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Gay Austin, January 1978 - File 001. 1978-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/119/show/102.

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(1978-01). Gay Austin, January 1978 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/119/show/102

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Gay Austin, January 1978 - File 001, 1978-01, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/119/show/102.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, January 1978
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date January 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript GAY AUSTIN January 1978 Gay Aust1r. is tn) .nor.tnly pubr1t:'l:if1on of Gay Community Sarv1cas. Th~ advcr­t1s. am.:ints you sac d1splay~o h3ram signify thas~ business' c..irr . .:mt s ... pport of tn3v.on< oftha orqa.~izat1on. Gladly patron1"?:e thesd dStablishmcnts, butabove all let tn~ pdOt>le knov. that you appr2c1at..! th ..d. r ~qual, op~n-n2artcd support. Her~m is the dir~ctory of thcs~ supportivJ busmesses: BARS Austm Country Pearl St. Warahouse Tne New Apartment BATHS Club Austin ADULT BOOKSTORt.:S All Amencan N ~ws Stallion Bookstore ARTS & CRAFTS Capital Ceramics LAWYERS 705 Red River 18tn & Lavaca 2828 Rio Grand<J 308 W. loth 2::i 32 Guadalupe 706E . 6th 1512 w. 12th Legal Clinic of Russell and Mahlab 50 l W. 12tn Gay Austin 2330 Guadalupe Room 7 Austin, Texas 78705 Dear Editor: 472-0148 478-0176 478-0224 4 7b-7::i86 478-0222 477-0148 478-9332 Dtctmber 28, 1977 Brothers and Sisters! As most of us have sometimt in our lives, I had becomt disenchanted with Austin last summer. It seemed to me that I knew tveryont in town and that everyone was playing games or giving off unapproachable vibes. I had several friends agreeing with me and some who wert planning to move away. I thought that maybe that was my only alternative, so I traveled to the West Coast to change my lift. Well, it certainly did, if I thought Austin gays were involved in games and bad vibes, then lord knows what level they were on in California. For some reason I thought gayness was a common denominator that held us together and I was surprised, but I was sJrprised on many counts. There is a movement that is slowly changing the way things are but so many gays don't want to be involved and that is a waste. There are mapy levels of involvement, some arc in your head and others are around you. Happiness is never in a place, California taught me, it travels with you and if you Just open your eyes and quit analysing, it settles around you like a second skin. I am sorry that it took several traumas, heartbreaks and the like for me to finally realize it. We are all in this together and I think it is time we worked together. All of JS, regardless of our trips can contribute to the betterment of the gay community. So next time you are dished, or looked at strangely, or any of the other cruelties we ·inflict on one another, forgive them and wrap your­self up in your cloak of happiness, they know not what they do. Thank the stars that you do! In love, peace and strength. 2 MANGROVE : the Trust of Touch contact improvisation by men by Kelly Kay !mag ine two male dancers on the dance floor, posing almost like statues, nonhuman. Gradually they come together, intertwine, and move as one amorphous body through the dancespace. Conscious only of his partner, each yields to and then supports the partner's mass and movement. Together they writhe like a conveyor belt fallen from its track. Imagine three male dancers lying face down on the dancefloor, arching their backs and rocking in rhythm. Their breathing is loud and sputtering. Wonderfully free creatures, they are like great fishes or whales, each paying homage to the others on the open sea. !mag ine two male dancers standing on the dancefloor, side by side, their shoulders quietly touching. Slowly, one dancer turns to face the other, letting his droopy head nudge the chest of his partner-the way a small child might approach a parant for protective acceptance . Imagine these moments, and you will imagine some­thing ofthe best of Mangrove, the San Fransisco-based men's performance collective, 3 of whose 8 members conducted workshops and performed at Studio D during the first week of January. The work of .v1angrove is contact improvisation. The dancers do not perform planned choreography. Instead they parform extamporan~ously, communicating with each other onstage through physical contact. The focal point of their work is the physical contact, the touch. Men spontaneously touching men. Men in­teracting with men through touch. And more importantly, men trusting men enough to touch. TalKing befort.l the performance, 1v1angrove member John LeFan (a native Texan) explained that before work­ing with Mangrove he possessed a deep-seated fear of men. He believes that our culture nurtures this fear in all males . During the dance, LeFan taK.es a sudden running leap towards Byron Brown. From nowhere Brown's arms rise to catch LeFan. Here there is no lack of trust, no fear. The success of Mangrove rests largely upon each dan­cer's becoming likewise vulnerable, always with the knowledge that he may depend upon the others for sup­port and freedom from exploitation. Significantly, these man-to-man physical depend­encies never become erotic. Sensual, yes; erotic, no. Mangrove's message is not only that men need not fear each other, but also that physical trust and touch need not imply eroticism. This is the message that all too many Austinites missed through their absence from the performances . An innocence of touch and a pure sensuality were especially apparent in the duet work of dancers LeFan and Rob Faust. Their work together was all the more striking for the physical contrast between the two: Faust, a tall, athletically handsome and gentle Aryan; LeFan, a much smaller, fiery dark-haired dancer, whose solo work resembled Bacchanalian revelry. LeFan, of the three, always seemed the most comfortable, the most open. The third dancer, Byron Brown, seemed too intellec­tual, too eager to play for la ughs, too ready to break a tender moment of movement, and really lacking in spon­taneity at times. All too often he would open his mouth to speak, encouraging the others to do the same. Then the movement would become subordinate to the dialogue, which was usually mindless anyway, and the beauty of the dance would wither for too long a tune. 3 Green deep, forest in the day where the light runs sapling bright in leprechaun cheerfulness thoughts racmg like the autumn leaves in a sunny wind like squirrels chasing through spring Forest thought in your eyes 1n your eyes in your hair light vibrant you smile weightless fire dancing in the wind -Amme Hogan ~ Family ,v1atter: ~ Par...!nts' Guide to Homos2xualitv, by Dr. Charles Silverstein .