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The Star, No. 7, February 3, 1984
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The Star, No. 7, February 3, 1984 - File 001. 1984-02-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 5, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1141/show/1128.

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(1984-02-03). The Star, No. 7, February 3, 1984 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1141/show/1128

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 7, February 3, 1984 - File 001, 1984-02-03, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 5, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1141/show/1128.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 7, February 3, 1984
Contributor
  • Hyde, Robert
Date February 3, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Texan's Gay Immigration Case Attracting National Attention By Don Ritz Immigration of gay men and women to the U.S. is a subjectthat has been picked up by the national news media. Richard Longstaff, owner of the Union Jack clothing stores in Dallas and Hous­ton, immigrated to the U.S. from Great Britain in 1965. Shortly after immigrat­ing, Longstaff opened his store in Dallas and later opened a second in Houston. Eleven years after immigrating to this country, Longstaff applied for U.S. citi­zenship. The U.S. Federal District Court Judge Joe Estes twice denied Longstaff citizen• ship and based his decision on two issues. Este,; claimed that Longstaff was in viola• tion of the Texas State Penal Code, Sec• tion 21.06, the "homosexual conduct" law, and that Longstaff had illegally entered the country. A law passed by Congress in 1952 states that individuals with "psychopathic per• sonalities" are exdudable and ineligible to receive visas to immigrate to the U.S. In 1965, the law was amended to include "sexual deviants." Longstaff appealed the decision to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans. Late last September, the Appeals Court, by a vote of 2 to l, affirmed the Federal District Court's decision. After the Appeals Court decision, the National Gay Rights Advocates (NGRA), located in San Francisco, requested a rehearing en bane by the Appeals Court. NGRA, citing numerous contradictions between the Fifth Circuit's decision and other smiliar immigration cases, requested that the case be heard by the entire Fifth Circuit Court, not just three judges. The appellate court refused the rehear­ing request. NGRA has now filed for the Supreme Court to hear the case. The Supreme Court received the writ on Wed­nesday, Jan. 25. NBC national news learned of the case, and reporter Carl Stem and a camera crew were sent to Washington to interview Longstaff on Tuesday, Jan. 23. Longstaff said that he was uncertain when the interview would be aired, but anticipated it would be aired on the same day the Supreme Court received the writ, on the evening news with Tom Brokaw. THE STAR AUSTIN * SAN ANTONIO Gay Texas' businessman Richard Longstaff Longstaff said that NGRA would fund the majority of costs for the Supreme Court case, and the organization would be accepting donatiorui. (Donations are tax dedut'tible, and checks should be made to NGRA or the Legal Foundation for Per· sonal Liberties, 540 Castro, San Fran­cisco, Calif. 94114.) Longstaff said, "Speculation is that the Supreme Court will hear the ca8e, but it is purely speculation as to when they will hear it. The timing (of the case) does not have the priority of something like a case ,..;th the death sentence. It,.. ould be up to a ye.ar before they decide to hear the case, then another year before they actually do hear it, and another 12 months to make e ruling." Ron Ranum, :-GRA administrator, said he lioped the case would not take quite that long. Ranum said he thought a deci­sion on whether or not the case would be heard would be made in October Ranum added that it's hard to predict any judicial decision. "NGRA is reaching out to get the best poti 1ble lawyertodotheoral agrumentfor the caae before the Supreme Court. " That Little Brown Bottle Under Your Nose Joe Baker, Commentary, p.7 Feb. 3, 1984 D Issue •7 o Published Every Other Friday ig Bro er as een ,• ng By Hollis Hood 1984 is here, end Biir Brother and Big Sis­ter have already been watching for decades. Dan Siminoski, who ret"ently filed for release of FBI gay surveillance documents under the Freedom oflnforma­tion Act, said in his keynote address at the Srcond Annual Gay Press AsRociation 's Southern Regional Confrrence Jan. 27 in Houston. Siminoski was in Houston to promote Siminosk1 VB. the FBI, the case filed on his behalf by the California Civil Liberties Union this past October, and to promote his forthcoming book, Spies m the C/osrt. The case nrose when h(• requested the release of FRI documents for hook research, "including hut not limited to" 1:1 gay organizations nationwide which the bur(,au had been tracking since the early Hl.iOs. "But it doesn't matter who's watching," the political consultant said, "the gay movement will make progrPSs. We must do whatever is necessary to maximize sup· port in this frightening world." It is time for the gay movement to reach out to the other human rights groups and b(-come a part of the mainstream human rights cause, Siminoski said. Through this clout, gays can imprnss upon the govern­ment that they will no longer toleratl' being spied upon and harassed. "We are Am(•ric.an citizens, and we need to rPach out to electoral candidates who are supportive of gay rights," he said "and make gay rights part of the huma~ rights coalition-call it ~he Rainbow Coa• lition, Roosevelt Coaht10n or what hav!' you," . Not only is the surveillance of the gay movement and prominent figures in it (documentation which. according to Sim­inoksi, numbel'!I in the thousands of pages in eight major cities nationwide) contrary to the basic freedom of speech guarant.•ed by the Bill of Rights, it is a dreadful waste of hundreds of thousands of taxpayers' PHOTO SMOAOOJlli Dan S1minoski dollars. In essence, gays are paying taxes to be spied on by their gover_nment, and that government is not allowing th~se persons to see the information that 1s being accum­ulated about them. Siminoski was told that the documents he rt'<juested would "endanger national Sl-curity" if they were released, and that the public served by such a releruie would be "so small" that it essentially was not worthwhile to go through the clerical pro­CCIISes involved. He termed this attitude "unadulterated poppy coc-k" He was also denied a fee waiver request for copying what records he could get, or ears, ays some $165. This attitude, he says, typifies the Reagan's administration's position of trying to undermine the purpose of the FOIA. Virginia Apuzzo, executive dirt'ctor of the National Gay Task Force, has voiced support for Siminoski's cause, saying, "The FBI's refusal to waivl' fees for Dr Siminoski's Freedom of Information Act requl'st is another example of the federal government's special and systematic hara. smcnt of the gay lesbian movement which Dr. Simmosk1 and other histonans and social scientists seek to document. This case will give us the opportunity to inform the American public about the dis­crimination we face nnd will be a major test of the rights of gay men and lesbians to b,• secure in their civil liberties." "I have been asked why I should care about 'old, dusty records,"' Siminoski told the gathered newspersons. "What differ• encc will it make? Well, I'll give you sev• eral reasons." ThiR is not just a gay case, he explained. It is of interest to ell civil libertarians. It demonatrate.s that no person nor group of persons is "safe under the law until they know exactly how that law may be abridged to violate their rights . '1'his case will tell us e lot about the relation.ship between gay rights and the federal government, which alledgedly stands for freedom. It \\ill demonstrate that civil liberties are only up to the defini­tion (given them) by local law enforcement agencies. Gay rights have always been violated and are continuing to be," said Siminoski, who holds a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin. He specifically referred to ret"ent bar raids in Houston where some 46 persons were randomly taken in for alleged public intoxication. "Houston is considered the liberal capi­tal of the South, but the police department admittedly has a file of license plate numbers, names and photographs-some taken out of the context of regular police 1minoski procedure-of homosexuals. If this can go on here, it can go on anywhere, and does," he said. He encouraged the Journalistb to go back to their respective cities and discover if their police departments had such files. "We should all c-are about these records," the longtime activist said. "It's one of the great scandals of administra• t1ve Justice. It is a dark, illicit, ugly history to taxpayer waste and secrecy " The FBI',. refusal will result in the larg­est FOIA case m history, he said. The government hasn't just saHld records on ind1v1duals such as John Lc.n non or Martin Luther Kmg, he said In the case of the ga) movement, "as with the ,..omen's mO\ement or any other move­ment wanting change," they have docu­mented an entire SO<'lal history. That'.s one reason Simmoski wants the records, he said. "The litigation will gh e us an opportunity to gather a large piet"e of gay history. A chance to recover much of what has not been kept by others. They have records on the Mattachine Society and One, Incorporated from the very beginning. "If there's one thing you can i;ay for the federal government, it is a wonderful archivist," he jokingly stated "It gathel'II ever~1hing and keep its. It keeps thmgs like a pack rat-all the dirt in all the closets-end they save, save. save." The emplo) ees routinely chp from gay and non-gay publications anything that refers to gay issues or gay individuals, he said, citing a meeting notice which appt>ared in the university newspaper in Hayward, Calif. The Gay Academic Union listed the name of the organization, location and time of meeting and other "juicy tidbit.s, like bring a sack lunch and cofftoe v.ill be furmshed." This clipping was filed in the Hayward Pwneer file under a national security classification. That indicated it to be an organization continued 2 THE STAR I FEB. 3, 1984 Austin Soap By Wanda Rumors Bartenders Can't Stay Put Which bar am I in anyway? I thought I was in the BoathouH, but all I s-were Dirty Sally'• bartenders. And on the other side of town at Sally's were the bartenders from the Boat­house. It must be love. When·s the wedding and whose going to be the bride? -o- Showt,me for the Bartenders• Well, 11 was fes­tive anyway The Croealng recently had a bar­tenders' review but where were all the bartenders Hats off to those who did put on a Show Too bad Donna SunlnNr mossed their vers10n of "She Works Hard tor the Money.