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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978
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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978 - File 001. 1978-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1013/show/999.

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(1978-05). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1013/show/999

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978 - File 001, 1978-05, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/1013/show/999.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date May 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript a aus lin Anita says= I love 8ay auslin ! vol. 2, no.8 mav1978 2 t?tY ltETIN ft'AY 1978 r 1;n ot 1;n ot 1;n ot J;n ot J;n ot J;n ot 1;nf 77-GJ99 477-fi:J99 477-fi:J99 477-fi:J99 477-fi:J99 477-ffi99 477-~ ----8ay austin STffF EDI~ CONTRIBUTORS ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Kelly Kay Jim Bagg Arnold Fleischmann Wayde Frey Art fwk>rris, I II David fwk>rris Arthur fwk>rri s rJAY AUSflN wishes to apologize to the BODY POLITIC for failing to acknowledge that the cartoon ap­pear ing in l ast month 's GAY AUSfIN, page 3, was .,.__. ___ used by pennission of that publication. The car t oon, depict ing a man apparently overcome by semant ical confusion, originally was pr inted on t he cover of the March issue of BODY POLITIC . 1l£ CPINIOO expressed herein are those of the writer or editor, and not necessarily those of Gay Commmity Services nor the advertisers. t?tY ft.STIN is publisheci bv Gay Conrnuni ty Services of the University Y, 2330 Guadalupe , Austin, Tx, "8705. The coordinators of Gay ColllTll.Dlity Sen•ices are : Arthur Morris Troy Stokes Steve fhomas Dennis Mi lam Bruce Aleksander Kelly Kay r~neral Coordinator Finance C.oordinator Office Coordinator (and peer cotmseling) Speakers Bureau Coordinator Media Coordinator Publications Coordinator f::AY ~.LISTIN is the monthly publication of Gay Commun­ity Services. The advertisements displayed signify the following businesses' support of the work of the organization. Gladly patronize these establishments an<l above all else let the people know that you rippre­ciate their equal , open hearted support. ADll.T BOOKSTORES All American News 253l Guadalupe 478-0222 Stal lion Bookstore 70b East 6th 477 -0148 BARS Austin Country 705 Red River 472 0418 New Apartment 2828 Rio Gr:mde 478 02l4 Private Cellar 709 East 6 t h 477-0387 BATHS Cluh Austin 308 \\est 16th 476 -7986 BODY AWARENESS Safari Grrn.'th Studio 2004'l Guadalupe 472 6828 COIN SI-OP Capital Coin Company 3004 Guadalupe 472 -1676 HAIR CUTTERS Comb Free 1512 \\'est 5th 477 8280 LAWYERS Legal Cl inil SOI West 12th -t78-9,32 RESTAIJWITS The Old Pecan Street Cafe 314 I:ast. 6th 478-l491 Dcadl inc for submissions to GAY AUSI JN's Jw1c issue is May 22. Submissions should he mailed or delivered to the Gay Col!lllwtity Services offices at: 2 330 Guadn I upe, 117 Austin, Texas 78705 Letters should also h<.' c;cnt to thi<> addrec;c;, ' , viewpoint r"AY 1973 GAY ,lVl;TIN 3 Gay rights proven unpopular BY ART M::>RRISJ III TIE ST. PflJ..L lffEIINIU1 HAS PASSED. There is now no ordinam:e protecting gay people from discrimirni· tion based on sexual orientation in employment, pu­blic acconunoclations or housing in St . Paul . The con­stitutionally qucstionahl<.' practice of :illowing the m:1jority to detcnnine the rights of a minority group had occurred again. But however unfortunate, the results were not "holely tmexpected. This cotu1t1Y has never heen one to uphold th<.' rights of any minority in nny election. Suffrage for women w.1s not gamed through popular vote. :Xor was the right to vote given Blacks as a re ­sult of J publ 1c vote. Cm "c imagrne a hlu k \,ornan's being aJ10\,ed to attend any state wnvcr­sitv if her admission had to be approved by popular vote at the tum of the century? Then why all of the uproar nnd surprise over our loss in St. Paul? The opposition to the 4-year·old ordinance was led by the Baptist-dominated Citizens Alert for M:lral­ity. They fought with a campaign of fear, misin­formation and hate. The manipulation of the voting public worked. The higher than expected tum-out of voters nccountcd for the overwhelming defeat of St. Paul's gays ' rights. You LAID BACK AUSTIN GAY FOLKS may be wondering how all of thi s concerns you. Your support of gay rights in other cities is most important . At this very moment both