• .itcGraw-Hil~, 1977. $8.9;:i. Every gay person is confronted at one t1111e or other with the prospect of t2llmg his/her parents he or she is gay. To most people, the idea ls not a pleasant on.;. On th.:! o . ...! hand is the fear that Mom and Dad won't un­d2rsta. 1d, that they will be hostile or confused or hurt so badly that it would seem better not to ha vc told them at all; on the other hand is the fearthat they won'tcare, that th~y suspectea all along orar.; 1ndiffer...!nt anyway, with th.:! result bemg a faeling of anticlimax and the sinking realization that all those years of fear and in­trigue were endured for nothing. For many parents, L•lc sudden knowledge that their child is gay can be quite distressing. Often with little warning, they ar.; forced to acknowledge that their child, v.hom they feel they Know better than anyone else m the world, has a whole other side, unKnownandundiscussad and uncharted, whichtlicymust recognize as a very large and real aspect of nis/har character. Coming out is difficult for all concerned, and adding to the strain is the fact that tradit10Pally not much has been said about the ritual of coming out except in gossip circles. Finally someone has had the good sense to write a book, a "parents' guide to homosexuality" which- os­tensibly- will help to ease the burden of coming out for both parents and children . Dr. Charles Silverstein's A Family J'-1atter is the first really systematic and profes: s10nal aLtempt to discuss this aspect of homosexuality from the family's point of view, and as such it is long overdue . Unfortunately,~ Family 1v1atter is not nearlyas suc­cessful as the urgency of the subJect demands. It falls far, far short of its intentions, and the reason , oddly enough, concerns Silverstein's misuse of the vast amount of information he has at his disposal. Silverstein seems more interested in rattling on about his owP (usually irrelevant) experiences and observa­tions than in providing a clear and concise guide for parents. For example, he wastes the better part of two chapters showing us how closely twentieth - century attitudes to­wards homosexuality parallel antiquated, nineteenth ­century notions about "sinful" masturbati:m . The ana ­logy surely is a good one, but to spend two chapters on it when there is such a vast amount of more crucial in­formation indicates a severe lapse of judgment on Sil­verstein's part. Most parents reading this book will be going through an extremely unsettling period, and they will not be very receptive to the notionof takinga leis­urly stroll through the annals of psychoanalytic history at such a time. The major part of the book consists of case histories of children comi.1g out to their parents, ta1<en from Sil­verstein's own files. In theory, this is a very good idea. Parents need to realize that they are not alone in their situauon, and they could learn much by observing how other parents react when they discover their child is gay. Unfortunately, Silverstein does not select the most appropriate studies, nor does he present them in a very effective context. He sketches his subjects in vaguely and so poorly that even the mostempathetic readerwould be hard put to feel much for any of the people in the author's deadpan accounts. Silverstein takes great pa ms to annotate each case with insightful and compas­sionate comments, but they are wasted, because he is 1ust not literary enough to present real, sympathetic people. And in at least two of the cases, Silverstein seems to present the studies because they are the bizarrest in his files, despite the fact that more typical cases would be so much more useful. One study tells of a man in his SO's, who has been taking testosterone injections for two years. He tells Silverstein that he has been in the closet for decades, and would not even come out when his son made the confession that he was gay. The whole case study comes off like a very bad Neil Simon comedy, and it certainly presents very little that is relevant to the typical family grappling with the typical coming out . Another case, dealing with a family of Orthodox Jews, is a grim little story that does nothing so much as churn 4 oh my darling baby! the stomach . Middle America, it seems, does not exist in Silverstein's experience . There is no telling why Silverstein pass~s up so great an opportunity for enlightenment and again opts for left­field examples and useless information; perhaps these people are his favorite clients, perhaps (and this is more plausible than it should be!) they are his only clients . Whoever they are, they definitely are not included with the best interests of the largest number of families in mina. Nothing but confusion can result fr':>m their in­clusion. Ironically, Silverstein holds back his most sensible, general family-oriented advice until the last few pages, and then he addresses the whole chapter to the 92.Y child instead of to the parents , for whom the book ostensibly is written! Another dubious use of potentially helpful data . In the last chapter, Silverstein includes a little dis­claimer concerning the spottiness of h is book. "You may already have noticed the omission of topics that you feel are important," he says. "These omissions arede­liberate .. . Why haven't I written more ... ? Because it's your JOb . " This is the famous cop-out my fourth­grade classmates used to use when they gave a book re­port on a book they never read. "If you want to know how it comes out, read it yourself!" Th.:l topic of homosexuality is truly "a family matter" and 1t 1s too deeply entrenched in each family's unique and complex history to be untangled by even the best lay psychology book; on this point, at least, Silverstein is correct. Still, people look to books in difficult times for solld, supportive information, and if a book is used to facilltate the discussion between parent and child, it must cover the topic thoroughly and not leave gaping omissions stand with the cutesy excuse that they occur only in order to tantalize the family into filling the gaps themselves . This is very thinly disguised irresponsi­bility. In the event that a good book is really necessary, I would recommend C. A. Tripp's rich and compelling The Homosexual Matrix, which is aboutasdefinitive a study of homosexuality as we are likely to see. It is arguably too intricate and complex to give anyone encountering homosexuality for the first time, but to date it is the only really thorough, fair, compassionate, and joyfullyread­able discussion of gay life to come along for lay people in quite some time. Even the most enlightened reader would have to work through it several times to absorb all that it has to say, but it is clear after one or two mesmerizing pages that the effort is worth it. I think moi:;t concerned parents will realize this right away and forge bravely through the book. If only Silverstein had approached the subject with Tripp's wisdom, insight, and a sense of selectivity, he might have written a useful book. But as it stands, A Family Matter is worse than no book at all, since it could only serve to add confusion to a family that ls al­ready going through one of the most crucial and unset­tling stages of its existence. -Michael Wertin PROVE IT Push and shove me deceive and abuse me tell me you care Distrust and hate me shout and curse me unbutton your jeans Throw glass and burn me drench me and pick me I'll lick off your sweat Tie your boots round my balls pinch my nipples pierce me- rehearse me Spit on me- ream me leave me for dead Yet risen again Sadistic again and again and again • •• - Jhett Roehl ----------- ~ ---------- &&A II --·· ·-·- 2 532 Guadalupe ''l#'oi l/,,e adive man'' the best selectlon In adult materlal ••• Anywhere! LOVE BOY Boy leaning against lamp post torn denim hugging young flesh well-worn black leather boots and jacket valiantly thrown over one muscular shoulder pouting lips pulling on unfiltered cigarette eyes wanting ••• always calculating staring holes through all. Sauntering as if a snake he changes skins for difference, able to be all that is needed in order that he might continue. He is chameleon coming and going with the season don't push him for a reason this lost and lonely boy. Many men happen by him others hoping to possess linger on past fleeting moments­never to hold him back. Instances of passion in dark- secluded rooms remind him of something he 's not quite sure of. Women caress his smooth- silken skin but none go further, for he has to honor celibacy . Angels may only love other angels they're not sanctioned for creation only sanctioned to help others like themselves! - Jhett Roehl 5 THE GAY PAST: Magnus Hirshfeld and the