· Too much• -o- Entenalnment ,s ahve and well and loving In Austin at the Auatln Anemallff. Congratula-tions on a great loolung bar and much success Sara, manager of Our Place ,n the future. -o-llactlstnet Bales IS giving away money again How many times Is this? This time It's on Valen­tine's Day for Best Sweetheart Couple and Best Valentine's Drag Pull out the gowns; it's worth money -o- Any clues on the Prtwa Celan' reopening? We know It's going to be the Third Eclllon, but where? If you know. tell us. -o- Wl'tat C/W D.J saw Alu• dance country on "Dynasty" and ,mmedlately went shopping !or • new wardrobe? -o- Backatreet Basics recently showed La Cage Au• Fol/as. Nlcole, we didn't know you got your start es a maid -o- Flaahlll Pizazz IS going to reopen aga,n. -o- On the down side, one of the more snooty in this town wants to keep Austin bars as nice as possible and keep the wandering trash out. She says th•1 too many good customers • re shying away because of the undersirables. Honey, what's one man's trash may be another Recognize anyone's back? Photo taken at Snuffy'a in S.A. man's tr-ure. Or haven't you heard? -e-lf you're Into good old-fashioned music. drop by and listen to DJ Gary Aobeft•on at the BoathOuse on Fridays. He's spinning the best ol the Oldies every Friday night -o- Then get ready for Jim Smith's personal roast. He sees himself as one of the capital's celebro­toes and he's in hlS kitchen prepearong his own, a la Daisey Dauber Style with the temper­ature set high. -o- P•ul of Houston, 1ust because you think Austin has lots of hunky college men. that doesn't mean you bnng books to the bar-nor buy all of them at the bookstores The hunks up here keep their heads elsewhere. you know. besides between the pages of books' -o- Austin'a Alternative hosted a benefit for WomyNpeek-that's right, womYn-th1s past Sunday If you weren't there. you missed a gOOd time Talk about graff1t1• San Antonio By~£~e Men on the Riverwalk My, my, my• Wasn't the weather wonderful thlS past weekend particularly on the Rlv-•lk which was ahve w,th the 15th Annual G,.•t c-try River Faettva• In full swing? And that wasn't all that was swinging Did you take a look at all those gorgeous m1htary men My dear• So many men; so httle time -a-l wonder how many of them made 11 over to El Jardin last Sunday afternoon for that festive birthday party lor Trixie laAue? She cel&­brated with champagne and a chorus of 'New York, ~ York." and we hear Liu Mtnnelll IS heading south to kill her Just wa,t 1111 next year, MISs LaAuel And speaking of festive times, Fleet• is cum• mm· soon. April 20-29 Mmmmm1 -o- Ma,ty, I've been asked to remind you not to forget 021262 ORISIT 021463, or uh, uh! 021484 Oh, well, don't forget' -o- Longnecks and good friends and long men go together Our Place welcomed the Galleon with MIiier Ltte longnecks an Our Place trad1- t1on for over four years -o- And In SA's downhOme C& W bar. Ara Waeter­naln, all of Ab's beer 1s in longnecks. So the longneck story grows and grows and grows -o- Patrick Grant'• Clrclea had his grand opening thlS past Sunday. Not sure about longnecks here, but the w,ne and cheese were great, as well as the music supphed by Project X, a local Jazz group -o- J.., at the Galleon, please get well soon. You wouldn't beheve the stonee that are flying around thtS state• -o- And If you'd rather ride than fly, dream abOut the Roctdn R Aiding Club wh1cl'I will be riding ,n the S.A rodeo parade Feb. 10th. The club will be meeting downtown at 8am for the 10am parade I think Sara at Our Place can give ya'II more into. -o- Congrats to Jimmy J-. The Gold Unlim­ited TV commercial ,s one of two selected for Judging In the Cleo Aw•rda th,s year, and PM Magazine named Jimmy's story "Best Story in the Region· Who says. ''Blond's don't have more fun?" -o- Helen would hke to extend a big welcome to the San Pedro Connection on the San Pedro Strip GAV COMMUNflY STAR A Voice Pub/u,hing Ccmpany Neunpap,r Published every other Friday Phone Austin (512) 448-1380 San Antonio (512) 737·0087 VOice Publish 'IQ Co C I RCULATION Gay Com=IIY Stor, 3.000 COl)iea bi-wffkl'( Mont~~o~~ '~=~fuJoc:'..:C:::~tv lot.al Tuu •ree le..500 copt99 weNty. •"O eom,,.,,,- 3317 MontrCN Blvd tJCl6. Hol.-lOn.. TX 7700&. f7\J) 529-0822 Contenll copyright &1984 Office hours: 10am·S:30pm Henry McClurg pub/,.,,., Robert Hyde ,...,,.g"'ll O<ht01 Mark Drago s,., •~ert. •mo d11Ktot Acel Clark on auocror Jeff Bray groph,a Sonny Oav1s accounting MMrllJM Gay Praa ,.IIOC.at:IOn N.,., SMYiCff lnternabonal Gay New, Agency, Paci he New-. Servtee Larry BUSh (Wahington O C) $"yndtat«I F••tut• S.,11,ce, I w,,,.,. J•ffrey W1tson. Randy Alfred srone-watl FNlUfN Synchcale Br11rt McNaughl. Joe Baker P0STMA$1EA S.nd eddteN corrections to 3317 MontrOH •306. Houston TX nooe $u0ttrlpl/Ofl tit• ,n US ,n Hlfed Mv•Jot» S49 per., .. , (52 ia1UNl. S18i,t,r1umonth8(2'Slu11N~ Ot$125pti,.,....ll(Jaa than n luua) Back isauH $2 00 NCh NahONr «111M1.11tt9 ,ep,-.senfat,;,e ~ ChSabltO Rivendell MM1<otir,g 11116 eon A......,. Now Vat\ ~0011 /2121 242-81183 Adv.nil"'fl dHdllM ~ OlNt Tuelday. 5 :,c»m. ro, iuue - 1-iftQ Frklay -'IQ NOi~• fO MIY«flHl'I Locaf ad¥efttsjng rat• tchedl.N OM WU effKUW.NOV 11 1913 Rn,POnSlbtt,ry -"fM Star- cSoet not uaume ,..ponatbll ty for -aM-r9.'~-ngn dalfufll ~ 11\0Utd aleft '"TM Stat'" IO •nv Austin Man Documents Chicago's Gay Lifestyle of 1960s Austin's David Sonenschein, formerly of the Indiana University's Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Repro• duction, has r8<'ently published his mid• 60's study of gay men in Chicago. Based on "open-ended" or conversa­tional interviews with gay men in Chicago in 1967, Some Homosexual Men examines the experiences and feelings of23 different men with varying intensities and styles of gay interest. Concentrating on problems of promis• cuity, sex and friendship, though high• lighting elements unique to pre-liberated Chicago of 1967, the book's broader con• cerns look at most problems of gay men throughout their lives. The book, being published on a non• profit basis, is available for $8 through the author at Box 475/i, Austin, TX 78765. AHRC Stages Meeting with Senator Doggett The Alamo Human Rights Committee is inviting the gay community to attend what it hopee will be the first in a series of "Meet the Candidate" events at an infor­mal meeting with State Senator Lloyd Doggett of Austin, a candidate for the U.S. Senate in the May Democratic Primary. The meeting will be held at 1:00 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 5, at "Victoria's Indiscre­tion" in the Four Seasons Hotel, 555 S. Alamo, San Antonio. AHRC ia not making an endorsement in this race at this time. Dan White May be Moved Out of California LOS ANGELES CIGNA)-Due to protests from official• and gay activists, paroled killer Dan White could be moved from California to another state where he has family tiea, if he can find a job there. Los Angeles County Counsel DeWitt Clinton said that earlier attempts were made to release White out of California to an unnamed state. But the receiving state, after conducting an investigation, con• eluded that White would not be employed until late spring 191\4 and thus refused to accept him es a parolee for that rea11on. Supervisor Ed Edelman won unanim, ous Board of Supervisors approval of a request to the state to transfer White out of California as soon as possible. In a pre­pared statement, Edelman said: "It is my understanding that in cases such as White's involving such publicity and noto­riety, the state can arrange an interstate compact, under which the parolee would be locatro outside of California." Edelman'& motion also calls upon the County Counsel's office to find out why the in!Rrstate compact was not used in White's cttse and to provide an explana­tion of the procedure. The Loe Angeles Police Commission also voted to ask authorities to move White away from the greater Los Angeles area. City Councilm11n Joel Wachs, who represents the heavily gay Hollywood Hills neighborhood, has formed a Com• mittee for Dan White Out of Los Angeles. He likewise questioned Los Angeles police Chief Darryl Gates about the depart• ment's role in