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The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983
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The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983 - File 001. 1983-12-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1078/show/1065.

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(1983-12-23). The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1078/show/1065

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983 - File 001, 1983-12-23, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1078/show/1065.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 4, December 23, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date December 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Gay Activist Attorney Schwab Dies of AIDS Infections By Robert Hyde Texas gay activist attorney Robert Schwab, 36, of Houston, died of AIDS· related infections Dec. 15. It had been announced about a year ago that Schwab, the chief strategist in the Baker vs. Wade lawsuit that struck down the state's sodomy statute, had been diag· nosed with AIDS. Born in Chicago, Schwab obtained a Ph.D. and went on to become a m>ted civil rights attorney. Don Baker, plaintiff in the case and close friend of Schwab, said, "I personally join hundreds of thousands of gay men and women in Texas to mourn the loss of one of our state's foremost gay rights lead· ers. "Robert and I were comrades-in-arms over the years, something that solidified a deep sense of respect and camaraderie when we were caught in the trenches togl'ther." Baker said that Schwab became a close friend of his in 1976. "We worked together for so long," he said near tears. "His loss extends to the entirety of the Robert Schwab in 1982 state, because he's worked with so many of us," he continued. "I'm saddened by the fact that we've )oi;t one of the pillars ofour movement, a" well as a deep personal friend." Schwab, founder of the Texas Human Rights Foundation and co-founder of Houston's Gay Political Caucus, was also known nationally as a co-founder of the National Education Foundation for Indi­vidual Rights, the Gay Rights National Lobby and the American Bar Association Committee of Gay Rights. Current HGPC pre"ident Larry Bagne­ris said. "The gay rights movement. .. haa definitely loat a true friend .... Before his death, he was able to make a large contri­bution to the gay community with hio fight against 21.06 (the section of the Texas Penal Code that made 'homosexual conduct' a mii;deameanor crime)." Former HGPC President Lee Harring· ton stBtedc "Almost all social change and progress begins with the court system. Robert chose this avenue in his endeavor to remove the so-called sodomy statute from the Texas Penal Code. Oppressive and unjust, it affected heterosexual as well "'":?'.1--:r"'... • t:!', •• • • 0 ~ • • '• ~ ' • I • as homosexual citizen". "His efforts were tireless and succesi;ful; the 1?ays, in particular, will miss him very much." His body flown to Miami, Fla., for bur· ial. Schwab is survived by his mother, Mrs. Esther Schwab of Ft. Lauderdale, and by his sister, Mrs. Charlene Touby of Miami. A memorial service has been scheduled for Sunday, Jan. 8, at Rothko Chapel at 3900 Yupon in Houston. Money for Wildlife Our Place, Snuffy's and the Rocking R Club raised more than $2000 and 200 pounds pf animal fero in the past few weeks through tips and donations for the Wildlife Emergency Center in San Anto­nio. The center, run by Carol Asvestas since Oct. '82, cares for livestock, as well as zebras, owls and other birds. The slogan of the Center is ~Help Ua to Help Them." Anyone wanting to donate should call 512-690-9238. Austin's Own Madalyn Murray O'Hair Hated by Many, Loved by a Few, Speaks Out on O.ya THE STAR AUSTIN * SAN ANTONIO •d Martinez, p.e Dec. 23, 1983 o Issue .4 o Published Every Other Friday Take a Peek at My Christmas Wish List By .Joe Baker Remember when you were a kid and \\ould write your Christmas wish list to Santa'! What am I tnlking about-we all still have a wish list! My wish list this year is a mix1>d bag. Thl'Ie's things on it for myself, for friends, the gay community, people I don't know, people I would like to know. Some things are serious, some are light. Take a peek; I wish a gay-or even a straight­medical respar!'ht·r would discover both the cause 1ind the cure for AIDS. I wish tht• Michigan Lottery Bureau would send me that registered letter I've heen waiting for all year I wish Broadway playwright Harvey FiPrstein (of Torch Song Trilogy and La Cag1• aux Foiles fame) would ask me to collahorate with him on hiR nl'xt big pro· ject. I wish ,John Thomas of the Human Rights Campaign Fund would sponsor a weenie roast besides $150 per ·ilate dinners. I wish the federal ap~.als court in New Orleans would uphold the unconstitution· ality ofTexaA anti-gay law 2Ul6. I wish a certain restaurant critic would start inviting me out to dinner again. I wish I had my car paid for. I wish I would be invited lo at least one Nrw Yl'ar's Eve party this year. I wish ,Joan Rivers would stop picking on me. I wish somebody would send me fresh flowers-just once. I wish that a certain bartender would ask me out. I wish tha t I had enough courage lo ask him out. I wish he would give me an indication if he would like me to ask him out. I wish sombody would give me a pair of leather chaps. Preferably with a hot man in them. I wish the hars had 25¢ drinks every night. I wish a certain blond would realize what a great couple we make. I wish breaking up didn't hurt so much. I wish rejection didn't liurt so much. I \\ish Congress would pass a gay rights law. I wish Richard Lon,gstaff would win approval from the U.S. Supreme Court to become an American citizen. I wish my mother would quit asking me if I am dating any nice girls yet? I wish I would tE'll my mother that I am dating some nice men, though. I wish the Rl'v. Jerry Falwell would be arrested for "flashing" little girls and old ladies at at a shopping center. I wish somebody would ask to be my groupie. I wish I was a teenager again-just for one week. I wish I had the buns of death. I wish my novel was written. I wish somebody would give me a male modelf es­cort for Chnstmas. I wish I really enjoyed working out. I wish everybody who is gay could come out of their closets. I wish the Dallas Gay Alliance would tiponsor a reception for Ronald Reagan during the Republican National Conven· tion in Dallas this summer-and he would attend. I wish a very good friend wasn't hurting so much, and that I could help him. I wish he realized how much he has going for him-and that he can make~ton his own and have a great new life. I wish New York was only an hour's drive from Texas. I wi1h everybody a very Merry Christ­mas and terrific New Year. Gay Leaders Meet with Presidential Aspirant Glenn p.2 Navy Unloading its Gers p.4 N.Y. Governor Bans Gan Discrimination p.2 Who Put the 'Dirty' in Dirty Sally's Ed 118rtinez, p. 3 Airing SMU's Dirty Laundry on National TV JoeBaker,p.S 2 THE STAR I Dec. 23, 1983 Gay Leaders Meet with Glenn National Gay Task Force Executive Direc­tor Virginia M. Apuzzo; Peter Vogel, Co­Chair of the National Association of Gay • and Leabian Democratic Club; and six leaders of the New York City gay/lesbian community met Dec. 13 with Presidential contender Senator John Glenn (D.-Ohio), reports the NGTF newsletter. The meeting, arranged through the offi­ces of Glenn's New York campaign chair­man, State Senate Minority Leader Manfred Ohrenstein, came six weeks after the candidate had expressed his opposi· tion to the federal gay/lesbian civil rights bill in response to a question from an NGTF representative at a New York forum. After the meeting, Apuzzo and Vogel asserted that Glenn "remainded intransigent" on issues of special concern to the lesbian/gay community. The meeting, which lasted for over an hour, did not center around the civil rights bill as a "litmus test," but rather addressed a broad spectrum of issues espe­cially important to lesbians and gay men, including immigration, AIDS, violence, social service delivery and discrimination against gays and lesbians in the military. The group also challenged Glenn 'a conten­tion, made earlier in the day, that lesbians and gay men were unfit to work as "teachers or YMCA directors." While the dialogue was cordial, the Ohio senator continually focused on the idea of sexual orientation as a choice rather than a pre-existing condition like race or sender. ''The Senator acknowledged the exist· ence of discrimination," Apuzzo noted, "but was unwilling to support any remedy for that discrimination. This intransi· sence is unacceptable." Vogel added, "He offered no new depar· tures from his previous positions." G Jenn himself stressed that he wanted a "continuins dialogue with the gay and les­bian community," and conceded that "this issue (gay and lesbian civil righta) has become an item on the national agenda." On Dec. 15, State Senator Ohrenstein announced his resignation from the Glenn campaign. Ohrenstein's district includes one of the largest gay and lesbian consti· tuencies in the nation. THE STAR Circui.tod In A....,n San Antonoo ond Co<puo CtvllU Pubhshed every other Friday 3008-A Burleson Road Austin, TX 78741 Phone Austin (512) 448-1380 San Antonio (512) 737-0087 MontroM YOIC9 Pllbliahing Co CIRCULATION The SIOr. •.000 _,.. -.ekly Montr- Y0tce ltlouston) 11 000 -·· -ly" tota0l. 1T1~. u.. a,c..;.o..,. .-1_9· .0 .e0,.0o._ ocoo, .-p,1,.•-, w. e-ek1ty y•V Q 3317 - - 0308. "°""""' TX 71008, (713) ~ Contents copyright c1993 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg - Ed Martine rrwrog"'fl editOI Lyt Harril ••ecut'" Mltletmmg d'rectcK ___ Mark 01'8g<> ~~-~~~---- __ Ac.I Clark "" d"""'°' Jell Bray gropltics Sonny Davis occount1llfl -G•yP,__ N-.-N lntemotiorullGoy - Agency. P8Clhc"-• SeMce. Larry Bual! (WMPllngton, O CI Syndic.red FNture SMrlceJ & W'ilWJ. Je!lroy Wiloon, Randy All- St-•n FM!urn Syndlcol•. Brlon McNaughl. Joe e .. ., POSTMASTER s.nd - correctlOno IO 3317 Mont.­• 306. Houaton n nooe SulJocflt>tJOn ... ,. In us In tuled --5'9 per yur (52 -) $29per..,.mon!l!s(26-J.orSl25per-(l•s 1Nn2&-) Boel-$200-" N•tJOMI ~ teprauntatwe Jo9 OiSabato RNono.tl Motteting eM 11th .......... - y""' 10011 (212) 2•:!-6883 A""""-'"'llf dNdhno ewery - Tundoy 5;30J>m. lot iUue - ,_>ng Fnday .._ng Notiato~ LOct ~ngratetcheduteOne•as eltedive - 11 1!183 Fl-.ty 'The s...