Scientific Humanitarian Committee by David Morris There was a sense of exhilaration in the Gay Liberation movement of about 1970 because it seemed daring and utterly new . Surely no one in history had even suggested that we homosexuals were something other than the ex­emplars of madness and evil that all the experts in the world haddeclared us to be . Now not onlywas it being suggested but we ourselves were making our own em­phaucdeclarations and somehow were be mg listened to. In calmerdays since, scholars have revealed the short­sightedness of our early enthusiasm. We have a history. Not only have gay people existed all along, but gay or­ganizations in the past have fought for gay rights with as much determination as their modern counterparts. Of the recent books dealing with gay history, the first to have a significant impact was The Early Homosexua: Rights Movement by John Lauritsen and David Thorstad (New York: Times Change Press, 1974) . It was mainly through this book that it became generally known that gay people shared the fate or countless others in Hitler's concentration camps, and through 1t that the pink tri­angle came to be used as a symbol for modern gay activ­ism. Although the book itself is no literary gem, the events it tells of are important and relevant to our own times. They are worth retelling. In 1897 a physician in Berlin named Magnus Hirsh- · feld founded the Scientific Humanitarian Committee to advocate the abolition of Paragraph 175 of the German Penal Code, the law prohibiting sexbetweenmales; other goals of the Committee which were to prove more impor­tant in the long run were the enlightenment of the general public about homosexuality and the promotion of interest among homosexuals themselves in the struggle for their rights. A petition was circulated throughout the 36 years of the Committee's existence calling for the repeal of Paragraph 175. Hirshfeld and other members of the group made international lecture tours for the purpose of edu­cating the public and arousing gay people. From 1899 to 1923 the Committee published a yearly journal, the Jahrbuch ftir sexuelle Zwischenstufen (Yearbook for Inter­mediate Sexual ~) which contained a wide range of articles onhomosexualtty and homosexuals from cultural, scientific, and political viewpoints . (~r~tcs 809 west 12th 472-6520 Retail &t Wholesale A c.a..ic Hobby Shop Ollerinf: • FULL Cl&AMIC 11av1c11 •INIT&UCTION •MOLDI • ltlLNI S.A.F .E. -ta hrre oa die ruat ud third S. .. y1 of nny moath. joia u l The Committee grew rapidly during the first few years of its existence; by 1908 some 5, 000 gay people were either members or had been m contact with the organi­zation . Many prominent figures, gay and straight, sup­ported them . The issue of gay rights was brought so effectively into the open that few German newspape rs could ignore it. In the 1912 Reich stag election campaign the Scientific Humanitarian Committee received 97 re­sponses to the questionaire it had sent to the candidates, only six of them expressing opposition . There were at times rumors that close electoral races had been decided by the gay vote . Among German political parties, it was consistently the left wing, particularly the Social Demo­crats, who showed the strongest support. Although World War I produced a lull in its activities, the German revolution which followed provided new im­petus. Like most of the rest of the Committee, Hirsh­feld was a socialist and a strong supporter of the new German republic . Immediately after the revolution, Hirshfeld broadened his efforts by founding the Institute for Sexual Science in Berlin, which he referred to as a "child of the revolution . " A forerunner of the Kinsey Institute for Sexual Research, the Institute became a repository for vast collections of written works on sex. It was also a kind of university where public classes on sex were held. It included what may have been the first marriage counseling bureau in history . • In the meantime the Russian revolution had triumphed and in its initial liberating spirit had eliminated all laws concerning sex between consenting adults. By 19 2 3, a delegation of Russian doctors, headed by the people's commissar of health, visited Hirshfeld's Institute, ex­pressing their approval and reporting that "no unhappy consequences of any kind whatsoever" had resulted from the elimination of the Tsarist anti-homosexual laws . Other attempts at internationalizing the gay movement were made in the 20s, particularly with respect to En­gland, where the most prominant figure was Edward Car­penter, the remarkable writer, poet, labor organizer, and proponent of gay rights . An article in a magazine published at the time by a second German gay group was entitled "Uranians of the World, Unite!" The greatest support from the United States came from the outspoken feminist and anarchist Emma Goldman, whose spee ches and articles in the magazine Mother Earth had for some time supported women's rights and gay rights. An article by her on Louise Michel appeared in the 192 3 edition of the Jahrbuch. Magnus Hirshfeld had an important part in forming the World League for Sexual Reform in 19 21. At its peak, over 130, 000 people belonged to organizations affiliated with the League. In the meantime, ominous trends were beginning in Germany. Magnus Hirshfeld, Jew, homosexual, and so­cialist, was the obvious target for budding Nazi groups. A meetinghe was addressing in Munich in 1920 was phy­sically attacked; in 1921 he was attacked by anti-Semites and left for dead in the street with a fractured skull; in 19 2 3 Nazi youths disrupted a lecture by Hirshfeld, open­ed fire and wounded many of the people in the audience. Equally ominous trends "began about the same time in the USSR, trends which were reflected in changes of at­titude shown tiy the Soviet delegation to the Congress of the World League for Sexual Reform. While they had previously sup ported gay rights and held up the Bolshevik repeal of anti-homosexual laws as a model for other na­tions, the Soviets were now speaking of homosexuality as a "social peril." As Stalinism developed, discrim­ination, spying, denunciations, and Party purges of gay people began. The Stalinists began describing homo­sexuality as "the product of decadence in the bourgeois sector of society." In 19 34, mass arrests were carried out; there were many suicides. In March of that year a law was introduced, reportedly at the instigation of Jo­seph Stalin himself, making homosexual acts a crime punishable by up to eight years in prison; sex between consenting adult males was punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment. What the Soviets were branding as "the fascist per­version" was in the meantime being described by the Nazis as "sexual Bolshevism." In May, 1933, it was announced that Germany was to be cleansed of books of "un-German" spirit. The first target was Hirshfeld's Institute for Sexual Science, which was raided by sev­eral hundred students who, to the strains of the Horst- GAY JEWS OF TEXAS Wessel song, removed more than 10, 000 volumes from the Institute's library, together with masses of unpub­lished manuscripts and other documents and a bust of Magnus Hirshfeld, which were later destroyed by storm troopers at a public burning. Within a few years, tens of thousands of homosexuals, pink triangles affixed, were to die in the Nazi concen­tration camps. There are, of course, lessons to be learned from the early history of gay activism. At the height of the Ger­man movement's struggle, it must have seemed to those concerned that nothing could stop the advance toward gay freedom and equality. Yet the most optomistic times for gay people were followed abruptly by the most ghastly. Surely no complacency can survive the realization