. This attitude is evidenced in two important decisions. First, in 1971, the national N.o.w. conference passed a res­olution expressing a woman's right to control her own !>ody and choose her own lifestyle and recognizing further •the • double oppression of women who are lesbians.• At the 1973 national conference, N.o.w. took a definite stand in resolving to actively introduce and support legislation to e11.minat~ discrimination based on sexual orientation. As a resu1t of this resolution, the Task Force on Sexuality and Lesbianism was established to provide a base from which education, 1egis-l ation and research could be accomplished. More specifica11y, the 1973 Conference workshop on Sexuality and Lesbianism passed an implementation statement which the Nat'1 Task Force bas translated into a set of interim guidelines for 1ocal chapter action. Included in this workshop report "is the pressing need for legal reforru regarding married women who are •required both by law and custom to acquiesce to a husband's sexual demands', as well as the necessity of working for civi1 rights for lesbians. The Nat'l Task Force has further been •mandated to engage in a massive sex education prograa within R.O.W., including research and the latest findings on female sexuality. In the area of education, the Hat'l. Task Force vil1 work ~o increase the awareness and understanding of both B.O.W. members and society-at-large of the broad range of fema1e sexual. expression end lifestyles, as well as provide inforaation on all levels of the educational system. Within the judicial and leqislative syste11s, the Nat'1. Task Force will hopefully be instrumental in the repeal of a11 sodomy laws which define sexual behavior for both heterosexual and homosexual people. Further legal actions wil1 be taken in the area of rights for lesbian mothers. Finally, the Nat'l. Task Force will actively encourage women to do research on female sexuality.• aee pmge 3• t. Our loc~l task force is open to all women and strongly encourages their support in participating and working toward our freedom and bridging existing communication gaps. A very positive outgrowth of the interaction on August l has been a CR (consciousness raising) qroup consisting of women of any sexual preference. The primary objective is to explore our sexuality and how we feel about ourselves and each other as women. Women have tremendous potential and mu~ to give and gain. Through our growth as people, our unity and purpose cannot help but be strengthened and our ultimate liberation be realized. The Nat'l. Organization for Women meets the 2nd and 4th Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. of each month. The meeting place is at the San Antonio Free Clinic Human Growth Center. For additional N.o.w. information call the Gay Switchboard Thursday evenings 7-11 at 733-7300 or the N.o.w. information line, 734-0441. · SAN ANTONIO GAY BAR OWNERS MEET by Randy Roesler, President On June 11, the first meeting of the San Antonio Gey Bar Owners Association, met et The Arena to discuss the mutual problems caused b1 inflation and possible solutions. The owners present also asreed to hold regular meetings on the second Tuesday of each month et different bars. So ter, The Arena, White Gazebo, El Jardin and Spanish Harlem have hosted these meetings. (Thanks to the above bar owners.) At OUl' last meet1~ on September 10, at the Spanish Harlem, tifteen of the 4ghteen Gay Bar owners were present. Also represented were members of the Gay Community Center . and staff ot TOOETHER GAY. The »ar owners present agreed to support fully ~­G• Y Community Center ani their actirl ties, and to become pert of t.he Center. The San .Antonio Gay Bar Owners Aeaoci at ion was vrganized in June, 1974, as a socia l and b~ineea type group, in order to discuss our mutual problems and better understand the 4•s1.rea ot OUl' patrons. As President or the .Aaaooiat1on, I will be reporting the thoushta or 1our loo al 8•1 bar owners aDd bow the7 attect you and 7our bera• aotivitiea. DIRECTORY OF GAY BARS IN SAN ANTONIO The Arena, 801 San Pedro, 225-9159 The Cork Room, 411 N. St. Mary•a, 223-8652 The Friendly Lounge, 622 Roosevelt, 534-0710 The Frisco Lounge, 147 E. Trevis, 223-0858 The Gay Silhouette,2522 Culebra, 432-9336 Granny's, 309 w. Market, 223-0866 The Hyp~thesis, 2012 Broadway, 225-0693 El Jardin, 106 Navarro, 223-7177 The Ke@ Tap Room, 826 San Pedro, 223-7700 The Lancer Club, 607 N. St. Mary's, 223-0900 Mary Ellen's Lounge, 815 Fredricksburg Rd. OOz nd Barrel Lounge, 1621, s. New Braunsfels, 532-0255 El Safari, 13194 s. Hwy. 81, 623-9812 San Antonio Country, 1122 N. St. Mary's, 222-8273 Spanish Harlem, 349 W. Josephine, 732-0110 The Unicorn Pub, 1607 W. Polar, 732-0369 The White Gazebo, 6724 San Pedro, 826-9307 FLEA MARKET Sometime this fall (probably