- .,_not ... ume ••pono bllllytor --n-g- Cla-""' --anoulcl lllert "'The SIOr" IO •ny New books from A L y s 0 N PUBLICATIONS 0 THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Friedel, $7 00. The entertaining coming-out story of Bunon Raider, who 1s so elegant that as a child he reads Vogue ID his playpen. "The wntuig is fresh and crisp, the humor often hilarious," writes the L.A. Times. "The funniest gay novel of the year," says Chnstophu Sueet. 0 ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. One teenager 10 ten is gay, here, twenty-sll young people tell their stones; of coming to terms wuh bemg different, of the decmon bow - and whether - to tell friends and parents, and what the consequences were. :J THE BUTTERSCOTCH PRINCE, by Richard Hall, SS.00. When Cor­dell's best friend and ex-lover 1s murdered, the only clue is one that the pohce seem to consider too kinky to follow up on. So Cordell decides to track down the killer b1mse!I - with results far ,.ifferent from what he bad expected. 0 ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, SS.00. "I've known that I was gay smce I was thineen. Docs that surprise you! It didn't me .. "So begins All·Amencan Boys, the story of a teenage love affau that should have been simple - but wasn't. 0 CHINA HOUSE, by Vincent Lardo, SS 00. A gay gothic that has everything: two handsome lovers, a mystenous house on the hill, sounds m the night, and a father-son rela11onsb1p that's closer than most. 0 THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDmON, by Patricia Sitkin, $6.00. When Evan Talbot leaves on a in1ssion to rescue an old schoolmate who bas been 1mpnsoned by fanatics in the Middle East, be doesn't realize that the mp will also involve bis own coming out and the discovery of who it is that be really loves. O DEATH TRICK, by Richard Stevenson, $6.00. Meet Don Stracbey, a private eye ID the classic tradition but with one difference: he's gay. TO ORDER Enclosed is S ; please send the books I've checked above. (Add S 1.00 postage when ordenng just one book; if you order more than one, well pay postage.) 0 Charge my (circle onef: Visa Mastercard acct. no.; ---------- expiration date:. ____ _ Signature: __________________ ~ name address cny state_z1p _____ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS, Dept P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 N.Y. Governor Bans Gay Discrimination in Government Br Kathy Tepes Vta Gay Pree1 Aaaociatlon Wire Service On Nov. 18, New York Gov. Cuomo issued an executive order banning discrimina· tion against lesbians and gays in state government. The executive order, which bans dis· crimination on the basis of sexual orienta· tion or preference, applies to both hiring and the delivery of servies by all New York State agencies. Governor Cuomo also set up a high·level task force to enforce the order. Unlike a similar order issued by Mayor Koch in New York City, the governor's order does not ban discrimination by con· tractors and vendors doing business with the state. However, Cuomo said the new tBBk force could recommend whether to extend the order to business with the New York State. Issuing the executive order was one of the campaign promises made to the lea· bian and gay community in New York State. On May 16, at the Fund for Human Dignity dinner, Governor Cuomo publicly acknowledged that lesbians and gays played a significant role in electing him governor. At that time, Cuomo addressed lesbians and gays directly by saying: ''Thank you, to all of you. I'm encouraging you to stay strong in the pursuit of the things you believe. As long as I am gover· nor, I will fight for a government intelli· gent enough and brave enough not to insist on uniformity." As .secretary of state, Cuomo issued the first directive in the New York State's his· tory barring discrimination based on sex· ual orientation or preference in the area of licensing and bonding. He also issued an order making it illegal to discriminate agairuit gay organizations who wished to Incorporate. Despite those firsts, Governor Cuomo angered most of the activists in the lee· bian and gpy community by delaying the executive order almost a year. It wasn't until after Governor Cuomo was deluged with letters deploring his delay, an appeal launched by the gay newspaper New York City News, that he ogreed to a meeting with a group of gay activists and non·gay, but liberal religious leaders. The anti­discrimination order was strongly opposed by conservative religious groups, who argued it would encourage homosexu· ality. Recently, the court struck down the Bod· omy laws in New York State, due to the efforts of the Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund. Convicted Kiiier Dan White to be Paroled International Gay New1 A1ency SAN FRANCISCO-Convicted double· murdere.r Dan White will be released from Soledad Prison on January 6 after having served a little over five years for the murders of San Francisco Mayor George MOllCQne and gay Supervisor Harvey Milk. The parole plan submitted by White to prison authorities is likely to be approved. According to Susan Sward of the San Franciaco Chronicl~ the plan calls for White to be released in the San Diego County area, an area with. a large popula· tion much of it conservative. Speculation that White might be released in the San Francisco Bay Area was dismi88ed by authorities, who indi· cated that White had too much to fear from thot1e angry at the lenient sentence he received for two murders. When White killed Moscone and Milk in 1978, he set in motion the remov_al of two of the most liberal members of city govern· ment and opened the way for their replace­ment by more coruiervative m_embers of government, a trend that contmues unto the present. • • Who Put the 'Dirty' in Dirty Sally's? First in a Series on the Gay Bars of Austin and San Antonio By Ed Martinez There's these two bars, one in Austin and in Houston, with the unlikely names of "Dirty Sally's." Ever wonder how they got their names? It makes for a good story, and it came right from the "horse's" mouth, Paul Stewart, better known as Dirty Sally, himself. According to Paul, he was working out in California, and through a series of cir­cumstanc1• s, he found himRelf in the busi­ness of designing and installing custom bathrooms. He had grown to the point at which he was designing some pretty fancy johns for some pretty famous people. One day he was in a bar, and when he left, a patron in the bar noticed Paul and asked the bartender about Paul's identity. The bartender, using Paul's drag name, informed the patron that that was "Sally." When asked what Sally did for a living, th1• bartender archly replied that Sally built toilets. '"Oh," the customer 8aid, "that's dirty." The burt!'nder told Paul about the inci­dent, the name stuck, and ever since that time Paul Stewart haR been Dirty Sally. Some years later, when Paul returned to Houston, he started a bar named, of course, Dirty Sally's. Although Paul has not been actively involved in the business for years, the name lives on. But what of the busine11s that carries the name? How does a bar get that way? What gives a bar a distinctive flavor unlik~ any other? For the answers to these and other questions, Jim Smith, the general man· ager of the two Dirty Sally's as well as the Chicken Coop in Houston, volunteered. Jim Smith took over management of the operation five years ago, after a back­ground in business and two degrees in sociology from I.SU and Washington Uni· versity in St. Louis. About 19 months ago, the Austin bar was added, andJim moved here for a fow weeks that has stretched into a year and a half. He is now a native of Austin and loves it. Dirty Sally's in Austin has the image of a college bar, being located close to the campus of the University of Texas, and the crowd at the bar does tend to be younger and preppier than some other bars in Austin. On a Monday night, when the popular free beer bust happens, some of the bcBt-looking young men in Texas can be seen, packed wall-to-wall inside and outside the place. But the reality of the bar is something different. At happy hour, day in and day out, the regulars hold forth at the bar, and this includes some of the more prominent business and professional men in town, including 1ome of the town's public offi· rials. These regulars are also a large part of the business at Sally's and make it a comfortable place for people of all ages to water down and relax after a hard day. The ambience of a bar is a hard thing to UT-Arlington Grants Recognition to Gay Group The University of Texas campus at Arlington-near Dallas-officially recog· nized thefiO-memher Gay/ Lesbian Associ­ation of UTA recently with very little controversy or debate. Luim Grt'<'n, co-founder of the group, said she was told if they ran the organiza­tion smoothly, they shouldn't have anv prohlems. She said the move was enco~­ruging, especially in light of recent events barring n·cognition of a gay group at SMll. The muin difference is that UTA do!'.s not provide funding for its campus groups, while student organizations at SMU can apply to use the student fee monies. At lITA. student groups are allowed to use campus facilities and services, post noti· Cf.'