that not only Jews, Gypsies, anddissidents died in Hitler's concentration camps, but thousands of homosexuals as well . ,\az/s ca"v bust of Maqnus Hirschfeld fn torchlight procession. We've all heard about gay discos, gay artists, and gay Christians. But Gay Jews? In Texas? Yes, such a species does exist here, and a group of us in Austin hav~ recently surfaced to form Gay Jews of Texas. The initials-of our name are G J T, which we pronounce "Gid­get"- like the famous lady Gidget of the movies. What is Gidget up to? We 're basically an informal rap group, meeting weekly or semi-weekly to discuss issues of concern to gay Jews. This isn't a religious meeting really, but rather a chance for Jewish lesbians and gay men to talk about their pasts, their politics, current problems, or whatever feels most lffiportant to the group meeting that week. It is also an opportunity for gay and lesbian Jews to get to know each other a little, something that doesn't usually happen very often. For many of us, in fact, Gidget is the first time in years we've sat down with a bunch of Jews, talking about how being Jewish affects our lives. In our meetings so far, we've talked about the traumas of high school, the peculiarities (both good and bad!) of our families, the right-wing reaction to the Interna­tional Women's Year meeting m Houston, anti-Semitism and heterosexism, the politics of Israel, and each other. The group has been meeting for about two months now, but is still open to anyone who is interested. From tune to time, we'll also be having parties and meetings open to anyone, not just Gay Jews of Texas. So, if you're a Jewish lesbian or gay man, and interested in exploring your roots a couple of evenings per month, give us a call. You can get telephone numbers of the members through Gay Community Services, or check the notice on the GCS bulletin board. 7 GAY) AND THE: OR: how to nurse those gay blues away It is amazinghow oneword can describe such a sen­sitive topic of human interest as does "homosexuality." Just the mention of it conjures up diverse, individualized feelings in every person alive . The very nature of this diversity is the reason for this paper, for many of these varied feelings stem from an enonnous lack of infonn­ation, as well as from an abundance of myths , stereo­typed falsehoods and out- right lies. In this paper I will provide valid infonnation about homosexuality with the intent that society in general and health professionals in particular will be able to reexamine their attitudes and beliefs on the matter and, as a hopeful result, will better be able to understand c.nd relate to gay people. Many of the false concepts about gay people, which in themselves lead to the fonnation of negative attitudes, prejudices and even hatred, will be probed . Because of the fact that the negativisms toward a segment of our human population do exist, the significance of such a paper as this is readily apparent. This is especially true when one discusses those in the helping professions, as it does not seem feasible that negative feelings will be able to evoke the needed potential to deal in a pos­itive, constructive manner with people to whom the neg­ative feelings are directed . The paper falls into two main parts. A discussion of the development of the self- concept in the gay individual will be undertaken after an initial discourse on the mean­ing of the concept of homosexuality and of the evolve­ment of the attitude of United States society toward homo­sexuality. The relationship of this self-concept to health and health-seeking will thenbe discussed. with empha­sis on the importance of the professional 's relationship with the client. The second, shorter section will deal with the importance of objectivity on the part of the prac­titioner. WHAT IS HOMOSEXUALITY? The definition of homosexuality appears to be very individualized . In the past , ithas always beendefined in behavioral tenns: a homosexual was one who took part in sexual acts with another of the same gender. One shortcoming of such a definition is that gay people many times d iscover their homosexual feelings before any actual sexual experience has occurred . This does not make them a ny less gay. At the same time , there are people who engage in homosexual sex without having a true gay identity. Some people in prison, and some prostitutes could be examples of this . Wha t , one could ask , is a gay identity? With this question we get a little deeper into the issue , as being gay is a whole lot more than sexual intercourse with a member of the same sex. In the words of clinical psy­chologist Don Clark, in Loving Someone Gay, I am Gay a nd that means that I know that I am able to involve myself emotionally, sensuously, erotically and intellectually with someone of the same gender . He and I can interrelate in a whole and satisfying way without having to create dis ­honesty and diversion from fear of possible sex­uality . Being Gay means that I know lam capable of this range of relating to another male and that I am willing to act on the capability and translate the potential into behavior. by David R. Drake but rather a capability. It might imply a frequent or nearly constant preference of attraction for same- sex people, but it does not in itself mean that one is in- • capable of satisfying heterosexual relationships. It is a very individualized thing. Mitch Walker, in Men Loving M..fill, considers gay­ness to be a self-made choice in the respect that it is a decision todo what is good for you, emotionally, sen­sually, sexually, lovingly and so on. He views it as a fonn of self-respect. Something else Walker does is to make a distinction between "gay" and "homosexual." The word "homosexual" usually refers to a sexual pre­ference and nothing else. Gayness is infinitely much more-it is a perspective. It is from these definitions of same-sex attraction that the viewpoint of this paper is derived. The words "gay" and "homosexual" will be used more-or-less interchangeably because they are in­nately interconnected, but it is important to realize that "gay" denotes much more than a sexual orientation; it is a whole identity and point of view that stems from that orientation. Sexuality may be conceived of as a continuum . At one extreme is a very small percentage of people who are exclusivelyheterosexual in theirmakeup, and atthe other end, an equally small percentage of people who are totally homosexual in their makeup. Everyone else, the large majority of people, falls somewhere in be­tween. One's proximity to one side or the other, if this can be honestly detennined, indicates in which of these two areas of human expression one will find the greatest degree of self-fulfillment and happiness. Once again, the idea that homosexuality and heterosexuality are mu­tually exclusive is rejected. This idea that almost ev­eryone has some capacity for homosexual expression is very strongly opposed by the American public in which homophobia is so deeply entrenched. There is a con­siderable emphasis amoung citizens of this country on the need to identify oneself as either gay or straight. If one uses Clark's definition of being gay, this seems even more ludicrous. . According to Man.in Weinburg and Colin Williams in Male Homosexuals: Their Problems and Adaptations, people are born with an undifferentiated sexual potential that develops through a learning process that is quite complex . Why do some people refuse to follow the course dictated by society and tune out their feelings of attrac­tion to people of the same sex? A more appropriate question might be: does it really matter? Only if one accepts the destructive assumption that gay people are really bad and innately unhappy, or unless we wish to rear children to retain gay