the decision, Wachs and many gay leaders said the department, which often is at odds with both gays and liberal politicians, may have wanted White released in Loe Angeles County as a way to upset the department'• longtime foes. Gates said that he had no influence in the decision about White's parole site. More Advice for Insomniacs Reaearchers have been burning the mid­night oil trying to find a cure for one of modern society's most common afflic­tions: insomnia. While they have yet to find a remedy, they have zeroed in on what makes us fall asleep, reports the San Jose Mercury News. The best conditions, not surprisingly, are darkness, quiet, and the right tempera­ture, around 65 degrees. Keeping regular hours helps, too. If you toss and turn on Sunday night, it's probably because you slept later over the weekend. Counting sheep may help you nod off, but doctors recommend yoga, breathing exercises and getting out of bed until you feel tired. California Cities Approve Gay Rights SAN FRANCISCO (IGNAl-Both Sacra• mento, the state'll capital, and Oakland, San Francisco's neighbor acroi;s the Bay, have voted for ordinances that ban dis­crimination against homoi;exuals. The Sacramento City Council voted unanimously to ban discrimination against gays in city jobs, despite a warn­ing that the "San Francisco-style" policy would encourage homosexuality. The council voted to add the words "sex­ual orientation" to its hiring policy to pro­hibit discrimination against emplyees or job applicants solely because of sexual preference. · Lisa Katz of the National Organization for Women and the River City Democratic Club, a gay political group, said the change was "a simple and basic human rights issue." But the Rev W.B. Timberlake of the Committee for Moral Concerns said it was a policy that would encourage homosexu• ality and put gays in city iobA where they might come into contact with children. Councilman Tom Chinn told Timber­la ke tha t he votNI for thechange .. because I do not believe in any discrimination whatsoever. I think you're reading a heck of a lot more into it than is necessary. It prohibits discrimination, period." The Oakland City Council passed an even more far-reaching ordinance forbid­ding discrimination in employment, hous­ing, business a nd government services. Councilwoman Marge Gibson, who introduced the measure, said the chambers were full of supporters, and one person spoke in favor of the ordinance just before the vote. There was no opposition. The measure was patterned after San Francisco's gay rights ordinance because of complaintll of discrimination by gay leaders in Oakland, particularly in hous­ing and employment. "The existing ordinance doesn't specifi­cally mention 11exual orientation, although the city has interpreted it to he implicit in the ordinance," Gibson said. Gibson previously introduced an Oak land ordinance prohibiting diocrimina tion by landlords against families with children. Matthew Coles, attorney for the East Bay Lesbian Gay Democratic Club who draftt'<I the measure, coiled it "a very strong ordinance. n little stronger than San Franrisro's bc<-ausc it allows fewer exe-mptions." One of the exemptions is in the area of housing. Owners of rental property who occupy one of the units and share kitchen or bathroom facilities with tenanta are exemptt'd from th1· ordinance. All employers, regardless of how many employees they have, must abide by the measure and employers with 15 or more worker ~uRt post notices "in conspicuous places" stating that "_discri~in~tion o!" the basis of sexual or1entatton 1s prohi-bited by law," . It is a misdemeanor to vtolate the new Jaw with viol11tors subJe<:t to civil dam age~ and fine.s. Joe Acanfora spokesman for the gay orgun1lat1qn, c111lro the measure "very compn•h1·nsive. It's just what we need m Oakland." FEB 3. 1984 / THE STAR 3 We Have a EARTON OR OU All Month l:ong All Dark Liquor s12s All Month Long Bourbon & Scotch Austin's #1 Bar (They say they are #1, you say WE ARE #1. Our staff thanks you.) 2828 Rio Grande at 29th Dial 4 78-8782 "The Friendly Folks" 4 THE STAR/ FEB. 3, 1984 Moondaughter's Emporium: The Way It Was By Sharon McDonald Commentary Not all relationships start out smoothly, and for us lesbian feminists, politics are often the waves that rock the boat. When I think of all the energy I had to put into raising Louise's consciousness about Feminist Dating, Goddess only knows how I've put up with it all. I could see it coming from the very first day. "Hi, Sharon? This is Louise, from the Women Against Sexist Things Every, where meeting. Want to have dinner with me at the Em;x,rium tonight?" "Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes!" I said coolly. I was put off at her approach, of course. As everyone knows, a proper Feminist Date begins when two or more women simul­taneously ask each other out, participat­ing equally in the decision-making process, neither party buying into the Man's game by resorting to macho behav• ior lfke speaking first. An image of Louise in her new vest at tut week's meeting flashed through my mind, and I decided to let her blunder pass. Maybe I can educate this woman, I thought, my heart pounding with the excitement of the political task ahead. Although she had started off on the wrong foot, Louise showed promise by obeying another rule of Feminist Dating: Get Thy Entertainment at a Feminist Establishment. The Emporium's full name was Moondaughter Bloodwoman's Menstrual Sponge and Whole Wheat Date Nut Bread Emporium, and it was a popu, Jar movement hangout for the six months that it operated. It served as a combma­tion restaurant, therapy center, theater, meeting hall, menstrual sponge ware­house and crash pad for traveling dykes. On weekends, there was entertainment by local performers who read from their jour­nals in two-and-a-half-hour sets. Tonight was All You Can Process Night, with con­tinuous reading for 24 hours at no extra charge We arrived just a~ the Cooking Colle<:• tive was dishing up the Savory Separatist Stew (the meat was what had been separ­ated) and generous helpings of Nukeless Noodle Surprise, a casserole with a baked­m anti-nuke leaflet The Cooking Collec­tive was committed to their motto: "Don't just eat, Educate!" We filled our plates and helped ourselves to the speaalty of the house, the little indi­vidual cunt-shaped whole wheat date nut bread loaves. Joining the others sitting on the cement floor in concentric circles, we commenced to get in touch with the woman at the microphone, who was read, 1ng her life story and acting out all the parts Whenever she got to a male charac• ter. her pnrnary relationship stood up and led the crowd in booing. By the time we got there at 9 p.m., she was up to her fifth No Gays In 'Winnie Winkle' Had someone in "Doonesbury" been ~n­ning out of the closet, editors of the New York News and the Chicago Tribune might have let it stand, but in "Winnie Winkle"? No way, said the editors of the two large newspapers, and according to Editor & Publiahrr, told the comic strip's writer, Henry Raduta, that a gay theme might be offensive to its older readers. The Tribune's assistant features editor did not care for the "unsophisticated" and "stereotyped" image of gays. The News' assistant managing editor said if the "Winnie Winkle" characters came "out of the closet," the comic would come "out of the paper." In the strip's abandoned storyline, Win• nie's son Billy announced that he and friend Russ Miller were lovers. In the revised version, Billy's now inter• ested in an older woman with children. birthday party and the train set she never got. "Wow, you two really missed Romethmg earlier'" a woman sitting near us whis­pered to me. •·There was this great show­ing of Marge Johnson's art!" "Who's Marge Johnson?" I asked, always eager to be educated. "Wow, you haven't heard of Marge Johnson? Oh wow. Marge Johnson was, like, the best artist, like she killed herself in 1955 because she couldn't stand being a housewife, you know, and she was proba­bly a dyke, and like she made all these paintings that male art critics won't recog­nize as great because they say, 'The:,,'re only paint-by-number, so how great is that?' but, like, her work is so full offemale images and places where she purposely didn't go by the numbers! It was so heavy." I turned back to Louise to raise her con• sciousness about Marge Johnson, but she was busy looking for an ashtray. I tried to raise her consciousness about smoking; after all, men do it. so it must be patriar­chal, but she just exhaled a cloud of smoke and stomped off. She corralled a member of the Cooking Collective who reluctantly produced a small ceramic cunt-shaped ashtray and said reproachfully, "Do you really want to put your filthy ashes into this beautiful thing?'' Louise's reply, they told me later, was very low consciousness. The Collective member gave her a dirty look, the ashtray and five leaflets explain• ing how smoking is a patriarchal institu­tion used to keep women oppressed. Just as we were getting settled again and I was telling Louise about Marge Johnson, I noticed that she was looking at me oddly. The more she looked, the more I lost my train of process. She had the most beautiful eyes. She's going to need a lot of educating, I kept warning myself as I pushed my hair into place and eased open one button. When she leaned over and kissed me, I decided I should otart by shar­ing good literature with her-like the new lesbian sex manual I'd just bought, for instance. That night we did our first skill sharing. I guess it just goes to