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The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983
File 005
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The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983 - File 005. 1983-12-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1078/show/1069.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-23). The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983 - File 005. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1078/show/1069

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983 - File 005, 1983-12-23, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1078/show/1069.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date December 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript 4 The Star / Dec 23,1983 Gay Politicians Issue Questionnaire for '84 Campaigns "The direction of our efforts has shifted beyond seeking acceptance by the rest of society to a clear demand that we, as American citizens, must be involved in the decisions that affect our lives." So reads the briefing paper which accompanies a questionnaire being issued by a collective of national gay/lesbian organizations, reports the National Gay Task Force. The material will be sent to Presidential candidates and will raise questions as to whether the candidates —will support passage of a gay civil rights bill, —will eliminate exclusion of gays from military service, —will oppose discrimination based on sexual orientation in immigration, —will use the Presidency to support the Equal Rights Amendment, —will support funding for AIDS research. The documents are part of an "84 and Counting" voter registration drive organized by the National Gay Task Force, the Human Rights Campaign Fund, the National Coalition of Black Gays, the Gay Rights National Lobby and the National Association of Gay and Lesbian Democratic Clubs. Teacher Fired Due to Sexual Orientation Maria Elena Escarcega was accepted over a year ago as a teacher's assistant at a Los Angeles elementary school, but when she showed up a couple of months later in a man's pink shirt, school officials demanded to know her sexual orientation. Escarcega told her employers she liked women, and she was fired on the spot, reports an .American Civil Liberties Union news brief. Those school officials are now being sued. Plaintiffs counsel, Steven Kelber, was adamant about the case: "The school officials violated Ms. Escarcega's rights guaranteed on federal, state and city levels. To exclude gay men and lesbians from positions in which they may provide positive role models cheats both students and the homosexual community. Just as important, it reinforces prejudice and perpetuates the unfounded myth that homosexuals recruit young people into a choice of sexual orientation. "... Escarcega is entitled to teach. She is qualified to teach. .Anyone who stands in the schoolroom door to bar her from entering denies a member of a significant minority of her constitutional right to be heard and to participate as a full member of this society. That denial will not go unchallenged." National Gay Task Force Seeking Leaders The Nominating Committee of the National Gay Task Force Board of Directors is seeking experienced gay leaders from around the country for consideration as candidates for election to the Board, reports the NGTF newsletter. Prime criteria are expertise in and/or willingness to do fundraising and a proven leadership role with a gay constituency. Interested persons should call or write NGTF (80th Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10011; (212) 741-5800) prior to January 31. 1984. Commentary I Won't Dance; Don't Ask Me By Sharon McDonald To me, there is no more awesome sight than a dance floor filled with human twosomes moving in time to a common beat. I know Eleanor Roosevelt said no one can make you feel inferior without your consent, and I believe it. Situations, on the other hand, frequently make me feel inferior without my consent and having to perform on the dance floor is one of them. It's during adolescence that dancing first rears its ugly head, along with other timely delights like menstruation and body odor. As a teenager, I was blessed with only moderate acne and personality bland enough to spare me overt social ostracism. By some quirk, I was a nondescript swan, secretly waiting to turn into my true ugly duckling self. I watched those around me who fell as casualties of the teenage social scene and knew that there but for a set of braces, 30 pounds, or four square inches of pimples, went I. Those execruciating years introduced me to the particular despair endemic to the dance floor. But what I felt then at those awkward high school dances was just the tip of the iceberg. In retrospect, it was relatively easy—if anything in those days could be described as "easy"—to bluff my way through social obligations without ever really learning how to dance. My high school years and several that followed were years of dancing with heterosexual men who are notorious for having invented the Brick Wall School of Dancing. This is closely akin to their Brick Wall School of Emoting. No men I ever danced with thought my erratic swoops and lunges on the dance floor were the least bid odd; they were plunging about with equal abandon and equal ineptitude. Later, when I can out, I entered a politically active circle of feminists whose last brush with fashion occurred a decade before. De-emphasizing personal appearance was a feminist statement. We