late October) we will be having a flea market at the clinic. Your donations are needed for this fundraising project. Almost anything will be accepted. Please bring your donated items in bags or boxes to the clinic between 12 noon and 4pm. Or on weekends. See Angel. If you want to rent a table or if there is anything you want to do at the flea market, please talk with Angel Castillo. Call 12 to 4pn, Monday thru Friday 732-4661. Help make this event profitable as well as enjoyable by getting involv~d in some way. Support your free clinic~ WE HAVE MO THE ENEMY AND HE IS US TENNIS IS FUN, TOO WANTED: Tennis partner, male, intermediate level or above. Call Gay Switchboard. SOUTH TEXAS REGIONAL CAUCUS Representatives of the gay organizations in the San Antonio area met on Sunday. September 8 to choose two delegates to serve on the Coordinating Council of the State Gay Task Force. According to the guidelines set up at the Augnat statewide caucus, one women and one man from each of four regions are to be selected to serve one year on the Coun­cil. The Council will meet four times e yeer. The current South Texas orgenizations ere Gay Women of San Antonio, The Brotherhood, Companions of St. Frsncis, House of the Covenaat, Gay Methodi.St Caucus1 Forward Foun­dation and Ber Workers (all of San Antonio.} · Fran Coley, of be Companions of St. Francis, wes chosen es the male representative. The female representative chosen is not presently in a position to be publicly nan8d. Other state organizations include the following: North Texas - Agape MCC, Ft. Worth; AURA, Ft. Worth; Circle of Friendf, Dallas; Daughters of Bilitis, Dallas; and MCC, Dallas. East Texas - Integrity; Transexusl Referral and Coun­seling Service; Task Force on Sexuality end Lesbianism, National Organization of Women; and MCC (all of Houston). West Texas - Gay Awareness, Lubbock; Gay People of Austin; Gey People of Austin on Campus; Texas Unitsrien­Universelists Gays, Austin; Gay Liberation et -the University of Texas, Austin; and Austin Women Workers'-Lesbian Caucus. New organizations wi!!hins •o join the Texas Gay Task Force should appraich their respective regional ·ceucus to ascertain whether or not they ere in harmony with· the state purpose. If the regional caucus approves the orgsnizetion, it becomes a member organization. In the event any organi­zation is rejected by a regional caucua, the group may apply to the Coordinating Council for intervention. Membership in the State Task Force shall be open to any sympathetic group regardless of ideological or religious beliefs, sexual orientation, racial or ethnic background. The first meeting of the Coordinatin@ Council will be held October 5 1n Austin. WHERE IT IS The Lesbian Women's Rap Group meets on 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month at the Human Growth Center (next door to S.A. Free Clinic). For additional information call Gay Switchboard at 733-7300. 6. .... - A FOOD STAMP ODYSSEY - OR - FAGGOTS NEED FOOD, TOO by Gene Leggett On Monday afternoon, July 29, I reported to Mr. Arthur Martinez, supervisor of the home investigators for the Food Stamp Program, Department of Publio Welfare on East Houston, that Robert de la Cruz, one of the workers under him, had discriminated against me as a member of the gay minority, had contributed to the economic oppression of gay people and, in short, was suffering from homophobia. After receiving a full report from me, Mr. Martinez agreed to have a conference with Mr. de la Cruz and sensitize him to the rights of gay people. A Classic Tale of Homophobia The ohain or events leading up to this meeting were as follows: On July 15, at my monthly interview for participation in the food stamp program, Ms. Diana Garcia decided a home inves­tigation should be made to verify that I had separate kitchen facilities where I lived (hot plate and ice chest are bare necessities, which I have). Ms. Garcia said an investigator would probably come by the end of the week. By Friday afternoon, July 19, no investigator had come. I had stayed around home for the entire weeks o I wouldn't miss "the visit" and thought it best to call down to the East Houston office to verify that someone was going to come. I was informed that the investigation had been completed on Thursday, July 18. I talked next to Mr. de la Cruz, who said he was the one who had come on Thursday afternoon and the investigation was indeed completed. (Mr. de la Cruz had handled my papers in June and did not seem to care for my bracelets, rings and earring.) I inquired how he could complete his investigation with­out making the home visit and talkins to me personally, and he replied that no · one was home when he came on Thursday. How You Find Out No One•a Home I told Mr. de la Cruz that I was home and asked him how he made the decision:on one