.8 and raise funds on campus. A nin~memher committee of students, faculty and staff voted on Nov. 23 ~o recog· nize thr group, with only one d1ssent~r. This is the second such group to organize nt UTA. The earlier one hllB disbanded. Cleaning up for the day at Dirty Sally's Bartenders meeting Sunday morning analyze and probably shouldn't be ana­lyzed anyway, but some of the ingredients of the management of a successful bar are worth noting. Jim Smith stressed that although places for fun and enjoyment, his bars are run on a strictly businesslike basis. ~;very Sunday morning at 10:00 a.m. while some are sleeping off Saturday night, the 11taff of Sally's are attending their W('('kly meeting. Cleanup work, dis­cussions and plans on how to improve the operation of the har are underway , and the overall attitude of the employee,; is gone over. "Attitude" is a word that haa gotten a had connotation in the gay world, but to Jim Smith, it is an important part of the success of Sally's. The staff is instructed to maintain an attitude of friendliness and helpfulness toward all customers of the bar, regardle.ss of who they may be. The "attitude" frequently displayed in some establishments is simply not permitted at Sally's. Smith is adamant about this point and b!'lieves strongly that the ha r's first objec­tive should be, and is, identifying his cus­tomers and attracting them to the bar. Thereafter, it's up to the staff to make those customf'rs fef'l welcome and want to 8tay and enjoy themselves. Apparently, the huHiness philosophy is working, for Sally's is easily one of the bu~i8"t ban; in Austin. The appt·arance and layout of the bar fost1•r8 a comfortable feeling for the custo­mers. Smith pointed out that a large part of the capital budget goes for the 'ound PHOTOS BY EOMAR1'tNEZ system, increasingly important to a suc­cessful bar. The physical design of the bar, itRelf, and the traffic flow around the bariR vital and optimally should allow custo­mers to see most or all of the rest of the customers from any point in the bar. Such things as the fre8h floral arrangements, and, Inst but most important, the bartend­ers, thems!'lves, an• all important. Smith hires the bartendcr8 himself, and admitted that many of them come from Dallas or Houston or other cities. But the big city attitude hangups are left at the door, or the applicants do not gel a job. Although the bartenders are frankly hired on looks (who really u·ants to spend all night looking at an ugly bartender?), they mW!t rate far above average as bartender~ as well. All of this makes for a good feeling among the employees, and a family feel­ing among the staff has gone far to help keep Sally's popular and profitable. "The bar business is very competitive, but if it werl'n°l, I'd lose interest," stated Smith. Apparrntly, Jim Smith needn't worry about losing any of the interest that run· ning a succei;sful bar has for him. As long as bars can be as profitable as Dirty Sal· ly's, there will be plenty of competition. Money follows a profit, and new bars ";u always be a fact of life in Texas' Capital City, in addition to the existing competing bara. Dirty Sally's has t"arved out il8 own par­ticular niche in the gay business scene, and it looks ns though it will be around for a long time to come. DEC. 23, 1983 I THE STAR 3 SAGA Resolves to Unify, Communicate The San Antonio Gay Alliance resolved to achieve greater unity and better communi­cation within the community in the com­ing year in order to improve gay life in San Antonio and accomplish ,.pecific SAGA goals. The first effort to formulate goals and plans for reaching them will be a weekend retreat in the Hill Country near Boerne at a leadership workshop to be.held Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 21 and 22, attheGuada· lupe River Ranch. Scheduled for the tw<Klay thought­provokir., g e,·ent is an informal discus­sion, recreation and work ~e'Sion' desigl11'd to develop an agenda for the gay community in 19h4, a budget for achieving this agenda, possibly restructuring the Alliance and the development of new lead· ership for the community. The retreat "ill end "ith a party and traditional Hill Country barbecue on Sun­day afternoon. Anticipated cost (including overnight accommodations, three meals and the bar· beque) is $50 per per>;on. However a lower registration fee of $25 has been made pos­sible through a grant to SAGA from Bogarts, Cahoots and Battros Properties. This opportunity to pay a lower fee will allow maximum participation from the community. Due to limited accommodations, reser· vations and remittance are needed by Jan. 5. Send check to SAGA. P.O. Box 12063, San Antonio, Tex. 78212. Rockin' R Celebrates Season The Rockin' R Ridera, a club for horse­backing riding enthusiasts, held their Christmas party Dec. 18 at Snuffy's and celebrated the 11eason with lots of food and fun. The Riders is a thr"" month-old organi­zation formed for the purpose of teaching persons about riding and entering rodeos. Members teach horsemanship and spon­sor trail rides, plus C'harity work. And. you don't have to own a horse to be a member-just have an interest in the sport. Anyone interested in becoming a member or finding out more should con­tact anyone at Our Place. Arizona Gays Upset at 'Hitlerism' Remark The Arizona Republic newspaper and local gay groups have threatened toteyfor a recall of Republican Hawley Atkinson, chairman of the County Board of Supervi· sors, following a remark that gayt> should be substituted for animals in medical experiments. Atkinson, however, says he has no intention of stepping down and will run again in 1984. In an Associated Press article, San Francisco gay leaders likened the remark to Hitlerism when Atkinson said " homo­sexuals and lesbians from San Francisco" ~hould be used in experiments instead of animals. He insists it was a facetious remark which he didn't think would make the newspaper. The Ari1ona Gay-Lesbian Task Foroe threatened to mobilize the county's esti· mated 150,000 gays for a rocall vote ifhe did not quit. Despite the confrontation, Atkinson says he can represent gays. "I'm against homosexuality, absolutet· against it .. . but when anybody calls me up who wants assistance with Maricopa County, I don't ask them what color they are, what race they are, what their creed is." 4 THE STAR I DEC. 23, 1983 Gay Pqliticians Issue Questionnaire for '84 Campaigns "The direction of our efforts has shifted beyond seeking acceptance by the rest of llOciety to a clear demand that we, as American citizens, must be involved in the decisions that affect our lives." So reads the briefing paper which accompanies a questionnaire being issued by a collective -0f national gay/lesbian organizations, reports the National Gay Task Force. The material will be sent to Presidential candidates and will raise questions as to whether the candidates -will support passage of a gay civil rights bill, -will eliminate exclusion of gays from military service, -will oppose discrimination based on sexual orientation in immigration, -will use the Presidency to support the Equal Rights Amendment, -will support funding for AIDS research. The documents are part of an "84 and Counting" voter registration drive organ· ized by the National Gay Task Force, the Human Rights Campaign Fund, the National Coalition of Black Gays, the Gay Rights National Lobby and the National Association of Gay and Lesbian Demo­cratic Clubs. Teacher Fired Due to Sexual Orientation Maria Elena Escarcega was accepted over a year ago as a teacher's assistant at a Los Angeles elementary school, but when she showed up a couple of months later in a man's pink shirt, school officials demanded to know her sexual orientation. Escarcega told her employers she liked women. and she was fired on the spot, reports an American Civil Liberties Union news brief. Thoee school officials are now being eued. Plaintiffs counsel, Steven Kelber, was adamant about the case: "The school offi­cial8 violated Ms. Escarcega's rights gua­ranteed on federal, state and city levels. To exclude gay men and lesbians from posi· tions in which they may provide positive role models cheats both students and the homoeexual community. Just as impor­tant, it reinforce11 prejudice and perpetu­ates the unfounded myth that homoeexuals recruit young people into a choice of sexual orientation. " ... Escarcega is entitled to teach. She is qualified to teach. Anyone who stands in the schoolroom door to bar her from enter· ing denies a member of a significant minority of her constitutional right to be heard and to participate as a full member of thia society. That denial will not go unchallenged." National Gay Task Force Seeking Leaders The Nominating Committee of the National Gay Task Force Board of Direc­tors is seeking experienced gay leaders from around the country for consideration as candidates for election to the Board. reports the NGTF newsletter. Prime criteria are expertise in and/or willingneaa to do fundraiaing and a proven leadership role with a gay consti· tuency. Interested persons should call or write NGTF (80th Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10011, (212) 741-5800) prior to January 31, 1984 Commentary I Won't Dance; Don't Ask Me By Sharon McDonald To me, there is no more awesome sight than a dance floor filled with human two­somes moving in time to a common beat. 1 know Eleanor Roosevelt said no one can make you feel inferior without your con· sent, and I believe it. Situations, on the other hand, frequently make me feel infe­rior without my consent and having to perform on the dance floor is one of them. It's during adolescence that dancing first rears its ugly head, along with other timely delights like menstruation and body odor. As a teenager, I was blessed with only moderate acne and personality bland enough to spare me overt social ostracism. By some quirk, I was a nondes­cript swan. secretly waiting to tum into my true ugly duckling self. I watched those around me who fell as casualties of the teenage social scene and knew that there but for a set of braces, 30 pounds, or four square inches of pimples, went I. Those execruciating years introduced me to the particular despair endemic to the dance floor. But what I felt then at those awkward high school dances was just the tip of the iceberg. In retrospect, it was rela· tively easy-if anything in those days could be described as "easy" -to bluff my way through social obligations without ever really learning how to dance. My high school years and several that fol­lowed were years of dancing with hetero­sexual men who are notorious for having invented the Bnck Wall School of Danc­ing. This 18 closely akin to their Brick Wall School of Emoting. No men I ever danced with thought my erratic swoops and lunges on the dance floor were the least bid odd; they were plunging about v.ith equal abandon and equal ineptitude. Later, when I can out, I entered a politi­cally active circle of feminists whose last brush with fashion occurred a decade before. De-emphasizing personal appear­ance was a feminist statement. We hung around one homey women's bar, lurching. our way through our favorite songs, unperturbed by prevailing community Paul Parker standards about what constitutes a dance. The life of gay women before feminism was never like this, I am told. You had to know how to dance, drink and shoot pool to win the woman of your dreams. Anyone doubting this should have seen the two 60-year·old women I saw clear the floor one night waltzing wonderfully to an old, old tune, showing the youngun's how it's done. It seemed like I'd only been out of the clost a few months when dancing, real dancing, experienced a revival that has yet to subside. No longer did shuffling around face-to-face v.ith your chosen vie· tim suffice; suddenly couples were kicking and twirling on cue. In a matter of months, the happy camaraderie of the local har became the close scrutiny of anxious eyes looking