hung around one homey women's bar, lurching our way through our favorite songB, unperturbed by prevailing community standards about what constitutes a dance. The life of gay women before feminism was never like this, I am told. You had to know how to dance, drink and shoot pool to win the woman of your dreams. Anyone doubting this should have seen the two 60-year-old women I saw clear the floor one night waltzing wonderfully to an old, old tune, showing the youngun's how it's done. It seemed like I'd only been out of the clost a few months when dancing, real dancing, experienced a revival that has yet to subside. No longer did shuffling around face-to-face with your chosen victim suffice; suddenly couples were kicking and twirling on cue. In a matter of months, the happy camaraderie of the local bar became the close scrutiny of anxious eyes looking to pick up dance pointers. And I'll admit it, this change did not exactly cause my contemporaries to dance a path to my door. Okay, so I'm not so light on my feet, but I have a great personality. But people are so fickle. My friends stopped asking me to dance with them altogether, and my lover started pretending she was dancing with the woman to my left. Dancing now meant you had to do a predetermined series of steps, in sequence and in time. Well, forget it. A wiser woman than I would just resign hereself to learning how to move it with the big kids. Not me, boy. You won't catch me in a gym full of third graders going, "One, two, three, turn!" I ignored TM, est and macrame, and I can outwait this silly and tenacious preoccupation with actual skill on the dance floor. Alright, so I don't have rhythm. I'll wait 'til the Old Values come back around: Money, Looks and Power. They're a lot more versatile and easier to acquire. McDonald, who Hues in Los Angeles, is co-winner of the 1983 Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Work in Feature Writing from the Gay Press Association. Her column appears here and in other gay newspapers. Texas Live Paul Parker Paul Parker Wows Crowds in Capital City By Ed Martinez Popular singer Paul Parker cast his spell over the crowds at Back Street Basics in Austin during his recent appearance there. Appearing in the Capital City after successful tours in Europe, Australia and North and South America, Parker gave the enthusiastic customers soulful renditions of some of his most popular composi tions. The half-hour show included Parker doing his own songs, such as "Shot in the Night," "Right on Target," "Too Much to Dream" and "Pushing Too Hard." Parker returned to California after leaving Austin for recording dates there. Parker was originally backed by the well-known musician, Patrick Cowley, '>efore his death in 1982 from AIDS. Navy Still Trying to Unload Its Gays The verdict's in on that Navy commander who was accused of sodomy with a crewman, reports the Associated Press, and the outcome is what was more or lesB expected throughout the gay community. Cmdr. Gerald M, Vanderwier, 42, was dismissed from the service and ordered to come up with $1,200 in back pay. He got off light—he could have received up to 15 years in prison and been forced to relinquish his benefits and all of his back pay. But since he had been in the service for over 19 years, Capt. Maitland G. Freed, the court-martial judge, felt he let him off easy. Petty Officer 3rd Class John E. Rain- ville, the hospital corpsman who was the other party in the oral sex act that led to Vanderwier's conviction, was released from the Navy with an honorable discharge since he was granted immunity from prosecution. All this is nothing new for the Navy. In 1983,1,167 men were kicked out for homosexuality. In 1982, the Navy unloaded 918 gays, including 17 officers. Merchandisers Facing Christmas Flops Business may be great this Christmas, but not everything was moving like hotcakes, reports the Wall Street Journal. Telephones, which many stores had great hopes for, are flops. So are videodiscs, and a Montgomery Ward spokesman says video game cartridges are "about as close a thing as we have to a bomb." One hopeful note for lovers of peace on earth: thone big portable boom box radios are losing popularity, too. National Gay Leaders Meet with New CDC Director Leaders of the National Gay Task Force met on Nov. 29 with the new director of the Centers for Disease Control, Dr. James O. Mason, reports the NGTF newsletter. NGTF Executive Director Virginia M. Apuzzo described the session as "a very good get-acquainted meeting that offered us an opportunity to introduce the gay community to Dr. Mason and to raise our interests and concerns about the work of CDC." Apuzzo stressed how important the work of the CDC is to the gay community, particularly during the AIDS crisis. "We want to see good epidemiology and surveillance," Apuzzo said. "This can be achieved within the context of protection of confidentiality and sensitivity to the Btatus of gays and lesbians in American society." Artificial Trees Become More Popular than the Real Thing The tree sheltering many Christmas gifts this year grew up in a laboratory, not on a mountainside, reports USA Today. Americans bought eight million artificial trees in 1982, and industry spokesmen say their orders were double this year. Christmas shoppers give several reasons for switching from the natural product. Some cite conservation, and others say it's safer. But most say they're just tired of cleaning pine needles out of the carpet.
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