Eugene, Oregon. and Wichjta, Kan­sas are gearing up for May referenda on gay rights. If these refe renda are not stopped, Austinites may be facing one of their own before they know it. Just look whom the Allandale Baptist Church has in­vited to ~tmicipal Auditorium this very weekend. . • • • again Eugene and Wichita gays need our support now. Send \\hat you can to help them in their struggle to pre­serve human rights. Remcnbcr, the ordinance you help save may one day be your O\m. Eugene Cit i zcns for Human Rights l'O Box 402, Eugene OR 97440 Hoirophile J\llrnncc of Sedgcwick County PO Box 2573, h1ch1t KS 67201 Tri-City National Defense Fund PO Box 3949. Holl}'\\OOd CA 90028 French Cuisine, Courtyard, & Bar. Open 8 a.m. until 2 at night. 314 Eost 6th St. 4 f:AY .AJ.ETIN rAY 1978 letters Respect vs e unintentional oppression Df:AR LDITOR: Your article "Gay \-Omen: not ' Le~hians "' in the Apri 1 ic;sue of liAY t'\LJS1 JN disturbed me for se\'cral rcasonc; and I "ould l ike to coment on it. Tite most disturbing aspect of the article for me "as its tone. It seems to me that "ncn people re­spect one another they call each other hy names of their respecthe choosing--to tell p"oplc that the nan!<.' they have chosen for the~elves \\'I ll not he honored and thev muc;t uc;(' c;olll(' other nrunc r.howc; .1 gcnuin" lack of rcsp<;>ct for the peopk 1 s integrity and value. ff my fr1('11dc; ac;k mP to call thcrr. "le" !nans" rather than "gay wo!"cn ," I am g I :id to do c;o ru:id I ."ould conc;1dcr. them to be completely juc,t i hed m being angr)' if I refused. Likewise, 1f I ask a friend to ca 1 J me "ga\·" rather than "homoscx ual" or "queer" 1 h.ivc a right to expect my requc"t to bc honored. I\ pcr<>on i.·ho rcfu-.cd to honor such a su::ple yet important request 'lo.ould hardly he c1 friend. Anoth('r point which I consider important is t h is: you don't have to intend to he opp ressive to be op­pressive. The mos t cl est rue t i vc and most common fonns of oppreo;sion arc ut tcrl y lmintcnt ional. l·or exanpl e , the ostensible puf1>0::-c of Anita Rryant 's crusade i s not to oppress gay people, but rnthcr to help societ y. The effect , of course , can he op­press ion of the firs t order. COMB FREE 477-82al 472-4978 Handmade Haircuts at People's Prices So , wlwn n group infonns us thnt we nrc lwing op ­pressive , 1>c ought to examine oursc l vc.'" c.1reful ly and , ahovc all , l 1-.tcn uu-eful h · to 1,hat thcv ha\:(' to tell u~ ah0ut ourc;('J\c>s. (ll11s 1s one of our big oppor tum t 1c" to grO\\ ! ) It 1s cnt r rclr pos-. ible that we arc. tndccd . unintentional oppres,ors. Another .1spcct of 'our 1 rt ll k 1>n kh I found disturb mg i-; }OUT srnple ll'llldl•d l l It IL I Sm of scparati<>m. It scem.s to r.x:· that 011c of th<' thing:-. that :;cparat1sts really acl'ompl1:-.h 1s to imuln· numerous people , who wo11ld hl' othcn.1,0 11n1moh•cd , 111 the <;trugglc for sc.•:-.ual l 1he1",1t ion. fhus in working for their oi.11 frrniri1"t •oal -', the.· genera) go.its O[ g.1y J1berat1on (if IJldt'Cd th< j.!11\ l i hera ti on lllO\Cllll!'lt 1 s ~·ohc>rant c nough to h,1\ l gaols) .ire .td\,1m d. 11111" thC' al I 1 rnl'c, .uch .is lt i~ , bCt\\Cen thl " I\ l(J\Cr.lC.llt" rnJ thl' "Wl 111.'l'S mo\'Cr.ien t ., :-. :I na t lll .11 cl'ld hi l!I I) dl' .... 11 1h ll' one: . hut i t abso l utcl>· must he h.1scd 1 n 11111 I 1 c pc.· t. I thrnk that 1 f I \\('Tc a '""h1an I wotild put morc of r:iy cnerg1ec; into the 1,omcn'" ".10\lr:Jl'nt th.m 111 the gay movcrrcnt hccmi-c thc 1,omcn ' • 1110H•ment :>tand~ a much ~rc<1ter dwncc of more 1111111L•<li;itl' ~Ill ccss an<l Its succcs.; ;1d\ <lllLC~ the goa I~ o !' hot h movcme:ut<; . LEGAL SERVICES at reasonable fees St.111 BC'ar The Legal Ci.n1c c harges S15 for your 1n1t1el c onau1tat.on ses ­sion with an attorney There la no time hmot II you went or n_,t add111onal services we will supply you with a wrtllen lee quota lion . II you don't wish to go on with a case alter consultation you a re under no further Obligation • U NCONTESTED DIVORCE (NO PROPERTY OR CHILDREN ) S 90 • U NCONTESTED DIVORCE (WITH PROPERTY OR CHILDREN I 150 I • UNCONTESTED ADOPTION 100 •NAME CHANGE 35 •BANKRUPTCY, IN DIVIDUAL 225 • BANKRUPTCY, HUSBAND ANO Wt FE 275 • SIMPLE WILL. INDIVIDUAL 40 • SIM PLE W ILLS HUSBAND ANO WIFE 80 The legal !Ha quoted above dO not inClude c ourt coats The5e fees are for cases l•led In Travrs County between Oece<nber 1 '977 ancl June 1. 