was home. First, he replied, there was no oar in the car port. (I don't have a oar.) Secondly, he said, he asked the landlady and she said no ( Read on awhile ) 8. Relunctantly, Mr. de la Cruz read me the qualifications. When he finished I pointed out to him that he would have to indicate to me which qualifications I did not fulfill and, again, I thought this could best be ascertained by a home villit. When I then suggested that I wished to appeal his deci­sion, Mr. de la Cruz hastened to add that he had not yet turned in his complete report; he was in the process or completing it. Yes, He Will Come Visit Met Keenly aware of the repetitive nature of my suggestions, I a@ain offered my opinion that Mr. de la Cruz should make a home visit before turning in his final report. "Alright," Mr. de la Cruz finally agreed, "a home visit will be made this next week." Could he come on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday? I had to attend a family wedding the end of that week. Yes, he could be fairly certain that a visit could be made on one or those three days. Fine, that was all I had wanted from the beginning. The Seoond Vigil Monday I waited; Tuesday I waited. I ran to the window every time a car door slammed; I heard imaginary door bells ringing; I slept wonderlnfi if my bedroom door would be smashed in so I would be caught." (With a wife or husband? I wasn't sure.) Late Tuesday I decided I better call the food stamp of• fioe again. Thia time I asked for Ms. Garcia (my caseworker for July). Ma. Garcia was surprised to hear my story. Mr. de la Cruz had turned in his report on Monday stating that I was ineligible for food stamp!. When had I talked to him, she asked. On Friday, I replied. He must have lied to me, I added unnecessarily. Ms. Garcia assured me that someone would come the fol­low!~ week. I replied that I would let Mr. de la Cruz in if he were the one to come, but that I preferred that some­one be sent who was not prejudiced against say people, aa Mr. de la Cruz obviously was. • one was home. I wasn't sure I had heard correctly. Did he mean that he had come all the way to my home and then decided no one was home on the basis of an empty car space and the word of a neighbor rather than the elementary and practical method or knockin@ on my door? I couldn't believe this was ordi­nary procedure for welfare workers. Mr. de la Cruz replied that a home visit would not be necessary because he had enough reports from "other sources• to ascertain that I was no~ eligible for food stamps. When I opined a second time that _a home visit and personal talk with me should be primary in all investigations, Mr. de la Cruz claimed I was trying t¢ intimidate him and darkly sug­gested that through his sources he knew "what was going on there." Moment of Truth "What was goine on her~?" I ssked him. Quickly blurt­. ing the woras--out as 1r th very saying of them might con­taminate him, Mr. de la Cruz declared. "You're living with that man as husband and witet" ~ "Husband and wife?" I asked, much amazed. 'twhere did yo~ pick up this information? From the neighbors, from the streets, from the gutter? Did you ask me if I was living with someone es husband end wife?,. "Well, are you'?" he asked, seeking final vindication. "'Of course not !" I replied. (Husband and wife• indeed t The very terms are oporessive to me. Whatever my relation­ship is to the person with whom I live. it is not husband snd wife. Does the food stamp manual specify who you may or may aot sleep with in order to qualify for food stamps, I silently wondered.) Getting Down to the Nitty Gritty "Read ma the qualifications in the manual for food stamp el181bility,u I demanded. Mr. de la Cruz, in a somewhat tacky voice, suggested I had a food stamp manual by my side and simply becauee I had a hot plate didn't make me eligible. I replied that I did not have a food stamp manual by my eide, but that I would not have applied for food stamps in the beginning if I had ·not felt I was eligible. see page IO. For Prometheus Hold fast to the rock that binds you. Today we are here to set you free. For centuries your friends have beer# few. You gave us hope from the oppression of the Tree. oak We cheer you for fighting for the right to be free And being different from the rulers. ' Although the sky was darkened and you could not see, You called the biased rulers liars. We cheer you for being courageous and withstanding all The pain throughout the years. From you we have learned, broadened our insights. Your pleas.for a release have reached our ears. Soon you will be free, From your plight. Soon we shall overcome all oppression. Peace, tranquility, and harmony with love Shall be the world's to share. Then you will be freed from your wearisome position~ At the time you will realize That we do care. Michael