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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 9, September 1980
File 009
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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 9, September 1980 - File 009. 1980-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1175/show/1166.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1980-09). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 9, September 1980 - File 009. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1175/show/1166

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 9, September 1980 - File 009, 1980-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1175/show/1166.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 9, September 1980
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date September 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript ^CONNECTIONS the l-.^ CONSEQUENCE Truth and Consequences The Consequence, directed by Wolfgang Petersen, is a classic formulation of what happens when boy meets boy and decides to tell the parents. In this case, telling the truth seems to lead inevitably to harrassment and destruction - of love and of the lovers themselves. Thomas seems to understand these facts When Martin is released, he insists on going with Thomas to see his parents. Of course, they are homophobic and harshly reject Thomas's plea for understanding. When he is taken to reform school, Thomas is preceded by the word that he's queer. His loving, vulnerable nature and his adolescent beauty and vitality make him the butt of both jailors and fellow prisoners. Thomas tries to run away and Martin tries various devices to free him. One is a visit to the reform school disguised as a psychological investigator. There's some comedy and release of angry tensions, but Thomas actually ends up worse off. Escaping again, Thomas undergoes so many scarifying experiences he returns to the school of his own . accord,'determined to somehow last out the time until, he's of age'. He does, enduring and watching sadistic cruelties with outward calm but inner anguish. When Martin comes to meet him after he's released, Thomas almost refuses to recognize him. He is so numb with self-loathing he simply can't react naturally or rationally to the love and understanding Martin is ready to give. In fact, the next morning he overdoses, rows out onto the placid lake in a small boat, and slips silently into the water. (This is the opening shot of the film. Its meaning is unclear at the time, but it hangs over the rest of the film like a cloud.) When Thomas disappears from the hospital where he's taken after his attempted suicide, we see only TV announcements asking for help in finding him. There are no results, no assurance that he will return and/or recover. There is no doubt that this tragic loss is due to his parents', and society's, homophobia. Pretending to help, they have in fact destroyed Thomas. It is impossible not to leave the theatre in a rage at the loss. Ernest Hannawald plays Thomas so well that it is hard to think of him as an actor. Everyone in the gay community knows of more than one'such tragic loss. Leaving the theatre, one puts the cases together into a raging fire of protest. Why? Why? Sick society has done no good, for anyone, despite all its nobly moral pretenses. Life has lost more than anyone can say. This is the most effective film I have seen for
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