1978. Feea lor legal work outside of T r a vi s Co ~ nty will be higher. The Leg• I Clint<: a1ao accept a c r lm1n11I c .. se a and civil caaea not Hated above. PleaM call lor an appoint,,_,t.No legal advice w i ll be given over the telephone Houra· 9 00 a:oo weekdays. Weekencta anct evenlng11 ~ ap Polntment . Vivian M ahlab Legal Clinic at 501 W.12th St. Austin, Texas 78701 l.f--_ _ 512-478-9332 __ --'-' news News briefs ... ... austin AAITA'S mu~ ! ! ! Hl1'1AN RIGITS GROUPS PL.AN BREAKFAST FESTIVAL Anita Bryant will appear as special guest witness Sunda>' M.'.ly 7 in Municipn1 Auditorium for Allandalc Baptist Church's Great Day celebration. fhc Austin Coalition for Human Rights, an aggregate of women's groups, pro-ERA activists, right·to-abor­non groups, and gay rights groups, is plarming .1 ''Breakfast Festivnl for Human Rights" to be held rn Tm..n Lake Park during Anita's appearance in Municipal Audi tori um. According to the festi val' s coordinator<;, it wi 11 be a pot-luck break fast nilly without speaker.;;. Starting time is 9arn. ADS TO BE Pt.ACED IN MRICAN-STATEst-WI There reportedly an: efforts to place two l.trge ads in the May 7 issue of the Austin Amen can Statesman, which would declare support for human rights. lEXAS GAY TASK FORCE Pl/INS lEXAS GAY OllFE~CE 5 The Texas Gay Task force announces that Texas Gay Conference Five will he held in Dallas at the M.1riott llotC'l .ltme 10-11. Co-chairpersons for the conference arc Lee l\napp and Steve Wilkins. The uruu1:il TGff Texas Gay Conference has in the past included a variety of workshops and other events. L•1st year's conference, held in Austin, included workshops on the gay press, gay activism and cormn.mity politics , gay poetl)· and other topics of interest to the gay commtmity. Featured speakers "ere M1runi 's Bob Ktmst and Houston• s Ray Hill. To register for the conference, ~~ich is open to everyone regardless of membership in TGfF, call C.CS at 477-6699 for more information. llH RD awt.AI NT FI LED fl&\It-BT CABJm' Since the last issue of C..f\Y AUSTIN, another com­plaint has bccm file<l with the Austin Human Relations I>eparuncnt ag:iinst the C:ibaret, a local disco, for violatjon or the sexual orientation provision of the l'ubl ic Acconvnodnt ions Ordinance (sec Gl1.Y AUSl'IN, vol. 2, no. 7, Apri I, Hl78). According to Terry Harris, the complninnnt , the case invol\·es an incident last October 21 (erroneously reported in GAY AUSTIN as hit\ring occurred in November) in which he and a male friend were bodily ejected from the club for dancing together. Harris says he called the police when the manager of the club threatened to call them hilllc;elf as a result of Harris' attempt to discuss the matter reasonably, but that the police took the side of the rAY 1978 GAY ALSTIN 5 manager. The police played a similar role in the in­cident at the hhite Rabbit disco reported last rnonth. The two complaints filled previously against the f.abaret, also involving discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, ha\·e meanwhile nx:nred a step closer to the courtroom. Branif Airlines, rn.ner of Cabaret and the Driskill Hotel in which it is lo­cated, have failed to respond to the attempt to reach a conciliation agr<:>ement, and the case has been sent to the City Attorney for prosecution. In the meantime, the \\hite Rabbit Disco, the sub­ject of se\'eral complaints under the same ordinance for discrimination against Chicanos and Blacks, is trying to change its image. It now features salsa music once a week and advertises over the local Spanish-language radio station. The word ''white" has hecn deleted from its name in recent adver-tising. · - -David Morris Aus tm' s Metropolitan Cormnmi ty Church is gearing up for an active month in May and is indu--triously seek­ing to increase membership for its small but active congregation. Now located at 614 East 6th St., ~tee is led by its new minister, Jeff Bishop, in Stmday sen·iccs at noon and at 7:30 p.m. The noon service is more fonnal, the evening service more "free-wheeling and experimental." Holy Cormnmion is observed at both. MCC: was host to a spiritual renewal week April 12-16 conducted by the New Freedom Ev3Jlgele.it:.ic Te:un, Whose wrokshops included such topics as Homose>..'Uali ty and the Bible, C01mnmity Outreach, Social Christian Action and Stewardship. In a joint effort with churches from Houston and San Antonio, the Austin M:C will lead a weekend Spiritual Renewal Weekend Camp in June. In addition to Stmday worship, church members gather often for a variety of other social and program events, including a monthly pot luck supper. ~l:C Austin is a mission church of the United Fellow­ship of M~tropolitan Comr.iunity Churches, founded by the Reverend Troy Perl)' in California. Headquartered in Los Angeles, UFM::C is organi:ed into nine dis­tricts in the United States and also has church ex­tension programs in Australia, Great Britain. Canada and Nigeria. Since UR>K:C's organization frOl!l a single church foLmded by Perry, author of "The Lord is ~ly Shepherd nnd He Knows I'm Gay," the international church has hecome one of the fastest gro..