E. Butler 1971 Food Stamp Odyssey ( concluded ) A Happy Ending On Monday morning, July 29, Mr. Joe Lopez came, very efficiently made his investigation, was quite pleasant to me, and told me my living quarters did comply with all the necessary requirements. By that afternoon, Ms. Garcia had completed the necessary papers; I had my monthly allotment of food stamps end the assurance of Mr. Martinez that he would call Mr. de le Cruz in for a talk. Well, it was an interesting experience. Many times we gay people suffer intimidation from straight people who, by innuendo, suggest that we are engaged in activities so hor­rible that basic rights available to other people should be denied to us. I hope Mr. de la Cruz now knows otherwise. IO. ) ) ) ) REDEMPTION a young Tradesman sits licking stamps behina th. Counter at th redemptioncenter. there • s !!Q. Salvation for me with you. n2E can! - Trade you f2!. th stamps you keep Licking. all .·y· you have in .~ Stock is balls 1' • & if I . Jim E. Read-you I you're selling for cash. & th Price goes l!_E while I stand here . Watching you watch me watching you ••• LICK THOSE STAMPS! th grinning Tradesboy gets up: CAN I SERVE YOU? Y!:. Pinklips have licked me Ihave to give !!E· & give .!.!l !.Q you/ boy, you Bonus for highgrade tradingstampsl' (WHATEVER YOU CHARGE ME, IT'S WORTH YOU To Bruce w. Your blond, sky blue eyed be8uty Is unreel end your eyes mirror the he ave ns ; I went to greb you, caress you end dreg you Down to eerth, where our hot breeth, Lost in 8n endless kiss, ·ewoon end embrace, Can meke our hearts pulse with fever, lust And ectasic throbbing~ plusing. end flowing Of our life fluids into esch othar, As we ride each other into the he~ven, Your eyes reveal end your body promises. Gus Sobel II. I2. MA BELL RELENTS! NO LONGER DOWN ON GAYS (Will your telephone repairman SWISH?) The August 10 issue of The Wall Street Journal reports a new policy statement by American Telephone & Telegraph Co., the parent company of the Bell Telephone System, concerning employment of gays. The statement sets forth policy to be followed by the operating subsidiaries (such as Southwestern Bell, locally). Discrimination against gays on the basis of sexual orientation not affecting job performance is no longer allowed and supervisors are cautioned against seeking information about such orientation when there is no job-related reason. Furthermore, a job applicant is not to be rejected because of known homosexuality or for belonging to a gay activist group! This startlingly liberal stance taken by A.T.& T. will presumably end the rather grim attitudes taken by most of the operating subsidiaries toward gays. The company has been under pressure by the National Gay Task Force because of its lack of performance in the gay rights area, and some of the company's policies have been outlawed (in Minneapolis, for example) by antidiscrimination ordinances, such as the one under study for San Antonio. A.T.&T. is the country's largest private employer, with over 1,000,000 people in the various divisions. -A BRIEF EDITORIAL This paper is late; this paper is rather long, and this paper doesn't have in it half the things the staff wanted it to. AS you may have noticed, this is the first issue of TOGETHER GAY as an "independent publication" ( whatever THAT means ). In becoming independent, we paased through a commercial issue, complete with ads; it never got to the bars, thanks to the generosity of a number of bar owners and other patrons who have offered to pay publication costs for this newsletter to keep it FREE to you, the reader, without ads. At last, here it is; the first issue of the second volume of TOGETHER GAY, and thanks to everybody whose work and patience have made it a continuing reality of the coxmnuni­of San Antonio Gays. d • ue, BAR PROFILE••••••••••••••••••••••• bJ Jim Dandy IJ. Bar Profile will be a continuous series of articles investigating and sharing news about the many Gay Bars in San Antonio. An indepth review of one bar will be presented each issue of Tosether Gay. "Gay Bars ere the community for most Gay people. Not only does one so to a bar to socialize and drink, but to share news, ideas, and friend­ship. Hopefully, we can broaden our goals to have other fol'Dl8 or community for Gays. This is how the bar owners and the Gay Community Centerare working together." George Barbosa, owner of the Frisco Lo(f1e at 124 E. Travis, is one of the Bar personalities in San Antonio who a interested in more than just making money. "Our younger Gay friends, those not old enough to go to bars, need someplace to go. Life on the streets is rough and we who have been around for awhile can help these kids have a better form of lite from the beg1nning.r George hopes to work with others so that someday youth activities oan be a reality. Geor@e