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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979
Pages 10 and 11
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979 - Pages 10 and 11. July 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/94/show/90.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979 - Pages 10 and 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/94/show/90

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979 - Pages 10 and 11, July 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/94/show/90.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date July 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 10 and 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_387j.jpg
Transcript EXCERPS a Leading Woman Coluranlat ba~ frorn an address by _ fore the ASSOCIATED WOMEN'S CLUB OF AMERICA We must have what the men have. It may not be much? but we mean to have. If we cannot get it with- out friction, then we will get it with friction. If we cannot get it through our organizations, then we will get it thru our combinations: or both if necessary. *****' We refuse to be poked in,the gallery any longer and Insist on being plao*d on the floor of tha house. ***** We are willing to look up at the men, but we don't always want to be forced or held down without being able to make a few motions of our own. ******* We want to hold our ends up to the men and show them our possibilities whenever anything arises that will fill our expectations ***** Nothing that comes will be too hard for us. **** * ' We women have always been Interested In good xnfcsundn movements and yill always take any load that is given us, «*** We are willing to work under the men that are notr above us as in the past, to the point of exhaustion, If necessary, but vo are beginning to become disgusted with their failures and shopt-comings* **&* Never, when anything Arose that requUfiP our presence and attention, have we fa Had to come, and co.ua again If occasion required It* **-;:-* a But too often have our enthusiasms baen aroused with false promises, and too often have our hopes and strivings been met wifchxfeeble performance which left us disappointed and unsatisfied flow have our efforts to push forward our sals been met In the house with the ory "Down with I petticoats". Now I say, UP WITH PETTICOATS AND DOWN WITH PASTS. Then Will things be seen In thai* truollght. As long as we women are split men will always be on top. up as we are, the NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR WOMEN March, 1979 Within the last month and in less jjithan 24 hours, some 30 volunteers !' were recruited to work in NOW's National ERA Ratification campaign from Michigan, Pennsylvania, Alabama, Mississippi, West Virginia, Tennessee and Colorado. For these 30 recruits it has meant leaving the accustomed comforts of their own homes, taking leaves of absence from jobs, arranging to have family responsibilities covered, forsaking familiar places and routines for the unfamiliar. Since 49 B.C. when Julius Caesar made the fateful decision to lead his army across a small river, called the Rubicon, in northern Italy, (an act that precipitated a civil war though it led to his eventual conquest of the Roman Empire), "crossing the Rubicon" has -llsllil meant — by dictionary definition — "to embark on an undertaking from which there is no turning back." In a real sense, these feminists have also crossed a Rubicon: it was an act of conviction, heavily laced with unregenerate idealism and a sobering belt of cynicism. Theirs is a passion for >the impossible-made-possible by sheer grit and a wily inventiveness. But no one who has worked — as they have — open-eyed in the ERA ratification campaigns in the states retains any naive illusions about the democratic process, majority rule, or the triumph of either logic or justice. With the most prestigious and reliable of polls showing nearly 70% of the population of this country in support of the effort to strengthen and change women's status, they — democratic process, majority rule, logic, justice — are all subject to perversion by a determined, moneyed, and frenetic minority. This side or the Hubicon there is the uncommon chance for living uncommon lives as opposed to those of "quiet desperation." In sum, there is the opportunity to live extra ordinary lives with the sense of being exceptional people in exceptional circumstances in the vanguard of a great —- and historically inevitable — advance of civilization. For though they lose a thousand "battles," they cannot lose "the war." They are not the defenders of the status quo, the desperate mythol- ogizers of the past seeking to enshrine it forevermore. Who, after all, celebrates those who fought against education for women? Their right to own property and be guardians of their children?. Their right to limit child-bearing? Their right to vote? Those who have crossed the Rubicon accelerate the future. They know that victory — ultimately — must* be theirs