show that appearan­ces can be deceiving. Louise turned out to be very well-educated, and as I said before, I'm always eager to be educated. McDonald, who lives in Los Angeleb, 1s co-winner of the 1983 Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Work in Feature Writing from the Gay Press Association. Her column appears here and in other gay newspaperb. Your eyes say a lot about you-don't let them tell your age! White SwaJlo.N eye a-earn iS fOr the man WhO dares to care about his appea a kl!. BecaJse the area around the eyes has rew 011 QlandS. tt1is area IS the first to show signs of a90Q. Whte SwabN eye a-earn IS pemaps the finest eye a-earn ever made It restores morsture and gives the eye area that youthful rjCN 2 oz. White Swallow Eye Cream $15.00 Retail Inquiries contact Stephen Lacobee, vice-president, MarkeUng fCredot card or money order 10 day dellvery> Name Address City MONEY ORDER State VISA O MASTER CARD Zip Card" Signature Mall to White swallow cosmetic company PO BOX 7344B, oept. F·260 Houston. TX 77273 Exp Date Order Total s In Texas. add 6" sales tax s Postage & Handllng s 1 so Tot al enclosed S Order before March 15 and receive a FREE travel size eye cream Ask for White Swallow In your favorite men's store FEB. 3, 1984 / THE STAR 5 Human Rights Campaign Fund Set~ Goal of $1 Million for 84 The Human Rights Campaign Fund, a national pro-gay civil rights political action committee, wound up its 1983 fun­draising with events in Key West during the last week of December. The fund, now in its fourth year, has set a minimum $1 million war chest goal for the 1984 elections. The 1981-82 cycle raised more than $609,000, and one 1983 activity, a dinner in New York at which Jesse Jackson was keynote speaker, netted some $30,000. Vic Basile, executive director, announced appointment of Shelia Kuehl and Jack Newby as co-chairs for the Los Angeles City Committee that began to reach its goal with a $1,000 plate dinner on Jan. 17. • GRNL to Tackle Anti-Gay Exclusion at Immigration Hearings The Gay Rights National Lobby (GRNL) announced that congre8sional hearings on immigration law reform are to be held in early 1984, and lively debate is expected in an effort to repeal the anti-gay exclu­sion in the 1952 law barrivg any alien who is "afflicted with a psychopathic personal­ity, sexual deviation or mental defect" from entering the country. GRNL Immigration Task Force Coordi· nator Craig Howell; Legislative Aide Mike Walsh and Executive Director Steve Endean have worked clo•ely with Rep. Barney Frank (0.-Ma.) to insure the hear­ing will take place, fulfilling a public promise by Rep. Romano Mazzoli (D.-Ky.),, chair of the House Judiciary Subcommit­tee on Immigration. Admitting that the current system of excluded categorieR embedded in the 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act is indeed "outdated," Mazzoli pledged to hearings on modernizing that section. "Gay Ri,rhta National Lobby will con• tinue working closely with Rep. R. Frank and other congressional friends to help organize favorable testimony for repeal of the anti-gay exclusion during the upcom­ing hearings," stated GRNL Deputy Director, Jerry Weller. • GayVote '84: Sexual Orientation Not An Issue in Democratic Delegate Selection For the first time in history, each state's plan for electing delegates to the 1984 Democratic National Convention must include specific language prohibiting dis­crimination based on sexual orientation, said Tom Chorlton, executive director of the Notional Association of Gay and Les• bian Democratic- Clubs. This is a direct result of several impor­tant developments during the past four years, the leader of the I 10 gay political associations said. In l!l80, the Lesbian and Gay Caucus at the New York Democratic Convention included 77 openlv gav delegates, alter­nates and committee members from 17 states. The Caucus was as large or larger than the delegations from 25 states. As a result, the gay rights were added to the Democratic Platform and to the Demo• 1·ratic- Char1~r. Senator Kennedy, members of his staff and key officials in the Carter White House met with the Caucus and courted its support. Mor:e th_an 400 _dele!(ates signed a petition placing m nomination a symbolic openly gay vice-pn•sidential candidate. In 19!14, the rules are tougher, said Chorlton, the candidates far more numer• ous and the election process shorter. "It will take more determination and hard work than ever ht>fore in order to matc-h or excee<!,the tre_mendous succ-ess of four yf'ars ago, he said. . . Now is the time to get directlv involved, suid Chorlton. 'ot aurprisiagly, presiden­tinl candidntes and party leaders support thos1.> who hn.c enmed th~t support through liard work end vSs1b1hty Above all, gay men and lesbians should demand their rights. Articles 1 and 10 of the Democratic Charter guarantee gay men and women "fully, timely and equal opportunities to participate in decisions concerning the selection of candidates, the formulation of policy, and the conduct of other partv affRira ... " it reads. "If you encounter any discrimination from your state or local party or from a presidential campaign, please notify the National Association immediately," he said. "Many of the party leaders and state executive directors are very supportive. Start now and build a long-term, working relationship with them." All participants should be aware of sev­eral basic requirements and guarantees included in each state's plan for delegate selection. No state may charge a fee to participate in this process or to run as a delegate. Each state must also help low and moderate income individuals to defray expenses related to attending the National Convention if they are elected as delegates or alternates. At the same time, participation in the process is restricted to those who declare their Democratic party preference (either through prior registra­tion, where applicable, or through a state­ment of support at the start of the process), and thoae who have not taken part in the election of delegates for any other party in 1984. In addition to delegate,; and alternates, each state will also select members for each of the three convention committees; Rules, Platform and Credentials. "These committees are especially impor­tant to the lesbian and gay community, WHERE COUNTRY IS #1 said Chorlton, "since the 1984 platform and important changes in the Democratic Party Charter will be largely decided prior to the convention in smaller groups. "Active participation, careful planning and hard work are the keys to success in 1984. This is the year to demonstrate con­clusively that the gay rights movement is indeed nationwide. "When the Democratic National Con­vention open8 in San Francisco next July," he continued, "the Lesbian and Gay Caucus at that convention must reflect both our diven;ity and our determi­nation to participate fully in the American political process. The door is open. Now it's up to u ," For additional information, contact the national a880ciation at 1742 Massachu• ~etts Avenue SE, Waahington, D.C. 20003. 820 SAN PEDRO, San Antonio, 224-7739 THE MUSTANG BAND Friday, Feb. 10, 9:30pm szeover Happy Hour Zpm·Bpm Monday-Saturday TWOFOIIONE Monday-Saturday Zpm·4pm and Wednesday Zpm·Bpm zse DRAFT BEER TUESDAY Zpm•Zam 1\eeT 1\ust SatuTda~ U Sunda~ $~.a;o 'i\\m·&\\m with VTee \lot Dogs Sunda~ Secured Parking on Weekends Home of S.A. MUSTANG Ya'll Come to Snuffy's on the San Pedro Stri 6 THE STAR/ FEB 3, 1984 Losing Weight Is No Easy Game By Harvey Thompson, M.D. Health Store 'Trapped mside every fat person is a thin Owners soul struggling to get out." That cruel generalization is not true. It doesn't take into consideration that essen­tial differences remain in the obese, even when weight is lost. Obesity is a life-long problem that cannot be cured, only con­trolled. Like hypertension, obesity rarely has definable and treatable causes. Seldom is any hormonal imbalance discovered. No single etiology explains all cases of obes­ity; different causes exist for different peo­ple. Obesity is an eating disorder, but its mechanisms are not reversed by simply limiting food intake. This metabolic dis­order is incompletely understood. Like alcoholism, obesity may have aspects of a medical illness. The alcoholic learns that he has a prob­lem shared with others which can con• tinue even without booze. Obese people are "different," even when thin, and must rec­ognize their overweight as a contmuing problem. Some justification for this think• ing follows. Appetite seems to be controlled by the hypothalamus, a feeding and satiety cen­ter. Body mass seems to influence the activity of this gland; the obese person appraently has a fixed point for degrees of obesity. That accounts for the tendency of overweight people to return to a certain level of obesity. The problem is not to lose weight, but to keep it lost when the "ther­mostat" wants to bnng it back up. Smee the cerebral cortex influences the hypothalamus, psychological, social and genetic factors affect food intake. Obese people are more sensitive to external sti­muli than non-obese persons. A "normal" person eats when hungry, as a result of internal cues presumably related to physi• ologic appetite regulators. But the obese person eats because it is time to eat or because the food is appetizing. He responds to external cues that make food a source of pleasure or a relief from bore­dom, not thinking of food as a c-alorie source. Obesity IS parually genetically deter• mined. Animal models show clearcut genetic causes that are more