sees the Frisco as e "friendly bar." MMost people come here and get e chance to talk to friends and meet new people because of the atmosphere and we're hoping to extend our hours so that more of this can go on." The Frisco will be open from lOam to 2am daily starting on Sept. 23rd. It will serve beer and wine during those hours and will have • "Happy Hour" from 4pm to 7gm daily. Coming events at the Frisco will include a"Miss Frisco Pageant• on October 26th. First Prize for this event will bee Trip to Mexico City. On Halloween, George's Birthday, there will be free beer and food from 9pm to 2am. When this reporter asked George what was the one unique factor of the Frisco, he replied, "Well, we're the crusiest bar in townl" Besides friendship and a good time, nice people like George, and cruising ••••• what more would you want1 Pt. Worth In the wake of Ft.Worth police harassment of the Texas Gay Conference,the police chief has apoloqized to the gay community of Texas. Ft.Worth police chief H.F.Hopkins also assure gays the license numbers taken by police have been destroyed. ~ demonstration against the police station for July 4~ was called off after Hopkins apologized. • According to reliable sources a ltate Investigation of local Authorities is now underway. THE FRE ~ UNIVERSITY An Alternative Educat ion Proj ect of the San Antonio Free Clinic A United Way ~gency Register _in person at the Sa A t i on the following~ days: n n on o Free Clinic, 1136 w. Woodlawn For Saturday, September 28 Sunday, September 29 - Monday, September 30 - further information call the 733-038 3 or 732-4661 - 12:00 noon to 4:00 p.m. 12:00 noon to 4:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. San Antonio Free Clinic at THE GAY COMMUNITY CENTER'S OUTREACH FROM A LESBIAN'S POINT OF VIEW by K & R Being involved in the Gay Community Center has provided an opportunity not only to communicate and work with other gays but also to share with straights how we think, feel, live, and love. In a society that all too often inhumanly alien­ates the homosexual, it is a unique experience when we are accepted, understood and cared for as what we are. We must not allow ourselves to continue to be alienated, ostracized, and rejected. One of the most positive ways to deal with society's insensitivity and ignorance is to com­municate openly and honestly with members of straight society our acceptance of ourselves and happiness in being what we are. This is difficult to turn off. Consequently, our sharing with straights has resulted in increased awareness, under­standing and empathy on their parts. During the Gay Community Center's existence, both gay men I4. and women have talked with college students, counselors, newspaper reporters and organizations, both on an individual and group basis. On several occasions we have been part of sociology classes at Trinity University and psychology classes at San Antonio College. Placed in a free, relaxed, comfort­able situation, we related to each other on a perso~al level how we felt about being gay and the kind of lifestyle we have chosen. Not only were they interested and asked many questions they came to see us as real people and many genuinely cared, changing previously held misconceptions and attitudes. Being members of the National Organization for Women, we, as a lesbian couple, are part of the Task Force on Human Sexuality and Lesbianism. Through their Speaker's Bureau and the task force, we have expressed our feelings and ideas. There is a definite need to raise the consciousness of the women of N.O.W. and through dealing with lesbianism openly, progress has been made in achieving understanding and trust. · Perhaps you have read the series on Changing Lifestyles in San Antonio in the Express and ~ several months ago. In these articles, Deborah Weser included the Gay Community Center and the lifestyles of both a male and female couple. Although lack of space prevented a more in-depth study, it is gratifying to know that someone in the news media is supportive of us and our efforts. In her interview with us we found Ms. Weser to be very open and sympathetic to us, our problems, and struggles to live freely and openly. Although there are those iD society who find it difficult to recognize and accept gays, we have discovered that there are people who, given the chance, will listen, accept, and support us. We find that this strengthens our belief and confidence in ourselves and gives us courage to live and be more open to work toward total acceptance by society. " • Sc Ur s, 11 Ve 01 Si lj 01 tc ii h1 Cl ti 81 01 w A 11 1 a' f e f s IT ALL DEPENDS ON WHO YOU TALK TO This is psychotherapy? " •••• The duckling sat in the corner nursing his bad humor. Then he began to think of the fresh air and sunshine and an uncontrollable longing seized him to