•ing churches in the world. Tt now hnc; more than 107 congregations in seven nations. f{Afl. srm WAlffiJIH CLOSES Aftc1· a decade of service to the Austin gay commtu1 i ty, Pearl Street Warehouse, affectionately known to its patrons as ''PSW," closed its door:; April 29. A significant decline in business is the apparent reac;on for the bar's clo<:ing. PSW 01mer5 ha\'C re­portedly plnced the bar on the market:. 6 ~y AIBTlN ~y 1978 BRISCOE BY A.Rt()lD FLEISOtW-lN TEXANS GO TO 11-IE POLLS on Mav 6 to select candidates for the November general election. l'·nile there are dozens of candidates for what seems to be an infin­ite list of offices, a nurrber of key primary races should be of interest to the gay voters of Travis County. The gubernatorial race features prinary battles for both Democrats and Republicans . In the GOP, fonner party chai rpcrson Ray Hutchinson is facing hi&l:t spending oilman Bill Clements. Without a pres1<le1_1- tinl rncc this year, most observers aren't expecting n large turnout in this election. The Democratic primary promises to be a real donny­brook. Incumbant Dolph Briscoe is campaigning on what he cites as a record of fiscal responsibility and prosperity for Texas. ms rallving cry is "no new taxes." He also attacks hJS rnaJOr opponent, Attomey General John Hill, as a free spender whose leadership "~uld produce larger state go\enuncnt and an 111coi::e tax to finance these ne" progra,";15. Bn scoc also likes to remind voters of a nurrber of new pro­grams created during h1s.s1x-year.tenure? the most rt'Cent being the ant1-crlr.le and h1gh"ay u:iprovcmcnt proposals approved by the legislature last year. CAPITAL COIN COMPANY 472-1676 AN EXTENSIVE COU..EcnON oF mms AND CUR!fNCY Blil JBfl.RY F!Ul AU. 00 TIE hQRLn ALSO BlN I NG ANT I QUES AND ALL GOl..D 2(14 DISCOUNT ON OOLD JEWELRY AND COIN SUPPLIES WilH THIS NJ, And in this corn CLEMENTS FOR HIS PART HILL has attacked Briscoe for n fai lurc­to deal squa~cly with the problems of chool fin:m cing, delay and crony ism in his appointment<;, nnd a p,cncral lack of leadership for the <;tate .. Hi1 I c;('l ls h imsclf as chrunpion of consumers, ci tl ng h 1 •; support for creation of the Public Utilities commic;c;ion, the performance of his office in handling conc;umer com plaints, and his confrontations with najor busine'>'>C." and uti I it it's such as Southwestern Bell. 11111 h<1s received strong support from the I iberal wing oi the.' party and enJOYS the endorsement of ·n1c Tc_x.1s Oh~c-r ver, the Texas l~omcn' s Pol 1 ti ca I r.aucus, anlr J nwn Oc'r of mrno1 ity group leaders around the .,t,Jte. Forr.er in~urance corra:11ss1oncr and statC' enator JO<' Christie and U.S. Representative Bob Kntcger arc dueling for the Democratic nomination and a chance ,. . ,.,1 ir- rr· 1 ... '}\,/ ' ··. .....· • ·I. ......t !: \J. I "'\" ': Con r. • • to face Republican .John Tower and his $1 million-plus tan1pa1gn chest in the fol I elect ion fur the U.S. 'it•natc. KRUEGER HAS ESTABLISHED a rcputa t ion as a hard-work­ing an<l effective memher of Congress since com.ing to l\ashington in 1975. Iii!': ratings by major interest group:,; identify him as a consen·ativc who \'Otes 1.;ith l ibcrals on !':Orne social and educational issues. He has ~een a leader of the efforts to end federal reg­ulation of 011 and gas puces, which has t•arncd him the support of that industry. He has also been en­dorsed by the Te<UllS te rs, as we 11 as by some local parn· and minority group leaders . ' HtrrC!llNSON (R) with NATHA.'i SMITH, his Travis County Campaign Co-chairperson lL@w® W@Mrf' IB3@@~Q celebrate spring with products from ®@ ·········•··•••···•·····•••····• ··•••••••··· The Body Bar of San Francisco ··•·••·····•············· •····•• ··· ··••••••• ... or choose som<'thirig}rom our collection of vibrators. sexual ~ cnlwncr rs. and books.for your /), sa.fari into hody au·on•m•ss . . :orne Celebrate With Us! ~~~ · 4 1< \F Open Wed.Sal 11·6 (l.J Al...: A Woman-Ownl'd