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The Wand, Vol. 13, No. 1, January 1996
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The Wand, Vol. 13, No. 1, January 1996 - Page 6. January 1996. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/946/show/943.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1996). The Wand, Vol. 13, No. 1, January 1996 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/946/show/943

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Wand, Vol. 13, No. 1, January 1996 - Page 6, January 1996, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/946/show/943.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Wand, Vol. 13, No. 1, January 1996
Publisher Womynspace
Date January 1996
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminists--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .W35
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3634790~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Note On some pages, comic strips have been digitally obscured to protect owner's copyright.
Item Description
Title Page 6
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File Name femin_201109_507f.jpg
Transcript THIS YEAR ...BUTT OUT! Sure, there are lots of good reasons to quit smoking. It just took me twelve years to find one. Once I made the decision to quit, I started reading everything about the subject I could get my hands on. I found nothing that inspired me. Then one day, about three days before my target date to quit, I hit upon my own inspiring thought. It was my own bright idea to start smoking, so why should I expect somebody else to convince me to stop? At that point I stopped reading and started thinking for myself. If you are expecting a righteous diatribe on the evils of tobacco, you will be disappointed. I would still be smoking today if I were as happy about being a smoker as I was the first ten years that I smoked. I quit because I had become one of those annoying whiny smokers. I began confessing my desire to quit to my friends. I rambled on endlessly about the damage that cigarettes were causing in my life. I couldn't light up without seeing the Grim Reaper tapping on my shoulder. After about two years of such nonsense, I had to admit that the thrill was gone for me. If the thrill is gone for you, too, I hope I can provide some encouragement. My first suggestion is to use any means necessary to help you stop. If you want to go "cold turkey," you have my admiration. I opted for the nicotine gum method myself. (Many straight people , warned me about the perils of the gum, such as jaw soreness, but, needless to say, that has not been a problem.) Use the patch, acupuncture, past lives, whatever. My experience has been that if you think it works then it will work. If you, like me, are looking for inspiration from literature, know that most of it is written by non-smokers. Take for example the supposedly motivational fact that if you quit today, your lungs will be back to normal within ten years. Smoking is all about immediate gratification. If we could wait a decade to feel better, we wouldn't be smoking in the first place. How many people would buy a diet book that boasted, "Lose all the weight you want by 2004*'? You will live longer. Now that is definitely a non-smoker's idea of encouragement. Who wants to live forever thinking the entire time about how badly she wants a cigarette? The folks who write stuff like "reduce your risk of cancer and heart attack" must not realize how much denial is involved with smoking. Deep down, every smoker believes that she will be that legendary puffer who lives to be a robust 100. Willard Scott's grandson will be wishing us a happy century along with that lady in Montana who lived so long because she never wore her seat belt and therefore was never trapped in a burning car. What I have for you here are a real smoker's reasons to quit: 1. MORE SEX It's true. Whether you are single or partnered, you will be having more sex when you quit. You will have no choice. One of the primary withdrawal symptoms is increased sex drive. Smoking is an oral fixation. Take the cigarette away and the fixation still remains. Also, you will not stink or have dragon breath any more, so women are bound to find you more attractive. 2. MORE TIME I never realized how time-consuming smoking was until I quit. This was especially evident at work. I used my breaks to smoke. By the time I reached the designated smoking area and had a few puffs, it was time for me to race back to work. I was always exhausted after my breaks. 3. YOU GET TO BE A BITCH And get away with it. The truth is that people who quit smoking are no grumpier than the average non-smoker. We just seem crabby compared to how we used to be when we smoked. Hey, it's easy to be mellow when you know that you can suck on a drug and everything will be all good. 4. NO MORE CONVENIENCE STORES Talk about living longer. You are much more likely to be killed while purchasing a pack at a mom-and-pop death stop than you are to die of lung cancer. Have you seen the papers lately? Those places are like shooting galleries. 5. EVERYTHING TASTES BETTER If you think food tastes better when you quit, wait until you try . . . 