awareness. According to Clark, gay people are gay and non-gays are non-gay as a result of millions of factors that include components presentat birth, usuallydescribedas temperament (how active or passive one is, and whether visual, auditory or tactile stimuli are more likely to cause a reaction), and early and late learning experiences and child-rear­ing practices that together build the core ofthe person, sometimes called the character . The millions of exper­iences that are a part of living in an unpredictable world build on temperament and character and create the unique personality. The reason that causative factors are not important is that gay people can be every bit as happy, satisfied and productive as non-gay people, and perhaps even live in a wider and richer world . Their problems S come from a castigating society and not from their own To Dr. Clark, being gay does not denote a restriction, identity. The reasons some people grow up gay and others do not are, as we see, individualized, varied and numer­ous. In the past, social scientists have assumed such interests were abnormal and have spent much time and effort looking for specific causes. Those studies con­ducted before Kinsey were small scale and generally much restricted to the realm of psychiatry and psycho­logy . Homosexuality was seen as a psychopathological condition (due to the notion that heterosexuality is a normal, natural outcome of sexual development against which all other forms of sexual expression are to be measured and compared) . The idea of a "cure" thus came about . Discovering a cause consequently came to be of major comcern . Because so much emphasis has been placed on this, the progress toward an understanding of homosexuality has been impeded . promised to send over patients that they claimed to have cured. None have ever shown up. The fact is that there are no validated changes in homosexuality to be found. Some gay people do seek out these so called "change therapists, " having been led to believe that the source of their unhappiness is inherently their homosexuality and not the social stigma attached to it. According to C .A. Tripp, in The Homosexual Matrix, the reason that such changes are not brought about is that ..• the adult human being's sexual response rests at bottom on amass ive, cortically organized, sex­ual value system which is impervious to the trivial intrusions launched against it by whatamounts to concerns, concerns which can muster theirs up port from no more than a fragment of frontal lobe au­Much of the research that was done was done without thority. proper methodology . The Institute for Sex Research has spelled out many examples of work that was not performed The effort to wage this war has been described as "an up to minimum canons of scientific research, including attempt to sink a battleship with a popgun." the use of extremely small samples, samples made up There are gay people in all segments of our society: of clinical patients as well as the non-use of control in communities of every size, at all social levels, in groups. The first large scale study of sex was the so- every profession . They are people in all walks of life. ciolog ical study done under the cprection of Alfred Kinsey. Gay people differ at least as much from each other as This was done under a conceptualization of homosexu- they do from straights . The socially integrated gay per­ality which was in conflict with traditional psychological son defines him/herself as a regular member of society. and psychiatric views. Sociology has seen homosexu- Further, various surveys over the years have shown that ality as a varient of sexual expression and not as path- 90- 96% of gay people would not change their sexual ological in itself. Thus, there is no need to search for identity even if they could do so by pushing a button. a "cure." Nevertheless, the Kinsey Institute Research There seems to be a belief in our society that gay has made a concerted effort over a number of years to couples do not work out over long periods of time. One locate and evaluate the histories of people whose sex- reason for this assumption is very likely due to the fact ual orientation has changed as a result of therapy. Not that such couples are less consp1cuous than the unat­. Q.!!Q. has ever been found. Several psychoanalysts hil.ve 9 ached, !Jrc.;nisci.;ous "'ay r:>Pople who terd to become the stereotyped image of homosexuality. According to Tripp there is virtually only one basic difference between gay and straight couples, and this stems from the similarity of the same-sex p-:irtners, In the great majority of gay relationships, neither partner plays a stereotyped gender role. Divisions of leadership are usually divided into neatly complementary spheres of action and decision making. These relationships often equal the very best meshings of heterosexuality. EVOLVEMENT OF !tl£. UNITED STATES CONCEPT Although the "sexual revolution" ofrecent years has somewhat removed the cloud of mystery from homosexu­ality and thus improved its image, homosexuality has by no stretch of the imagination become totally under­stood. The fact is that the closer something moves to­ward acceptance, the more it causes alann in the forces against it. A new tolerance usually means a surface ac­ceptance and a decreased tendency to delve in the basic issues. Alfred Kinsey pointed out that in our American culture, no type of sexual activity is more frequently condemned than homosexuality. There are practically no European societies, with the possible exception of England, and few, if any, cultures in the world that-.pave become as disturbed over homosexuality (especially amoung men) as we have in the United States. The customs, laws and morals of a society come about usually for the purpose of establishing a uniformity in social behavior with the intended result of minimizing friction amoung members . A few of the laws concerning sexual behavior are necessary for practical reasons, but most of the sexual laws in our society came about without rega:d to practical necessity.,,. but from a reli­gious philosophy and values that evolved in opposition to "sins of the flesh." The sexual mores of United States society comes from men who believed that celibacy and abstinance were morally superior to any sexual expres­s ion, although it was "better to marry than to burn. " Sex even then became fully acceptable only when prac­ticed at certain times, in certain ways and with certain motivations present. Sexual excitement in itself was associated with sin. Anti-homosexual laws have never claimed that such activity threatens person or property, but are listed as crimes against nature, as if there were some other source than nature from which they could have come. An interesting by-product of the societal taboo against homosexuality is that gay people hide their gayness in order to survive in a hostile straight society. Therefore business." Tim said nothing and walked away. His mother approached and put an ann around him, saying, "Tim, I've only made one mistake in my life." Tim ask­ed her what she meant. "Twenty years ago I should have hadan abortion." She has since taken to telling friends and neighbors that Tim is dead. THE DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-CONCEPT IN THE GAY I have been homosexual nearly all of my con­scious life. I have had overt homosexual exper­iences for about five years, I have been openly homosexual for perhaps a year and a half. And I am still discovering the multitude of ways by which the straight world makes the lives of all homo­sexuals painful, while most of the time, remain­ing completely unconscious of the pain inflicted. These words of John Murphey very aptly describe the predominate problem associated with