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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978
File 012
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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978 - File 012. 1978-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1013/show/1010.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-05). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978 - File 012. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1013/show/1010

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978 - File 012, 1978-05, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1013/show/1010.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date May 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript rWiq78 GAY AUSTIN II CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 AT FIRST JABEZ IS PORTRAYED as something of a freak. "It (Jabez) stood like a statue, its hair swinging forward to cloak its face, the straining cloth of its clothes tracing lines of such tenderness that the teacher felt the powerful attraction of androgyny, like a self-memory." It also happens, conveniently, that Jabez bears resemblance to his sister Ludie, about whom Jim had entertained lustful thoughts prior to his marriage. But as the narrative porgresses and Jabez's character is more clearly defined, the sexual ambiguity dissipates. "Deliberately he showed his front as well as his back to Jim, to let Jim know that he was not a freak, something half man, half woman." Later, "It was Jabez who woke Jim by slapping his erect cock against Jim's face. When Jim came fully to, it was to see a large male organ poised over his mouth." At the novel's end the "old" Jabez is dead; and when the new Jabez "thought of corn- holing Jim a real brutal manhood stirred in him." THE NOVEL'S ACTION, THEN, progresses from heterosexual tension to androgynous tension to homosexual tension. If Sorrentino is correct in saying TOO MUCH FLESH AND JABEZ is not "about" homosexuality, I find this progression odd. Miss Ethel's novel lapses at times into outright polemics in defense of male homosexuality. For example, "from that very satisfactory spout could come the evidence of his joy, a gift for Jim that he would come to see as a lot better than the secretive and unprovable satisfaction that a woman had to offer or conceal." In wrestling with guilt after sex with Jabez, Jim reviews tiie pros and concludes, "he could not sec the perversion as amounting to a hill of beans in the bigger scheme, except in the legal sense, and he had never had much respect for lawmakers." Then as surely as if "she we're Mary Renault, Miss Ethel writes of a time when Jim and Jabez might ex- cape and rest "beside seas upon which Greek lovers in pairs had gazed ..." And here (the novel having ended inconclusively, the reunion of Jim and Jabez implied but not consummated), Miss Ethel embraces more strongly than before the fantasy that she can become Jabez and go to Greece with Jim: "the two of us, together in Greece?" As HER FINAL ACTION, Miss Ethel asks the real Jim Cummins to read TOO MUCH FLESH AND JABEZ. "He read the book as a confession: that she could have been the woman for him, or the boy, if that was the way he tended." Why must we conclude with Sorrentino that the importance of one theme (loneliness) reduces another theme (homosexual love) to the rank of a mere plot element? Sorrentino, you see, argues that the real theme is Miss Ethel's "desperate attempt to come to terms with her own loneliness, her desolation of spirit." With at least equal justice we could reverse his argument and maintain that the loneliness motif and heterosexual trappings of the novel's framework arc there to provide a socially acceptable pretext--and context--for a vindication of homosexual attachment. But I trust it's not necessary to conceive a distorted interpretation of a novel in order to review it in GAY AUSTIN. r- ^^ r L \ Clllb AUStin 308 W. 16th Street 476-7986 WICES OF THE YOUNG We watch on TV the jobs we'll never have. We see the images of lovers we'll never have. Hey, boys, stop osculating in the corner. Come over here and watch this. See those straight freaks? They're not like us. They get residuals for being in commercials. We get minimum wages or unemployment comp. I'd rather be on TV than work In Jack-in-the-Box. Wouldn't you? You know you're not wanted there. You know there'e not room for you. So what are you waiting for? They can't use you. They don't need you. Come join me in a spectacular little celebration. We're gonna rock the top off this old town. I never knew it could feel so good To bust loose, to kick ass, to go smashing. That'll get us on TV I bet. --Wayde Frey ■^^^.^■^■■■wfo^ THE STALLIOB BOOISTOM 706 E.6th Street AUSTXN.TEXAS WottAe tfmyed, #wUt*effi<»t" L
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