difficult to evaluate in humar1S, but there are definite patterns that can be shown. If one parent is obese, 40 percent of the children are. Eighty percent of the children of two obese adults are oven,;e1ght. And, though less than one-third of obe.e adults were over­weight children, almost all overweight children become obese adults. Adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase is a big fat word for an enzyme that tan make fatty acids from lipoprotein in the blood and allow the excess fat to be stored. The level of th!S enzyme IS elevated in the obese, and remains so even when they are at normal weight. This accounts for their tendency to reg am weight loss; there may be some genetic predisposition for high levels of ATLPL in the blood. There seem to be two types of obesity, hyperplas1tc and hypertrophic. The hyperplastic or Juvenile-onset type,s char­acterized by excess replication of fat cells dunng some entice! period in childhood. Studies actually indicate that if a child can be kept from obeStty, there is far less Beware of Those Who Can't Keep Eye Contact It turns out bad guys really are shifty­eyed, reports the Chicago Tribune. So claims security expert John Buckley, who says avoiding eye contact is just one sign of a guilty consciPnce. He eays crooks also use euphemisms like "take" and "hurt" instead of "rob" and "murder." And watch out for the guy whose memory is a little too good. Buckley Rays remembering what one was doing six weeks ago at 10:00 a.m. is a sure sign of a well-rehearsed lie. likelihood of oven,;•e1ght in adulthood. Hypertrophic obesity does not result from an increase m fat cells, but from eat• ing too much and exercising too little. It's a self-increasing situation. since obesity itself leads to inactivity. The vicious cycle can be altered through discipline; as weight comes down, activity is easier. "Overeating" is relative, though. Increaseing age lowers caloric require­ments. so that a steady eating pattern can cause overweight even if exercise remains constant. The obese try to defend themselveA with "my body doesn't burn off calories like other people's." True, the energy required to metabolize foodstuffs is often lower in obese people. It would be attractive to blame obesity on this more efficient ther­mic response, but that seems secondary to the already obese state, not an initial cause. The body "learns" to be storage­efficient. Some societies idolize the "generous• "figure. In the United States, thin is in, and some people literally starve them­selves to be chic. In a gay dance bar, "love handles" may be too much; to a chubby. chaser, 100 pounds of fat is delightful. What is the definition of obesity? The best definition is that obesity is overweight to the extent of a threat to health The Framingham Study showed that weight in excess of 20 percent over ideal is the danger mark. About one-third of all men and women fall into this cate­gory. Measuring fat folds is another indi­cation. If you can "pinch an inch" of fat on your triceps area (back of the upper arm), you're overweight. The treatment rate for obesity is less hopeful than that for cancer. Only five to 10 percent of the obese are able to lose weight. In the first place, just getting a fat person to move is a major project; gaining weight makes one an efficiency expert for exertion. The obese person figures out how to do everything with as little effort as po11sible, yet exercise must be a part of any weight-control program. Four minutes of running can burn the calories from a glass of milk, a piece of buttered toast or an orange. Anorex1genic drugs for obesity control are controversial. Less than half of all internists will prescribe them. When they do, non-amphetamines are more com• monly used because of the addictive poten• tial of amphetamines or "speed " Laws that require a triplicate "narcotic" pres• cnptlon for the substances makes physi­cians even more reluctant to use them. Thyroid medication is of no benefit. Thyroid hormone actually causes more lean tissue loss than fat. and is associated with cardiac toxicity. Human chorionic gonadotropin (or HCG) was popular in many weight-reduction clinics until stu• dies showed that it worked no better than salt mjectior1S. The weight loss that resulted from its use was more a response to frequent medical contact, a placebo effect, or an associated diet. The multi-million dollar reward, of the weight loss industry has spurred as many diets as there are therapists. Ho"ever, there is little eV1dence that any one hypo­calonc diet is any more successful than another The only virtue of " fad" diets is that at least patients are motivated to try them. More drastic measures such as intestinal shuntmg, gastric stapling and bypass are reserved for the extreV1ely obese. Each "style" of diet has its dangers. Low-carbohydrate diets are by nature high in fat, so hypercholesterolemia can result. Prolonged-sparing fasts can increase ketosis, which can suppress the appetite, but can also cause acidosis and death. On the other hand, short-term total starvation seems remarkably well• tolerated, but because of potential compli• cations, 1t requires medic-.al supervision The key is the boring truth of calories. Each pound of fat holds 3500 of them, so a dB1ly deficit of 500 calories will I08e a pound in a week. To achieve that or better results, the obese person has to be moti• vated to give up food, regardleu of his susceptibility to a "1dc range of stimuh. Behavior modification techniques are being tried with some success, teaching the fat person new patterns of eating, The techniques work best in group situations; weight loss is greater in a group of sim• ilarly affected people than in single indi• viduals. Competing to see who can lose the most poundage can be fun and rewarding, but each person has to find his own motiva­tion. One slim and trim man I know did it with the help of a very easy device. He simply put a mirror on his refrigera• tor door. Dr. Thompson practices medicine in Sacraml'nto, Calif.. and is co-medical director of the Kaposi's Sarcoma Founda­tion thne. rJJ983 SI-Onewall Features Syn• ,Jicate. Are you a STAR distribution point? If not, become one. There's no charge and you'll find it will bring people into your business. To be a d1stnbut1on point, we require you to place the newspaper 1n a lighted, easily-accessible locatton, and be able to distribute at least 25 copies each ,ssue (Some locattons go through 400 to 500 copies each issue.) Your location w,11 be printed m the paper each issue ,.._, E.A<:;LEC.R.E S T I:N':N' f<>r U l timate Acc:c>modati<>•~c,; f-1 <".>t<"d Pool * Jacuzzi * Cont. Brc-.1kf., .,,t l'V<.•ekcnd-. 104 A von dal e, H C>US r c >N (7 13) 52.~-9004 Go Skiing at Colorado's Only Gay Ski Lodge SI.., this spring at the only gay ski lodge 1n Colorado, located h,gh m thr central mountains Onlv t hours from Denver c•II I 70, The Hunkhouse nfftrs the finest ski fa<1h1tes in the \\e•t with three sk, areas available un a free shuttle bus service Brerlenridi:e C.,•ppt>r \1,,untain and Krvsh>ne A.nd \a,I .. onlv .,smiles awav' P1<1urea r,•aring fireplact' w11h steaming mugs uf coffet'on a bt-usk1n rug alter a hard days sk ng, surrounded by some of the hottest skiers ,n the country' All at somt• of the lowest rates in the c"untry1 THE BUNKHOUSE (.WM ~ ~J oH~ POB t>, Breckenridge, CO 110424 Eddie Murphy Accused of Bigotry LOS ANGELES (IGNAl-Movie and televi• sion star Eddie Murphy has come under fire for his anti-gay routines. Murphy has for several years done satir­ical portraits of effeminate homosexuals on NBC's "Saturday Night Live," but it was his AIDS-related remarks that have led to an uprising of anger and protests, to the point where a group has purchased ads in Rolling Stone, Billboard and Cashbox magazines. The group-The Eddie Murphy's Dis­ease Foundation-enlists support because it wishes to let the star and his supporters know that he can be "cured" of homopho­bia, fear of homosexuals. Peter Alexander, speaking for the Los Angeles-baBed campaign, said the group of about six young professionals formed spontaneously after the Home Box Office special, "Eddie Murphy: Delirious," was broadcast on the cable network late last year. "We just decided to do something," Alex• ander said. "At first we thought about being serious, but then we decided to fight him on his own terms and use a bit of humor." During the HBO special, which was taped during a Washington performance, Murphy rt>peatedly refers to homosexuals as "faggots" and implies that casual con• tact with gays can spread AIDS. "AIDS is scary, 'cause it kills," Murphy jokes. "It ain't like the gold old days when veneral disease was all you got." The comedian also said that women might kiBB gay men on the lips and thus transmit AIDS to heterosexual men, a claim denied by medical authorities. HBO stressed that the service was care- WINTER TRAVEL SALE London $499 round trip Offernl d tor dep.irture, thru 1-tarch 15 1QS4 Amsterdam $599 round trip Oftrr ,al,d for 4epartures thru March JI. JQS4 Frankfurt $599 round trip Oftrr val,d for departure 1hrL Aprd JO 1054 Brussels $6 23 round trip Olffr a ,d t r dep,uture5 thru Mmh 31 1054 R, ndtnp a r fare on Br t sh Caledonia Get two free economy tickets with the purchase of a First Class round trip ticket to London Ofter 1a ,d fordep.irturesthru March IS, 1Q64 Call Houston (713) 529-8464 or Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 fut not to broadcast the show before 10 p.m. and that disclaimers about the con• tents appeared before each airing. "Comedy by its nature tends to satirize all groups, and that is what Eddie Murphy attempts to do in his ~pecial." Alexander's group spent $10,000 to buy the magazine ads because it wants to elim• in ate the spread of ignorance about gays and AIDS whether in the guise of 'comedy" or not. "The scariest part," said Alexander, "is that Eddie Murphy is supposed to repres• ent hip, liberal young America, and he goes into this thing that he's afraid of homosexuals because he's afriad of AIDS." A representative of Eddie Murphy Pro­ductions in New York would only say that "Eddie Murphy is not anti-gay, only anti­AIDS." FEB 3, 1984 / THE STAR 7 ... NATIONAL TOU FREE GAY L\'FORMATIO.V _ f] lnformauon on local ga\. har.. rc,1aur.. . nh h<,ok,torc:, t.:'<..'Ort -.en 1u·, hath" and ocher g.a" hu\i1ne,~ CJ 24 houn a da,. (,(;:\t"O day, .a \\t:c:k Q No chugc:: tor your c.:aJI or 1nJormauon In th ~ rnsoo-223:7030" 1'IJn~, IN NEWYORK, CALL COLLECT {212) 582~5590 Service not available in Alaska or Ha~1ail at this time If you 111i,-ant ,our bu~nrss hstcd .md haH-n·t hu_.n L1 Jrllta"t<."1.I tn a <,A, -koO rcptt'5COtnr,·ie. <.'"