homosexuality-a general lack of acceptance in our society. This cannot help but affect the gay person in the development of his/her self-concept. Self-concept can perhaps be best described as the conscious awareness an individual has of his/her attributes that make him/he r different from all other individuals. It is how we think about ourse lves. According to Clark, gay people grow up suspe cting that there must be many basic things wrong with them, or why else would loved ones say such things about people who have feelings like theirs? The seeds of self­doubt and self-hate grow and are with the gay person every day. The homosexual is a member of the least visible min­ority in the country, having only certain feelings in com­mon with the other members. The most pervasive and acute until now have been guilt and shame at being some­thing that is feared and despised by straight society. Some people can handle this, but it has crippled, in one fonn or another, millions of others. To live as an in­visible man or woman is very painful. In the words of Donald Webster Cory, A person cannot live in an atmosphere of universal rejection, of widespread pretense, of a society that outlaws and banishes his activities and de­sires, of a social world that jokes and sneers at every turn without a fundamental influence on his personality. INTERNAL STRUGGLE OF THE GAY there is little about gayness in the public consciousness The awakening of gay feelings comes at various ages , and it thus continues to appear abnonnal. Therefore gays but for most it comes quite early. Whenever it occurs, hide their gayness. It is an endless cycle that could however, there follows a long period of quiet, internal, only be broken if everyone who is gay woke up tomorrow emotional struggle. It is a lonely struggle. Consciously colored green. This is the "Closet Syndrome." or not, one becomes an alert gathe rer of infonnation, Homophobia, the fear and rage one feels toward homo- listening for news of others with the same feelings. Most sexuality, is rampant in this environment which has of the news available is bad, as the re are few, if any, changed hum an sexuality into a paranoid, feared pheno- apparent respectable models. One feels pulled in the menon. We are taught that fe elings of emotion toward dire ction of one's impulses , ye t held back by the re - a member of our same sex should be considered with pugnance of becoming an outcast. d isgust. 10 Howard Brown, in Famil ia r Faces, Hidden Lives, tells fJllll~ the story of Tim, who grew up in Brooklyn . At his par ­ent's twe nty -sixth wedding a nniversary, his father pro­posed a toas t to Tim's older bro ther , who was s erving m Viet Nam: "Thank God nobody in our family' s been rejected by the army. We don't have any fags in this family. " As he was in no way e ffemina te , Tim's parents had a s sume d he was straight. Whe n Tim movea to Green­wich Village, his fathe r que s tioned him, ''Why do you wa nt to live there? That's whe re all the fags live. " Tim was fired from two Jobs because he was gay. Once when his supervisor saw him holding hands with a friend In a movie th eater line . The next year he was ' ired from another Job for appearing on a special te le ­vised report as anadvoca teof gaycivilnghts . His par - nts s dw the report a nd by his next vis it home had con­cluded tha t they had "a faq in the family" a fter all . (Be­fort.: th specia l re port had come on , Tim's fa ther had muttered, 'The fags should b put on a bodt and bomb­ed , ') Whik Tun wa horn , his fdth .. r saL'.:l 'Son, if y u wa'1t to be q 1 er 1s 3 thr dol.ar bill that 's your (·· .. :• 1 !!\jl"T'' 1 C)"y,.. · .... ... . .... ,.-·; . I \ THE BAR WITH A HEART 705 RED RIVER 472-0418 Upon firstdiscovering gay feelings, most people give in to the massive societal pressures and try to conform to the popular idea of what is normal. The first effort to do so usually lasts for years and is characterized by a reluctance to admit to a "deviant" identity . 'A com­monmethod ofdoing so is toannounceone's own intense anti-gay feelings . At any rate, after this first effort ends in failure, it is followed by a second struggle that is motivated by the hope that the "deviant" identity can be changed. After this has drained emotional and pos­sibly financial reserves, most are left with a seriously lessened self- esteem and confronted with despair . The surviving, wounded gay person must make some choices . Some try to kill the pain with alcohol or pills . Some give in and becbme the devalued, laughed at eccentric by adopting stereotypical behavior. They are surviving and refuse to go on unnoticed. Miraculously, a growing percentage of gay people are able to choose a pathway of integrity and truth. They have managed to grow stronger in the struggle and have decided once and for all to come out of the closet and to be self-respected. RELATIONSHIP or SELF-CONCEPT TO HEALTH We are now beginning to realize that social forces have an influence on all kinds of phenom­ena which we have hitherto analyzed in individual terms. We are beginning to understand, for ex­ample, that even physical illnesses such as heart disease and cancer may be influenced by socio­logical factors . . . If this be the case, as is plain­ly indicated by recent studies, then it ought to be clear that the relationship of the homosex11al to a larger hostile society must have profound.effects on his life . Here Martin Hoffman, in his book The Gay World, sums up nicely the underlying physical ramifications of the internal struggle of the gay person. The fact that social pressures can have major influence on the physiological processes of the body has been proven in various studies and is thus quite applicable to the gay situation dis ­cussed up to this point. An additional health problem of gay people is actually an offshoot of the health problems of society in general . Diseases spread by sexual contact are a problem for both gay and s tra igh t people, but the area of the body in which one manifests symptoms of the disease can bea clue as to the sexual act from which it was obtained. This could conc.:livably cause anxiety in the person who is afraid of being stigmatized to the point where the person would not seek medical assistance . HEALTH SEEKING How all this ties in with health seeking, however, has much larger ramifications . The response of health professionals in the past has been d istinctly negative . As a result, many gay people have avoided seeking health care at all. The very fact that gay health agencies exist points up a very tragic flaw in our health care system, in that everyone should be entitled to equal health care from any agency . Hospitalization is a specific situation in which many gay people have undergone much personal trauma . Such an experience can be unpleasant, embarrassing and even terrifying . The gay patient may even find himself denied the strongest support possible in this time of stress, that of his/her closest loved one . He/she and his/her lover cannot express affection, or even show much con­cern, for each other without incurring the wrath of the floor staff. Much psychological pain is thus imposed on to;:> of the physical pain . Hopelessness and help­lessness are common feelings among hospitalized gays . Many hospital personnel believe that gay people are im­moral or abnormal and thus erect barriers between them­selves and the patient. This denial of the professional relationship to the client to the gay person is in no way conducive to good health care . One is denying them a very lffiportant factor in the return to a high level of health . THE PROFESSIONAL AND OBJECTIVITY The need for objectivity on the part of the professional should be an apparent necessity. A part of the motiva­tion for going into the helping professions should be a real desire to help people . Gays are people and are as deserving of good health care as anyone else. The tech­niques used in caring for gay people are no different, but prejudicial attitudes can affect in a negative manner the way in which the care is given . Professionals must seek accurate, current information about gay people . They need to reassess their basic attitudes and examine how they respond to gay patients and their relationships. Clark points out the importance of never assuming that a client is heterosexual . When taking a history, exam­ining, orwhatever, keep inmind the possibility thatthe person, regardless of appearance, may be gay. Gay nurses and physicians, if they dare to risk alien­ation and job loss, can be helpful m educating those with whom they work. He/she can serve as a role model of the healthy homosexual, and m do mg so facilitate a flow of educat10nal information. 