Business 'lbove the Haircut s1or11J GROWTH STUDIO ~004 1/2 Guadalupe Austin. Texas 78705 ~~*~"*·'!;*.!;*.!J")(@*.!i a lool at the rimaries lllLL Of nll the candidiates for state-\\ide office this year, Krueger is the only one who has a public rec­ord on gay rights issues. Last year he voted for an :urmendrent to a bill in the House which would have prevented legal aid ftmds from being spent in cases involving questions of gar rights. Thanks to action in the Senate , however , the bill became law "i thout this restriction. OiRISTIE CHALLENGES KRUEGER and Tower by saying, "The major oil companies have two candidates in this race. The people tlcscnc at lca::-t one." Chr jsr i e has hanurercd at Krueger's opposition to con"umer class act ion suits :md a federal consumer coopcratfrc bank, his stand on weakl'ning thC' Clean Air Act , and his pos­ition un 01 l and gas deregulation . Chri:.t 1e na-. tried to crl'atc an image of a conslDTler ad\•ocatc and end rnmncnt al i ~., t, 1111d has resorted to a variety or publicity stunts to counter Krueger's edge in flllld raisrng. He has been inclorscd by the Corranittee on Pol t t ical Education of the AFL-CIO, The Texas Cbscr­ver, and several minority group organiza~ ~ cities such as Houston. These are the choices facing Texas \Otcrs on May 6. They arc important ones \\hich can dramatically c;hapc the future of gay rights in Texas and in hashington and should not be taken lightly. --~~~~~~~~~~~---~~~~~~~ &&· •-•1·1- --a• 2532 Guadalupe ''f!7o-i l/,,e adive man'' the best selection In adult material ••• Anywhere! 8 GAY PIBTIN l'AY 1978 ... national ST. PM.. ICTIVISTS m 1rumcr1m The St. Paul Citizens for I h.unan Rights went to court seeking an injtmction imncdiately after the referendum repealing the city's gay rights ordinances passed in the April 26 vote . The in1unction would prevent implementation of the referendum pending court litigation in order that gay citizens would not lose their jobs while the issue remains legally unresolved. According to Craig Anderson of the SPCHR, the group will challenge the referendur.t on proce­dural grotmds. Eventually they plan to deal with the concept of the legality of a maJor1ty voting to abolish the rights of a minority. Jean O'Leary and Bruce Voeller, co-executive di­rectors of the National Gay Task Force, said they were "outraged that a majority of misinfonned vo­ters have once again denied civil rights to a group of Arrcrican citizens ." AT L.OOG LAST: A~ FPAACISCO r:AY RIC:JffS Omll~CE The nation 's city reputed to have the gayest populn­tion in the country now has a gay r ights ordinance, which prohibits discr iminat ion based on.sexual orien· tation in cmploym::nt , housing, and public accomnoda­tion. The ordinance was passed on a 10-1 vote by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors after much debate. The San Francisco ordinance gives convlainants three possible avenues for action. 'Ibey may file a complaint with the San Francisco Hunan Rights Ulll1nission; sue for injtmctive relief; or ask the district attoniey to prosecute. OAKIE HCll5E l>lID SENAlE PASS BIROfR'S BILL John Birch Society rember Senator Mary llelm's bill allowing the firing of a school teacher . who publicly coll'llli ts "the detestable and abarunable crime against nature" with a person of the sruoo_scx passed the Oklahoma house 88-2 and the senate with no dissenting votes. Before the bill is presented to the govenior, the house will again vote on th~ bill as it has been amended by a conference corrm1t­tce. Senntor Helm reportedly introduced the b1ll in an effort to prevent the gay movement from migrating to middle America from the Ea.;t and West coasts. The Oklahcrna Education Association has voiced opposi­tion to the bill. f:AY CNWJIM WINS MTOOY (f HIS om.IIDJ Telling the court that he is gay, for the first time in Canadian legal history a gay man was awarded cus­tody of his children after divorcing his wife. The MJntreal man was found to be ''the parent with the most meaningful emotional tics with the chil­dren," a 13 ycar·old boy and an 8 year·olJ girl. The mother, who has a history of psychiatric Jis­order ~md depression, was given generous visitation rights. PIBBYTERIPl'lS W\Y ORIY\IN (.l.l\YS A special ~tudy group of the 2.6 million member United Presbyterian Oturch has reco11111Cnded that the church adopt a policy pennitting the ordination of gays. The majon ty of the 19-mcmber study group fotmd that homosexual relationships could be "ethically sound," although five