to pick up dance pointers. And I'll admit it, this change did not exactly cause my contemporaries to dance a path to my door. Okay, so I'm not so light on my feet, hut I have a great personality. But people are so fickle. My friends stopped asking me to dance with them altogether, and my lover started pretending she was dancing with the woman to my left. Dancing now meant you had to do a predetermined scr· ies of steps, in sequence and in time. Well, forget it. A wiser woman than I would just resign hereself to learning how to move it with the big kids. Not me, boy. You won'tcatch me in a gym full of third graders going, "One, two, three, tum!" I ignored TM, est and macrame, and I can outwait this silly and tenacious preoccupation with actual skill on the dance floor. Alright, so I don't have rhythm. I'll wait 'til the Old Values come back around: Money, Looks and Power. They're a lot more versatile and easier to acquire. McDonald, who lwes in Los Angeles, is co-winnt>r of the 1983 Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Work in Feature Writing from the Gay Press Association. Her column appears here and in other gay newspapers. Texas Live Paul Parker Wows Crowds in Capital City By Ed Martinez Popular singer Paul Parker cast his spell over the crowds at Back Street Basics in Austin during his recent appearance there. Appearing in the Capital City after successful tours in Europe, Australia and North and South America, Parker gave the enthusiastic. customers soulful rendi· tions of some ofh1s most oot>ularcoml>05i tions. The half-hour show included Parker doing his own songs, such as "Shot in the Night," "Right on Target," "Too Much to Dream" and "Pushing Too Hard." Parker returned to California after leav· ing Austin for recording dates there. Parker was originally backed by the well·known mlll!ician, Patrick Cowley, 'ieforc his death m 19 2 frQm AIDS. Navy Still Trying to Unload Its Gays The verdict's in on that Navy commander who was accused of sodomy with a crew· man, reports the A88ociated Press, and the outcome is what was more or less expected throughout the gay community. Cmdr. Gerald M. Vanderwier, 42, was dismissed from the service and ordered to come up with $1,200 in back pay. He got off light-he could have received up to 15 years in prison and been forced to relin­quish his benefits and all of his back pay. But since he had been in the service for over 19 years, Capt. Maitland G. Freed, the court·martial judge, felt he let him off easy. Petty Officer 3rd Class John E. Rain· ville, the hospital corpsman who was the other party in the oral sex act that led to Vanderwier's conviction, was released from the Navy with an honorable dis­charge since he was granted immunity from prosecution. All this is nothing new for the Navy. In 1983, 1,167 men were kicked out for homo­sexuality. In 1982, the Navy unloaded 918' gays, including 17 officers. Merchandisers Facing Christmas Flops Business may be great this Christmas, but not everything was moving like hotcakes, reports the Wall Street Journal. Telephones, which many stores had great hopes for, are flops. So are video­discs, and a Montgomery Ward spokes· man says video game cartridges are "about as close a thing as we have to a bomb." One hopeful note for lovers of peace on earth. thoee big portable boom box radios are losing popularitv. too. National Gay Leaders Meet with New CDC Director Leaders of the National Gay Task Force met on Nov. 29 with the new director of the Centers for Disease Control, Dr.James 0 . Mason, reports the NGTF newsletter. NGTF Executive Director Virginia M. Apuzzo described the session as "a very good get-acquainted meeting that offered us an opportunity to introduce the gay community to Dr. Mason and to raise our interests and concerns about the work of CDC." Apuzzo stre88ed how important the work of the CDC is to the gay community, particularly during the AIDS crisis. "We want to see good epidemiology and surveillance," Apuzzo said. "This can be achieved within the context of protection of confidentiality and sensitivity to the status of gays and lesbians in American society." Artificial Trees Become More Popular than the Real Thing The tree sheltering many Christmas gifts this year grew up in a laboratory, not on a mountainside, reports USA Today. Americans bought eight million artifi· cial trees in 1982, and industry spokesmen say their orders were double this year. Christmas shoppers give several rt>a· sons for switching from the natural pro­duct. Some cite conservation, and others say it's safer. But most say they're just tired of clt>aning pine nL-edles out of the carpet. • DEC. 23, 1983 I THE STAR 5 Airing SMU's Dirty Linen on National TV Commentary By Joe Baker I must hand it to students and administra­tors at Southern Methodist University. The majority of them might be bigots, homophobic, naive or somewhat ignorant. But they are true southern ladies and gentlemen. They don't like to air their dirty linen in public. Airing it in Dallas is all right. It's even all right sometimes to air it throughout Texas. But, please, not on national televi­sion. The folks at SMU have been in a tizzy all week over an invitation extended to a flamboyant anti·gay activist to appear on Phil Donahue's talk show. Ted Brabham's invitation to appear on the popular daytime program, along with a member of the Gay and Lesbian Student Support Organization, has brought public expressions of dismay from SMU adminis­trators and student leaders for fear mil· lions of viewers will see him as a poor representative of the university. Kind of ironic, isn't it? They didn't mind cheering Brabham on when he was the leading critic against recognition of the campus gay group. But that was when the story was rela· tively confined to SMU's own backyard. Once it hit the big time and started to draw national publicity and attention, the SMU folks got embarrassed about their self· appointed guardian of campus mo•ality. It seems that Brabham is a little too ''flamboyant"-that's their word, not mine-for SMU. Funny, hey, isn't "flam­boyant" the word used usually to ileecribe us? Nobody has tagged Leslie Co'}X with the word, either. She's co-ch arr uf the gay support group and also has been invited to appear on the Donahue program. along with Brabham. Indeed, Leslie is anything but flamboyant-and I'd betthatSMU admin· istrators and student leaders were wish· ing she could be viewed as the official representative of the university. But, of course, she can't because she's on You're Reading THE STAR America's Newest Gay Community Newspaper the "wrong" side in this battle! Reportedly, when SMU officials learned that "Donahue" producer Susan Sprecker had invited Brabham to appear on the show, they pleaded with her to reconsider his appearance, or at least to allow a less controversial student leader. Sprecker refused, sticking to her judge­ment that Brabham speaks for a large number of SMU students who oppose recognition of the fledgling gay organiza· tion. The "Donahue" controversy has added new fuel to the campus uproar over gay rights that has raged since the gay sup­port group firat sought recognition as a campus orranization last spring. The stu· Another Gay Mayor Br. Dion B. Sanden Va GPA Wire Serivce SANTA CRUZ, Calif.-ln a unanimous vote the city council Nov. 15 elected John Laird mayor of thia seaside resort town­the first openly gay mayor in its history. The 33-year·old Laird, an administrator for the Santa Cruz County affirmative action program, had been vice mayor for a year. In Santa Cruz each year, the city council elects one of its members as mayor on a rotating basis. Following tradition, it was Laird's tum to be chosen. The 7-0 vote marked the first time in six years that the council had elected a mayor unanimously. . Council member Mardi Wormhoudt was elected by a 4.3 vote to succeed Laird as vice mayor. Laird was ecstatic over hie election. dent senate has voted twice-the last time 16-15-not to sanction the group. Brabham, who admits harboring aspi­rations of a political career after gradua· tion, calla himself colorful and articulate. And he likes controversy-and publicity. Some SMU administrators and student leders started questioning Brabham's motives after a move he took before the second senate vote in October. He infuriated them by sending 1,000 SMU alumni a letter asking them to notify university President Donald Shields that they oppose the gay organization. The letter-written on SMU stationary-also asked for contributions to educate the pub­lic about the "dangers of homosexuality." Shields responded by maJ<mg a public statement to disclaim Brabham's letter, saying Brabham was not acting on behalf of the university. Shields said he resented the implication that he could be swayed by presaure tactics. SMU students leaders also then began disavowing Brabham's style and actions. The result: He's not just as controversial among those who agree with him as he is among the university's gay men and women. Student body president Homer Rey­nolds says it is not only administrators and student leaders who are dismayed over Brabham appearing on the Donahue show. He says the majority of the students feel that way. "I think the concerns that were articu· lated to me were not just frustration, but sheer disgust that a persons such as Ted would, in essence, be representing SMU on national TV," said Reynolds. 