Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983
File 004
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983 - File 004. 1983-12-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1078/show/1068.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-23). The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983 - File 004. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1078/show/1068

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983 - File 004, 1983-12-23, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1078/show/1068.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date December 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript Who Put the 'Dirty' in Dirty Sally's? By Ed Martinez There's these two bars, one in Austin and in Houston, with the unlikely names of "Dirty Sally's." Ever wonder how they got their names? It makes for a good story, and it came right from the "horse's" mouth, Paul Stewart, better known as Dirty Sally, himself. According to Paul, he was working out in California, and through a series of circumstances, he found himself in the business of designing and installing custom bathrooms. He had grown to the point at which he was designing some pretty fancy Johns for some pretty famous people. One day he was in a bar, and when he left, a patron in the bar noticed Paul and asked the bartender about Paul's identity. The bartender, using Paul's drag name, informed the patron that that was "Sally." When asked what Sally did for a living, the bartender archly replied that Sally built toilets. "Oh," the customer said, "that's dirty." The bartender told Paul about the incident, the name stuck, and ever since that time Paul Stewart has been Dirty Sally. Some years later, when Paul returned to Houston, he started a bar named, of course, Dirty Sally's. Although Paul has not been actively involved in the business for years, the name lives on. But what ofthe business that carries the name? How does a bar get that way? What gives a bar a distinctive flavor unlike any other? For the answers to these and other questions, Jim Smith, the general manager of the two Dirty Sally's as well as the Chicken Coop in Houston, volunteered. Jim Smith took over management ofthe operation five years ago, after a background in business and two degrees in sociology from LSU and Washington University in St. Louis. About 19 months ago, the Austin bar waB added, and Jim moved here for a few weeks that has stretched into a year and a half. He is now a native of Austin and loves it. Dirty Sally's in Austin has the image of a college bar, being located close to the campus of the University of Texas, and the crowd at the bar does tend to be younger and preppier than some other bars in Austin. On a Monday night, when the popular free beer bust happens, some of the best-looking young men in Texas can be seen, packed wall-to-wall inside and outside the place. But the reality of the bar is something different. At happy hour, day in and day out, the regulars hold forth at the bar, and this includes some ofthe more prominent business and professional men in town, including some ofthe town's public officials. These regulars are also a large part of the business at Sally's and make it a comfortable place for people of all ages to water down and relax after a hard day. The ambience of a bar is a hard thing to UT-Arlington Grants Recognition to Gay Group The University of Texas campus at Arlington—near Dallas—officially recognized the BO-member Gay/Lesbian Association of UTA recently with very little controversy or debate. Luan Green, co-founder of the group, said she was told if they ran the organization smoothly, they shouldn't have any problems. She said the move was encouraging, especially in light of recent events barring recognition of a gay group at SMU. The main difference is that UTA does not provide funding for its campuB groups, while student organizations at SMU can apply to use the student fee monies. At UTA, student groups are allowed to use campus facilities and services, post notices and raise funds on campus. A nine-member committee of students, faculty and staff voted on Nov. 23 to recognize the group, with only one dissenter. This is the second such group to organize at UTA. The earlier one has disbanded. First in a Series on the Gay Bars of Austin and San Antonio Bartenders meeting Sunday morning analyze and probably shouldn't be analyzed anyway, but some ofthe ingredients of the management of a successful bar are worth noting. Jim Smith stressed that although places for fun and enjoyment, his bars are run on a strictly businesslike basis. Every Sunday morning at 10:00 a.m. while some are sleeping off Saturday night, the staff of Sally's are attending their weekly meeting. Cleanup work, discussions and plans on how to improve the operation of the bar are underway, and the overall attitude of the employees is gone over. "Attitude" is a word that has gotten a bad connotation in the gay world, but to Jim Smith, it is an important part ofthe success of Sally's. The staff is instructed to maintain an attitude of friendliness and helpfulness toward all customers of the bar, regardless