&IJ Ken \\'ii ham, '\,;uional ~c.~ \I~ the.: .1hou.. numhc.·r- 249 Weslj4tb~t • Suite 405 • \'eu >ork. \ >' l(XJf/1 • ( JI.!) 58.!-55')(1 Drop by and Have a Miller Lite Longneck The Galleon also welcomes the San Pedro Connection to the Hot End of San Pedro Also, don't forget our Sunday Brunch, noon .8 THE STAR/ FEB. 3, 1984 Feature The Bonham Exchange: Alamo Elegance for the 80s Outside of the Bonham Exchange By Ed Martinez Where else but the Hispanic center of Texas would you expect to find a classy, elegant gay nightclub? San Antonio, Texu' most aophisticated city, lays claim to what is probably one of the poshest gay clubs in the country. The Bonham Exchange is a labor oflove for the owner and staff of this luxurious entertainment center for both gays and straights. Built in 1892. the building which holl8e8 Bonham Ex<'hange was Fiesta Time Comin' Again In Old San Antone The annual San Antonio Fiesta will be April 20-29 and willincludethetraditional parade and carnival. The 10-day celebration celebrates Easter tide and San Jacinto Day and includes street dancing and frolicking cit• ywide. Trailriders to Invade San Antonio Some 8,000 trailriders, each v.ith his own horse or buggy, will invade San Antonio on Friday, Feb. 9, to help kick off the Fifth Annual San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo. Hon1es and riders will be featured in a Western Parade that starts 10 a.m. Satur• day, Feb. 10. The riders represent some 12 different trail rides coming from as far away as Laredo and Victoria, each ride lasting from four to seven days. originally a German athletic center, and the ornate brickwork on the exterior of the building bespeaks the architecture of the period. Following the original use of the building, it became a USO center during World War II and then a U.S. Poat Office. The Poat Office removed the paint that had covered the exterior, and after the 70s, the Post Office moved out, and the build­ing remained vacant for a time. Located within spitting distance (for a good spitter) of the Alamo, Texas' sacred shrine to its admittedly brief history, the Bonham Exchange was then acquired in 1980 by its present owner, Hap Veltman, who a1eo owna other busin- m San Antonio. Veltman spent the better part of Womynspeak Seek Women's G rafitti Womynspeak Collective is a group offemi• nists who have organized to create a news• paper of and for •·womyn" to share information between the various women's communities. "We welcome all kinds of non• oppressive articles, graphics, poetry, sto­ries, photo&, etc~ u well u critical feedback." a spokeswoman said. The group describea itself as radical­" aome describe themselves as lesbians, radical Dykes, heretics and pagans, former Amazons, anarcho-socialist femi• nists and iconoclasts. We hope our news• paper is as exciting as our visions of ourselves as womyn, and we hope you like it." she said. For information, write WomynSpeak, P.O. Box 49576, Austin 78765-9576. Vidro bar at the Bonham Exchange a year getting the butlding in shape, res• toring much of the interior and doing the design work, himself. that would ulti• mately result in what the historic buildi:-­has become. The club abounds in stunnmg pieces that would stand out in any home or busi• nese. The floors have been stripped and exposed, disclosing gleaming hardwoods that beckon invitingly. Oriental rugs accent hallways leading from one room to another, and imposing armshairs stand like sentinals. Antique desks, glass cases dilJJ)laying, for example, the photography of the owner, and old musical instruments suspended from the ceilings of the various bars further enhance the ambience of the place. The entire effect is harmonious and unified, with an air of hospitality that fits in perfectly with the reputation that San Antonio has always enjoyed. There is a huge ballroom with an immense dance floor, surrounded by cat• walks from which patrons can view the dancing. On the upper level, there is an intimate bar adjacent to the dance floor, called the Travis Bar. There is alao a bar downstairs called the Bowie Bar. On the entrance level, there is the very high-tech 'Alamo Bar, with a huge video screen. The Crockett Game Room is acrou the wide entrance hall from the Alamo Bar, and still higher on the third level.another bal• lroom opens every Thun1day, featuring female imperaonators. Customers can spend hours just wandering around, enjoying the building, itself. Originally, the management, ably headed by Rick Squillante and Joe Pao­lucci, featured live entertainment, such 88 Tina Turner, and live theater, i.e., Com• n. Tribute to Mary Ellen&. munity Productions. This policy was dis­continued, however, and now the emphasis is on the music. Jon Berge, the current DJ, and Randy Sills, the light technician, spend endless hours orches• trating the sounds and sights the custo­mers are treated to every night at the Exchange. There can be little doubt that the sound is the thing these days, and now, even more ao, sight is the thing as well . Rea-nt developments in videotapes of popular songs, such as those by Michael Jackson and Paul McCartney, have led to such things as videodiscos, where video jockeys mix and blend videotapee on huge sus• pended screens to which the customen1 dance while watching the screens. Joe Paolucci said that this is the coming craze, and that eventually the Bonham Exchange will have some form of video­tape in the dance area of the bar. One of the chief drawbacks to this type of entertainment is the cost, but in a night­club like Bonham Exchange, cost is appar• ently a minor consideration. Local events are frequently staged at the Bonham Exchange, among them are events for the San Antonio Gay Alliance, the Alamo Human Rights Committee, awards banquets for the San Antonio Conservation 8ociety and benefits for Toys for Tykes. The Bonham Exchange is rapidly becoming a true community cen­ter. While continuing and furthering a trend in gay night clubs, which includes many glittenng spots in places like Los Angeles and New York, Bonham Exchange has managed to refine this trend, adding a pat­ina of class and style befitting this old Spanish city. lr!ONDAY s1oo Call Liq_uor 8-10 TUESDAY-S125 Bar Drinks 8-10 WEDNESDAY _ s1oo Long Necks 9-11 THURSDAY-s1oo ?.ta.rga.rita 8-10 SATURDAY-SO¢ Draft 2-5 SUN'DAY-35¢ Draft 3-6 Ben Valentine's Show HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 2-7pm Tues .. Fcl::. H 9:;::m ~il! Draft 50¢ ~e~~~~uL~¢ Bar Drinks s1°0 "Best in Country Sounds" Sister Bar to Snuffy's WITH IO , NO COVER FOR ROCKIN' R & TGRA MEMBERS (SHOWS EXCLUDED) FEB. 3, 1984 / THE STAR 9 Big Brother Has Been Watching for Years, Says Siminoski from page 1 which could be a threat to the national security. Now the FBI denies it has records on the Gay Academic Union, and will not release them. It also says that thousands of sheets were destroyed, but Siminoski wants proof that the allgedly shredded words have not just been spirited away for other uses. Should he retreive this information, he intends to donate it to the National Gay Archives, he said. "The funds I am raising on this trip will perhaps go to build the several city blocks of buildings needed to house these damned pieces of paper." Yet another reason the case is needed, he said, is to ensure that the FOIA remains strong. "The FOIA is a journal­ists' act, and access is a journalists' issue," he said. Siminoski, himself a nationally­syndicated columnist for Stonewall Fea• tures, said, "We have a vital stake in seeing this act remain strong. We must protect it from any attack by the Reagan Administration." He requested a "wish list" of informs• tion, he said. And for his effort has come under close governmental surveillance of his personal comings and goings. While on his criss-cross of the country promoting the case, he was photographed in New York. "It restored my faith in the Big Apple as a friendly town to see someone get on a rush hour subway with a very expensive camera and lenseR in a plain brown paper bag and take it out and casually photo­graph the occupants of the car," he said. "Unfortunately, they couldn't get me doing anything more exciting than brush• ing my hair." Also on his junket, his briefcase, which contained many documents and tapes of information and interviews, plus personal papers and valuables, was stolen at the airport in Phoenix. A week later the police returned his briefcase, all personal papers and valuables in tact, but missing the doc­uments