float on the water. At last he could not help telling the hen about it. I5. "What on earth possesses you?" she asked. "You have nothing to do. That is why you get these fantasies in your head. Lay some eggs or take to purring, and you will get over it." ~"But it is so delicious to float on the water," said ~ the duckling. It is so delicious to feel it rushing over your head when you dive to the bottom." "That would be a fine amusement!" said the hen. "I think you have gone mad. Ask the oat about it. He is the wisest creature I know. Ask hiit. if he is fond of floating on the water or diving under it. I say nothing about myself. Ask our mistress herself, the old woman. There is no one in the world cleverer than ~he is. Do you suppose she has any desire to fl~at on the water or to dive underneath it?" "You do not understand me," said the duckling. ••••• •• frOJD !.!!!! Ugly Duckling by Hans Christian Andersen Sometimes you have to talk to one of your own kind to be understood! This is the reason for the existence of Gay Switchboard: to provide a truly understanding source of info.raation and help for gay people. Volcnteers are now-beinq recruited for this work, which is of a kind that mature, concerned people often find deeply satisfying. Here there is an opportunity to help others like themselves, in situations where they can draw from their own experience aa a gay person. There is also the opportunity to help dispose of the stereotype of gays as frivolous and irresponsible people. A Switchboard worker often finds that he or she is the sole confidant of some deeply troubled caller, and the realization of this gives a deeper meaninq to one's past experience--especially if it has involved suffering because of rejection for being gay. On Sept. a, at 7:30 P•••, the Gay C0atmunity Service Group will hold a •ea.ting at the Human Growth Center of the San Antonio Free Clinic for the purpose of review-ing current Switchboard operation and- providinq inf or•ation f Qr those who want to know more about · thia activity. There ia a special need for Switchboard workers who are menab~rs of et~nic minorities, but the principal quali-fications are, as always, maturity and respon- ~ ~ sibility. For further information call 733-7300, 7•11 p.m. Thomas s. Szaz, M.D., informs straight readers of his Manu­facture of .Madness that society considers homosexuality a crime 16. and a disease. (It's hardly news to those of us who have been bombed!) Szaz points out that contemporary gays are treated like those women of the Middle Ages dubtied "witches". Whereas "witches" were persecuted by "men of the cloth", gays today are receiving like treatment from the legal and medical professions. To cite a case in point, Szaz notes Clive Boutilier, a Canadian national. He was deported by the Immigration and Naturalization Service because he identified himself as homosexual. This case finally wound up in the Supreme Court. In an incredible ruling, the court stated that Boutilier's homosexuality wns "a condition, namely, a (and get this now obsolete A.P.A. jargon) psychopathic personality at the time of his admission (into the U.S.A.)." 3zaz continues by asking a significant question: if the United States government wanted to know if immigrant aliens were homo­sexual couldn't they ask them upon immigration instead of spying on them later, as with Boutilier? He had lived in the U.S. for ten years befor e he was deported. Szaz shows that in today's society many see Gays not as persons, individuals with individual needs, but rather as ridiculous objects. In short, one who is Gay is thought of as a nonconformist and therefore SICK. The great philosopher Sartre said it best: "Human relations are possible between homosexuals just as between a man and a woman. Homosexuals can love, give, elevate others and elevate themselves." Let us therefore hope that in time our society will ultimately come to that view. Dr. Szaz simply underlines the fact that America (and France) have not heard this message. Gays are not criminal psychopathics; since the Ame rican Psychiatric Association no longer considers Gays psychopathic at all, it is a matter of simple logic that they cannot be criminal psychopathics. WOMEN ON THE MOVE On Sunday, September 8, a picnic was held at the North­east Game Preserve with over forty people present throughout the afternoon. Planned by several bar owners end members of the Gay Conmunity Center, the purpose was one of unity end bringing the two groups together. The events involved were the "carry-in" eni the keg which wee furnished by one of the bar owners, get acquainted time, a meeti?l£ concerning future activities, ani the election of the r~presentet1ves to the Coordinating Council of the Texas Gay Task Force. Result!