mcnhers issued a minority report con eluding that homosexuality "is not God's wish for his children," and is a result of ''man ' s fallen nature." Oturch officials fear the issue could lead to divisions when it is considered at the church's general assembly this May. f:AYS fffT WllH FEIIfW.. PRISCN ~ In one of the meetings planned by the Nat~o~al Gny Task Force to be held with government officials, reprcscntnt i ves from several gay groups met with Nonnan A. Carlson , Director of the federal Hureau of Prisons. Also in at tendance were Midge Cost:mza, nssistant to President Carter, and Patricia Wald , Assistant Attorney General. Mcmcbers of the gay COll1Wllity present included Jean 0' Leary , "ffifF co-director; Rev. Troy Perry of the United Fellowship of Metropolitan Comm.mity Olurches; I>avid Rothenberg, exccuti ve di rector of the Fortune Society· Nan Htmtcr of the Uunda l..egal Defense and Education Ft'.md; and Robert Arthus and John Wahl , attorneys, MCC Prison Project. 0' Lcnry described the recting as "a most important nnd encouraging first step in our relationship with the Bureau of Prisons, and we count it among the most pro­ductive sessions we've had with federal agencies to date." Carlson agreed to invite representatives of ~he na­tional gay corrrnunity to speak at planned ~e111111nrs for sensitivity training of prison staff in Atlanta, Dallas and Denver. Carlson also promised to desigl_late a member ?r his stuff to be officially responsible for han<ll ing complaints from gay inmates of the federal prisons. The newly fonncd NGrF prison project, w1der the direction of Carolyn Handy, co- fotmder of the Na tional Orgamzation of Black lfomcn, will continue to work with prison authorities and handle problems of gay llllll3tes on both the stnte and federal levels. W\Y 1978 UA.Y ALSTm Breakfast Festival forHuD1an Rights A gathering of all the people of Austin .who - by our presence - wish to affinn human rights and communicate to ANITA BRYANT an unmistakable sense of UNWELCOME. "We deplore the efforts of Anita Bryant to erode the growth of human rights in Austin , in Texas , and in America through her continued opposition to ERA ; to lesbian and gay rights in employment , housing and affectional preference ; and to women ' s rights to choose abortion . We affirm the human rights of ALL people , regardless of sex , sexual preference , age, race , belief or econ-omic condition. " Au s t'i n Hu man Ri' gh t s co a1 i· ti·o n -9-A-M-- MAY -9-A-M-- Town Lake Park - next to Municipal Aud. bring food, music & t-shirts (for silk-screen) 10 GAY ,AIBTIN f"AY 1978 arts The story IS homosexual love BY JIM BAGG IN A OfCKLIST Cf OJRfaff and forthcoming books on hOl!X)sexuality, Publisher's Weekly (Aug. 8, '77) comnents on the strong market and quotes book.-;el­lers to the effect that gay books are bought both by a growing horoosexual population which has stop­ped hiding and by curious heterosexuals whose in­terest has been stimulated at least in part by national publicity given gay rights issues. Yet in a recent Advocate interview (July 13, '77), Merle Miller co:::plains that the "New York Times and the New York Review of Books will not give any attention to gay novels. Jonathan Katz's book (Gay American History) has been ignored. If all those si­lent ~Titers, including those on the staff of those two publications, would 'coire out,' things would be different.'' As an infrequent reader of the NYTBR and the N'IRB, I had little direct knowledge of the truth of f.lil­ler's accusation and was curious to run across Gilbert Sorrentino's review in the N'ITBR (vol. 83, no. 1) of a novel with a manifestly homosexual theme. Was Merle Miller wrongly critical of the Times, or had the NYTBR changed its policy? I STIU.. OON'T !GD/ THE ANS\1£R to that question, but I suspect, after reading the Sorrentino piece, that it's okay to review a gay novel in the pages of the NYTBR if the reviewer is careful to deny the lr.lpOrtance of the homoc;exual content: "(this book) certainly is not about hoiooscxuality. It is not, finally, about sex--wh1ch is usetl as the base upon which its fonnal structure is built." TOO f.IJOi FLESH AND J \BEZ (by Coleman Do\l:ell; New Directions Paperback, 151 pages, $5.95) is a novel within a novel, the fabrication of Miss Ethel, a retired high school teacher who "had never onl.c entered another person . . . " In her loneliness ~liss Ethel writes a "perverse story'' about a for­mer pupil, Jim ClllllTlinS, who had showed great in­tellectual promise