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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 3, No. 7, July 1975
Page 3
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 3, No. 7, July 1975 - Page 3. July 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/99/show/97.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1975). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 3, No. 7, July 1975 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/99/show/97

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 3, No. 7, July 1975 - Page 3, July 1975, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/99/show/97.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 3, No. 7, July 1975
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date July 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 3
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File Name femin_201109_339c.jpg
Transcript LOOK I A, IT'S GONNA ELY 3 HAFFCU, the Houston Area Feminist Federal Credit Union is about to become a reality. Lore than the requested thirty thousand dollars of seed money has now been pledged, and a Charter meeting was held on June 23rd in the Student Center at University of Houston. About thirty area feminists representing a number of organizations elected interim officers and filled out the necessary forms to obtain a Charter from the federal government. Marjorie Randal attended this meeting on behalf of Bay Area NOT and accepted a slot on the credit committee until election of officers in January. After the credit union office is opened, volunteers to staff it will be needed. Interested persons please call Laura Oren at 528-3631. For information on the status of other feminist credit unions in this country (obtained at the meeting), call Harj at Li88-U396. HAFFCU maintains a box at the Women's Center, 3602 Milam, Houston 77002. C-R in Academe The sound and slide show on sexism in textbooks which will form a part of our program meeting this month, "Boys and Girls Together," by Hattie Thurlow and Kay Whyburn, was recently presented to a graduate class in selection of materials for school libraries at the University of Houston in Clear Lake City. In her thank-you note for the occasion, Professor Lea-Ruth Wilkins has written, "All of us were left with some very thought provoking ideas which might have been left out of the course had you not brought them to our attention." HLUS QA CHANGS.... "The French Revolution was thus anti-feminist a priori. In this it followed the princi pies of Rousseau, who was against allowing women any place in public life. The first manifestoes of the Revolution hardly nention women. The Droits de lfhomme et ducitoyen# proclaimed by the Constituent Assembly three weeks after the storming of the Bastille, is sometimes translated "human and civic rights,1 but a more accurate rendering would be f the rights of men and citizens,1 for women were excluded from most political rights. They were neither actively nor passively enfranchised, and they could not hold any high office. The women of the people who filled the galleries of the popular assemblies, parliament and the courts, and made themselves conspicuous by their violent interruptions, were regarded by the politicians only as unwelcome spectators. In the National Convention special posters were pasted up enjoining the women in the gallery to keep quiet. Nevertheless, the turbulent and amorphous mass of the tricoteuses produced one of the first political womenfs associations. In order to win the men's ear more easily, it called itself the Societe Fraternelle des Deux Sexes. Its founder was a provincial actress, and it had something SJ the air of a melodrama, its members ran about in men's long trousers; many of them, to show their fighting spirit, stuck pistols in their belts. Their behavior in their political demonstrations was also extremely radical. The men of the Revolution, however, mis-trusted these street-Amazaons, especially when they saw that the women of the upper and middle classes who tried to take a hand in politics were becoming increasingly the mainspring and tools of the reaction. Madame Roland, a Republican of Roman stamp, linked up with the Girondistes, the Party of the Right. Charlotte Corday, also at first an enthusiastic revolutionary, murdered Marat, the President of the Jacobin Club, to avenge his attacks on the Girondists. Both women ended their lives under the guillotine in 1793 • About the same time, that fate also overtook Olympe de Gouges, the authoress who had championed equal rights for women at the very outbreak of the Revolution. She had drawn up a Declaration of the Rights of Women, modelled on the Declaration of the Rights of Man, but this hud found very little resr/nse in France. Her ideas did, hox-iever, influence the movement for women' s rights in England. In 1792 Mary Wollstonecraft, the spiritual ancestress of the English suffragettes, published her subversive book, A Vindication of the Rights of Women. In the same year the burgomaster of Koenigsberg, Theodor Gottlieb von Hippel, a friend of Kant's, wrote e treatise On the Position of Women in Bourgeois Society. He did not go so far as the chamrdon* of women's rights in west Europe, but it was a beginning. It is true that these beginnings never led to any tangible result, after political feminism had been nipped in the bud in 1793 by the prohibition of the Paris Women's Club." —Richard Lewinsohn, A History of Sexual Customs, 19^6, pages 220-???.