~ from this @roup was e beginning toward a greater feeling of sisterhood and the establishment of a smaller group to work toward and plan a weekend campout in November. D J ( J t j J 'l ] t n I i: c 1: :m b 0 nt c C1 11 d2 oJ wt me a BOOK REVIEW LESBIAN/WOMAN by Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon * reviewed by k This book is undoubtedly a milestone in my years of gay life. First, it f ills a much-needed v a cuum in the area of what we can read or give others to read s o Lesbians can be bet~er understood. I h ave felt at a l oss for many years becaus~ I couldn't in good conscienc e rec ommend an authoritative book about ourselves as Lesbian/Women. Secondly, the book personally motivated me to become actively involved in the lesbian cause. I became aware of how these two lesbian women have totally dedicated their lives to helping other women either more or less fortunate than themselves. The great number of pecple they've contacted. the hundreds they've counseled; the lectur­ing and studying they've done--has all been to improve the lives of lesbians. such a totally humanitarian concern for an oppressed group truly has my most deeply felt respect. The book consists of ten chapt"ers. Subject areas covered actually take in the entire lesbian experience: self-image, lifestyles, sexuality and sex roles, common myths and paranoia that are all too often felt by gay women. Often excluded in most gay lite~ature but not forgotten here are chapters on Lesbian Motherhood and Growing Up Gay. The latter chapters share the history of the Daughters of Bilitis and the now­present Lesbian/Feminist movement. It concludes with our demands as lesbians--full rights as citizens and freedom to be the people we are. *Glide Publications, 1972. Also Bantam paperback ed. BAR WORKERS MEET On Tuesday, September 10, ei@hteen representstives of al­~ ost ell of San Antonio's gay bars and mixed bars (Is there a er in town that doesn't have at least a few of us there most of the time?) met to continue recently begun discussions of ~tual concerns of bar owners managers, workers and the gay Community at large (that's usr. Two representatives of the Gay ommun1ty Center were also present. 1 Topics raneed from problems of the under-age gays to keep­d 118 restrooms from beirlll trashed {Reallyt) to drag concerns to rug problems. Also, a good amount of time was given to good Old get acquainted chit-chat. w Consensus was reached in two significant areas: the group 111 continue to meet monthly, with minimum organization and maximum communication, and the group understands itself to be a part of the Gay Community Center. see page I8. A Swmnary of "Oppression in Mexico" By Gerald Hannon from I8. the May-June iasue of "The Body Politic" in Toronto, Canana. Mexican Machismo (cult or manlineaa) aeems t..o reject all Gaye in general end force them into hiaing. Mexico City'• two gay bars are behine wells and hidden from the public. Mex1cRn Geya, esheme4 ot their gayness ~re afraii to give public evidence of their sexual preference for rear of rieicule, or worse ostracism. The only homosexual toleratei is the ective role(this I know from personal experience-. The passive agent then becomes ~n object of riaicule. There ia no reciprocation as in our relationships. The urge to domination in Machismo is the reason, and it dehumanize•• There is a pilot group seeking to est8bliah a 'phone distress and family counseling service and to translete aympethetic material into Speniah. They operate as • tiny minority in en embettle& group. Bob Figueroa, nevertheless feels that it is necessary to develop a higher self-fteteem and Gay pride, elthough the author feels that the environment does not seem to be conducive. Figueroa is the leeder of this group, and is dedicating • good deal of hia time to this error Let this moment ••• Let this moment we ere joined be endless. As I take you in my mouth, And clesp you to my throbbing,pulsing breast, In this forever moment,whoae heet seizes And loses us in en endless cir• .. ~ Whose joy is eternal. I drown in the white dewn flow of your repture, Let me drink or you till I quench my heart Forever. Lover let this moment be en endless dream we ahere. Gus Sobel BAR WORKERS MEET (CONCLUDED) As talk rolled from subject to subject, it became increas­i 1 apparent that the various ba~ owners were concerned, not 0~y1 for their own economic growth, but for the welfare or the entire 8 community. Indeed, the two concerns could not be aeparat:d: {Could it be that ind ividual liberation IS gay liberation IS human liberation?) This meeting was an important atep in improving the quality of gay life in San Antonio. I uspect we shall be h earing more rrom this group. If JOU have any concerns relating to the bar acene, pass them on to your favorite bar or call them in to the Gay Switch-board. • • he 'or REFLECTIONS ON THE YEAR PAST (by a