0 This can help sensi­tize others to the needs of gay patients and he1p them to meet those needs without prejudice and hatred stand­ing m the way. As health professionals strive to respect and relate man honest manner with gay people, better care will be the inevitable outcome. Appearing in Austin next month on February 21 is the highly acclaimed men's dance troupe Les Ballets Troca­dero de 1v1onte Carlo. Led by the charming and grace­ful defector from the Bolshoi, Olga TchikaboumsKaya (pictured above in a scene from Swan Lake), the troupe has a flair for the unexpected . Refused in Fort Worth, the show is sure to sell out in Austin . 11 - I.i.. - - / -- , .t /~~ --~ ) t CHRISTOPHER !SHERWOOD •' / AUSTIN BOTANICAL NOTES: JANUARY Gin lovers, hay fever sufferers and people who swim in Lake Travis take note-a species of plant highly re­levant to your lifestyle is quite abundant here m Austin. Junipcrus ashe1i, sometimes called red cedar, is a small fragrant evergreen tree which is native to this area and virtually covers the lakes area of the Edwards Plateau. (This is not the cedar from which cedar chests are usually made . ) Juniperus asheii is dioecious-that means there are separate male and female plants . The male plants pro­duce pollen in small brown structures about the size of a small wart at the tips of the branches . It is the pol­len from these pollen cones which frequently causes the so- called cedar fever in Austinites and can turn the ground yellow around the male trees. Mature female plants are easily recognized at this time of year by their blue- gray fruit-about the size of the head ofa large kitchen match- which looks as though it has been dusted with confectioner's sugar . It is these so-called juniper berries (they are not berries in a strict botanical sense) which provide the flavor for gin. Unlike its more widespread cousin Juniperus virgin­iana, Juniperus a she ii is endemic to central Texas . A beautiful little bird , the golden cheeked warbler, is also endemic to the same area because the bird requires the bark of th is particular tree (no other will do) to build its nests . Juvenile junipers have a different kind of leaves from their sexually mature brothers and sisters. The leaves of old plants are small scale-like things whtle the im­mature foliage is li1<e green needles about two or three centimeters long . -S. B. RITA MAE BROWN 12 Television (and the other media as well) has a tend­ency to identify characters as being gay by using stereo­typical portrayals . While we shout about how unfair it is to portray gay people as fitting only the stereotype, we might extract some minimal solace by noting that the treatment of our minority group is being approached the same way other minority groups have been treated. In an examination of this treatment of minorities, let's look at the way black people have been presented to the public. The first television show featuring blacks was Amos 'n Andy. This successful carry-over from radio presented the "step-'n-fetch-it" stereotype. That kind of stereo­typical presentation on television with its vastand het­erogeneous audience became something more than the "good-natured" kidding of an ethnic type. Instead, it tended to validate the stereotype as a true representative of a whole people, and in that way contributed to further prejudice . It was finally driven off the air because its portrayal of black life fed , rather than dispelled, racial bigotry. It was the only series on black life in all broad­casting, and it portrayed the characters in precisely the way bigots imagine black people to be . Most people watch a lot of TV, and people who watch a lot of television carry in their heads a television ver­sion of reality ratherthan a true one. Most white children in a recent poll felt that comedy shows like The Jeffer­sons and Sanford & Son accurately portray black family life . Even white city children with black friends con­sidered the shows realistic . The apparent contradiction presented by their own black friends they explained as exceptions to the rule . As Dr. Bradly S . Greenberg of Michigan State University concluded , some people are more likely to believe television than their own exper­iences. Should they have no real - life experiences with the subject being handled, the material is accepted at face value as being both factual and valid . All of the aforementioned, which operated in the ex­ample of black minority stereotyping, holds true in the case of the media ' s treatment of gay people . People "buy" what they're shown- and gay people have been shown "as queer as a three dollar bill . " Gay men and women are being shown on television only after some of the taboos about "perversion" have fallen to the wayside in the higher interest of advertising revenue . For years, scripts containing gay characters I. FOR A FRIEND: by way of reminder Summer's gone home for vacation. You thought she left you in charge, but no sane element could possibly trust the chaos in yr I. II. DIFFUSED The black of his feathers prisms into a thousand lights colors on fire on his back II. DIFFUSED The black of his feathers prisms into a thousand lights colors on fire on his back a~ he struts' across the lawn III. EPILOGUE night flung the clouds high shook itself clear in the starlight and somewhere from the north the constellations murmured, rearranged. - Amme Hogan 13 were rewritten to exclude any mention or hint of homo­sexuality; the heterosexual bias must always prevail . Everyone you saw on TV was portrayed as a straight char­acter regardless of the author's intentions. With the exception of an occasional gag routine, such as Milton Berle dressing in drag, gay people were non-existent. This way of handling homosexuality as a stereotype or not handling it at all ia an adaptation from the film in­dustry. There, homosexuality was either totally avoided, or sight gags were employed to bolster a sagging scene . These stereotypes were variations of "real" men and wo­men seen by the public as slightly odd but amusing. We were always good for comic relief. As far as television is concerned, the age- old use of the stereotype still has plenty of comic mileage left in it. While I am willing to grant that a few episodes on a few programs have presented some portrayals that I could say something positive about, we are still struggling at the stage analogous to the black "step- 'n- fetch - it" from Amos '.!!.Andy. Gay men and women are still being portrayed in a manner which fits the expectation of anti- gay bigots . As with other minority group stereotyping, this can only lead to the reinforcement of the prejudices which breed discrimination . The average viewer unacquainted with a variety of gay people looks at the character of Jodie on ABC's Soap, for example, and sees a swishy, mincing fruitcake