but had disappointed her by con­fonning to small-tOhn eJqJeCtations: marriage and the life of a fallllCr. Part of her attraction to Jim had been sexual , and indeed there had been groundless "faculty gossip" about her weekend tutoring of the boy. So MISS E1lEL'S FflJ<fASY is ostensibly heterosexual in origin. I say "ostensibly" because distinctions between genders get blurred in Miss Ethel's mind. As a young girl she had been a ''blunt-languaged hoyden •• . toughening (into androgeny, she thought ) at the hands and minds of five wild bro­thers and a pack of equally wild male cousins, the way she had had to conceal the calluses from her suspicious JIX)ther ... her primary question had been addressed to masculine esperience: 'What is it like?'" And now, in her old age, Miss Ethel has discovered that she can "become" a character in her own novel: "now Jim, now Jabez , now Ludie, and so on, . . . she had an increasing sense of insecurity in her own persona , which like an amoeba had divided into two and then gone on sub­dividing." too mu fies and Jabez On the basis of scant evidence, Miss !:thel con­structs her own version of Jim CU111nins, a man of supcrnonnal sexual parts (hence "too much flesh") trapped in marriage to a frigid wife "whose small­ness was at least partly to blame." Reduced to plot sumnary, TOO MJ~ FLESH AND JABEZ sounds like off· the-ra?c porno: a virile young farmer who can get no satisfact ion from his wife resorts to masturba­tion accorryanied by fantasies involving loose women; he has a wet dream involving a partner of unknown s?x who "loved his bigness and told him so"; and finally he meets a 14 year-old boy named Jabez re­cently expelled from his parents' home and sent to live with his aunt, a consequence of doing You Know What. Jabez does not regard bigness as an irryedi­l! l:lnt, and sets out to seduce Jim, who proves a willing victim. CONTINUED 00 PAGE 11 r- 1 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 AT FIRST JABEZ IS PORTRAYED as something of a freak. "It (Jahez) stood like a stattl(.', its hair swinging forwal'd to cloak its face, the straining C"loth of its clothes tracrng lines of such tender­ne<> s that the teacher felt the po\\erful attraction of androgyny, like a self-memory." It also happens, conveniently, that Jabez hears resemblance to his sister Ludie, about whom Jim had entertained lust­ful thoughts prior to his marriage. But ;1s the 11:1rmt1 \'C porgrcsscs and .Jabez.' s charac­ter is more clearlr defined, the sexual ambiguity dissipates. "Dt'l iht'rately he shm>ed his front as i.cl I as his hnck to .Jim, to let Jim know that he was 11ot a freak, :iOmcthing ha! f man, half woman." Later, "It was ,Jabez "'ho M>ke Jim by slapping his erect cock ag.iinst .Jim's f;Ke. \\lien Jim came fullv to, it w:1s to see a large male organ poised O\'er his mouth.'' At the 110\'cl's end the "old" Jabez is dead; .md when the new Jabez "thought of com­holing Jim a real brutal manhood stirred in him." THE NOVEL'S ACTia-J, TI-EN, progresses from hctero sexual tension to androgynous tension to homo sexual tension. If Sorrentino is correct in say-ing 100 M.Jnl I LESll AND JABEZ is not ''about" homo­sexuality, I find this progression odd. Miss Lthel's novel lapses at time:; into outright polem· ics 111 defense of male homosexuality. For example, "from that very satc1sfactory spout could come the evidence of his JOY, a gift for Jim that he would come to sec as a lot better than the secretive and unprovab I c sat i c; f<1ct ion that a woman had to offer or concc.11." In 1.re~tli11g with guilt after sex "1th Jabez, Jim l'C'dcw~ the pro and on ltldes, "he could not sL'c the perversion as amounting to a hi 11 of bc:m" in the bigger scheme, except in the lcga I scnSl', m1d he had never had much respect for lawm:1kc1·s." Then ns surely ;1s if she w~re Mary Renault, Miss l:thel writes ot a tune when Jim and Jabez. might ex­cnpe and rest "beside ~eas upon which Greek lovers in pnirs had gazed ... " Anti here (the novel hav­ing ended inconclusively, the reunion of Jim and .Jabez mp! ied hut not cons11Jllllatcd), Miss Ethel em brace~ more strongly than before the fantasy that she can become Jnbcz and go to Greece 1-:ith Jim: ''the t1'o of us, together in Greece?" As HER FINAL ACTIOO, 'liss f:.thcl asks the real Jim ClllT.lrn-; to read TOO ~um H.ESH A.\'D JABEZ. "He read the hook as a confession: that she could have been the 1.oman for him, or the boy, if that i.