Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979
Page 6
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979 - Page 6. July 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/94/show/86.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/94/show/86

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979 - Page 6, July 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/94/show/86.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date July 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_387f.jpg
Transcript A JOSEPH SARGENT HI M "GOLDENGIRL" Starring JAMES COBIJKN LESLIE CARON- ROBERT CLLP HARRY GLARDINO-CURT JURGENS- JOHN NEWCOMBE and introducing SUSAN ANTON as "Gokfciurirr ScrwotovbvJOHfr KOHN Starts Tomorrow! (PG] istf. I joes />ton anti-draft effort ALTON, 111. (AP) _ a campaign callea "Dads Against Drafting Daughters" wiU be launched Sunday on Father's Day, with a barrage of newspaper adver- tisements according to Phyllis Schlafly, leading oppo- nent of the proposed Equal Rights Amendment. "We appeal to all men, especially fathers and veterans to oppose the present push to draft 18-year-old gu-lTand send them into military combat," said Schlafly Pope decries birth control, divorce By DONAL O'HIGGINS NOWY TARG, Poland (UPI) - Clasp- ing his hands above his head, Pope John Paul II condemned birth control and di- vorce in a stern sermon to a mile-deep throng of brilliantly constumed Polish mountain folk Friday and led a prayer "to save our nation from the slavery of alcoholism." "We swear to be teetotalers," the vast congregation roared in response. john Paul's finger-wagging lecture did nothing to dampen the soaring spirits of the crowd - the greatest mulititude he has drawn in the first seven days of his nine-day trip back to his homeland. So vast was the throng packed onto a 3 1/4 quare-mile airport grounds on a starkly beautiful plateau below the rug- ged Tatra mountains that it took the pope more than a half-hour to drive through it. The congregation comprised mountain people from the whole southern fringe of Poland, as well as Czechs who crossed the border at the two nearby mountain passes to hear him. The pontiff first cajoled the massive congregation with jokes about the clouds shrouding the mountains where he once skied, hiked, climbed and tobaganned. Then, shoulders squared, face serious, he turned solemn, saying, "So much for the warm-up." Launching into his condemnation of contraception, divorce and alcoholism, the pope strode about the podium be- neath an arched replica of a shepherd's hut, pointing his finger at the mountain men in their sheepskin breeches and black hats. "If man's right to life is violated at the moment in which be is first conceiv- ed in his mother's womb, an indirect blow is struck also at the whole of the moral order, which serves to ensure the inviolable rights of man," he thundered. After stressing the "indissoluble bond of spouces," the pope prayed for release "from the slavery of alcoholism" that af- flicts more than a million Poles and elic- ited the chorused vow, "We swear to be teetotalers," from the masses before him. There was a tense moment when the pope ducked off the podium to greet the 500 priests, each with attendant altar boys, mustered to serve communion to the gigantic congregation. Thinking the pope was leaving, the crowd began seething and pushing and nervous parade marshals yelled for reinforcements. But the real crush came when John Paul finished his sermon and began a slow ride aboard a flat-bed truck through the teeming, flower-tossing throng. Elderly ladies suddenly possessed the strength of giants as they clawed other spectators out of their way. Nuns and priests used elbows and shoulders to hurl themselves forward. The rugged moun- taineers bulled their way to the front. As the papal vehicle, two security cars on each side, ended its snail's pace procession through the congregation and headed for his helicopter, the crowd broke into a near stampede. Nuns hiked up their habits to gain speed. Old men who appeared too feeble to walk began to sprint like athletes. Crowd marshals posted near the helicop- ter pad braced themselves as the hordes surged toward them. Some stood their ground; others fled. In a nearby militia barracks, an alert sounded and a unit came racing across the field. But the crowd checked itself before the flying squad arrived and the pope took off in his borrowed Russian- made helicopter without incident. Before returning to Krakow and a later open car trip to Skalka, site of the martyrdom 900 years ago of St. Stanis- law, patron saint of Poland, the pontiff ordered his helicopter pilot to swing south. "The pope wants to fly over the Tatra mountains so he can say goodbye to them," a priest said. At the church in Krakow on the site where St. Stanislaw was killed, dismem- bered and thrown into a well 900 years ago, John Paul met with 10,000 students. The meeting was so much to his liking he ad-libbed constantly through a speech to them and dragged out the meeting until hours after its scheduled close. The pope's final mass of his nine-day visit will be Sunday in Krakow.