6. FEWER CAR ACCIDENTS Non-smokers have been wasting all of their time and effort getting bars and restaurants to prohibit smoking. Sure, second-hand smoke kills a few thousand people a year, but that is nothing compared to how many car wrecks smokers cause. Those groups should be lobbying for a non-smoking lane on the freeway. If I ran out of smokes while driving and I thought there might be another one somewhere else in the vehicle, you better Reprinted from Deneuve January/February 1995 Deneuve has a new moniker, CURVE by michele fisher believe that I was looking for it. Many's the time I have steered my car with one foot while I searched the back seat for a butt. Did you know that it is impossible for the human eye to focus on an object that is very close and one that is further away at the same time? Ask any smoker; she will tell you. Every time you light up behind the wheel, you travel a few hundred feet totally blind. Ever try to steer a ton of metal while a burning object smoldered on your crotch? I have, but not very successfully. 7. SMOKING HAS BECOME FASHIONABLE AGAIN Generation X is big on smoking. I prefer my addiction to bring up feelings of isolation and humiliation. I used to thrive on the degradation of slinking outside alone at social functions. I would shiver on someone's back porch and pretend not to notice the occasional pitiful glance that would come from a warm non-smoker inside. Recently, the porch has become too crowded. 8. NO MORE PET GUILT When I smoked, I felt sorry for people around me, but I figured they knew what they were getting into when they entered my ashtray of a house. I even puffed around the kids shamelessly. I reasoned that a little smoke in the crib was nothing compared to what the kid would do to himself when he became a teenager. But pets. I just couldn't help feeling like a louse for screwing up their already too brief little lives. When I quit smoking, the cat quit snoring. Now that was inspirational. 9. WOMEN WILL HAVE TO DATE YOU TO FIND OUT THEY DO NOT WANT TO BE WITH YOU When you smoke, it is too easy for women to rule you out as a prospective partner. When you quit, you will be like everybody else. A woman will be privy to your short-comings and bad habits only after sex has occurred. If you are planning to quit, I hope this helps. If you are still smoking, then for Goddess's sake shut up and enjoy it. As of press time, Michele Fisher was still making the world safe for her cat and getting plenty of sleep. Seeking Submissions for March issue on Body Image and Overeating So as not to dis smokers by themselves and because body image is a universal concern for women, we are planning to feature personal writing and book reviews on body image and behaviors around food in the March or April issue. Please send submissions to Womynspace, P.O.Box 980601, Houston, TX 77098 or drop off at our envelope at Inklings Bookshop in the Bulletin board area behind the door. Please sign your submission. We will withhold names if specified. For more info, call Sue Cox at 664-9215. Submissions must be received by February 15. A very prolific author, Leslea Newman published a novel in 1986 Good Enough to Eat. Her heroine is Liza Goldberg who is funny, twenty- five and a bulimic. Here's how Liza eats Doublestuff Oreo cookies: "She put the book back and reached for her calorie counter. I do have to plan another diet after my fast, she thought, bringing the book over to her bed. She thumbed through it as she ate the tops off a bunch of Oreos. When she'd had about ten, she put the bottoms together, making quadruple cream sandwiches, lined them up, and ate them slowly as she plotted a new eating scheme. Let's see, 500 calories. Think I'll start with English muffins. Liza looked them up: plain 120 calories, raisin, 130. A tablespoon of butter had 100 calories, so two teaspoons would be about 66. That makes 200 calories for breakfast..." Newman's novel explores the disease, bulimia and the recovery process. A more recent work is Fat Girl Dances With Rocks, a coming of age, coming out novel about two high schools girls who like geology and looking for rocks. The girls also experience a rocky relationship. More on this book later. Sue Cox Quotes and Soundbites From Feminist Booksellers on The Importance of Feminist Bookstores to Feminist and Mainstream American Culture "We are in feminist bookselling to educate, to end sexism, racism, ageism, homophobia, classism, and all the other inequities that threaten our society and survival, and to create a safe space for our sisters and brothers. We are in the business to change the world. Feminist bookstores are in it for the long haul and are proud to be part of a larger movement for social change. — Theresa Corrigan Lioness Books, Sacramento, Calif. "We have a commitment to carry and disseminate progressive ideas, not merely to sell commodities. We do so much more than sell books; over the last ten years we have helped innumerable women through life crises, not by counseling them, but by empowering them about , the choices they have." - Tollie Miller, Co-Owner, A Readers Feast, Hartford, Conn. "If people buy books at Barnes & Noble, small stores (including feminist stores) will go out of business, feminist presses will suffer and books will disappear. This is how economics creates censorship - book buyers contribute to their own censorship by supporting the chains. If book buyers allow this to happen, Barnes & Noble (and the other chains) will decide what gets sold, what is in print, the size of print runs, and ultimately, what people have access to. The question is not who gets a piece of the pie; the pie itself will be drastically changed. And don't expect feminist and other progressive causes to be part of what's left." - Sally Owen, co-owner of the recently closed Judith's Room, New York City ___^m^mxmmmmim^JKmm