Lesbian, for Lesbians) For the past year I have been involved with the Gay Community Center. It has been a positive turning point in ay life resulting in change and self-growth as a lesbian woman. It has caused me to become a stronger, more confident person. My awareness and commitment to the gay community has increased and deepened, particularly for my sisters. My involvement encompasses a wide range of thought, feeling and emotion. The newness in the beginning was re­freshing and stimulating, full of wonder, hope and expectation. Here was a chance to truly be myself without e hassle of whether or not I would be accepted. Here at last was an opportunity to be and communicate with other gay women outside 0£ the bar scene. Possibilities for developing a center for ~gays, no matter what their needs, desires, hangups, and capabilities might be, abounded. I 9. A natural outgrowth was the women's rap group. The desire that existed then, as it does now, was to get to know and ex­perience where other gay women are at. Our real selves have been hidden from each other too long; it is time to unite and work for our self-respect and the right to be. The goals iden­tified and defined then are still vital now. Through individual and group sharing, there exists real potential for self-growth, increased understanding of others, and alternatives to the bar £or the lesbian. We're hopeful that the common bond of lesbian­ism that we share will create a more secure, comfortable, open situation. Hardly any response we've received has been negative, yet few women have actually come. And many of our meetings and rap sessions have proven to be productive, worthwhile self-growth experiences. Yet I have also felt much frustration and help­lessness because more women do not support our efforts. Is the lesbian in San Antonio that insecure in her identity that she aust remain uncommited and threatened? Although I realize not aJ.l lesbians are insecure and uncaring, I also feel strongly that in order for anything ever to be done to promote our cause and find solutions for our concerns, the lesbian must raise her consciousness concerning the oppression not only against women but against lesbian women. ' If we work together, what can we hope to gain? The possi­bilities are unlimited, if we would only allow ourselves to be open and grow. As I see it, we must begin with self-acceptance as lesbians. Faith and confidence in what we are can only be positive. Next, we must accept other lesbians wherever they're at. We all have a right to be who and what we are, but at the same time to be open to new ideas and lifestyles that can enrich our lives. Change is good. By raising our own consciousness we CAn help raise the consciousness of other lesbians. Together OQ.r strength cannot be ignored. The numbers of us who choose ~o live as openly as possible are then capable of raising the consciousness of straight society. Many of us have done so and have been accepted, not just toler~ted, for what we are. The more open and sharing we become, the more possibilities exist for mutual acceptance. This can only mean a more positive future, freer from hassle and discrimination and alienation. In liberating our individual selves, we then make it possible to be liberated as a minority. Our future is built on what ve do~· Let's not wait! GAY SWITCHBOARD 733 7300 7 PM to 11 PM GAY PRIDE WEEK '74 How it was Gay Pride Week in Frisco A series of attractive and colorful floats was featured in Gay Pride week in San Francisco last June 30. There was an element of patriotism that went with a joyous, open frivol­ity. The parade was 40% shorter than last year, but the theme was Obtaining Full Gay Rights by 1976. Gay Pride Week in Hollywood Los Angeles celebrated Gay Pride Week with a carnival and parade that was joyous, bucolic and rather "sock 'em, rock 'em, knock 'em dead" last June 30. People came out into the open in a variety of outfits and moods and there were 20. some attempts to bait the police, who are rough on Gays in L.A. A carnival, complete with well-labeled gays, games of chance, hot dogs, etc., was staged. The L.A. parade even had a large contingent of young gays from Orange County, outside, L.A., blowing bubbles and drawing "yaks and howls". Gay Pride Week in N.Y. A record 43,000 gays marched in the parade on Christopher Street in N.Y. last June 30 and there was a militant and caustic anti-Catholic mood in the wake of the defeat of the local Gay rights law known as "Intro 2" by the City Council. There was a spirit of pride, militancy and joy among the gay people. Typical was the college kid who rode the shoulders of his lover in hot pants, holding a placard for the TV, read­ing "Hi, Mom and Dad". There was a rally in the band shell in Central Park.
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