and ca88ettes pretaining to his case However, Siminowski is undaunted in his quest, saying that the "FBI has never denied that they have this information, and they never give any indication of what they intend to do with it. other than to hold on to it." He noted that J. Edgar Hoover alledgedly had several thousand pages of files on government officials that would be used when necessary to influence those persons' decisions in favor of FBI sup­ported causes. '(The) FBI has never denied that they have this information ( on gays), and they never give any indication of what they intend to do with it .... ' Siminoski is no novice to the pohl!cal area, as well, having served as staff inves­tigator for the Fair Campaign Practice Committee in Washington, as a consul­tant to the Tribal Council of the Yavapai­Apache Indians, and as an openly gay political science profeSRor at Arizona State University, University of Missouri at St. Louis and Texas Tech University. Federal agencies have been "sluggish" in replying to his queries. he said, because this is an election year, The FBI and the Justice D~rtment have, needless to say, been particularly ldow !n dealing with the <"A.lie. "But that is giving me time to do this tour and to inform people about the suit and it's importance; and I am writing a book on the influence of gays on the 1984 election" he added. Ultimately it will be the strength of the movement and gay rights that will stop such abuses of personal rights, he said. "The government has got to understand that gays represent a massive polticial force and that we are going to start dem~nding our rights," he said. "This i88ue could have an impact on the coming elections. We are totally prepared to go to the Supreme Court, and we won't lose at the federal level. I know the law; I know the quality of this case." Siminoski says that there has been no "freedom of access" to the records, as demanded in the law. "As defined in the denial letter by the FBI, the reasons for denial were broad, vague and open to mis­application at the whim of the agency. If these standards are to be applied, no requeRtor could know in advance whether he qualified, and the resisting agency would be free to disqualify by mere defini­tion any data it wished to withhold," he said. This is not just a violation of gay rights, he stressed again and again. It is a viola­tion of civil rights. It is a time in the gay movement that it needs to find the com­mon bonds it holds with the blacks, the Hispanics, the women's movement and others, he said. Find their common causes and common enemies and ban together to make each stronger to effect change, he suggested. He said voter registration and getting the gay vote out in the elections is most important. "Then," he said, "we must be able to document this gay vote and show that it made a difference, so people will believe us when we say gays have political clout. "While the gay community can be viewed as a distinct segment of the Ameri­can society, it does not follow that the gay movement can reasonably be viewed as distinct from the U.S. civil rights move­ment as a whole. The legal and social rights lesbians and gay men are fighting for are not different from those for which blacks, Hispanics, native Americans, women and others have been struggling for since the 1960's and earlier." Siminoski solicits individual support for the ACLU case. Requests for information and contributions should be addressed to the National Gay Archives Freedom of Information Fund, 1654 North Hudson 51vd., Los Angeles, CA 90028. 10 THE STAR/ FEB. 3, 1984 Fourteen-Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fr, Sat FEB. FEB. 3 4 FEB. FEB. FEB. FEB. FEB. FEB FEB. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 FEB. FEB FEB. FEB. FEB. 12 13 14 15 16 Fo, edd:ltiona format or phone numbers tor events isted below 00k tor 1ne aponaonng ..:,rgantzat10n unoer Organf1'aUon1 1n the T"8 Sta(a O reciory Selected Events First Week -.SUNDAY: Alamo Human Rights Committee "Meet the Candidate," informal meeting state Sen Lloyd Doggett, candidate US Senate, 1pm, "V1ctona's Indiscretion," 4 Seasons Hotel, 555 S Alamo, San Antonio Selected Events in Future Weeks • IN 1 WEEK: Lincoln's birthday, Feb. 12 • IN 1 WE.BK: Blueboy's 6th Annual Man of the Year Contest, Feb. 12, College Bar, 110 E. 14th, New York •IN 1 WEEK: Ssn Antonio Gay Alliance 1984 Distingu1Shed Service Awards Banquet 6.30pm Feb 12, Amencana Inn, 96 !1,'E Loop 410 • IN 1 WEEK: San Antonio Gay Alliance 3rd Annual Awards Banquet, Feb 12 • IN 1 WEEK: Valentine's Day, Feb. 14 • IN 2 WEEKS: 5th Annual Women's Valentine Dance, Feb. 17, Unitarian Church, Austin • IN 2 WEBKS: Washington's birthday, Feb 20 • I.V 3 WEEKS: Aus trn Lesbian Gay Polit1cal Caucus meets 7:30pm Feb. 28, Com.missioner's Court, Courthouse Annex • IN 8 WEEKS: ALGPC sponsored "AIDS Awareness Week" opens, March 31-April 7 • IN 4 WEEKS: Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday, March 6 •IN 6 WEEKS: St. Patrick's Day, March 17 •IN 8 WEEKS: April Fool's Day, Apnl 1 • / ,V 9 WEEKS: 9th Annual Southeastern Conference of Lesbian and Gay Men, "Pulling Together and Reaching Out," Holiday Inn-Medical Center. Birmingham, Ala., openR, Apr. 12-15 • IN 11 WEEKS: Fiesta opens, San Antonio, April 20 • l.V 11 WEE.'KS: National Gay Health Education Foundation 1st · outheastern Lesbian Gay Health Conference, Apr. 21 Atlanta • 11\" 12 WEBKS: Fiesta chmaxes, San Antonio, Apnl 28-29 • IN 18 WE.f.'KS: First pnmary party elections m Texas and party precinct conventions, May5 • IN 14 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12-Nov. 11 • IN 16 WEEKS: Texas Senatorial D1Stnct Party Conventions, May 19 • IN 16 WEEKS: Gay Press Association 4th j\;ational Convention, May ~28. Los Angeles • IN 16 WEEKS: Memonal Day, May 28 • IN 17 WEEKS: Run-off party elections in Texas, June 2 •IN 19 WEEKS: Texas Democratic Party Convention. June 15-17, tentatively Houston •IN 19 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th a nniversary of Stonewall uprising, national slogan "United & More in '84 " June 15-24 aEARLY J ULY: Lesbian and Gay Bands of America concert, Los Angeles • IN 19 WEEKS: !liational Gay Health Education Foundation's 1st International Lesbian Gay Health Conference, "Toward Diversity," r-:ew York, June 16-19 • IN 23 WEEKS: Democratic We're The Star r-ational Convention, San Francisco, July 16-19 Star Classified •IN 25 WEEKS: "Hot Men, Hotlanta," annual raft race down Chattahoochee River, Atlanta. Aug. 3-5 • IN 27 WEEKS: Texas Gay Freedom Celebration. Dallas, Aug. 17 •IN 27 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug. 19, San Francisco •IN 27 WEEKS: Republican National Convention opens, Dallas, AuguRt 20 • IN 28 WEEKS: "Series 8." Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens Memorial Park, Houston, Aug 26-31 •IN 30 WEEKS: Texas Gay Freedom f'estival opens, Dallas, Sept. 12-23 ANNOUNCEMENTS e ndical81 lhil It g I a TAR dtSt bution poml COMMERCIAL SPACE FRENCH QUARTER BAR New Orleans. established 35-years on busy street, excellent location lucrative ~;,,t~~t1.~~y ~~ =~-~="r;~J) ~,~ DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED STRINGERS WANTED .. The Star seeks free-ranee news wntera m All'St1n and San Antonio for assign• ments Send samples of your work to ~~~i:ac~~g H-:;i9,,:u.gr7h;o& 3317 FOR SALE BAR LIGHTING FIXTURES 30 ra n lights 2 e1ghtsp1nners Sell cheap Call Austin. 441-8679 GAY BARS AUSTIN e Aust,n Attert'lat•ve-5500 S Congreu 442 9285 e a.ck Street Bask:s-611 E 7th .t77-3391 • Boat House 407 Colorado- 474-9687 e TheCrouing -611 Red Rive, 47&-36 1 e O,rtySatys 2'828AoGrande 478-8782 • Or Frankenturte,'1 3' 7 E Sth CORPUS CHRJST/- e H dden Door 1003 Morgan A¥ 882-0183 • Jo ty Jack 2 413 Peoples e ~pantahGatJeon. 517NChaperral 882-<>510 • Sandbar .COS T r;k>r 884-0277 e lodiac 617 S Sta;,les -883-7'$.l El PASO The Apartment -804 My,t e Club Ptga le-4 '1 E Frank 1n Av -532'4K>18 lliamond U 308 5 Flofence-5'6-9332 Le M tord 207 E San Antonto ~9327 Noa Noe 6726 Alameda Av 77M273 Old Pta tat oo---219 S Ochoa 533--6055 Pet Shop ~•9 Pa sano o, 5-46-9629 San Anton10 M rung CO- 800 E San Antoruo 54&-9903 Wh lpert «lt N E Paso 544~969 McALLEN Bumpers 1100 Pecan Outty1 1702 N 10th Ma I 8011 200 N 29th SANANGELO-e Ph .. 111 2226SherwOOCIWay 942·9•$8 SAN ANTONIO e Abl Wnte,na re-622Aoosev.l1-!32...00'5 e Bogarta 11~1 Wnt Ave-349-7187 e eonnam Exchange 411 Bonham- 2713811 e Cahoob -435 Mc:C.rty 3'&4·9257 e CJub AUant.is-32' Navarro-:l25--9'68 • Club Headl or Ta,r.-2'526 Cutet>ra-cJ&-.4450 • Ctew-309 W MaBet 223-0333 e EJ .Jardn- 106 Navarro- 223-1177 e Faces 119 E Mio- 3'1 4302 • Ga eon-330 San Pedro-225-2353 • wa-3503WNtAY-341-9l59 e Madam Arttu,ll"a------607 N St Mary I n5-9618 • One N ghl Saloon 8t5Freoencklbu,V 736- 9942 • Our Place-1 1"> Gen Krueger-340-17~ e RaYrrPoYrrer & LJghtCo 2315SanPedro,- 734 3399 ORGANIZATIONS SELECTED NATIONAL OAGAHJZATtONS Gay Pr .. Abociabon- POB 33t505 Wastungton DC 20033- (202) 387 2430 '-~ I -Oh My ts nod' The·mvrtst,on has a r:onserft form attached' GayR;ghbNatfONIL · • y r ;, ' " · Washw,gton DC 2C013-W) 5'&-1801 Human Rights Campetgn Fund-POB 139&, WN~ lngton. DC 20013-(202) Mtr2025 lambda Legat 0-'enee- 132 W 43rd. N!!W York NY 1~(212)9"-94&8 M.ct • Fund lo, Human R1ght1 (Gay Pre11 Assoc •Uon) POB 33605, Wuh ngton DC 20033 {202) 38"' 2430 NaUonal Atloclation ol Bualneta Couneils Box 15145 San FrancllCO CA 94115 (415) 1a5-e3e3 NatlOf'\al Associabon ol Gay & leeb..,,_ Oemocta11C Clut. 1142 M3u Av SE. <Nasrungton DC 20003 (202) 5' ,-3 "" NetlOnal Gay Health EduetbOn Foundlti:on POB 78-4 Ntw York NY 1003& 12~2, 563-6313 or Or Greenberg at !713) 513-$204 Nat1onaf (lay Aighls Ach,ocat• b40 C111ro, S.n F"rancaco CAM1u (415)863-3624 National Clay Taslt Force- 80 5tn Av Nttw York NY 10011 1212, 74' saoo NGTF I Crlli$1 ne (e00) 22 · 7()44 outside N.,. York State T••- Gay/lest11an TW Force- POO AK Denton 7e20 817)387--8216 AUSTIN Aust n Lambda POB 645.5 78783-- •7~3 Aust n LesblanJG1y fJol llcalC aucu1 P0B822 78767 o474-2717 meets 4ttl Tues 7 30pm Commtsstoner, Court Courthouse Annex VaJ.