340-1758 "He'• an opportunist, a media hound. He'll do anything to get his name in the presa, and that turns a lot of people off." Personally, I think Brabham's televi· sion is a god-send. He's just the !rind of spokesman against homosexuality that the SMU gay groups needs to gain public support and achieve official campus recognition. Keep on talking, Ted. Keep on doing your dirty tricks. This country may have a few problems. And people may not always agree with each other. But there is one thing for sure: big-mouthed bigots always come across as bia·mouthed bigol.8. Isn't television wonderful? For • those who are interested, the Donahue show in question will be aired on Jan. 10. "Best in Country Sounds" (Lowenbrau not included) © Bar Drinks s 100 SISTER BAR TO SNUFFY'S 6 THE STAR I DEC. 23, 1983 O'Hair Sees Herself as Crusader for Common Sense By Ed Martinez Common sense, as one wag put it, isn't. Thomas Payne entitled his treatise during pre-Revolutionary times "Common Sense," and the arguments included in it helped form public opinion in favor of America's departure from the British Empire. Austin, Texas, claims a leader in the battle for common sense, according to the self·proclaimed leader of American athe­Urts, Madalyn Murray O'Hair, the woman who 11ingle-handedly led the court battle that resulted in the landmark decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in Murray u. Curktt that prohibited forced prayer ses- 1ions in public schools in America. O'Hair founded the American Atheists, a group within an organization known as the Society of Separationists, Inc. From this group's headquarters, a structure sur­rounded by tall, metal fences topped with barbed wire, O'Hair conducts the work of her organization. O'Hair is a grandmotherly-looking woman in her 60's. The public impreBBion of her is ueually that of an acerbic, often hoatile guest on such shows as "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson. O'Hair is a frequent guest and panelist on such shows, and almost invariably draws fire because of her views on not only reli­iPon, but also women's liberation and other timely subjects. What is generally less well-known is that O'Hair is an attorney, with a Doctor of Jurisprudence degree, and also a social worker. Her career in social work spanned many years in Baltimore, where she worked tirelessly to install one of the very first government unions in America in the Social Security Administration, which is headquartered in that city. Her zeal in cauH& for llOcial change led to her ouster, she claims, from the Social Security Administration. Later, after her successful court fight to remove prayer from public schools, O'Hair was involved in a number oflegal actions which resulted in her moving to Hawaii, then to Mexico, and then to Austin, Tex., where she now lives and which she has made her home. PHOTO BY £0 MA RTINU I Madalyn Murray O'Ha1r O'Hair once ran for local public office in Austin, unsuccessfully, and continues to write and lecture world-wide. Regardless of the public perception of O'Hair and her stands, she continues to emerge in print and m the media. surfac­ing repeatedly with actions and attitudes that frequently alarm, shock, and, on occasion, delight. A good example is a recent story reported by the International Gay News Agency which reported that O'Hair had expelled the Gay Atheist League of Amer­ica from the American Atheists for, according to the report, "requiring O'Hair's group to accept the religion of the religious mates of gay atheists." A phone call to Gerald Tholen, vice. president of American Atheists, at the group's headquarters in Austin, disclosed that American Atheists "collaborate, they are not affiliated" with various groups, of which GALA is one. He indicated that American Atheists are not in the business of excommunicating any groups, but Tholen did allow that the problem of reli­gious mates of avowed atheists could and did cause problems. Tholen stated that this was a problem with religious couples of different reli­gions, and so could logically be expected to be a problem in a marriage between an atheist and a religious, whether straight or gay. Chalk up another tempest in a teapot, probably resulting from lack of comm uni· cation between the outspoken O'Hair and the media. O'Hair was one of the earliest people to work for blacks and to demonstrate for civil rights. However, even there her views do not folow the herd. Although earning her credentials as a social activist in civil rights battles, O'Hair's comments on the late Dr. Martin Luther King could be con· sidered unorthodox. "The only blacks that have been permit­ted to achieve anything have been the preachers. I once met Dr. Martin Luther King, and I asked him why he wanted to keep the blacks on their knees. The blacks will never get anywhere until they get up off their knees. But Dr. King wanted to keep them on their knees. praying." Her outlook on gay liberation is another example of her candid opinions. O'Hair spoke of the recent efforts of the Metropoli· tan Community Church to gain admiBBion and recognition by the National Council of Churches: "This is another example of the gays wanting to rush back into a burning house. Gays have been insulted sexually, and now they want to be insulted intellec­tually. This is the most flagrant maso­chism." On the subject of women's lib, O'Hair repeated a line that she said she uses con­stantly in lectures to women's groups: "You show mew ho cleans the toilets in a house and I'll tell you who's a liberated woman." O'Hair did express her opinion on the subject of women's liberation in more orthodox terms, however, when she stated that she felt quite confident that if women were paid equally for equal work, every· thing else would take care of itself. O'Hair recently returned from a tour of Soviet Russia with a group, and her insights definitely bear repeating. According to O'Hair, the Soviet determi­nation to provide each person in Soviet Russia with the best poBBible education will enable them to ultimately overtake us technologically, as well as militarily and politically. While holding no brief for Marxism, O'Hair pointed out that when the Soviet revolution occurred in 1917, 93 percent of the population of Russia was illiterate. To contrast that with modem Soviet achieve­ments in science and industry is to illus­trate dramatically what a society is capable of and what we may expect from that society in the next 66 years. O'Hnir descnbes herself as an anar· chist, and believes firmly that a just order can only be built on the rubble of the pres­ent order, whether capitalist or commu· nist. She continues to Rtudy, to write and to lecture, secure in her belief that her work has value and must continue. O'Hair readily admits that the very system with whirh she so often finds fault is the very system that permitted her own cause to he vindicated through the courts. Neverthe­leBB, Madalyn Murray O'Hair continues to rail against what she considers the forces of unreason. She dreams "the impossible dream;" she fights "the unbeatable foe." In an age shackled to a TV screen and the bland npetition of the common wis­dom, O'Hair's crusade for individuality and common sense stands out like a light­house in a black seaofsmugnessandcom­placency. HOUSTON bob~·~ 2327 Grant at Fairview 528-8342 NU MUSIC by J.D. ARNOLD ROBBIE STUBBS OF RICH'S HAPPY HOUR DAILY 12pm-6pm KRAZEE HOUR NITEL Y 9pm-11pm 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer TUESDAY 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer J WEDNE~~~~ t}i/' V 2-for-1 Well Drinks 1j if'\'(.}; ff 9pm-m1dnight 1 V\ Y t 0 Regular Subscription $30 0 Trial Subscription $15 O Send me more information, please. Name ~-----~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Addre·~--------------------- City. __ ________ State ___ lip _____ _ Type of Computer ___ _ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 Love is in the Air By David Meunier "This is your head flight attendant Trudy speaking. We haue an emergency. I repeat: We haue an emergency. One of our .ste­wards has lost his gold neck chain!" It was every airline passenger's nightmare-cruising at 37,000 feet when all of a sudden disaster strikes! If you think cruising on the ground is tough, you should try it at this altitude. Piercing ear­aches because of fluctuating air pressure makes conversation almost impossible, not to mention airline meals which cause nausea. Plus, there's little privacy trying to shout across a retired school teacher from Ohio or winking at the object of your desire only to have him tum away for you to confront the cold stare of a business­man from Des Moines. Wait a minute! Let's backtrack to how this whole mess started. I was on my way home to Texas after a wonderful vacation in Key West. Origi­nally, I had decided to take the bus to the airport in Miami, but at the last minute a group of my friends had chipped in the difference so that I could fly. As Amy said, "Buses are so tacky, and they don't serve cocktails!" How could I refuse? I had my apprehensions about using Air Sunshine-Air-Sometimes, as the locals quaintly referred to it. But my mind was quickly put at ease when I learned it would be the popular Tea Dance flight, so named because it leaves Sunday at 8:15 p.m., right after the biggest Tea Dance Of\ Key West as La-Te-Da's is ending. You could still catch last minute sun, dance and drink and gather a few more addresses. It waa a frantic scene at the airport, as cars screeched in at breakneck speeds deposit· ing disoriented and inebriated passengers at the last minute. I eyed the plane nervously. It wasn't even a jet. It was one of those two-engine prop numbers which had probably last seen service in World War II. The stewar­de .. at the door looked like ehe wae from the same era. It did not bolster my confi· dence. Once inside the plane, I was distracted from my misgivings by the frivolity of the crowd. It looked like it was going to be a fun flight. What Air Sunshine lacked in opulence was more than made up for in special features other airlines did not offer. Even though it was a small plane, it had two male flight attendants to meet our every need. They made a nice addition to Trudy, who turned out to be one campy old broad. us that An Sunshine provided free cock­tails. What a nice gesture, I thought. "It's to get your mind off this old wreck you're flying in," she roared. "Would it be possible to change seats?" I inquired. "Flying in the back always makes me airsick, and I wouldn't want to puke all over George here." "I'll see what I can do, hon," she prom­ised. George, in the meantime, was leaning halfway out into the aisle, giving me apprehensive looks. At least ifI could be in Clark or Clint'• section, the flight would be tolerable. Soon I was up front seated next to Lucy, a retired school teacher from Ohio. But at least I had an aisle seat. Just as I was establishing a rapport with Clint, the unthinkable happened. Trudy's voice crackled over the intercom: "This is an emergency. I repeat, an emer­gency. One of our flight attendants­Clark- has lost his gold neck chain!" Total chaos erupted. Screaming queens ran up and down the aisle. It was horrible! How could this be happening only 10 min­utes from Miami! A Gary Larson cartoon flashed in my mind-Fifi, the french poo­dle, saves the day by taking over the con­trols of a plunging airliner. But there was no french poodle on board! We were doomed! I knew I had to act quickly. If I could find Clark's neck chain, I could restore order. Plus, the hunk would be indebted to me for life. Everyone was searching frantically-even the pilot. (What was the pilot doing back here?) Clint led us in show tunes, while Trudy did Ethel Merman impressions. Then. like a miracle, I spot· ted it lying near one of the johns. A hugh DEC. 23, 1983 I THE STAR 7 Commentary cheer arose as I announced my find. Clark ran towards me. At last-love was in the air! As we embraced, I felt the plane drop­ping. "Oh. my God!" I •creamed. "We're los­ing altitude!