with limp wrists who wants a sex-change op­eration, attempts to commit suicide because he's un­happy with his life, and has a date with a female nurse who wants toshowhirn whathe's missing . People watch that kind of image and believe that it's representative of gay men . It's easy to accept because it fits in with everything they've ever been told . If that kind of stereo­typical portrayal was attempted with a black, rather than a gay, character, the show would never have been pro­duced, let alone aired . Unfortunately , we are the new minority . As such we have only now reached the point that blacks reached with the first broadcast of Amos '.!!.Andy . Fortunately, this is only a starting point. Some good things have actually come with the bad . We'll take a look at this in future articles . - Bruce D. Aleksander L AL SERVICES at nuonable fees The l.eeml Cline chervea $15 for llOOK WMt,.. COl'*lltetion - Wlltt ., •ttorn91 n.. ii no t.,. hmit. If JOU ,.. or - edd1honel --- will M.1pply ,o<1 wtth • - rtten fee quotation. If JOU don't wlah to ID on With a caae att. coneultMion. JOU - ...,.. no further obligation. - Uncont...., ch•orce (no~ ordli....,) $ 110 -~ed d;_.ce (With p,op.rty or ch•ld,.,,l 150 -- .U..n.c.o..n "c'8.t.l.d. .~. ion 100 35 - .......... cy . ..,.....,., 225 - a.m.ruptcy . ...... nd end wife 275 -~ will. 1nclivoduel 40 ~ .... wi ll• . ...... nd end wife eo ..,.,.,..,.._,he- 100 lepl f- quoted ellow do not include court coata. Ti- ,_ are ,.,.. .,_ filed in Trewie C-nty i..- December I, 1977 and Mwch I, 117& F... for ..... _. outaida of Trewi• County will be h ,.tier. The L ... I Ch...c .i.o eccept• criminel c:aMe end c i• il ce- not lia ted abo ... Pie- call for en eppolntment. No 1 ... 1 ecl.ice will be 9 ;,,.,, .. ,,., the t elephone. Legal Cliaic of Russell ct Mahlab 501 W. 12th St. Austill, Te1u 78701 512-478-9332 !!!!fii -~ HOURS· Mon.·w.d 11·5 Thu. a ·Fn 11·11 ~,-,,, by appointment ........ ._,,. ...... • •••• _____ ................... *'- • Thoughts About It All Amme Hogan Somewnere, sometime in ail the recent anti-gay ac­tivity, we've all asked oursc1ves "Why?" And no mat­ter how the question gets answered, or p.;;rhaps pusned aside, it keeps cropping up: "why? are these people after us," or in extreme frustration: "WHY?" Well, I've figured it out, and it's as stupid and sim­ple as it is frightening . The great majority of people don't want freedom, either for themselves or for others. Freedom means equality for all; freedom means an end to cut- and- dried, time-worn methods of doing; freedom means one must think and create instead of ruminating. People tend to be lazy: they don't want to think, they don't want to change. It is this desire for stability (and damn the cost!) that allows dictators to get into power. This desire is what makes Amenca 's sidle to the right so dangerous. It places those of us who want an end to the injustice in the role of activist, agitator or (subversive). And that, boys and girls, means we are un- American: be­cause we refuse to sit on ourhaunches andbe shat upon . Of course we're getting double messages here. One is that we should be proud, we should exercise our free ­dom of speech . Two is that we should be so pleased with things a s they are that we will not feel any need to exercise this right. We don'thave freedom of speech unless we ~wha t everyone else says . Nor should we try to exercise the minds of those ru­minants around us . If you are different than they, you have lost your right to speak, and should forthwith shut up and quit worrying their little heads with fresh ideas and thoughts . If you will shut up, they , in their great benign state, will let you live in peace . At the cost of your freedom . But before we get too upset over this, we must remind ourselves that the people who don't want you to have your freedom don't want theirs, either . I am waiting for the day when the illustrious chairman of the excellent department at the outstanding university announces to his distinguished colleagues that since they have fulfilled the requirements of HEW by hiring a woman and a member of a minority, it will be necessary to recruit a homosexual in order to comply with HEW's most recent guidelines. So you want change, eh? Well, what about my right to remain the same? We've all had that thrown at us, either in the form of Anita and the churchers, Birchers, etc . , to the do- nothing-positive leg is la tors (esp. the one who Keeps trying to choke goats with his civil rights) to our parents stuck in the "you're-sick-but-we'll-try­to- love-you-anyway" syndrome. And we'1e all tired of it. But what do you do when you live under a system based on discrimination: against the poor, against for­eigners (unless wealthy), against differences in pigmen­tation of the skin, against those with different affect­ional preference • .. what do you do in a system that is based to favor white, heterosexual, misogynist males? Well, boys and girls, you can throw bombs. Butdon't get caught, and don'tdo it if you've mentioned such ac­tion in an article with your name on it. You can sink into murky despair, back in your closet; the w-h-m-m society would like nothing better. You can adopt var­ious attitudes, however inappropriate, and become a woman-hating, passing-for-straight gay man. Or, hard­er still, you can be a woman-hating lesbian. You can orient yourself to change; you can try to be reasonable with the unreasoning ruminants; and you can begin see­ing yourself as a changer working in a society that needs the change. In a society based on discrimination against some, there must necessarily be discrimination in favor of others. Equality of rights will of course remove from the privileged some of their privileges. But a privilege is nota right, and the loss feltis onlythe loss of some­thing to which the holder was not entitled. The gain of rights by those who previously had none can only be counted as an improvement of society. Let's go improve . And I am waiting for lo, of those distinguished colleagues to smile knowing smiles as they raise their hands (and not-so-limp wrists) to assure their illustrious chamnan that it wtl! not be necessary to recruit new faculty members m order to comply with those guidelines. -j. e . 14 CZECHOSLOV~K"- - - 1938 .. .. TD STllLIOI BOOISTOU 706 I.6th Street AUSTIN. TEKAS OPI• TIL 3•• MIDWINTER by Dennis Milam Dark candles of light Vv<d ht1vc c;omc such il good way our b 'clcons stand like twisted battleworks prot ting th,; cardboard m,rn bt.)yond y,;t t11<~S<! men wnthe rn a circular dance to fr.Ju themselves to fr.::"' the integral universe with their tears of a day when the spirit and the love came their way I am alive I can love I struggle I am beautiful I am gay People made of cardboard breathe as alive swearing the sun shall be theirs beautiful people came again upon the battleworks and bid calm the rising streets to run those very same streets crying aloud with vengeance that armed love we knoV¥ speak from beautiful passion's bps not heeding creakings of cardboard We are alive We can love We struggle We are beautiful We are gay Run streaming laughter mto the arms of straight America saying sisters and brothers we love you as we love ourselves 1et us be as one wu t<now our power love moves the sun the sun can be ours ride the rays to paradise 15 LI (Su KE μ£11 d ac.>.ciwa Ka~ n.>.T/taSec;, μ(aat S€ IJUKTE<;, rrcpa 8' cpxer' Wpa, iyw 8€ μova KaTEvSw. A SEX POEM Cr .. 1srnq for dougnnuts m down own Turn mg when Lh turn llgnt allows left Crossing in the crosswalk b tween white lme& we see a pnest saying [to himself] Je suis, tu es, il est, an existential crises we drive on oblivious. Cruising for doughnuts, glazed. 16 Albuqu~rqu0 - Steven Thomas
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