of who they may be. The "attitude" frequently displayed in some establishments is simply not permitted at Sally's. Smith is adamant about this point and believes strongly that the bar's first objective should be, and is, identifying his customers and attracting them to the bar. Thereafter, it's up to the staff to make those customers feel welcome and want to stay and enjoy themselves. Apparently, the business philosophy is working, for Sally's is easily one of the busiest bars in Austin. The appearance and layout of the bar fosters a comfortable feeling for the customers. Smith pointed out that a large part of the capital budget goes for the sound system, increasingly important to a successful bar. The physical design ofthe bar, itself, and the traffic flow around the bar is vital and optimally should allow customers to see most or all of the rest of the customers from any point in the bar. Such things as the fresh floral arrangements, and, last but most important, the bartenders, themselves, are all important. Smith hires the bartenders himself, and admitted that many of them come from Dallas or Houston or other cities. But the big city attitude hangups are left at the door, or the applicants do not get a job. Although the bartenders arefrankly hired on looks (who really wants to spend all night looking at an ugly bartender?), they must rate far above average as bartenders as well. All of this makes for a good feeling among the employees, and a family feeling among the staff has gone far to help keep Sally's popular and profitable. "The bar business is very competitive, but if it weren't, I'd lose interest," stated Smith. Apparently, Jim Smith needn't worry about losing any of the interest that running a successful bar has for him. As long as bars can be as profitable as Dirty Sally's, there will be plenty of competition. Money follows a profit, and new bars will always be a fact of life in Texas' Capital City, in addition to the existing competing bars. Dirty Sally's has carved out its own particular niche in the gay business scene, and it looks as though it will be around for a long time to come. DEC. 23, 1983 / The Star 3 SAGA Resolves to Unify, Communicate The San Antonio Gay Alliance resolved to achieve greater unity and better communication within the community in the coming year in order to improve gay life in San Antonio and accomplish specific SAGA goals. The first effort to formulate goals and plans for reaching them will be a weekend retreat in the Hill Country near Boeme at a leadership workshop to be held Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 21 and 22, attheGuadalupe River Ranch. Scheduled for the two-day thought- provoking event is an informal discussion, recreation and work sessions designed to develop an agenda for the gay community in 1984, a budget for achieving this agenda, possibly restructuring the Alliance and the development of new leadership for the community. The retreat will end with a party and traditional Hill Country barbecue on Sunday afternoon. Anticipated cost (including overnight accommodations, three meals and the barbeque) is $50 per person. However a lower registration fee of $25 has been made possible through a grant to SAGA from Bogarts, Cahoots and Battros Properties. This opportunity to pay a lower fee will allow maximum participation from the community. Due to limited accommodations, reservations and remittance are needed by Jan. 5. Send check to SAGA, P.O. Box 12063, San Antonio, Tex. 78212. Rockin' R Celebrates Season The Rockin' R Riders, a club for horse- backing riding enthusiasts, held their Christmas party Dec. 18 at Snuffy's and celebrated the season with lots of food and fun. The Riders is a thret month-old organization formed for the purpose of teaching persons about riding and entering rodeos. Members teach horsemanship and sponsor trail rides, plus charity work. And, you don't have to own a horse to be a member—just have an interest in the sport. Anyone interested in becoming a member or finding out more should contact anyone at Our Place. Arizona Gays Upset at 'Hitlerism' Remark The Arizona Republic newspaper and local gay groups have threatened to try for a recall of Republican Hawley Atkinson, chairman ofthe County Board of Supervisors, following a remark that gays should be substituted for animals in medical experiments. Atkinson, however, says he has no intention of stepping down and will run again in 1984. In an Associated Press article, San Francisco gay leaders likened the remark to Hitlerism when Atkinson said "homosexuals and lesbians from San Francisco" should be used in experiments instead of animals. He insists it was a facetious remark which he didn't think would make the newspaper. The Arizona Gay-Lesbian Task Force threatened to mobilize the county's estimated 150,000 gays for a recall vote if he did not quit. Despite the confrontation, Atkinson says he can represent gays. "I'm against homosexuality, absolutely against it ... but when anybody calls me up who wants assistance with Maricopa County, I don't ask them what color they are, what race they are. what their creed is."
File Name uhlib_783846406_n004_003_ac.jpg