~ "Of cour~e." smiled Clark. "We're land-ing in Miami!" • The restroom door sprung open, and we fell in. On the ground, as Trudy gave an interview to the assembled reporters, Clark and I had a passionate restroom romance. Later, Amy called to ask how my flight went. "Remember Erica Jong's book, Fear of Flying, that you promised to loan me?" I said. "Well, I won't be needing it." Meunier is a free-lance writer living in Houston Clint and Clark both had marvelous tens and looked stunning in their airline uniforms of navy blue tank tops and kelly green running shorts. Those bright and bold colors somehow didn't look as good on Trudy, but her constant mugging of Mae West made you love her never the less. ===~·;«=: ==~·~-==~~~==:~ ~·~ .,,..,.. ~-~ I have always felt that airports and air­planes are such romantic places. I was hopeful that somewhere among the crowd Mr. Right would be seated. About three­fourths of the passengers were gay. The rest didn't seem to mind. I waited with great anticipation for my seatmate to arrive. Would it be the hot number in the violet Polo shirt? Perhaps that hunky blonde still wearing just his Speedo bathing suit? Unfortunately, it was neither. George was a middle-aged, heavy-set funeral home director from Dania. He imme­diately engaged me in conversation. "How far do you go?" he asked sugges­tively. "Only to Miami. Then I'm transferring to Pam Am for Houston," I replied curtly. "What a shame. How long is your lay­over?" He leered. I didn'tlike the way he put emphasis on lay. "Only 15 minutes," I lied. As I was pushing his han_d off m_y knee for the third time, Trudy amved to inform ' . ' 8 THE STAR I DEC. 23, 1983 It's Time to Party AB's Westernaire hosted their first wedding Friday, Dec 16. Everyone wishes Cookie and Edna the best of luck, even though they would not tell anyone where they were going. Also Ab"s recently held a benefit raising $156 plus toys The money went to ELF Louise and her children. --a- San Antonio Mustangs brightened a bleak Christmas for a needy family They donated food. toys and doth1ng to an unemployed mother of aix children, ages six months to nine years Afterward, the Mustangs went caroling at a local nursing home -o- Seems llke everyone at Cahoots is wondering about Scotty's collection. Tommy. Scotty and Jeff, purported to be the best three-way m town, will be having their Beat the Sands of Time" party New Years weekend. The party"s great, so don't be late' -o- Our Place IS having their Chnstmas show with all of our favorites-Dolly Madison. Monica Letgh, Pauletta Leigh, Autumn Summer. Alexls Colhns and Shelley Wynelly, plus all the Our Place regulars. -o- Marilyn and J.D. In called The Star and asked us to send a Merry Christmas Greeting to eve­ryone at the Bonham Exchange in San Antonio -o- 2015 Place will host a no cover N-Year's Eve bash with free champagne and party favors. -o- The Galleon and 2015 Place. together at the 2015 Place last weekend, raised $570 to benefit Toys for Tykes. -o- 8uelely and P9te of the L.my J in Houeton wleh Ab and Bruce at Ab's Westemaire in San Antone a very Merry Christmas and Happy N-Year. -o- Here's something to stick in the back of your mind You' ll never know when you'll need It Richard Comish was the first man to be con­victed of a "homosexual offense· in America He was executed in 1624. -o- N-YNf's EY8 Parties will be happening ever­ywherw In Texas At Our Place in San Antonio, they're planning a big Country Party-so big that you are going to need to get advance res­ervations SO do It this week. -o- The Galleon In SA will have free champagne, favors. etc , at midnight-with no cover. -o- Ab's Westernaire hasted a comedy and C&W show to benefit ELF Louise and her children. They raised $156 plus toys. The show was great and thanks to Pauletta Lish for your time and efforts. -o- Faces along with Our Place held a Toys lor ELF Louise benefit show raising more than $537. This WM held on Dec. 12. Also Faces thanks to Jody of Our Place for her time and efforts-they w.e grea11y appreciated. -o- L.J 's IS planning a steak night and Jam Ses­SIOn 1n 1984 . and that Is not so long off. Lollie Invites all her friends to her annual Chnstmas Party Friday, Dec. 23. MIH'ry Christmas and Happy N- Year -o- Face of the Month Winner for December at Face's last Monday was Vicky Holiday. Congratulations. -o- Doll'I forget Steak Night at The Crew. Doug is still cooking up the juicy hunks of meat. Don't lorgel to stop by and have a great steak. Write Us. Letters to the Editor. THE STAR We Want to know Your Opinion on Issues ol Interest to the Gay Community. Special Texas Departure January 31, 1984 Call Bruce for Details Key West/Ft. Lau<ferdale extensions available Houston phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 Plan Now to Attend the Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference lt1ll GAY PRESS ASSOCIATION January 27-29 Hotel Savoy Houston Workshops, Speeches, Entertainment If you are working in the gay media or are a ~ay person working In the non-gay media (either journalism. ac:tver­tising or administrative), plan to join your colleagues in Houston. Also. for officials of gay organizations who are NOT in the gay media but who would like to learn how to better Influence the gay media. local and national. we'll have a special workshop. To Henry McClurg. vice president Gay Press Association 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 Enclosed is my $25 registration fee (for GPA members) or $30 registration fee (non-GPA members) for the Southern Regional Conference. (Include $10 additional if post­marked after Jan. 13) u I am in the gay media. o I work for the non-gay media. o I do not work in the media but would like to attend the workshop on influencing the gay media and other events of the conference. Name _____ _ , ___ _ Address ________ __,__ --~ Phone(s) o I am a member of the Gay Press Association rn am NOT a member of the Gay Press Association (If arrMng in Houston 1:1; plane. train or bus. let us kno.vyourt1meof arrlvol ondwewtll pick YQl.J up ct the airport or depOt ) When we receive your form. we'll send you a conference schedule and a brochure on the Savoy Hotel so you can make reseivations. (You do not hove to stay at The Sava-t to attend the conference.) The Savoy Is within walking distonce of several gay clubs Addition­ally. busses will be available for tours of Montrose nightspots. Your registration fee will include tickets for free and discounted admis­sions to several clubs Austin Soap By Tututu Divine Revving Up for Year's End We starting out small with THE STAR- small but still packed with great articles. In future issues we'll be expanding our local Austin, San Antonio and Corpus Christi coverage- and distribution. Stay with us-and watch us grow We're strongly comm11teed to giving our area a professional. quality local gay newspaper We"d like to hear lrom you. let us know what you like-or don't like- about the new gay newspaper. Lei us know what features you'd like to see. Write us· The Star, 3008-A Burleson Rd , Austin, TX 78741. -o- Thlngum Bob. Esq Eatery will be making some changes m 1984. adding booths with craftsmen and hve acoustic music. Yes, they are still serving their great regular menu -o- Wayne 1s having his birthday party at Back Street Basics Thursday, Dec. 29. C&W with Jim Poston. How many spanks this time? -o- Capital City Playhouse warms Austin with Roger & Hammerste1ns South Pacific resum­ing Dec 28 thru Jan. 14, 214 W 4th. Call 472- 2966 for info. - o- Best wishes to Ed. Austin's own professional salad thief P.S Stay out of the damp weather. We wouldn't want you to come down with laryng1tisll - o- The Boathouse is having a music countdown till midnite with the hits or 1963 New Year's Eve with free champagne, party favors and other Boathouse surprises -o- Wax Attack Records wish all of Austin and San Antonio friends a very Merry Christmas and Prosperous New Year - o- Beal- New Year'• Eve, hare are aome - excuses you m1ghl want to use to throw a party Dec. 25 It's Christmas Day. And songwriter, composer and gay community friend Morada Jane Benton is 83 today. She wrote "Ditch D1g­gin' Daddy" and " I Love Texas,"' among oth.ers, and now lives 1n Houston, where she sociahzes at gay clubs Dec. 27: Radio City Music Hall opened today In New York City In 1932 And today 1s the birthday or Marlene Dietrich, born 1n 1904 In Berlin. Dec. 30 It's Tiny (Tiptoe through the Tulips) Tim's birthday But no one knows how old he is. Jan. 1: It's the first day of a new year and the first day of your New Year's resolutions It's also Paul Revere's birthday. He was born in 1735. And J. Edgar "bulldog face" Hoover He was born In 1895. Jan. 3 On this very important day in 1888 (are you ready?), waxed paper straws were patented. They evolved. of course. into those illy bitty plastic straws we stir our drinks with. Jan. 4: ''Tom Thumb" was born today in 1838 - a - Back Street Basics in Austin Is having a ''Tropi­cal Nights in Hawaii" weekend celebration. That sure sounds good after all this c-o+d Texas weather. Strict Christmas Rules at Pentagon Yee, Virginia, Christmas baa come to the Pentagon, but subject to military disci· pline, reporta the Washington Post. The Defense Department issued strict guidelines regarding holiday decor: trees must not be over four· feet high, and prefer· aby should be artificial. Only round oma· menta are permitted. Forbidden are candles, gla81 or pointed objects, aa well aa fake snow. Holly and other material may be used, but only "sparingly." The man in charge of enforcing thl' regu· lations is Capt. I. W. Freeman, who says the rulea "speak for themselves." Any questions about them, he aaya, must be submitted in writing. DEC. 23, 1983 / THE STAR 9 Over the Rainbow (and Beyond) Commentary By Dan Siminoski, Ph.D. Stonewall Featuree Syndicate Of all my memories of the 1979Gay Rights National March on Washington, the image I recall most clearly came shortly before the end of the rally at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. It had been a glorious fall day, with blue skies, white clouds and a light breeze that snapped the flags all around the Washing· ton Monument. One hundred fifty