<Is the "ay he tended." \\hy must he conclude ,,ith Sorrentino that the importance of one theme (lone! iness) re­ducL'S .mother theme (homosexual love) to the rank of a mere plot clement? Sorrentino, you see, argue5 that the .rctJl thelT1C' j-; Miss 1.thel's "desperate at· tempt to come to tcrnis hi th her mm loneliness, her desolation of spirit." \\'i th at least equal JUStic·c we could reverse his arg1uncnt. an<l maintain that thl' loneliness moti r m1tl hctcroscxu:ll trappings of the novel's rramc\•ork arc there to provide a sod ally acceptable prctoxt--:ind l.'.ontcxt--for a vindication of ho1oosexual attachment. But I trust it's not necessary to conceive a dis toi-ted inte11>rctat ion or Ct novel in order to review it in C.AY AUST!t-;. tf..Y 1978 GAY .AIBTIN 11 --Club Austin 308 w. t&th street 476-7986-- \UICES Cf 11£ YOO~ We watch on 1\' the jobs we' 11 never have. he see the images of lovers we'll never have. Hey, boys, stop osculating in the comer. Come over here and watch this. See those straight freaks? They're not like us. They get residuals for being in co.'!ll'!Crcials. lfo get minimum ,,ages or unemployment C<>Jll>. I'd rather be on 1\' than work In Jack-in-the-Box. l\ouldn't you? You know you're not wanted there. You know there'e not room for you. So what nre you -waiting for? They can't use you. They don't need you. omc · o:in me "n n -spectacular li t1:lc cclehration. We' re gonna rock the top off this old toi.n. I never knew it could feel so good To bust loose, to kick ass, to go smashing. That'll get us on 1V I bet. --Wayde Frey THE mLLIOI BOOISTOU 706L6th StF9et AUSTIN. TBKAS . ., - 12 r/J..Y AIBTIN ~1AY 1978 IJ\ILY f't:HlAY-FR IDAY $2 lockers, Club Austin, 8am-4pm f't:HlAY-SAMDAY Happy Hour at the New ApartlTICnt, 4-Spm TUESDAY FRIDAY SlHlAY l..ambda AA, 209 \\'. 2ith , 8pm free beer, the ~ew Apartment Movie ~ight, Club Austin Lesbian rap group (open), Womcn­space, 7:30μn Buddy night, @ for 1 Club Austin. Showtime, Austin Colllltry, 10: ~Opm 01icken night, free lockers for ages 18-21; free chicken dinner at 7pm, Club Austin Womenspace programs with discussion; coffee at 7pm, peaker at_ 8 pm; see weekly topics below Rap group , Gay Conmunity Services (open), 8pm llappy flour at the New Apartment , noon-8pm Volleyball sponsored oy GCS, Ram­sey Park, W. 44th at Rosedale, 3pm After Hippy Hollow Hour, free beer and hot dogs , 7pm, Private Cellar. Metropolitan Coomuni ty Oturch ser­vices, 12 noon and 7:30pm, 614 E. 6th St. calendar SffIIAL OOTS IlJRI~ "1AY 11Ulll.'.ln Right5 and You, Am', 8: 30 pm. l. University of Texas Lesbian/Gay Al I iance regular bimonthly meeting, Texas llnion room 2,408; last meeting of the serres ter. 3 !luman Rights and You, rebroadcast on J\C:IV, 8:~0 pm. S 1\omcnspace program: .Janna Zum11·1m and A I ice \\'oods will present a slide show on the meet ­ing in LA to form a national lesbian femi ­ni st organization. h Primary elections. 7 A Great Day sponsored br Allandalc Baptist Church with Miss Anita Bryant ao:; special guest, Municipal Auditorium, 9:45 am, free adJru ssion. Breakfast Fe<:tival for Human Rights, spon­sored by the Austin ltuman Rights Coalition, Town Lake Park, 9 am. Bring your 01·.n food. 12 lfornenspace program: Victoria Hellman of Austin CollllllD1ity Nurseries South will lead a discussion on how to choose a day care .center and how to judge the quality of care. 14 t-bthers' Day. 17 Gay Community Services monthly general meeting, 2330 Guadalupe, 8 pm. 19 Womenspace program: Martha Schulman, owner of Moondream Catering , will lead a discus­sion of the preparation of vegetarian food. 21 Free VD tests sponsored by GCS, Club Austin, and the Texas Department of Health; all par­ticipants receive a lo.'OOden ni ckel good for one free drink at the Private Cellar; Club Austin, 10 pm-midnight. Soci ety for the Ad\•ancerncnt of Freedom and Equality bimonthly meeting, Capital Cera­mics , 809 W. 12th St., 8 p.m. 22 Deadline for submi ss ions to r.,w AUSTIN. 26 l'lornenspace program: Kate Vamlcnnocr on "\\omen Unite with the Earth: The Politics of Appropriate Technology." \\'111111 "'l'·•H' ",1 l'J ,. , 1 .. , \\ ' "" '' '• , , ·Ill< tor 111 10 1 111.lt hl'J ' • , 1.1 '' 1 11d I"'"'" i: ud1cr \\ O llltl .111.I IL1fl1111i: 1h1ul! 1h, t1111 111i.11•1(\. \\ ~·.ire v p c11 lro111 7 I 0 1'111 I lll'<;tl.I\ du , ·••di I r1tl.1\ .1hmc Somrni:r:o. D ui: 11 ! \ \o l• t1.1d •lu pc. rcl.·phom· 4 72 .rnSJ. ~ ~ r- )> CD r­m ~ )> c: (J) --'"'.I 2 OJ )> Al (J) .... OJ ~ :c V> ~ (/) --I z CJ) 3:: m (/) ~ G> m d )> z- ~
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