­ent nea Day Dance Feb 17 AIDS Av,areness Week Mar 31 Apr 7 (JanetZumbrunat-4,41 1130 A tm Pride Week Tuk Fore• POB 13303 1s111 meets upata 11 102 w 1 u,_ r;,,C,RPUS ~HRS Tl Qay Bartenders Assoc at on c o ZOd ac lounge 817 Staptes -883-7753 Mttlropo tan CommunHy Church- c. o Un tar tan Church 3125 Horne Rd 851 9698 meets ~pm Sundays SANAN10NIO A amo Human Rights Committee 150 Terre I Plaza .,ae 78209 65-HXl74 655-5485 M.tet ltie Candidate inform11 meeting state Sen Uoyd Doggett candidaht US Senate 1pm FebS v1ctona, indiscretion 4 Season, Ho1e1 5SS s Aramo Dignity -349-3632 meets Sun 5pm St Pa1rick1 Church 1--35 near NflW Braunfels & Pine Oay Sw,tchbotrd 733-7300 tnlegr ty SA POB 1~ 78212 734-0759 meets 1tl & 3rd Thurs Lambc:1a AA. 1312 Wyomtng-67o4 28t9 Lnt>tan & Gay~•• ln Mechcine-80.1: 2900C3 18280 Rock n R Riders uo Our Place 115 Gen Krueoer 340-175,8 ~•~ ::~~~~= ~~~~di 7= 130pm Feb 12,AmencanalM 96NELoopo410 PERSONALS GWM, 29, 6'1", brnlbrn, seeks ,mcere person to build hfettme 1el•t1onah1p POB 2574 Aust n 78768 SEEKING FRIEND/ LOVER Me WrM. 5·9·. 150. 42. ha,ry. versatile You under 40, smooth, sltm body Skip 512/826-8<481 TERRELL F. Looking tor you! Please call If you re around (512) 495-3661 Chris A PRIVATE GAY CLUBS RESTAURANTS SANANTONICJ. • Oub San Antonio- 1802 N Main A...--73$-2467 e E.-.ecut,ve Health CIIJb. 723°A~S-8807 :A:UeS~TINm- Bob, Eaq Eatery-607 Red RMtt SA"NANTONIO---- - e Bogart1-11S-'1 we,1 Av-3-49-7US7 e c,c1a-107 w Locust •733-5237 SERVICES, ETC. STAR CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS ADVERTISING RATES Placing a Classified other than a Placing a • PERSONALS? Read this: Personals? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words in bold and up to 15 total • ANNOUNCEMENTS words, FREE. (Additional words beyond 15 per • ACCOMODATIONS week are 30¢ each.) • CARS & BIKES FREE PERSONALS apply only to individuals. No AUSTIN-Gey Community Star, Autttn-4'&-1380 _ SANANTONO-Amencan Male (ha,r repl~)-3431 N SI Morts-73&-9678 Gay Comm~r. San Anton,o-737-o0B7 Via Monie Cark>-N St Marys at Mulberry 73&-- SHOPS & STORES ByTycho FEB. 3, 1984 / THE STAR 11 e l(fttn Wagner Cards AG tta- 1801 N Man- 733-3555 TRAVEL TRAVEL GROUP LEADERS Consult us first about your group needs Vanous fares aod rules may perm,t you to tavel tree Travel Con,ultants 1-800-392· 5193 Fortunes commercial services or products for sale . • COMMERCIAL SPACE For Fr,cfay ..,.,,,ng. February 3 1984 through Friday..,.,,= February 10, 1984 HOW LONG? A Free Personal can be placed for ··• • DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES one, two or three weeks at a time-but no longer ARIES-If you're willing 10 make some drastic changes. all that • EMPLOYMENT dreaming you've been doing can come true. Although your dreams may & without re-submitting the form, be about something qu,te practical, your approach 1s not Enlist the aid JOBS WANTED I BLIND BOX NUMBER: If you want secrecy, we'll of your partner on this one, and watch what happens • FOR SALE, MISC. assign you a Blind Box Number. The answers to TAURUS-Youmaynotbewealthy, thoughyou'restartingtobew1se, • MODELS ESCORTS youradwillbesenttousandwewillthenconf1den- and your health ,s excellent. That's probably because you·re finally ' ' ti ally forward the replies to you. Rate is $3 for each doing something right for your~elf; a new regimen of diet and exercise, MASSEURS • PETS issue the ad runs but replies will be forwarded as perhaps Keep up the good work and see your good health affect all • SERVlCES • TRAVEL long as they come in parts of your life. RATE: Up to 3 words in bold, $2 each ANSWERING A BLIND BOX NUMBER: Address GEMINI-What would be a rude awakening for some bounces right week. Additio nal regular words 30¢ each your reply to the Blind Box Number, c/o The Star, off of you. You're learn,ng to roll with the punches, no matter how hard per week. Minimum charge $3 per week. Voice Publishing, 3317 Montrose no.306, Houston, or how soft they are. There·s a mentaVphys1ca~emotional balance that feels good to you now and looks good to others More than one may DEADLINE: 5:30pm Monday for Friday's TX 77006. Enclose no money. Your letter will be want to feel it, too! newspaper. forwarded unopened and confidentially to the CANCER- The fulfillment that you're getting at home seems to make LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run t he advertiser. your dissatisfaction at work even worse. The contrast ,s Just too great to same ad 4 issues or longer, pay the full CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD: keepon,nthesamerut lfyoucan·tchangeiobs,youmightf1gurehowto run in advance, and make no copy All charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box sw,tch or improve your position: work with your head. changes during the full run, and you can charges must be paid in advance OR you can LEO-The blues are getting to you, and your usual "go get 'em" deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 issues or charge to MasterCard o r Visa. We do not bill- routme1ust isn'twork,ng. It feels hkewlnterwill neverend.andyoucan·t longer under the same condi.tions and except through your c redit card-for classifieds. get outside yourself enough to get onto others. Some long talks with a you can deduct 25%. , PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be good friend are what you need to blow away your funky blahs CHARGE YOUR AD: All classifieds must charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in Clas- VIRGO-The price ls right' You've h,t the Jackpot' If you·ve been be 'd · d OR h Ted t (512) 448-1380M d T d g holding off on making a big purchase or waiting to make a serious pai in a vance you can c arge s, 1 s O on ay or ues ay, am Investment, now·s the time. Stop planning and start doing Don't let this your classified to MasterCard or Visa. We I to 5:30pm. The Free offer does not apply to Person- supremely practical moment pass without making the most of 11 do not bill-except through your c redit als phoned in. You will be charged the same rate as card- for classifieds. other types of Classifieds. LIBRA-Your wlld and woolly passion could take you on a magical mystery tour which weaves through all kinds of twists and turns PHONE IN YOUR AD; Only those who Someone who comes .cross as a hot and heavy number could make will be charging to MasterCard or Visa things kinky for a whlle-unt,1 you get on there and do some can phone in classifieds to (512) 448- straightening out• 1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm.-------~-~---~---------8COAPfO=Vou may v.t euctly'wl1111 you want right now, but ask yourself if it's what you need and 1f rt comes at someone else's expense {up to 3 normal-size words In bold capitals) Those are only warnings. Your drive and amb,t,on are so strong that ttiey naturally create those threats Keep up the quest (but with a little (free or 30¢/word) ____ tenderness). (free or 3()¢/word) ___ _ (30¢/word) (30¢/word) ___ _ (30¢/word) _ bold headline at $2 ___ _ words at 30¢ each ___ _ Blind Box at $3 per issue __ Total times ......• . weeks (use additional paper 1f necessary) Name Address Amount enclosed (O check o money order, o cash In person • VISA charge o MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card: # __________ _ __ exp date __ _ SAGITTARIUS-You've got at least one ghost to get nd of. someone or something from your past really has a hold on you In order to get the new year rolling. you have to figure out how to make memories treasures Instead of burdens A woman w th bright eyes may have the answer CAPRICORN- A serious commitment ,s waiting in the wings. but not for much longer. It's time to take all the dancing and romancing and turn ,t onto a real day-to-day thing-If that's what you want. It's now or never for this one Do It, or forget It Got rt? AQUARIUS-Confused? Well, I 1mag,ne so' A golden opportunity presents itself, but false moral or ethical considerations have you stymied. You definitely must sort out yoar pnorit,es You could be at the start of an exciting new cycle, and. of course, at the end of an old, tired one Mail to The Star, c/o Voice Publishing, 3317 Montrose no.306, Houston, TX 77006 PISCES-Smcere True blue. Honest as can be All the above fit you like a glove. Your fine qualities will attract confusion, dashed hopes and advice on the general weirdness of hie from others, but In being 1ust who you are, you rise beautifully abov& ,tall. Real fine-w,sh you were mine •1184 STONEWAU FEATURES 6YN01CATE BERNIE W"AT 8£AtJTIFUL. SCENEJN, ~I.AN ! JUST SPECfACUW f MOTME.R ~TUR£ IS lRUU.Y IN HER A .. ~ fOtlM, ~ «.,~ COMPARE 1D ms~ BAHQl.liT? UGI' AT 'JNE S1ll> ltJ TIE 116111' BUIE St• flltl1'S !! ~ r A axx! \WtATA IUIK /.' YES I AIM I -- (,A,I (.o,'14fM~ TD StU ~ wur/ ! (,fa(;oUS.' 12 THESTAR/FEB.3,1984 Austin's Sweetheart Ball CASH COSTU1"E CONTEST ' $100 Well Drinks All Night $10000 . Prize for Best Couple Nick Starr · Wayne McCracken nly $100 Cover $5000 Prize for Best Costume TUESDAY, FEB. 14™
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