thou· sand people had come to make themselves visible to our government and demand equality under the law. I was standing at the side of the stage as Holly Near began to 11ing the Judy Gar· land standard from The Wizard of Oz, "Over the Rainbow," Holly's singing was electric, sparked by the magic of the moment and the power of our mingled voi· ccs. I cannot speak for everyone's feelings, but mine included tears, pride, satisfac­tion and faith in the continued growth of our struggle to be free. In The Wizard of Oz, the rainbow repres· ented both escape and arrival-escape from a world of loneliness and frustration , 1rrival in a place oftechnicolor hopes and imitless potential. Like Dorothy, many of 1s have felt isolated and unloved, and lave dreamed of some time or place where Ne might know security and affection. For is, as Dorothy discovers, witches have >een all too real, and powerful wizards with empty promises all too plentiful (especially in election years). A11d, as Dorothy discovers at the end of her odys· sey, the place to struggle for change is right here at home, in the real world of ordinary people and routines. When we sang with Holly Near those familiar lines of yearning for something better and freer, we were in part reminding oursl'lves of our goals and purposes, affirming to one another that we would make it to the Promised Land, to that pot of gold at the end of our queet. But while it is important for us to consider long-term goals, it seems to me that too much empha· sis on our dreams may leave us just as unsatisfied as Dorothy was in the Land of Oz. What we need is an image of ourselves that is less concerned with dreaming and more occupied with doing. What we need is a political program. Neither I nor any writer or activist I know of is prepared to present a fully­developed manual for accomplishing the goals to the gay or human rights move­ment. But some important steps are being taken by the architects of one strategy, which I believe may be tile most powerful idea of the 1984 elections: "The Rainbow Coalition." Though the image belongs to You're Reeding THE STAR America's Nr3west Gay Community Newspaper many, it is most associated with Jesse Jackson, the black activist and Demo­cratic presidential candidate. It was incor· porated as the theme of the recent March on Washington for Jobs, Peace and Free­dom. at which blac~s. Hispanics, women, gays and others united to strive for indi· vidual goals through collective action. The "melting pot" was once the common image of a society in which ethnic differ· ences would be minimized as all individu· a le bec~me_ "Ame~icans ." Though pleasm~ m h1s~ry_, this image is patently absurd m apphcabon. Americans are far from equal with one another, and differen· ces among us are based more on race and class than on any other factors. The "Rainbow" ~ncept offers an image of groups working togetller, each still as dis· tinct as the bands of color in the rainbow. The proponents of the Rainbow Coali· tion urge minorities to ignore their differ­encl'll and to emphasize common goals by uniting on voter registration projects and by agreeing on candidates to support in 191\4. Tht> program begs three questions each, of potential interest to the gay com'. mun1ty: (I) Ts such a coalition feasible, or might it tend to weaken incumbent progressive';, largely in the Democratic Party? (2) If a coalition candidate (probably Jackson) were to enter the presidential primaries, most observers agree there would be little actual chance of winning the nomination. Therefore, could a coali· tion candidacy justify itself through increased voter registration, deeper atten­tion to coalition issues in the campaign, and election of candidates to lesser offi. ces? (3) Is there a place for gay illtiues and candidates in tile coalition, and would support for Jackson offer lesbians and gays a better political strategy tllan IJlOre established (but supportive) figures such as Alan Cranston or Walter Mondale? These are large question,; that gays and others will be debating for monilii;. per· haps years in tile future. However we feel about particular candi­dates or strategies, one tiling is certain. Gay political muscle was evident in every ·ace in which tile Human Rights Cam­paign Fund made an endorsement in 1982. That success was made possible by sizea· ble contributions of time and money, and by some fine work by our national and local organizations. But we haven't unco­vered more than the tip of the iceberg of potential gay power. As will all minorities, our communities are under-registered, our candidates underfinanced, and on elec· tion day, far too many ofus do not vote. We can and must turn each of these tenden· cies around. We have a real chance to return control of the Senate to the Democrats. a party historically friendly to the needs of minor· itiee. And we have the best opportunity in our history to elect and reelect supporters of tile Gay Rights Amendment, and tllen push for serious committee hearings on the bill. These are not dreams to be realized at some indistinct point in the future. They are specific opportunities tllat we must commit ourselves to realizing in the months to come. If we do, and if we main­tain that commitment, I believe tllat pas­sage of the Gay Rights Amendment to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 will be possible before the end of tile decade. Dr. Siminoski is a political scientist and has been active in the gay rights mot•e­ment for about a decade. He may be wrzt· ten at 1221 Redolldo Blvd., L-Os Angeles, CA 90Ci19. 1983 Stonewall Featuret; Syn, dirotc. COME HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS CHRISTMAS NIGHT, DEC. 25 SPECIAL BUFFET, SPM • •.,,.,• a• ~ II ,,,,, ••o 0 o • e •• v .o • • • I a ~ •,,° c>" 0 NEW YEAR'S EVE PARTY • NO COVER CHARGE OPEN 8PM FREE CHAMPAGNE & PARTY FAVORS AT MIDNIGHT, OF COURSE • NEW YEAR'S DAY BRUNCH NOON-3PM 10 THE STAR I DEC. 23, 1983 Fourteen-Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat DEC. DEC. 23 24 DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. JAN. 1 2 3 4 5 For additional tormatJOn or phone numbers lor events hsted beSow look tor tho aP<>MQnng organtuuon ur1der 'Org11naatiOnS· In the The Sllir"• Olrectory Selected Events sponsors "AIDS Awareness Fl.rst u1 k Week," exact dates to be rree announced -SUNDAY: Chn stmas, •IN 1 O WEEKS: Mardi Gras Dec. 25 Fat Tuesday, March 6 •TUESDAY: Austin Lesbian/ tiN 12 WEEKS: St. Patrick's Cay Political Caucus meets Day, March 17 7:30p:n Dec.27, Commissioner's •IN 14 WEEKS: April Fool's Court, Courthouse Annex Day, Aprill Selected Events tiN 17 WEEKS: National • F Gay Health Education in uture Weeks Foundation 1st Southeastern •IN 4 WEEKS: NOW's Lesbian/Gay Health Lesbian Rights Conference, Conference, Apr 21, Atlanta Jan. 20-22, Milwaukee tiN 19 WEEKS: First primary tiN 6 WEEKS: Gay Press party elections in Texas and Association Southern Regional party precinct conventions, Conference, Jan. 27-29, Houston May 5 tiN 7 WEEKS: Lincoln's tiN 20 WEEKS: World's Fair birthday, Feb. 12 opens in New Orleans, May 12, •IN 7 WEEKS: Blueboy's 6th lasting to Nov. 11 Annual Man of the Year tiN 21 WEEKS: Texas Contest Feb. 12, Union Club, Senatorial District Party 110 E. 14th, New York Conventions, May 19 tiN 7 WEEKS: Valentine's Day, Feb. 14 •IN 8 WEEKS: 5th Annual Women'• Valentine Dance, Feb. 17, Unitarian Church, Austin •IN 8 WEEKS: Wuhington's birthday, Feb. 20 tiN MARCH: ALGPC tiN 22 WEEKS: Gay Press Association 4th National Convention, May 25-28, Los Angeles tiN 22 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 28 •IN 23 WEEKS: Run~ff party elections in Texas, June 2 tiN 26 WEEKS: Texas We're The Star The new Austin and San Antonio gay newspaper Look for us every week at your favorite club or shop Demcx.Tatic Party Convention, June 15-17, tentatively Houston tiN 26 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anniversary of Stonewall uprising, national slogan "United & More in '84," June 15-24 Star Classified llEARLY JULY: Lesbian and Gay Bands of America concert, Los Angeles •IN 26 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Foundation's let International Lesbian/ Gay Health Conference, ''Toward Diversity," ~ew York, J une 16-19 •IN 30 Wb'EKS: Democratic National Qonvention, San Francisco, ,July 16-19 •I!\' .14 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug. 19, San Francisco •IN 35 WEEKS: "Series 8," Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens Memorial Park, Houston, Aug. 26 (tentative), lasting to Aug. 31 (if necessary) ANNOUNCEMENTS BUSINESS OWNERS We ust rrweeach w"k ln tt'til d redory commun1ry orgal'\ilatlon. pfut ~£~ serv6no u dtStrlbUbon potntl tor e Indal• INa ltstmg • a ST AR diatnbuUon pomt DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES DALLAS AREA COUPLE will share t>ome In exchange for same for occasional v1Slts to Austin Call 2141660- 2638 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED STRINGERS WANTED '"The 5 11(' seeks Ir- lance news writers 1n Austin and San Antonio for assign­ments Send samples of your work to Henry McClurg "The Star.· 3008-A ~urleson Rd .• Austin, TX 7874t AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO Presently wori<lng In a laboratory and wishing to get into sales? Represent nattonally known scientific Instrument tine. College degree, 25-30 years. unal· lected masculine demeanor and oulgolng personalay Subm t resume In strict con· hdenuahty to Sales Manager Suite 219. 2615 Waugh Or , Houston, TX 77006 GAY BARS AUSTIN -- e Back Street Ba!.tCS· 611 E 71h-477·339' i eoet House-401 CoSOrldo-•7 ... 9667 • Chanco 800 Red Arter -472-8273 i Dirty Sally's Apattment-2828 Rio Grande 478-8782 • Pizzaz -404 Cotorado- •74--1003 • p.."yate Cetlar-709 E 6th-·t17-o:387 • Red River Crossing- -611 RedRiver-l7&-3611 e Aound Up Saloon- 105 Red River ""76-6806 CORPIJS C.HRIStl i Hrctden Ooot 1003 Morgan Av -682-0183 • Jolly Jack< •'I Peoples • Spanath Ga !eon- 517 N Chat)9rra -182 0610 • Sandb3r-it08 Taytor 884-0277 • Z.OO~ .g17 s Stap'es ---W--1753 EL PASO Tf'le Apartment -acM Myrtle Club Plgatle--<111 E Frank n Av ~·9018 Otomond Ld-308 S Flofence-5'6-9332 le M forcl-207 E S.n Antoruo-5'1&-9327 N09 Noa=-6126 Arameoa Av 779-9m Old PlantatlQn-219 s Ocno8-53J.6055 Pet Shop 11-919 Palsano Or ~9629 San Antonio M ning Co-- 800 E San Antonlo-- 5-111-9903 W1'h1per1--00:1 N El Paso- ~6969 M'ALLEN Bumpera- 1100 Pecan Oufly t 1702 N 10tfl M11I 8oJt -200 ~~ _ e W I 3503 West Av 3ot1.t359 e Mac:tam Anhur't-«)7 N St Marya 22.S-9678 ~2e Night 5alo0n -815 Fredef'JCklburg 730- ORGANIZATIONS Oh My Ghodf The mv1tat1on has a consent form attached' Umbda i.9011 o.f.,..._ 132 W 43tcl. N._. York NY 10039--(212) M4-4MM Med11 Fund IOt Human Rights (Gay Prea.1 =:~:~3()33605. WUh1ngk>n DC Na!iOnal AQOC-.tion of B~nna Councill-Boa 15'45 Ian franccaco CA "41t~ t4TS) 88W363 National Auodatton of Gav & Lemlan Democratic ==.;~ ~~;,o:v SE Washlngton DC National 01';' HNRh EdUClhOn Foundation to 81:h Av 11305 New Yott NY 10011 .. {212) 10&-1009 Natl0n1I Qay ~tght.a Advocates-540 Cutro S.n Franetseo CA SM114-(4t~) ~· NalJOf'lal Gay Task Force- «>5th Av New Yon. NY 10011 (212) 7-41·5800 NGTF'I CnMtlne (800) 22' 7044 toutslde Ne-w Yozt Stlile) Te.- 0.y lnb .. n THlt F )(C9- POB AK Denton 7G20t (817» 317-8219 AUSTIN Aust n Lntuan/G1y Pot tiai! Caucus POB822 78767 474-7717 meets last Tues 7 30pm COmm 1110net1 COurt Courtt'louae Anne11 AIOS Awarenna Week tn M.irch (Janet Zumbrun at 4"1·t•)()) CORPUS CHRIST G1y Bartenc:tera A1aoc111lon c Zod ac Lounge 817 Staples -18).n53 Meoopo· tin tommunlty Church-c o Un tanan C.hurch ~12~ Horne RcJ- 951 96"98 SANANTONIO ~m~uman Atghts Committee "'65ot-(I07-4 Oignlly 34~3632 meets Sun 5pm, St Patnclt1 Church J.35 ne1r New BraunlelS & Pine Oay Switchboard 733-7300 lntegrllylSA POB 1~006. 78212 734 -0759 meets 11t & 3rd ThurJ Lambda AA 1312 Wvom1ng-e7'-2819 ~=•n & Gay People1n M~ICine Box 290043, SA Gay A1111nce--Bo.11 12063. 78212-733--8315 PERSONALS SEEKING BISEXUAL COUPLES Sensu• I fun lrohc and par11es Meet ~~2~1th ltke mterests Call (Austin) TIRED OF BARS GWM 20, 6" 180. looking lor same Write 'Todd, Box 2355, Midland, TX 79702. FINANCIAL BACKER OR partner wanted to build homes 1n booming Austin Masculine, sane 44!H;888 -.B:o:L-.A:-C::'K°'"A~N=-Dc-W=HIT=1!-~~ Men Together creates a better lllestyle 3317 Montrose, Suite 1142, Houston 77006 PRISONER SEEKS HELP Gay TDC Prison Inmate requires moral and l1nanclal aupPor1 to process appeal to US Supreme Cour1 Landmark decision would prevent being gay as admissable evidence to auppQrt conv1ctaon on totally unrelated matt&r Wtll respond to all lnqumes Any financial help graciously accepted. and somehow repaid Carl E. Jordan 35289).A. Route •4 Box t too. Rosriaron. TX 77583. DALLAS AREA COUPLE ;~~~~·;~ ho~~~~~h:.~Pt: f~.~~~~ 66().2638 BERNIE I ALWAYS FEEL 11LET OONN • Rl6f.fT AFTrR DUijSTMAS. 'Mil,~, MAYBE mis Wt LL ~fER YOO UP/ VIDEO M(JVffS?! 1'HUNG AND HORN'<',' , DEC. 23, 1983 I THE STAR 11 I rn AUN, JUST ~·.W\r r VE AL..WA'rS WNfffD ... ·~ FRAN-CRISCO NGfTS/ A.BUIE' CHRJSTMA51! POLISH GAY MAN SAN ANTONIO­31, passive, black hair. hairy body, wants friendship with active gay Would like to immigrate to USA Will answer all Andrew Hoszowskl, UI Warszawska, 1516, 44" 100 Gliw1ce. Poland PRIVATE GAY CLUBS iCiubS&fl Anlomo--1802 N MalnAv- 735--2467 • Execut•v• HNitl'l'Ci'Ub--=723 ~B=-225-8807- STAR CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS ADVERT~SING RATES Placing a Classified other than a Placing a • PERSONALS ? Read this: Personals? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words in bold and up to 15 total • ANNOUNCEMENTS words. FREE. (Additional words beyond 15 per • CARS & BIKES week are 30¢ each.) • DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES FREE PERSONALS apply only to individuals. No commercial services or products for sale. • EMPLOYMENT & HOW LONG? A Free Personal can be placed for JOBS WANTED one, two or three weeks at a time-but no longer • FOR SALE, MISC. without re-submitting the form. •MODELS, ESCORTS, BLIND BOX NUMBER. If you want secrecy. we'll MASSEURS • SERVICES I assign you a Blind Box Number. The answers to your ad will be sent to us and we will then • TRAVEL 1 confidentially forward the replies to you. Rate is$3 RATE: Up to 3 words in bold. $2 each for each issue the ad runs but replies will be week. Additional regular words 30¢ each ' forwarded as long as they come in. per week. Minimum charge $3 per week. ANSWERING A BLIND BOX NUMBER Address DEADLINE: 5:30pm Monday for Friday's your reply to the Blind Box Number, c/o The Star, newspaper. 3008-A Burleson Rd., Austin, TX 787 41. Enclose no LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the money. Your letter will be forwarded unopened same ad 4 issues or longer, pay the full and confidentially to the advertiser. run in advance, and make no copy CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD; changes during the full run, and.you can All charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13.issuesor I charges must be paid in advance OR you can longer under the same cond1t1ons and charge to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill­you can deduct 25%. . . except through your credit card-for classifieds. CHARGE YOUR AD: All class1f1eds must . PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be be paid in advance OR you can charge charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in your classified to MasterCard or Visa. We ' Classifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, do not bill-except through your credit 9am to 5:30pm. The Free offer does not apply to card-for class1f1eds. Personals phoned in. You will be charged the same PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those w.ho rate as other types of Classifieds. will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in classifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. ------ --~- (up to 3 normal-size words in bold capitals) (free or 30C/word) _ (free or 30¢/word) ~ (30¢/word) _ (30Clword) __ (30¢/word) _ _ bold headline at $2 __ _ words at 30¢ each (use additional paper 1f necessary) Name Address --- Amount enclosed - Blind Box at $3 per issue Total times .• ••. . •. weeks (C check c money order. c cash 1n person c VISA charge c MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card: # Mail to The Star, 3008-A Burleson Rd .. Austin, TX 78741 exp date RESTAURANTS, CAFES SERVICES, ETC. AUST1/ll- • Tho Sw In Ausn~13eo - ---- ---= ----- SAN ANTONIO· · e Amerietn Ma.., ( he1r replac«nents)-3C38 N SI Marys-736-9678 By Tycho The Star tn San Ant.omo--- 737.Q087 Vollo~~N SI Marys at Mu!berry- 73&-11e811 SHOPS & STORES ew~kAec:ordl;~f 7th:=ot1:MJt3 - SANANrONO- · - H.-..&131 San Podro-3'!H367 Stnng of - V.ntage CI011>in9-1ll03 N Mai:n-733-1433 video wor1c1-111C2 N- ........ :-7-J6.91127 Kevin W-CatCs & G>tta-1901 N ,;;-;;::. !'»-= Fortunes For Friday fWen111g. December 23. 1983, through Frld•y even111g. December SO, 1983 ARIES-Christmas week could mean some unexpected but delightful travel time for the ram. You'll want to charge right up and wrap up business matters so you can enjoy your fun-filled getaway Go somewhere you've never been before with someone who's both lover and guide. TAURUS-II the snow hasn't fallen where you are right now, there 1s at least the peaceful calm that a blanket of the white stuff brings. The hustle and hassle are over. and you're satisfied and content to enjoy simple basic pleasures. Take a deep breath-ah, yes• GEMINI-This new life you're living requires some ad1ustments in your routine Through that one special person, others have entered the picture. Just because someone has a gift to give doesn't mean you have to do the same; consider your pnorl!les. CANCER-Take it strlctly day by day this week. You are bound to be the center of activity, and with all the goings-on. you could burn out fast 1f you don't take It easy. By the way-don't let that long-distance call upset you; say hello, and say goodbye, and mean ill LEO-Don't let an unexpected guest fluster you. See the situation that arises as a welcome change. You'll need your sense of humor. and a fa tr amount of goodwill, too. What looks difficult can lead to something entirety different. Really, It can. VIRGO-Now, you're able to share those memories with someone else- probably a father. brother. or male member of your family. love of the warm and nurturing kind ftlls your heart. What you share means much to both of you. Strength and tenderness are beautifully combined LIBRA-In your sign all w86k: Mars. You'd like to feel peaceful and full of goodwill, but that's not the way it is this week. The more you try to do what you think you should do, the more it seems to backfire. You're going to have to be the "you" you feel hke to get that peace you're after. SCORPIO-In your sign a/I week: Pluto and Saturn. Things are almost too quiet. (Were you expecting fireworks in December?) It's a time for reflection and a break in routine. This 1s not a standstill, but rather an interlude from which to draw sustenance for the new yeer to come. What's wrong with feeling content? SAGITTARIUS-In your sign al/ week. Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune. While you remain this month's shining star. others around you may be 1n the dark. In their darkness there may be consternation and confusion. Don't blind them with your hght. but at least let it shine where it's most needed Be generous CAPRICORN-Jn your sign all week: The Sun. An encounter with someone whose values are different from yours could turn your heart around. That could affect your new position of influence in a beneficial way. Listen to the advice of someone you may have previously disregarded. Allow yourself a strong attraction. AQUARIUS- While the holidays provide a bnef respite, you still feel like there are two of you in the world. To reconcile your divided self, you'll need to take a more careful look at what has been and what can be. And, there are times when It's okay to be more than one person• PISCES- While others are relaxing and taking It easy. you're out there making plans and taking charge. You're tapping abilities that nicely combine the practical and the psychic to make the future a better place to be. Someone special will make your Christmas especially hoe. • 1913 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNDICATE 12 THE STAR I DEC. 23. 1983 ' .. , ~ · 4 • ' •• • 4 i i . .. . &. .. • .. ' BACKSTREET BASICS • . ' ~ • • . '• I f , • • NliW:Y NI'S ' \ • ' • I " .. ~ , ~ • A • •• · EKE ·• • FRIDA,. $1 WELL WUNKS FRO 1o.4IPM ,~.OOCo" r SA~AY FJIEECHAMPAGNE&PARTYFAVOI~ Jlo.906\SH GlVEAWA T 12:30AM • ' 8 ANCINli TILL 5:00AM .. ON{f $1. • COVER FREE TRIP FOR 2 TO HAWAII IN JANUARY 7 DAYS AND NIGHTS RAFFLE TICKETS $1.00 AT THE BAR DRAWING WILL BE HELD ON MON., DEC 26 • • 6 f • ~. • l ' • • • • c .,.,. ( _ • COUNTRY GHT AT JlAC({STR~ET • 8 j 8RY TUt ~ & fftJRSDAY NIGHlS ~ " e~ • 9-MM • 1 N~ COVER ~ 1 a • t • A • a # & . • .•. .. CL.• EDCHRIS MASDAY t~
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